2010 - Oregon State University

10 downloads 10 Views 5MB Size Report
Sep 15, 2011... Assessment Report form 2010.docx ...... developing internship programs for students to get more extensive hands-on ..... Grade sheets are given to faculty ...... W/03. RNG 355. 3. 20. 3.28. W/03. RNG 441. 4. 14. 3.65. F/03.

Annual Assessment Report Form DUE September 15, 2011 to Gita N. Ramaswamy, Director of Assessment Option II: Ask for 2010 Assessment Reports around March 15, 2011. All departments in each college/unit submit their reports to College Associate Dean/Unit Leader responsible for assessment by May 15, 2011, and then the Timeline: College/Unit report as well as the individual department reports to be forwarded to Director of Assessment by September 15, 2011 by the Associate Dean/Unit leader.

Directions: Please complete this report for each program with distinct learning outcomes in your unit. Be concise, but provide as much information as needed to give a snapshot of your assessment process. The boxes will expand to accept more text. If you have this information in another format that articulates the following, please feel free to attach that document and refer to it as appropriate in the boxes below. If you have any questions, please contact Gita N. Ramaswamy at 7-2180.

1. Program Information: Program Department College Timeframe Report Submitted by

Rangeland Ecology and Management Rangeland Ecology and Management Agricultural Sciences Report covers activities from 01/01/2009 to 12/31/2010 M. Borman

2. Program Outcomes Provide the Student Learning Outcomes for you program(s). Students will be able to: 1. Students will be able to recall, integrate, and apply essential core information about the key components of Rangeland Sciences: a. major rangeland types and their key ecological characteristics. b. basic plants-animal interactions. c. management practices relative to ecological and economic productivity and influence on ecosystem products and services. d. historical background of range management. 2. Students will effectively communicate ideas orally, graphically, and in writing. 3. Students will be able to use quantitative tools to analyze and propose evidence based solutions to Rangeland ecology and management issues.

C:\Documents and Settings\greenc\My Documents\OSU\Assessment\2011\RNG Assessment Report form 2010.docx

- 1-

C:\Documents and Settings\greenc\My Documents\OSU\Assessment\2011\RNG Assessment Report form 2010.docx

- 2-

3. Measurement- Provide a detailed narrative or schematic to articulate how the outcomes you have measured during this cycle have been assessed by responding to a through d for each measured outcome. a) Identify the outcomes from above that you will be reporting on for this assessment cycle. 1.a. Students will be able to recall, integrate, and apply essential core information about the key components of Rangeland Sciences relating to major rangeland types and their key ecological characteristics.

b) Describe the methods you have used to assess each outcome. Midterm and final exams, term papers in RNG 341 (Rangeland Ecology and Management – Intro course), RNG 351 (Rangeland Ecology I: Grasslands), and RNG 352 (Rangeland Ecology II: Shrublands).

c) Describe any measurement tools used (surveys, rubrics). *Please attach the assessment tools used. In RNG 341 the first midterm evaluates student learning relative to this topic area. In RNG 351 and 352, 2 midterms evaluate student learning relative to this topic area and each course requires a term paper related to specific elements of this topic area.

C:\Documents and Settings\greenc\My Documents\OSU\Assessment\2011\RNG Assessment Report form 2010.docx

- 3-

4. Results, Conclusions, and Decisions-Describe the results, conclusions, or discoveries made during the measurement activities listed above by responding to the following: a) Present a summary of the outcome data collected during this reporting cycle. *Please attach data collected. To this point we have not retained exam or term paper grades.

b) Include any additional information needed to provide appropriate context including unintended outcomes, measurement difficulties that may have led to ambiguous results, etc. NA

c) What conclusions have you drawn from your assessment data? Over time we need to develop assessment tools relative to our learning outcomes that are easy to implement and synthesize.

d) Have you made any decisions that will be used in your planning process? We have just held a program curriculum review. We developed a consistent set of learning outcomes for each course which will be consistently applied at both locations (Corvallis and La Grande).

e) Has the process of assessment either validated your current process or called for modifications in your planning? Over time we need to develop assessment tools relative to our learning outcomes that are easy to implement and synthesize.

C:\Documents and Settings\greenc\My Documents\OSU\Assessment\2011\RNG Assessment Report form 2010.docx

- 4-

5. Please provide a skeletal assessment plan (Mapping Guide) for your program: Provide a skeleton plan (Mapping Guide) describing how all the courses and assessment activities map to the program outcomes. See attached

6. Other activities that have informed decision making: Please report on any other activities that you feel fall under assessment that were not captured above. This may include general satisfaction surveys, employer input, or other initiatives that contribute to student learning or program improvement. Exit interviews at both La Grande and Corvallis campuses indicate a general satisfaction with curriculum, teaching, and preparation for employment. Employers informally express satisfaction with preparation of our students. Improvement of communication and conflict resolution skills would be helpful.

7. Planning for the upcoming cycle Briefly describe what you plan to work on for the upcoming cycle. As we merge with Animal Sciences we will integrate program outcomes as appropriate and will work together to develop systematic assessment protocols. Depletion of faculty numbers will slow this process due to time constraints.

C:\Documents and Settings\greenc\My Documents\OSU\Assessment\2011\RNG Assessment Report form 2010.docx

- 5-

Table of Contents Page A. The Review 1. Review Schedule......................................................................................................... A-1 2. Review Team .............................................................................................................. A-3 3. Departmental Status/Review Objectives .................................................................... A-4 B. Standard I – Rangeland Ecology and Management Unit Characteristics 1. History of Department .................................................................................................B-1 2. AnRS Faculty/Staff Positions ......................................................................................B-2 3. Organizational Charts and Committee Structures .......................................................B-6 C. Standard II – Degree Credential .................................................................................... C-1 D. Standard III – Curriculum and Advising 1. Animal and Rangeland Sciences Undergraduate Program ......................................... D-1 2. Undergraduate Course Offerings ................................................................................ D-3 3. Online Catalog Listing for Rangeland Ecology and Management BS Degree........... D-4 4. Academic Advising..................................................................................................... D-8 E. Standard IV - Rangeland Ecology and Management Educators 1. Current Range Faculty ................................................................................................. E-1 2. Policies Cultivating Excellence in Teaching ............................................................... E-3 3. Courtesy and Affiliate Faculty..................................................................................... E-5 4. Range Courses Offered by Term ................................................................................. E-6

F. Standard V – Extracurricular Professional Development 1. Rangeland Ecology and Management Club................................................................. F-1 2. College Ambassadors, Jobs, Internships and Scholarships ......................................... F-2 3. SRM Student Attendance............................................................................................. F-4 G. Standard VI – Assessment of Courses/Program Effectiveness 1. Program Effectiveness and Curriculum Progression .................................................. G-1 2. Student Evaluations and Survey Results .................................................................... G-2 3. Student Recruitment and Retention ............................................................................ G-4 4. Student Enrollment, Characteristics, Class Standings and Honors ............................ G-6 5. Student Evaluations of Teaching .............................................................................. G-15

   

H. Standard VII – University Credentials and Support 1. University Credentials and Accreditation ................................................................... H-1 2. OSU Libraries .............................................................................................................. H-2 3. Teaching and Research Labs ....................................................................................... H-3 Appendix 1 A. Strategic Plan ............................................................................................................... 1-1 Appendix 2 A. Semester Credit Conversion ........................................................................................ 2-1 B. Office of Personnel Management GS-454 Series ........................................................ 2-2 C. EOU Class and Minor Check List................................................................................ 2-4 D. OSU Class and Minor Check List................................................................................ 2-7 E. EOU Course Syllabi ................................................................................................... 2-10 F. OSU Course Syllabi ................................................................................................... 2-27 G. Exams ......................................................................................................................... 2-57 Appendix 3 A. Faculty Vitae ................................................................................................................ 3-1 B. Faculty Publications ................................................................................................... 3-46 Appendix 4 A. Student Assessment of Teaching Forms ...................................................................... 4-1 Appendix 5 A. AnRS Teaching and Research Labs ............................................................................. 5-1 B. AnRS Farms, Ranches, and Facilities .......................................................................... 5-5 C. OSU Libraries Collections ........................................................................................... 5-7

   

Sunday (May 22): Arrive PDX – Borman meet and transport to Hilton Garden Inn Corvallis Monday (May 23): 7:30-9:00

Breakfast with Sonny Ramaswamy, Larry Curtis, and Cary Green - Hilton Garden Inn

9:00-9:30

Walk to Strand Ag Hall

9:30-10:00

Meet with Mike Borman and Jim Males – StAg 202

10:00-11:00

Polycom with Tony Svejcar, Dave Bohnert, Reinaldo Cooke, ARS Scientists – Stag 209

11:00-12:00

Meet with Charlie Fifield (BLM), Tom Hilken (USFS), Bob Gillaspy (NRCS) Stag 209

12:00-1:00

Lunch with Bill Hoyt, Kay Teisl, Mike Borman - McMennamins

1:30-6:00

Travel to La Grande with Borman

7:00-9:00

Dinner with Tim DelCurto, Larry Larson, Ryan Limb, Gary Kiemnec, Mike Borman - Ten Depot

Tuesday (May 24): 6:30-8:00

Breakfast with Larry Larson, Mike Borman

8:00-8:30

Travel to Union

8:30-10:00

Introductions to Union-based faculty and tour facilities

10:00-10:30

Travel to EOU

10:30-10:45

Break

10:45-11:15

Tour EOU facilities

11:15-12:00

Meet with EOU based students

12:00-1:30

Box lunch with principal staff and faculty delivering REM degree (Larson, Limb, Kiemnec, DelCurto, Mueller, Scott)

1:30-2:00

Meet with EOU Provost

2:00-7:30

Travel to Hilton Garden Inn - Corvallis

7:30 –

Team dinner and work on report A-1

Wednesday (May 25): - 7:30

Breakfast at Hilton Garden Inn

7:30-8:00

Walk to Strand Ag Hall

8:00-8:30

Meet with Ricardo Mata-Gonzalez - Stag 209

8:30-9:00

Meet with Doug Johnson - Stag 209

9:00-9:30

Claudia Ingham - Stag 209

9:30-10:30

Tour Valley Library and meet with Bonnie Avery - Library front desk

10:30-11:00

Meet with Center for Teaching and Learning and Teaching Across Campus leadership (Susie Brubaker-Cole and Jon Dorbolo) – Stag 209

11:00-12:00

Meet with Corvallis Range undergraduate students - Stag 209

12:00-1:30

Lunch with CAS/COF Department Heads - MU Board Room

1:30-2:00

Meet with Range Graduate students - Stag 209

2:00-2:30

Connie Davis and Nora Ross – StAg 209

2:30 - 6:00

Time to work on report

6:00-8:00

BBQ with Range faculty, staff, students (undergrad student awards) – Avery Park

8:00 -

Work on report

Thursday (May 26): Breakfast on own at Hilton Garden Inn 8:30-9:30

Meet with Mike Borman/ Jim Males – Strand Ag Hall 202

9:30-10:00

Meet with Vice Provost Academic Affairs Becky Warner – Stag 209

10:00-11:00

Meet with all Range Faculty (EOANRC via polycom) – Stag 209

11:00-11:30

Meet with Dean Sonny Ramaswamy and/or Assoc. Dean Larry Curtis to discuss Visitation Team report – Stag 209

11:30

Lunch and/or travel to PDX with Borman

A-2

Society of Range Management Review Team

Ken Fulgham, Team Leader Professor and Chair, Rangeland Resources Humboldt State University Department of Forestry and Wildland Resources 1 Harpst Street Arcata, CA, 95521-8299 (707) 826-4127 Fax (707) 826-5634 [email protected]

Laurie Abbott Associate Professor New Mexico State University Animal and Range Sciences 323 Knox Hall Las Cruces, NM 88003 (575) 646-2870 Fax (575) 646-5441 [email protected]

Robert G. Hopper Rangeland Management Specialist BLM, Oregon State Office 333 S.W. First Ave. P.O. Box 2965 Portland, OR 97204 (503)808-6118 FAX (503)808-6021 [email protected]

Rod Heitschmidt SRM EVP Representative 6405 Inverness Road Granbury, TX 76049 (406) 853-5770 Cell (817) 579-0959 [email protected]   A‐3   

OSU Rangeland Sciences SRM Re-Accreditation Review Introduction and Background Information May 2011 For the Department of Rangeland Ecology and Management the 10 year period since our last SRM Accreditation Review has been a period of transition, which will culminate in the merging with Animal Sciences to become the Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences (AnRS) effective July 1, 2011. There have been significant impacts caused by severe cuts in Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension budgets through the past decade. The timing of these cuts struck both Departments extremely hard due to a number of retirements that have occurred and lack of resources to fill behind most of them. Partially in response to the budget climate Oregon State University has developed a University wide plan to reduce the numbers of academic units at all levels. A result of this plan is the merger of Animal Sciences and Rangeland Ecology and Management into Animal and Rangeland Sciences. The two Departments have had three faculty retreats and additional joint meetings. From this planning we have developed a Strategic Plan (included in the self evaluation) for the combined Department. We are in the process of recruiting nationally for a new Department Head for the combined unit. Since the previous review in May 2000 the Range major on the OSU campus in Corvallis has struggled to maintain student numbers. Since 1984 the Department of Rangeland Ecology and Management (previously Rangeland Resources) has maintained a Range major as part of the OSU Agriculture Program at Eastern Oregon University (EOU) in LaGrande, Oregon. The Range major at EOU has increased undergraduate student numbers in recent years and is an important hub of the OSU Agriculture Program at EOU. Graduate student numbers have continued a trend of reduction that started during the 1990s. We attribute the continuing decline in graduate student numbers primarily to fewer faculty with research/teaching tenure track appointments . The College of Agricultural Sciences and the Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences are committed to maintaining a viable Range program and a Range major. This commitment is reflected in the Strategic Plan for AnRS. The Range major will continue to provide courses necessary for students to qualify for the OPM GS 454 Range Conservationist rating. Students will be advised accordingly. The Dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences has stated that the new department head will have 5 faculty lines at the highest priority staffing level for the College to be filled as resources allow. If the Range program is to thrive, as opposed to merely survive, it will be important that 2 of those positions have a Range orientation and that they are in addition to, not replacements for, current Range faculty.

A‐4   

The College and Department are committed as well to maintaining the Range major as part of the OSU Agriculture Program at EOU. We consider the Range programs at Corvallis and LaGrande to be the same program. A restructuring is also occurring for the program at LaGrande. The College of Agricultural Sciences academic program at EOU is being administratively combined with the Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center (EOARC) at Union to form an administrative operating unit. The faculty will continue to have their tenure homes in respective departments at OSU. There are currently two Animal Science and two Rangeland Science faculty included in what will be the Eastern Oregon Agricultural Program in LaGrande and Union who will have their tenure homes in OSU’s Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences. An additional OSU faculty member at EOU contributes to the Range program by providing soils courses that are needed by Range majors. We believe that the Range Program on the OSU campus in Corvallis and on the EOU campus in LaGrande would each qualify for SRM Accreditation independently. However, because of OSU metrics related to student numbers and graduates per major, it is vital that the Range Program be considered as a single program provided at two locations, not as independent programs. The self-study document for the SRM Accreditation Review Visitation Team was initially prepared for our OSU Graduate School and USDA-NIFA reviews conducted in March 2011. It has been modified somewhat to address SRM Accreditation criteria.

A‐5   

Rangeland Ecology and Management History

The Rangeland Program had an early beginning in 1917 with the initial offering of a ‘range’ course. The Program grew very slowly through the 1960s. During the 1970s through 1990s the program added several faculty and was converted from a program within Animal Sciences to an independent department, Rangeland Resources (later Rangeland Ecology and Management) in 1981. The program/department was thriving through the mid-2000s when transfers and retirements combined with budget cuts reduced faculty numbers substantially. The first “range” course, “Range and Pasture Botany,” was taught in Botany in 1917. In 1920, E. R. Jackman joined the Extension staff as a county agent in Wasco County. He began work with crested wheatgrass in the Columbia Basin. In 1934, Professor Hyslop started a course “Range Improvement and Management” in the Department of Farm Crops. In 1949, C. E. Poulton was hired as Associate Professor to organize the range management program at (then) Oregon State College with a joint appointment in the Departments of Animal Husbandry and Farm Crops, and the first 4-year range curriculum was started. The following year the first four students graduated with Range Management degrees. In 1953, E. R. Jackman was selected as the first Range Management Specialist in the Oregon Extension Service. He worked closely with range livestock men and federal agency people in a program to develop range and related resources of Oregon. At one time it was said that Jackman knew more ranchers by their first name than any man in Oregon. The first Ph.D. was awarded in Range Management to D.N. Hyder in 1961. Dillard Gates joined the Range Staff in 1962 as Range Extension Specialist. During the 1970s several Range faculty were hired: Alma Winward in 1970, W.C. Krueger in 1971, J.C. Buckhouse in 1975, T.E. Bedell and S.H. Sharrow in 1976, and R.F. Miller in 1977. In 1981, the Department of Rangeland Resources was formed with W.C. Krueger as the first department head. During the 1980s L.E. Eddleman (replaced Winward), D.E. Johnson, P.S. Doescher, L.L. Larson, and M.L. McInnis were hired as Range faculty. Larson and McInnis were responsible for teaching range courses at the OSU Agriculture Program at Eastern Oregon University in LaGrande. During the 1990s, M.M. Borman, T.K. Stringham, and R.C. Ehrhart were hired. Borman replaced T.E. Bedell as the Range Extension Specialist and Ehrhart was hired to coordinate the distance degree in Natural Resources at the Cascade Campus in Bend. In 2007 Borman was appointed department head to replace W.C. Krueger who retired. During the past decade numerous faculty have transferred or retired with M.M. Borman, D.E. Johnson, R. Mata-Gonzalez (hired in 2008 to replace Eddleman) remaining at the OSU campus in Corvallis and L.L. Larson and R.F. Limb (hired in 2010 to replace McInnis) at the EOU campus in LaGrande. R.C. Ehrhart continues to teach several e-campus Range courses on a part time basis. The Range Program/Department at OSU has been noted for many years (since the appointment of E.R. Jackman in 1953 as Range Extension Specialist) for its strong outreach program throughout Oregon. Students trained through the Range Program have been valued employees due to their multidisciplinary backgrounds by federal and state land management agencies. Research by the Range Program has been valued by the range livestock industry and by federal and state management agencies that rely on applied research to address numerous issues related to rangeland ecology and management.

B-1

AnRS Faculty/Staff Positions – January 2011 On-campus Faculty Administration Department Head

Recruitment in progress – currently Jim Males

Rangeland Program Lead

Mike Borman

Professional Faculty Office Manager Academic Advising

Nora Ross Dodi Reesman

Classified Staff Office Specialist (ANS) Office Specialist (RNG) Information Technology (shared with F&W and FS currently) Farm Services Dairy Horse Center

Helen Chesbrough Connie Davis Scott Austed Aaron Moffett Bill Ross Bob Straube Travis Way (herdsman) Jeff Behm (milker) Recruiting

Research/Teaching Faculty (OSU Campus) Ruminant Nutrition Non-Ruminant Nutrition Animal Nutrition Animal Physiology Bovine-Beef Reproduction Banfield Professor of Companion Animal Management

Gerd Bobe (split with Linus Pauling Institute) Gita Cherian Kelvin Koong David Froman Fred Menino Michelle Kutzler

Bovine-Dairy Reproduction Equine Reproduction Functional Genomics

Open Open Open

General Animal Behavior

Open

Aridland Plant Autecology/Physiology Grazing Systems/Range Management

Ricardo Mata-Gonzalez Doug Johnson B-2

Aridland Watershed/Riparian Aridland Synecology/Restoration Inventory and Analysis

Open Open Open

Commodity Research/Teaching Faculty (OSU Campus) Beef

Dairy

open (Males covering teaching on 1039 appointment, could handle with lecturer with Range Animal Grazing Behavior, Range Animal Nutrition or Extension/Teaching split) open (Gamroth 1039; need to keep E&G/AES split; get summer salary from dairy industry)

Extension/Teaching (OSU Campus) Small Ruminant/forage/grazing Small Flock Avian Equine

Jim Thompson (Extension plan moves Amy Peters after J Thompson retires) Jim Hermes Dawn Sherwood

Welfare/Ethics Food Products/Food Safety

open open

Rangeland Ecology and Management

Mike Borman

Extension/Research Dairy

Open

Small Ruminant/Forage

Open (see Extension/Teaching above)

Veterinarian

Charles Estill (.35 FTE) Aurora Villarroel (.35 FTE)

FTE Teaching Faculty (OSU Campus) Head Advisor

Jim Hermes

B-3

Instructors (non-tenure track) Contentious Issues/RNG341 General Animal Science Animal Products Companion animals/behavior Equestrian Equestrian and ANS 220

Claudia Ingham Matt Kennedy Lea Ann Kinman (Clark Meat Lab mgr) Giovanna Rosenlicht Dawn Salazar Ross (Horse Center mgr) Open

Faculty Research Assistants

Allen Feltmann (Foundation Funds/Grant funds) Mark Keller (Nutrition Lab) Mary Meaker (Grant funds) Nathalie Quezada (Foundation funds)

Department Farms/Ranches/Facilities Soap and Berry Creek Ranches Dairy Horse Center Poultry Center Sheep Center Clark Meat Center Swine Center

Janice Hunter Ben Krahn Dawn Salazar Irene Pilgrim Tom Nichols Lea Ann Kinman Matt Kennedy

Off-campus Faculty EOARC – Burns Ruminant Nutrition/Extension Beef Cattle Extension

Dave Bohnert Reinaldo Cooke

Rangeland Ecology

open

Eastern Oregon Agricultural Unit – La Grande/Union Ruminant Nutrition/Management Beef Cattle Production Systems

Tim DelCurto (research/teaching/Superintendent) Chad Mueller (research/teaching)

Rangeland Ecology & Management Aridland Synecology/Restoration

Larry Larson (teaching/Program Lead) Ryan Limb (new hire - start Dec. 2010)

Crop and Soil Science

Gary Kiemnec (Adjunct Range, Crop and Soil Science academic home)

B-4

County-Based Faculty Central Oregon – Crook County Central Oregon – Crook County

Barbi Riggs (ANS) Tim Deboodt (pseudo RNG, AgEd/GenAg)

Eastern Oregon – Baker County Eastern Oregon – Malheur County Eastern Oregon – Wallowa County

Cory Parsons (ANS) Anna-Marie Chamberlain (ANS) John Williams (RNG)

North Central Oregon – Umatilla County

Randy Mills (ANS)

Northwest Valley – Polk County Northwest Valley – Tillamook County

Gene Pirelli (ANS) Troy Downing (ANS)

South Central – Grant County South Central – Harney County South Central – Klamath County South Central – Lake County

Gary Delaney (RNG) Dustin Johnson (RNG) Chanda Engel (ANS) Pete Schreder (RNG)

Southwest – Douglas County Southwest – Coos/Curry County

Shelby Filley (ANS) Amy Peters (RNG; Extension plan has her moving to campus – will not be filled)

B-5

Rangeland Ecology and Management Organizational Chart (through June 2011) College of Ag Dean

Experiment Stations, Agricultural Research Centers, and Research and Extension Centers

Extension Program Staff Chair

Extension Faculty Coos, Crook, Grant, Harney, Lake, and Wallowa Counties

Rangeland Department Head

Professorial Faculty OSU EOU

Other College of Ag Department Heads

Classified Staff

Beginning July 2011 Animal and Rangeland Sciences Organizational Chart College of Ag Dean

Experiment Stations, Agricultural Research Centers, and Research and Extension Centers

Extension Program Staff Chair

Extension Faculty

Animal &Rangeland Sciences Department Head

Unit Personnel

Baker, Coos, Crook, Curry, Douglas, Grant, Harney, Klamath, Lake, Malheur, Tillamook, Umatilla, and Wallowa Counties

B-6

Professorial Faculty OSU EOU

Other College of Ag Department Heads

Office Manager and Classified Staff

EOARC Director

Degree Credential The major, Rangeland Ecology and Management is specified on undergraduate diplomas. The official university transcripts specify that undergraduate students receive a degree entitled: Bachelor of Science Major: Rangeland Ecology and Management The official university transcripts specify that Graduate students receive a degree entitled: Master of Science students: Master of Science Rangeland Ecology and Management Ph.D. students:

Doctor of Philosophy Rangeland Ecology and Management

C‐1   

Accreditation Standard III: Curriculum and Advising Animal and Rangeland Sciences REM Undergraduate Program Our students come from diverse backgrounds and are pursuing an education that will take them in diverse directions in their post-graduate careers. We offer both Animal Sciences (ANS) and Rangeland Ecology and Management (REM) majors. Within the Animal Sciences major we provide a science track that helps students prepare for acceptance into a veterinary medicine or other graduate program and an animal management track, with a science basis, that prepares students for employment in a wide variety of fields ranging from companion animal oriented careers to managing agricultural based enterprises. The REM major prepares students to function as range conservationists and managers. The Rangeland curriculum with selected additional courses will qualify students for the Range Conservationist and Soil Conservationist ratings required for federal land management agencies We provide a variety of opportunities for hands-on learning. Several classes incorporate field trips for students to apply what they have been learning in the classroom in an on-the-ground field setting. Some field trips are relatively close but still require transportation. Others (e.g. rangeland courses) are in central and eastern Oregon, are logistically challenging and require transportation. We are developing internship programs for students to get more extensive hands-on learning in clinics, in industry, in production agriculture environments, and in agency settings. On the OSU campus in Corvallis, a teaching and research pavilion is under construction. Faculty are involved in advising and, with staff support, students remain on track in achieving their educational goals, and to become as competitive as possible for their future endeavors. Undergraduate education addresses the following (edited to reflect the REM program): -

-

-

The undergraduate curriculum for Rangeland Ecology and Management majors with appropriate courses from other disciplines, qualifies students for both the federal government OPM GS-454 Range Conservationist and OPM GS-457 Soil Conservationist ratings.  All undergraduate education stresses broad-based problem solving, leadership development, communications, including writing, speaking, and human relations, and a balance of classroom and out-of-class activities.  A strong undergraduate advising program is maintained with faculty available to students. 

Curriculum Overview-B.S. in Rangeland Sciences The Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences (AnRS) offers a major in Rangeland D-1

Ecology and Management. The B.S. in Rangeland Ecology and Management is offered both at Oregon State University in Corvallis and in the OSU Agriculture Program at Eastern Oregon University. The AnRS Department offers the courses necessary to satisfy the Range Management required courses described below under the GS-454 Range Conservationist series requirements. With appropriate course selection from other disciplines, students with a B.S. in Rangeland Ecology and Management qualify for federal ratings both as Range Conservationist and Soil Conservationist (see rating requirements below). Students in the Rangeland Ecology and Management degree program experience a curriculum that emphasizes a balance of coursework relating to rangeland resources, soils, domestic animals, wildlife, ecology, sociology, and biological sciences. Coursework integrates these disciplines into a framework which helps graduates develop critical thinking skills necessary for their futures. The typical course of study includes courses in chemistry, mathematics, geology, soils, economics, computer science, statistics, animal science, communications, botany, ecology, rangeland ecology and management, and other natural resources. Curricula are broadly based and allow students to emphasize areas of specialization to complement the basic Rangeland Ecology and Management emphasis. A Rangeland Ecology and Management major will complete approximately 48 (32) credit hours of writing, math, and science in the Baccalaureate Core; 105 (70) credit hours of chemistry, math, biology, economics, animal science, rangeland ecology and management, and natural resources in the Rangeland Ecology and Management Core; and 27 (18) credit hours toward an emphasis area. The advising checklists for REM majors and minors at both Corvallis and LaGrande campuses are provided in Appendix 2, pages 4-9. Curriculum Updates Faculty members who teach the same course at Corvallis and LaGrande informally meet to compare syllabi, materials, and methods. REM faculty from OSU and EOU met in 2007 at EOU to review and update the REM curriculum. Since that time faculty have retired or transferred from the Corvallis campus and non-essential courses have been dropped and others have been changed from every year to alternate year offerings. REM faculty are planning to meet during summer 2011 to evaluate REM course offerings, syllabi, etc. to adjust to fewer faculty numbers and our inclusion in the AnRS Department. We are committed at both locations to maintaining a curriculum that addresses OPM GS-454 requirements and that prepares our students for professional careers.

D-2

Rangeland Ecology and Management Undergraduate Course Offerings: Unless otherwise noted, all courses identified below are offered at both locations (OSU main campus in Corvallis and OSU Agriculture Program at Eastern Oregon University in LaGrande). Course number

Credits Quarter

Semester

RNG 101 RNG 341

1 3

.67 2

RNG 351 RNG 352 RNG 353 RNG 355 RNG 411 RNG 421/521

3 3 4 3 4 4

2 2 2.68 2 2.68 2.68

FOR/RNG 436/536 4

2.68

RNG 441/541 RNG 442/542 FOR/FW/RNG 446/546 RNG 455/555

4 4 3

2.68 2.68 2

3

2

FOR/RNG 477/577 3

2

RNG 490/590

2.68

4

Name

Notes

Orientation Rangeland Ecology and Management Range Ecology I Grasslands Range Ecology II Shrublands Wildland Plant ID Desert Watershed Management Advanced Plant ID Wildand Restoration and Ecology Wildland Fire and Fuels Management Rangeland Analysis Range-Animal Relations Wildland Fire Ecology

EOU only Intro course

Riparian Ecology and Management Agroforestry Rangeland Management Planning

Alternate years Alternate years

Corvallis only Alternate years Cross listed, Forestry lead Alternate years Alternate years Cross listed, Forestry lead On the books, not currently offered Cross listed, Forestry lead Alternate years

Range courses offered via Extended Campus (on line) are listed below. Course number

Credits Quarter

Semester

RNG 341

3

2

RNG 353 FOR/RNG 346

3 3

2 2

RNG 355 RNG 455

3 3

2 2

RNG 490

4

2.68

Name

Notes

Rangeland Ecology and Management Wildland Plant Identification Topics in Wildland Fire

Winter and Spring terms Fall and Spring terms Forestry lead, fall and spring terms Fall and Winter terms Spring term

Desert Watershed Management Riparian Ecology and Management Rangeland Management Planning

D-3

Winter term

The current online catalog listing of course requirements for the Rangeland Ecology and Management BS degree is provided below. Once approved by the University, the degree will no longer have formal options. Students wishing to pursue a particular emphasis within the degree will work with their advisor to select appropriate courses. The list below can be found at: http://catalog.oregonstate.edu/MajorDetail.aspx?major=622&college=01 To earn the Rangeland Ecology and Management BS degree, each student must take the core courses plus additional courses in one of the seven options: general rangeland resources, range management, range science, range/forestry/fire management, range/soils, range/wildlife, wildland ecology. Course work credit may not be counted twice to satisfy department core, option or minor requirements. Departmental requirements may be utilized to satisfy Baccalaureate Core and non-departmental minor requirements. Baccalaureate Core (48)6 General Sciences and Communications (47 minimum)6 ANS 313. Applied Animal Nutrition: Feeds and Ration Formulation (4) ANS 436. Sheep Production Systems (3) or ANS 443. Beef Production Systems (3) AREC 351. *Natural Resource Economics and Policy (3) or AREC 352. *Environmental Economics and Policy (3) BI 211, BI 212. *Principles of Biology (4,4) BI 370. Ecology (3) or BOT 341. Plant Ecology (4) BOT 321. Plant Systematics (4) BOT 331. Plant Physiology (4) or BOT 488. Environmental Physiology of Plants (3) BOT 414. Agrostology (4) CH 121. General Chemistry (5) CH 122. *General Chemistry (5) CH 130. General Chemistry of Living Systems (4) CSS 305. Principles of Soil Science (4) CSS 306. Solving Problems: Soil Science Applications (1) CSS 466. Soil Morphology and Classification (4) ECON 201. *Intro to Microeconomics (4) GEO 102. *The Surface of the Earth (4) MTH 241. *Calculus for Management and Social Science (4) ST 351. Intro to Statistical Methods (4) or ST 201. Principles of Statistics (3) plus ST 209. Principles of Hypothesis Testing (1) WR 327. *Technical Writing (3)

D-4

Natural Resources (10 minimum) CSS 310. Forage Production (4) FOR 111. Intro to Forestry (3) FOR 251. Recreation Resource Management (4) FW 251. Principles of Fish and Wildlife Conservation (3) Rangeland Ecology and Management (32 minimum) RNG 341. Rangeland Ecology and Management (3) RNG 351. Range Ecology I-Grasslands (3) RNG 352. Range Ecology II-Shrublands (3) RNG 353. Wildland Plant Identification (4) RNG 355. Desert Watershed Management (3) RNG 421. Wildland Restoration and Ecology (4) RNG 441. Rangeland Analysis (4) RNG 442. Rangeland-Animal Relations (4) RNG 490. Rangeland Management Planning (4) Free electives (16 maximum) Total Credits=180 (quarter system) Footnotes: * Baccalaureate Core Course ^ Writing Intensive Course (WIC) 6 Certain classes may be used to satisfy both the baccalaureate core and the rangeland ecology and management core. RNG 101. ORIENTATION TO CAREERS IN RANGELAND ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (1). Offered at EOU only. Orientation to the OSU Department of Rangeland Ecology and Management; and major fields of study in the profession of rangeland resources and related fields of natural resources. Learn about careers in natural resources, writing resumes, government employment, graduate school opportunities. RNG 341. RANGELAND ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (3). Nature and management of rangelands. Integrated land use with emphasis on plantanimal-soil interactions. RNG 346. TOPICS IN WILDLAND FIRE (3). An interdisciplinary survey of concepts relating to fire science, ecology, management, and policy. Includes case studies of several representative ecosystems, ranging from west- and eastside forests of the Pacific Northwest to shrub steppe ecosystems of the Intermountain West and chaparral ecosystems of southern California. Distance and campus-based delivery using videos, website, and discussion. CROSSLISTED as FOR D-5

346, FW 346. PREREQS: Course work in forest biology or ecology (e.g. FOR 240, FOR 341) or equivalent. RNG 351. RANGE ECOLOGY I-GRASSLANDS (3). Principles and terminology of grassland ecology. Addresses the spatial-temporal dynamics of structure, function, and process in North American grassland ecosystems. Water, nutrient cycles and energy pathways are explored in context of the variable driving forces of climate (drought), herbivory, and fire. PREREQS: BOT 313 and RNG 341. RNG 352 RANGE ECOLOGY II-SHRUBLANDS (3) Introduces the ecology of shrublands using an autecological approach. Explores the effects of stressors such as temperature, drought, fire, and herbivory on plant morphology, physiology, reproduction, and growth. Covers life histories of common shrubs and descriptions of shrubland communities used to promote understanding of autecological principles. PREREQS: BOT 313 and RNG 341 RNG 353. WILDLAND PLANT IDENTIFICATION (4). Students will learn how to identify approximately 100 plant species found in wildlands of North America and Mexico. Individual plant species ecology, basic plant anatomy and identification characteristics observable only through a microscope or dissecting scope, and how to use a dichotomous key for plant ID will also be covered. RNG 355. DESERT WATERSHED MANAGEMENT (3). Principles and methods in managing rangeland for optimum production and regulation of water yields, as well as maintaining soil stability and on-site productivity. Effects of grazing herbivores and their potential as land use, manipulative tools. Concepts of arid land hydrology, with emphasis on the resultant effects on runoff quantity and quality. RNG 421. WILDLAND RESTORATION AND ECOLOGY (4). Emphasis is placed on understanding the ecology of arid and semi-arid ecosystems through the study of ecological processes responsible for ecosystem function. Range improvement practices for stabilizing and repairing degraded wildlands by directing autogenic recovery mechanisms are discussed. This involves manipulating plants, soil, animals and microenvironments for improved ecosystem function. PREREQS: Course work in soils and ecology. Field trip required. RNG 436. WILDLAND FIRE SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT (4). Principles and applications of fire as a natural resource management tool, the role of fire in conservation management, restoration, and preservation of ecosystems. Covers basic D-6

techniques and current research used to describe fire behavior and spread, fuels and fuel manipulation, and fire effects on the biota. Focus will be on fire as a natural process in ecosystem dynamics. Lec/lab. CROSSLISTED as FOR 436/FOR 536. RNG 441. RANGELAND ANALYSIS (4). Techniques used to describe vegetation in shrub-lands, grasslands, and forests. Use of measurements in resource management. Course is field-oriented, emphasizing both theory and practice of wildland inventory methods. PREREQS: ST 351 or ST 351H. RNG 442. RANGELAND-ANIMAL RELATIONS (4). Domestic and wild animal use of rangelands as related to environmental factors, palatability, food habits, nutrition, physiography, and their effects on management of rangeland-animal resources. PREREQS: RNG 341. RNG 446. WILDLAND FIRE ECOLOGY (3). Coverage of fire histories and ecology of major forest, rangeland and wetland ecosystems. Includes fire interactions with physical and biotic components of ecosystems, role of fire in ecological processes, and utilization in natural resource management. CROSSLISTED as FOR 446/FOR 546 and FW 446/FW 546. PREREQS: Course work in ecology and natural resource management. RNG 490. RANGELAND MANAGEMENT PLANNING (4). Administration and management of rangelands; planning processes involving goal setting, inventories, personnel management, environment, conflict resolution, and other constraints necessary for decision-making. Use of data collected from field problems to support the execution of class plans. Field trip required. Lec/lab.

D-7

Academic Advising OSU Campus – Corvallis Dr. James Hermes is the Departmental Head Advisor overall for AnRS. Within REM, Dr. Michael Borman is the officially designated advisor for REM majors. Borman is responsible for the Advising checklist (pages J xx - xx) and for approving course substitutions. The checklist is designed to guide students to satisfy OPM GS-454 Range Conservationist rating requirements and to satisfy OSU baccalaureate core requirements. Connie Davis, office specialist, assists REM students with creating their individual plans and finding courses that allow them to complete their programs in a timely manner. Students meet with Connie each term to receive a PIN that allows them to register for the next term. At that time academic progress is discussed and adjustments are made if needed. Questions and concerns about courses for professional development, course substitutions, etc. are addressed by Borman. OSU Agriculture Program – EOU – LaGrande Background information: The OSU Agriculture Program at EOU is a cooperative program in which students can attend and enroll in all classes on the Eastern Oregon University campus and obtain an OSU degree. OSU Faculty teach the agriculture and natural resource courses and advise undergraduate students along with the Administrative Program Assistant (OSU employee). Degree curriculums are approved and mirror main campus curriculums. Due to the cooperative nature of the program and the fact that students are admitted and enrolled at EOU, the advising differs from Corvallis. The program follows EOU policies, procedures, and time lines for student registration and advising. Advising: When students are admitted to EOU, or change their major, declaring any of the OSU Agriculture Program majors, they are assigned to the advising coordinator. This assignment is done through the EOU Academic and Career Advising office. Freshman advisees: As of April 2011, all new freshman will remain assigned to our advising coordinator as their primary advisor for fall and winter terms. At the end of winter term advising students will be transitioned to a faculty advisor in their major. Transfer students: Once the advising file is in order, and the OSU articulation is complete, the student is assigned to a faculty advisor. D-8

Student Progress: The OSU Agriculture Program office maintains advising files for each of our students. Each term grades are updated on a student check sheet. Grade sheets are given to faculty for the advisees, and then filed. Per EOU policy all students under 45 credit hours have an advising hold placed on their registration records. The hold is removed once the student meets with the advisor. This hold is removed either by the advising coordinator or the registrar’s office. Holds are also placed on a student’s registration for academic warning or probation. EOU Catalog statement: Newly admitted students, all students with 44 or less earned credits, and students on academic warning or probation are required to have their adviser’s approval and signature prior to registration each term. However, students are strongly encouraged to make an appointment with their adviser at any time to discuss academic programs, to seek other kinds of assistance, or to just talk and ask questions. Although an adviser may not be able to solve all problems or answer all questions, they can refer students to other campus offices which can be of assistance. EOU Catalog academic policies: http://www.eou.edu/catalog/documents/academic_policies.pdf What criteria are used to guide advisors regarding course substitutions? Faculty advisors are responsible for initiating and finalizing approved coursework changes to individual degree programs. The advisor is responsible for initiating discussions with the Department Head if the change could impact degree integrity. If the coursework change influences baccalaureate, college or university graduation requirements the above discussion is expanded to include the College Head Advisor. In all cases, the advisor is responsible for initialing or creating a memo to the file that verifies the approved change.

What mechanism ensures that each student meets with their advisor at least twice per year? Campus size and faculty workloads restrict the number of class offerings that are available on campus in any given year. As a result, the 4 year degree program relies on a coordinated sequence of alternate year classes. This format naturally encourages students to remain in contact with their advisor so that prerequisite and alternate year coursework can be completed in a timely fashion. Students are reminded and encouraged to meet with their advisor each term, and most do. Our faculty and staff have very good relationships with our students and they are comfortable approaching faculty for academic advising as well as career advice.

D-9

Accreditation Standard IV REM Educators Courses required by REM majors are taught be 5 faculty (Borman, Ingham, Johnson, Mata-Gonzalez, and Miller) at the OSU campus in Corvallis and 3 faculty (Kiemnec, Larson, and Limb) at the EOU campus in LaGrande. Miller has semi-retired into a ½ time appointment, Ingham is in a non-tenure-track Instructor position, Kiemnec is tenured in Crop and Soil Sciences, but holds an adjunct appointment in the Range program, and Ehrhart is an Assistant Professor in a non-tenure-track position teaching REM courses online. Curriculum vitas and publication lists are provided in Appendix 3. Since 2005, College of Agricultural Sciences newly hired faculty have been hired on 9month appointment rather than the 12-month appointments that had been the norm. Mata-Gonzalez and Limb are on 9-month appointments as replacements for 12-month faculty who have retired.

Table 1. Current REM faculty, rank, PhD institution, and dates of employment at OSU REM faculty member

Rank

Received PhD OSU campus Corvallis Oregon State University

Dates of employment at OSU

Michael Borman Claudia Ingham Douglas Johnson Ricardo MataGonzalez Richard Miller

Professor

Gary Kiemnec

Assoc. 1986 – present Professor Professor Colorado State University 1984- present Asst. Oklahoma State 2010 - present Professor University Distance Education – Extended Campus Asst. University of Texas – 1999 – 2005 OSU Professor History Cascades Campus M.S. Range Mgmt. 2005 – present eUniversity of Montana campus REM

Larry Larson Ryan Limb

Robert Ehrhart

1994 - present

Instructor Professor

Oregon State University Colorado State University

2009 - present 1982 – present

Asst. Professor Professor Emeritus

Texas Tech University

2007 – present

New Mexico State University EOU campus LaGrande Oregon State University

E-1

1976 - 2009

Rangeland Personnel 2000-2010 Fall 2000

Fall 2010 Faculty

UG Borman, Michael Buckhouse, John Doesher, Paul Eddleman, Lee Ehrhart, Robert Johnson, Douglas Krueger, William Larson, Larry McInnis, Mike Miller, Richard Sharrow, Steve Stringham, T Vavra, Martin

0.2 .55 0.6 1.0 .35 0.1 .77 0.9 0.4

AES 0.5 .45 0.4

ES 1.0 .03

other

Cascades-Bend

.65 .57

.33 .23

0.1 1.0 0.6 1.0 1.0

Comment Extension Retired reassigned-COF Retired Natural Resources Spatial Ecology Retired Weed Ecology Retired Retired Retired Resigned Retired

UG 0.1

AES 0.4

Mata-Gonzalez, R Ehrhart, Robert Johnson, Douglas

.35 .64 .35

E-Campus

Larson, Larry Limb, Ryan Miller, Richard

.77 0.6

Borman, Michael Buckhouse, John

Instructor Claudia Ingham

ES 0.5 0.2

other

.65

Physiology, Plant ID Natural Resources Spatial Ecology

.65 .23 0.4 0.5

Comment Dept. Head/Range, Extension Watershed

Weed Ecology Fire, Restoration Ecology Emeritus

.33

Research Support Casady, Grant Kelley, Claudia Lowson, Kathy

Lofton, Susan Dingus, Carolyn Rossi, Cindy Laliberte, Marc

1.0 1.0 1.0

.13

.37 1.0 1.0 1.0

.50

Office Manager Accounting Tech Office Specialist Computer Admin.

Staff Support Davis, Connie AMBC

E-2

1.0

Office Specialist Accounting Support

Policies cultivating excellence in teaching REM faculty are encouraged to attend the Society for Range Management Annual Meeting and PNW Section meetings. In general, most faculty attend the national meetings at which they present research results and participate on SRM committees. Most faculty attend one or both PNW Section meetings each year. REM faculty are active researchers and publish in scientific journals. See Appendix 3 to review CVs and publication lists for current faculty. Oregon State University supports the Center for Teaching and Learning and Teaching Across Campus which provide workshops, seminars, and tools to enhance teaching by faculty. These opportunities are advertised to faculty in general. Teaching Across Campus's Mission: to assist faculty and staff to succeed at improving educational quality. Technology Across the Curriculum (TAC) is founded in the recognition that information technology (IT) holds a critical role in all areas of academic life. Technology is not the primary concern of most disciplines, yet it is impractical to pursue research, scholarship, teaching and learning in the 21st century without adequate IT skills. TAC seeks to raise the level of IT proficiency at OSU systemically. We pursue this aim by focusing on aspects of technology that cut across the disciplines; techniques and tools which operate across the curriculum. Like a polished gem, IT at OSU has many facets. Needs for the various departments vary widely and individual instructors make choices based on what they know to be most important to learners. It simply will not do to assert a common prescription and a single solution to all of these needs. At the same time, we see that common technologies such as the web, databases, email, digital imagery, web 2.0 applications, and presentationware do have fundamental principles which guide effective tool users. The intended results of our program are more effective use of time and resources, stronger knowledge creation and communication, more effective teaching and learning, and greater satisfaction in work done well. If any of these outcomes coincide with academic aims, consider working with TAC to increase your IT proficiency. Please visit the TAC website to use our Flash-based GEMS (turn on your audio) and other educational resources. Your feedback is critical to us and we hope to hear from you this academic year. Research All members of the TAC team seek innovative uses of technology to aid learners and teachers. We welcome suggestions about such innovations from faculty, staff, and students.

E-3

Development TAC partners with OSU programs in order to design and implement uses of technology and multimedia for specific educational objectives. Training Our workshops and seminars are open every term to OSU faculty and staff at no cost. A variety of educational technologies are covered including Blackboard, Dreamweaver, and Powerpoint. The types of learning opportunities range from demonstrations to collaborative development. In all cases of TAC training, the primary objective is to advance the quality uses of technology for teaching and learning; educational objectives come first. If you wish to see a specific educational technology or educational technique covered, please let us know. Support TAC maintains the TAC Lab (115A Waldo Hall) which provides equipment, software, and expertise to faculty and staff. See the TAC Lab section. TAC team members assist faculty and staff with issues related to Blackboard, Dreamweaver, Powerpoint, Photoshop, and Acrobat. Support opportunities include on-site, phone, email consultation. Many issues with these technologies may be quickly resolved through the Computing Consulting Desk (http://tss.oregonstate.edu/consulting/). For assistance with the pedagogical aspects of these technologies, contact TAC. Assessment TAC's major goal is to advance information technology proficiencies across the entire institution. The key outcome of this goal show up in improvements in student learning and faculty/staff capabilities. A vital aspect of the TAC program is to collect data that measures the effects of educational technology use.

E-4

Courtesy and Affiliate Faculty REM has several courtesy and affiliate faculty as part of the program. These faculty are generally off campus and do not contribute to the undergraduate teaching program except as occasional guest lecturers. Given current advances in technology it is conceivable that we can utilize these faculty to provide their expertise by developing teaching modules in digital format. At this point, this is a concept not a reality. Courtesy and Affiliate Faculty include: Name Tony Svejcar Jon Bates Chad Boyd Kirk Davies Jeremy James Roger Sheley Jeff Herrick Michael Fisher Gregg Riegel Martin Martinez-Salvador Pat Shaver Melvin George Norman Harris

Affiliation USDA-ARS USDA-ARS USDA-ARS USDA-ARS USDA-ARS USDA-ARS USDA-ARS Central Oregon Community College USDA-FS USDA-NRCS UC Davis Univ. of Alaska

E-5

Location Burns, OR Burns, OR Burns, OR Burns, OR Burns, OR Burns, OR Las Cruces, NM Bend, OR Bend, OR Mexico Portland, OR Davis, CA Palmer, AK

RNG courses offered by term, location, and instructor beginning Fall 2011 Course

Corvallis

LaGrande

Fall FOR 111 CSS 466 RNG 101 RNG 341 RNG 351 RNG 352 RNG 353 RNG 421 RNG 441

forestry Soil Morph & Class orientation intro grasslands shrublands plant ID restoration measurements

Ingham Johnson Johnson Mata-Gonzalez Borman Johnson

RNG 341 RNG 353 RNG 355

intro Plant ID watershed

Johnson Ehrhart Ehrhart

Larson Kiemnec Limb Limb Larson alternate odd years - 2011 Larson alternate even years - 2012 alternate even years - 2012 alternate odd years - 2011 e-campus e-campus e-campus

Winter CSS 395

world soils

Kiemnec LL/RL contribute alternate odd years 2011 Larson televised to Corvallis

RNG 355 RNG 411 RNG 441 RNG 442 RNG 442

watershed adv plant ID measurements animal relations animal relations

Borman Mata-Gonzalez

RNG 643 RNG 662

plant ecophys rng ecology

Mata-Gonzalez Mata-Gonzalez

alternate odd years - 2011 alternate even years - 2012

RNG 341 RNG 355 RNG 490

intro watershed planning

Johnson Ehrhart Ehrhart

e-campus e-campus e-campus

Larson

alternate odd years - 2011

Larson

alternate even years - 2012

Johnson

Spring RNG 341 RNG 353 RNG 421 RNG 490

intro plant ID restoration planning

Ingham

RNG 353 RNG 455

Plant ID riparian

Ehrhart Ehrhart

Limb Limb Limb

Borman

alternate odd years - 2011 alternate even years - 2012 e-campus e-campus

E-6

Accreditation Standard V: Extracurricular Professional Development Rangeland Ecology and Management Club The Rangeland Ecology and Management student organization information can be found on the department’s web page. Range Clubs operate on both the OSU and EOU campuses. To this point they have operated independently, primarily due to distance. Student participation varies from year to year depending on the makeup and personality of the student population. For the past couple years, faculty advising for the club at OSU has been less than desirable. Dr. Borman has been the official club advisor, but other demands have limited his availability. The club leadership has conducted meetings monthly, solicited guest speakers on topics of interest, and procured resource to support member travel to annual SRM meetings. Dr. Mike McInnis served as the club advisor for the EOU club until his retirement in December 2009. It is anticipated that Dr. Limb, recently hired to replace Dr. McInnis, will assume club advising beginning Fall 2011. Club members from both clubs have participated in the Plant ID contest and URME at the annual meetings. Students conduct fund raising activities and solicit financial support from University and College sources and from the PNW Section SRM to support travel and activities. The Department helps cover shortfalls as needed. While at the SRM annual meetings students have taken advantage of Tapping the Top, on-the-spot hiring by federal agencies, and other professional development opportunities at the SRM annual meeting. Due to timing of meetings and classroom and summer employment demands, participation in PNW Section meetings has been very limited. Rangeland Ecology and Management Club Oregon State University 305 Strand Agricultural Hall Corvallis, OR 97331-2218 (541) 737-3341 [email protected] Mission Statement To educate future rangeland management professionals and the general public, promoting professional growth and development, and providing society with an understanding of sustainable ecosystems and the good and services they provide. This club is associated with the Society for Range Management. What We Do The Rangeland Ecology and Management Club at OSU participates in a wide variety of activities. Since 1963 the Range Management Club has been part of the Department of Rangeland Ecology and Management in Oregon State University's College of F-1

Agriculture. The primary goal of the Range Club is to bring students together in an academic and social combination of opportunities in order to provide exposure and interaction with past, present, and future land and natural resource management professionals. These opportunities allow students to gain a full understanding of employment possibilities in their chosen field of study. With this goal in mind, the Range Club is aspiring to allow students to fine tune their individual personal goals for the future, so the Department of Rangeland Ecology and Management and subsequently Oregon State University's College of Agriculture, can continue its outstanding reputation in educating conscientious and quality rangeland and natural resource professionals. As a member of the club students will have the opportunity to: • • • •

Attend the SRM Meeting and compete in contests that are recognized by professionals throughout the discipline. Meet professionals, faculty and students from all over the United States, Canada and Mexico. Volunteer for community service projects. Get to know other students from different departments on campus.

The Rangeland Ecology and Management Club welcomes student members from any academic discipline. Our only requirement is an interest in promoting and learning about sustainable ecosystem management, and to have some fun and make some friends in the process! Ambassador for Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resources Ambassadors serve as student representatives of Oregon State University, the College of Agricultural Sciences, and the College of Forestry. Ambassadors contribute to the advancement of OSU and of the Colleges through participation in promotional and recruiting activities including on-campus recruiting events, professional conferences, as well as industry and alumni events. Other recruiting activities include correspondence with prospective students, visits to high schools and community colleges, and campus tours for prospective students and their parents. From the Department, Sarah Noelle served as an Ambassador during 2009-10 and Jessica Hopper during 2010-11. Job Opportunity information The Department maintains a “jobs board” with posting of permanent and seasonal job opportunities. Opportunities are also sent to both undergraduate and graduate students via e-mail. In recent years our students have had no problem finding summer employment while in school and permanent employment following graduation if they are willing to be flexible about location.

F-2

Bedell Internship Dr. Tom Bedell, Emeritus Professor, established an endowed fund through the OSU Foundation to support an internship for one student each year. The intent of the internship is to provide a student with experience on a production ranch. The selected student spends half the summer at each of two ranches. The student lives with the ranch families and participates in ranch and community activities. In return, the Bedell fund provides tuition for the following academic year. Range faculty at OSU and EOU collaborate on identification of a deserving student who will benefit from the opportunity. College of Agricultural Sciences Scholarships The College of Agricultural Sciences provides a variety of endowed scholarships. The Range Program has representation on the CAS scholarship committee and Range Program students are able to compete for the scholarships.

F-3

Table V.1. REM student attendance at recent SRM annual meetings: 2009

2010

2011

OSU

Jessica Hopper Alexandra Barner Cameron King Sarah Noelle Cori Nuss

Jessica Hopper Sarah Noelle Sara Norman Cori Nuss

Jessica Hopper Sara Norman Catherine Sesa

EOU

Christine Boullester Steven Doverspike Will Hudson Nik Nilson Roger Olsen Jessica Parries Larne Sheehy Jesse Svejcar Carol Van Grunsven Nathan Wilson Whitney Witherspoon

Christine Boullester Sarah Hill Michael Higgins Will Hudson Mike Johnson Sarah Kellom Robert Luster Nik Nilson Jessica Parries Cody Rickert Jessica Riggin Larne Sheehy Jesse Svejcar Kelby Witherspoon Whitney Witherspoon

F-4

Meaghan FitzGerald Michael Higgins Jake Kasparek Sarah Kellom Bryson Ricker Kristy Riggin Logan Ross Larne Sheehy Gina Thompson

Accreditation Standard VI: Assessment of Courses/Program Effectiveness Assessment of Program and Program Effectiveness REM faculty from OSU and EOU met in 2007 at EOU to review and update the REM curriculum. Since that time faculty have retired or transferred from the Corvallis campus and non-essential courses have been dropped and others have been changed from every year to alternate year offerings. REM faculty are planning to meet during summer 2011 to evaluate REM course offerings, syllabuses, content, connections, etc. to adjust to fewer faculty numbers and to our inclusion in the AnRS Department. We are committed at both locations to maintaining a curriculum that addresses OPM GS-454 requirements and that prepares our students for professional careers. As course syllabuses are updated, learning outcomes are identified and described for each course. Learning outcomes are then evaluated through assignments, planning exercises (for some courses), and exams. Syllabuses with learning outcomes for specific courses are provided in Appendix 2 Curriculum Progression – Development of Concepts and Skills During their first two years as undergraduates, students will generally satisfy their baccalaureate core course requirements that cover communications; mathematics; culture, diversity, and social sciences; general biology and botany; and chemistry (see check lists for REM majors, Appendix 2, pages 4-9). Those who know early that they are interested in Range as their major will typically take the introductory range course (RNG 341 – Rangeland Ecology and Management) during their sophomore year and progress from there. Numerous students from other majors (e.g. Natural Resources, Environmental Sciences, Animal Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife) take RNG 341 as an elective and discover that Range is the major for which they have been searching. If early enough in their program, a number of students have changed their majors to Range and completed the degree requirements. Others are far enough along in their programs when they discover Range that they take additional range courses, but do not change majors. Range majors begin the range curriculum with RNG 341, which provides an emphasis on nature and management of rangelands and integrated land use with emphasis on plantanimal-soil interactions. Depending on when specific courses are offered, students will progress to the other 300-level courses which focus on ecology and dynamics of arid and semi-arid ecosystems and ecosystem functions, and on range plant identification. Students will then progress to the 400-level courses which provide greater depth of understanding of ecosystem processes and incorporate measurement, management, and planning as part of instruction. These additional application skills are generally addressed through problem sets, lab activities, field trips, and/or class projects, often performed by teams of students. Refer to course descriptions provided under Standard III and syllabuses in Appendix 2 for course descriptions. While taking required upper division Range courses, students, depending on their areas of G-1

interest, will take courses emphasizing watershed management (in addition to RNG 355), forestry management, fisheries and/or wildlife management, recreation management, fire management, livestock production, and integrated pest management. Student Evaluations Standard course evaluations, provided by OSU, are completed by students at the end of each term. The last part of the evaluation gives students an opportunity to discuss what worked and didn’t work for them and how they think the course could be made more effective (forms available in Appendix 4).

Rangeland Ecology and Management Exit Survey Summary Recent exit surveys from graduating Rangeland Ecology and Management students provide an overall “Satisfied” response. Areas with “Very Satisfied” responses include academic advising, class size, and interaction with faculty. This is largely a function of our being a relatively small program with ready access to advising and faculty. Upper division classes tend to be smaller as well. Some of our 300 level classes are relatively large due to students from other disciplines enrolling to satisfy degree requirements in those programs. They too generally received favorable ratings by students who take them. Metrics now being enforced by OSU may result in lower ratings in the future as class sizes increase and student-faculty interactions become more difficult to maintain. Easy access to advising and ready access to faculty will likely become more difficult with requirements for higher student numbers for a program to continue. We anticipate that we will meet the class size metric and be able to continue to offer the courses we currently offer. Most of them are needed for our students to qualify for the federal OPM GS-454 Range Conservationist rating. Many of our students plan careers in the federal system. “Satisfied” responses were given for quality of teaching, quality of course content, rigor of course content, and computer facilities. We have had faculty who know their subject matter and are able to deliver it such that students feel they are gaining relevant knowledge and skills. We have had a computer facility that satisfies most of the computing needs of our students. Clubs/activities received a “Dissatisfied” response. In the past we would likely have received at least a “Satisfied” response. Until about three years ago we had a dedicated faculty advisor for the Range Club. With depleted faculty ranks we have not had the luxury of providing consistent faculty advising for the club. Remaining faculty have been spread too thin to take on an additional duty. We hope that recruitment of an additional Range faculty member will allow us to provide more consistent support for the club. Internship experience received a “Very Dissatisfied” response. We have only one G-2

endowed intern program that provides an excellent opportunity, but for only one student per year. That internship opportunity is available to students at both campuses and has recently gone to a student in our program at Eastern Oregon University. This is an area that we would like to enhance, but we need resources to do so. However, with a shift to 9-month appointments for newly hired faculty, it is likely to be difficult for newer faculty to supervise internship programs. They will be spending time working on proposals to cover summer salary, which has not been necessary for faculty formerly hired on 12month appointments. Rangeland Graduate Alumni Survey Summary Of the surveys returned the majority considered their graduate experience to be satisfactory. Most felt they had been well prepared to advance in their career or to move to a more advanced degree. A substantial majority would recommend the program to a prospective student. Most of our graduate students are supported at some level of assistantship. The FTE level varies by funding procured for a project, but all who received assistantship support were granted tuition waiver and at least a small stipend. Overall, the graduate experience for our students was considered positive. Rangeland Current Graduate Student Survey Summary Our graduate student population is considerably depleted relative to prior years due to depleted faculty ranks. Only three of our current graduate students completed this survey. In most respects the students were positive about their experience and opportunities in our program. Two responses were somewhat negative. Categories included: “If I decided to change my major professor, the program mechanism for doing so is suitable”; and “The program offers adequate opportunity for its graduate students to gain teaching experience.” With so few faculty, changing major professors is a challenge, especially if the student is funded on a particular project. We do not have the resources to offer funding internally. We have no Graduate Teaching Assistantships in our program. Also, we do not offer lower division courses in our curriculum, so opportunities for a student to gain substantial teaching experience are limited. We do encourage students to provide “guest” lectures related to their graduate program when related to course material being covered in one of our classes. Neutral responses were received for: “The program offers an adequate selection of graduate courses, sufficient for timely completion of a full graduate program”, “Program seminars are adequate to keep me informed of developments in my field”, “ The program informs me of adequate opportunities for professional development and contacts outside OSU, such as attendance at professional meetings”, “Graduate teaching or research assistantship stipends in this program are adequate”, “Graduate program policies clearly G-3

identify petition and appeals procedures available to me”, “There is a well-established mechanism for regular graduate student participation in program decisions affecting students, whenever this is appropriate.” Some of these neutral “criticisms” are justified and due primarily to lack of resources. Department seminars have been discontinued for now due to lack of faculty and students to support them. Assistantships are at lower FTE levels generally than previously due to lack of internal financial support to augment project support. State support is much less than it was just a few years ago. However, a couple of the criticisms are not really supported. Every graduate student who submits a paper to the annual Society for Range Management meeting is supported to attend. Generally that support is provided by a funded project, but the department supplements that support as needed. Petition and appeals procedures are published in the Department Graduate Student Handbook. In our Graduate Student orientation sessions, we note that they are in the handbook, but we do not dwell on them. I have maintained an open door policy for students who have issues or who simply want advice. Most responses related to office, computer, faculty expertise and classroom activities, access to faculty, etc. were positive to very positive. Student Recruitment Activities On the OSU campus recruitment for the Range major has been dormant for the past three years, primarily due to loss of faculty who had been responsible for student recruitment. Recently, the College of Agricultural Sciences Academic Programs office has been directing students who describe an interest in natural resources to the Department to discuss a Range major. After the merger of Animal Sciences and Rangeland Ecology and Management into Animal and Rangeland Sciences, effective July 1, 2011, the Range Program Leader will work with the CAS Academic Programs office to develop a strategic plan for recruiting students to OSU for the Range Program. At EOU the Agriculture Program is a satellite program of Oregon State University. It was designed to bring agriculture education (undergraduate) to the 10 county service area of Eastern Oregon University. Within the original mission statement the Agriculture Program was directed to develop partnerships with community colleges that serviced students interested in developing careers in agriculture within the same region. To that end informal partnerships have been developed with Treasure Valley Community College, Blue Mountain Community College and Columbia Basin College. These partnerships typically include the development of advising guides as well as campus visits to enhance student contact. In this current form these efforts provide approximately 1/3 of our annual recruitment. Academic Standards for Admission, Retention, and Graduation Any student who is admitted to OSU is eligible to be a REM major. Students at EOU are EOU students through their sophomore year, then apply to and are accepted into an OSU degree program. Range majors at EOU, who complete degree requirements, graduate with an OSU Range Ecology and Management degree that is identified on their G-4

transcript. On both campuses retention is primarily a function of ready student access to faculty and support staff. Student needs are attended to as quickly and efficiently as possible. Connie Davis at OSU and JoLyn Scott at EOU know how the systems work and are able to facilitate working through problems that students encounter with registration, financial aid, etc. Student retention is generally not a problem. In general at OSU a Baccalaureate degree is awarded for the satisfactory completion of an instructional program requiring at least four but not more than five years of full-time equivalent college-level academic work that includes the following: 1) institutional general education requirements (i.e., baccalaureate core); 2) major area of study requirements; and 3) may include minor, supporting area, or elective requirements. A minimum of 180 credits (quarter system) is required for most degree programs, some majors may require more. The Rangeland Ecology and Management degree is awarded when students complete university requirements and major area of study requirements. An advising check list is completed for each student at both locations to assure both the student and the program that the student is on track and the requirements are being met. See Appendix 2, pages 4-9 for checklists for both locations.

G-5

OSU AG PROGRAM @ EOU total of registered students pursing a Range degree REM Majors

FRESHMAN

SOPHOMORE

JUNIOR

SENIOR

TOTAL

Total in Ag Program

Fall 2010 Fall 2009 Winter 2010 Spring 2010 Fall 2008 Winter 2009 Spring 2009 Fall 2007 Winter 2008 Spring 2008 Fall 2006 Winter 2007 Spring 2007 Fall 2005 winter 2006 Spring 2006 Fall 2004 Winter 2005 Spring 2005 Fall 2003 Winter 2004 Spring 2004 Fall 2002 Winter 2003 Spring 2003 Fall 2001 Winter 2002 Spring 2002

22 19 21 19 10 8 11 7 9 5 10 13 11 7 8 5 5 7 5 4 3 2 7 7 6 9 4 4

26 11 11 16 5 7 4 15 13 9 8 12 7 12 8 9 6 3 6 3 4 8 5 6 4 7 8 9

16 8 12 6 19 13 12 14 13 14 14 10 14 11 12 9 8 12 8 8 10 7 7 9 6 7 6 6

13 27 28 34 19 25 27 21 26 28 19 21 21 13 16 18 9 10 9 13 12 13 8 5 9 10 16 16

77 65 72 75 53 53 54 57 61 56 51 56 53 43 44 41 28 32 28 28 29 30 27 27 25 33 34 35

148 151 156 158 118 119 123 129 129 122 153 153 141 141 139 134 127 128 121 103 101 108 101 98 90 112 108 102

G-6

OSU AG PROGRAM @ EOU New REM students FRESHMAN Fall 2010 Fall 2009 Winter 2010 Spring 2010 Fall 2008 Winter 2009 Spring 2009 Fall 2007 Winter 2008 Spring 2008 Fall 2006 Winter 2007 Spring 2007 Fall 2005 winter 2006 Spring 2006 Fall 2004 Winter 2005 Spring 2005 Fall 2003 Winter 2004 Spring 2004

8 10 6 4 6 1 2 3 4

Transfers

TOTAL 16 13 4 2 10 2 2 6 1

8 2

4 4

2

24 23 10 6 16 3 4 9 0 12 6

2

3 1

5 2

G-7

8 3

Total in Ag Program 45 51 15 9 39 7 6 23 12 1 41 11 5 37 5 1 38 9 2 16 3 2

OSU Campus Undergraduate RNG Class Enrollments. Overall enrollment/Range student enrollment.

G-8

Fall 100 90 80 70 60 OSU

50

EOU 40

Total

30 20 10 0 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

G-9

2007

2008

2009

2010

OSU – Rangeland Admitted Undergraduate Student Characteristics Academic Year Number of Applications Gender Male Female Ethnicity American Indian, Alaskan Native Asian Black Hispanic White Unknown Age 16-20 21-30 31-40 40 and over Resident Non Resident Average GPA Average SAT (Verbal) Average SAT (Math) Average SAT (Written) Average ACT (Math) Average ACT (English) Average ACT (Comp) Average TOEFL7

2001 11 4 7 0

2002 17 8 9 0

2003 12 8 4 0

2004 8 6 2 0

2005 11 8 3 0

2006 12 7 5 2

2007 17 11 6 1

2008 18 10 8 1

2009 21 10 11 2

2010 13 7 6 0

0 0 2 9 0 6 4 1 0 11 0 3.25 520 540 530 15 19 17 n/a

0 0 1 16 0 7 9 1 0 15 2 3.22 560 534 540 18 18 18 n/a

2 0 0 10 0 5 7 0 0 7 5 3.12 498 484 490 21 14 19 n/a

0 0 0 8 0 4 3 1 0 5 3 3.16 524 560 540 n/a n/a n/a n/a

0 0 0 11 0 3 8 0 0 8 3 3.36 523 477 510 22 24 22 n/a

0 0 0 7 3 4 8 0 0 8 4 2.95 540 516 530 17 18 18 n/a

0 0 0 13 3 6 11 0 0 13 4 3.42 503 537 620 n/a n/a n/a n/a

0 0 0 17 0 7 9 0 1 15 3 3.68 447 477 450 24 22 23 n/a

0 0 0 16 3 8 10 1 2 19 2 3.70 558 535 565 18 24 22 n/a

0 1 1 8 3 3 10 0 0 10 3 3.16 522 553 485 24 19 22 n/a

G-10

Range Undergraduate Student Class Standings – OSU and EOU combined GPA Year

Name

Dept. Standing

College Standing

3.86 3.67 3.54 3.54 3.49 3.4 3.31 3.29 3.1 3.02 3.01 3 2.93 2.89 2.81 2.78 2.66 2.33 2.25

Out of 1139 Undergraduate Students in the College 2007 Smergut, Casey John 1 38 2007 Wilkerson, Paul Isaac 2 118 2007 Coons, Kristin Lee 3 183 2007 Mc Claran, Beth Lorene 3 183 2007 Tilden-Browning, Jake 5 218 2007 Sunseri, Anthony Michael 6 275 2007 Jaberg, Jamie Sue 7 332 2007 Boullester, Christine 8 351 2007 Nuss, Cori Elizabeth 9 501 2007 Walker, Alyssa Tiponi 10 577 2007 Noelle, Sarah M 11 579 2007 Sisemore, Jared Orth 12 589 2007 Huff, Aimee Renae 13 640 2007 Hayes, James Roy 14 665 2007 Read, Joshua LeRoy 15 735 2007 Miltenberger, Sheena 16 760 2007 Koogler, KC Scott 17 840 2007 Paulson, Kenneth Dl 18 1016 2007 Lawson, Morgan J 19 1050

3.74 3.52 3.48 3.45 3.3 3.12 3.07 2.96 2.9 2.58

2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009

Out of 1007 Undergraduate Students in the College Hopper, Jessica H 1 96 Mc Claran, Beth L 2 203 Swisher, Garrett W 3 223 Hill, Lloydene Fay 4 240 Rainey, Amanda S 5 338 Silkett, Ashley Erin 6 431 Nuss, Cori Elizabeth 7 460 Kelly, Reid Baily 8 543 Noelle, Sarah M 9 583 Druba, Tiffany Renee 10 761

GPA

Year

3.52 3.5 3.48 3.26 3.16 2.99 2.92 2.9 2.31 2.11

2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008

4 3.95 3.75 3.7 3.38 3.35 3.3 3.27 3.12 3.1

2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010

G-11

Name

Dept. Standing

College Standing

Out of 924 Undergraduate Students in the College Mc Claran, Beth Lorene 1 169 Mc Claran, Margaret L 2 178 Bodily, Trenton Ross 3 191 Hill, Lloydene Fay 4 306 Boullester, Christine Marie 5 371 Nuss, Cori Elizabeth 6 475 Kelly, Reid Baily 7 517 Noelle, Sarah M 8 528 Higgins, Michael Ryan 9 822 Highfield, Michael Thomas 10 880

Out of 1156 Undergraduate Students in the College Mathews, Erin K 1 1 Bristow, Laci Lee 2 30 Hopper, Jessica H 3 100 Norman, Sara Christine 4 130 Swisher, Garrett Wade 5 300 Alex, Sarah Estalin 6 320 Silkett, Ashley Erin 7 355 Boullester, Christine M 8 385 Nuss, Cori Elizabeth 9 502 Kelly, Reid Baily 10 512

GPA Year

Name

Dept. Standing

College Standing

GPA

Year

Name

Dept. Standing

College Standing

Highfield, Michael Forgue, Joshua Maitland Mouw, Wesley James

11 12 13

888 932 1001

3.04 2.99 2.87 2.75 2.61 2.58 2.44 2.42 2.2 2.11

2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010

Jackson, Cassandra Noelle, Sarah M Hill, Sarah Ashley Clapp, Katie Rose Druba, Tiffany Renee Herr, Christopher Dean Perkins, Ricky Allen Bolton, Jesse Jacob Forgue, Joshua Maitland Walkup, Hillary Lauren

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

557 596 681 767 852 876 961 978 1066 1095

2.31 2.17 0.5

2009 2009 2009

4 3.99 3.95 3.76 3.35 3.26 3.22 3.1 3.08 3.08 2.87 2.76 2.68 2.47 2.44 2.38 2.31 2.25 2.17 2.15

Out of 1308 Undergraduate Students in the College 2011 Petersen, Hailey Annice 1 1 2011 Vora, Nicholas R 2 19 2011 Bristow, Laci Lee 3 27 2011 Hopper, Jessica Hailey 4 124 2011 Silkett, Ashley Erin 5 363 2011 Mc Kenzie, Colin Michael 6 438 2011 Swisher, Garrett Wade 7 468 2011 Nuss, Cori Elizabeth 8 571 2011 Alex, Sarah Estalin 9 591 2011 Jackson, Cassandra 9 591 2011 Ring, Rita Ellen 11 750 2011 Druba, Tiffany Renee 12 843 2011 Herr, Christopher Dean 13 912 2011 Perez, Nicole Lucina 14 1047 2011 Cross, Benjamin Frank 15 1069 2011 Campbell, Tygh Leland 16 1102 2011 Forgue, Joshua Maitland 17 1142 2011 Walkup, Hillary Lauren 18 1168 2011 Scruggs, Matthew Aaron 19 1197 2011 Duncan, Chase Douglas 20 1202

G-12

RANGELAND UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT HONORS AND AWARDS – both OSU and EOU Award Outstanding Senior Outstanding Senior Outstanding Senior Outstanding Senior Outstanding Senior Outstanding Senior Outstanding Senior Outstanding Senior Outstanding Senior Outstanding Senior McClintock Scholarship McClintock Scholarship McClintock Scholarship McClintock Scholarship McClintock Scholarship McClintock Scholarship McClintock Scholarship McClintock Scholarship McClintock Scholarship McClintock Scholarship Bedell Internship Bedell Internship Bedell Internship Bedell Internship Bedell Internship Bedell Internship Bedell Internship Bedell Internship Bedell Internship 11

Year 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Student11 Student A Student B Student C Student D Not Awarded Student E Student F Student G Student H Student I Student B Student C Not Awarded Student J Student K Student F Student L Student M Student N Student O Student P Student C Student Q Student R Student T Not Awarded Student U Student V Student W

Do not identify student(s) by name.

G-13

Recognition Certificate Certificate Certificate Certificate Certificate Certificate Certificate Certificate Certificate Certificate Plaque and $500.00 Plaque and $500.00 Plaque and $500.00 Plaque and $500.00 Plaque and $500.00 Plaque and $500.00 Plaque and $500.00 Plaque and $500.00 Plaque and $500.00 Plaque and $500.00 3 terms of paid tuition 3 terms of paid tuition 3 terms of paid tuition 3 terms of paid tuition 3 terms of paid tuition 3 terms of paid tuition 3 terms of paid tuition 3 terms of paid tuition 3 terms of paid tuition

Range Summary of Departmental and College Student Evaluations of Teaching, Fall 2001 – Fall 2010 Departmental Summary of General Teaching Qualities

Term Fall1 2001 Winter1 2002 Spring1 2002 Fall1 2002 Winter1 2003 Spring 2003 Fall 2003 Winter 2004 Spring 2004 Fall 2004 Winter 2005 Spring 2005 Fall 2005 Winter 2006 Spring 2006 Fall 2006

Departmental Summary of General Teaching Qualities – Undergraduate Students Course Instructor’s as a Contribution Whole

Course as a Whole

Instructor’s Contribution

3.77

3.48

3.14

3.46

2.81

3.50

Departmental Summary of General Teaching Qualities – Graduate Students

College Summary of General Teaching Qualities

College Summary of General Teaching Qualities – Undergraduate Students Course Instructor’s as a Contribution Whole

College Summary of General Teaching Qualities – Graduate Students

Course as a Whole

Instructor’s Contribution

Course as a Whole

3.69

3.51

3.65

3.53

3.52

3.55

3.0

3.35

3.71

3.19

3.44

3.46

3.46

3.27

3.58

3.28

3.82

3.50

3.52

3.56

3.66

3.70

3.70

3.70

3.82

3.62

3.70

3.55

3.5

3.6

3.53

3.64

3.54

3.42

3.74

3.56

3.5

3.48

3.66

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

4.0

4.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

6.0

5.5

6.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.5

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.2

5.0

5.0

6.0

5.0

6.0

5.0

5.5

5.0

6.0

5.0

5.0

5.2

5.0

5.0

5.0

4.8

5.0

4.8

5.1

5.1

5.0

4.9

5.2

4.8

5.1

5.1

5.3

4.9

5.3

4.8

5.3

5.1

5.1

5.0

5.3

4.9

5.1

5.2

5.6

4.9

5.3

5.0

5.2

5.4

5.7

4.8

5.1

4.8

5.0

5.1

5.2

5.0

5.3

5.1

5.2

5.2

5.5

5.0

5.1

4.9

5.1

5.3

5.4

4.5

5.1

4.7

5.0

4.3

4.5

4.9

5.1

4.9

5.1

5.1

5.5

5.0

5.1

5.2

4.9

5.1

4.8

4.9

5.1

4.9

5.0

5.2

5.2

5.1

5.5

5.1

5.2

5.7

5.8

4.9

5.2

4.8

5.1

5.2

5.4

G-14

Instructor’s Contribution

Course as a Whole

Instructor’s Contribution

Departmental Summary of General Teaching Qualities

Term Winter 2007 Spring 2007 Fall 2007 Winter 2008 Spring 2008 Fall 2008 Winter 2009 Spring 2009 Fall 2009 Winter 2010 Spring 2010 Fall 2010 1

Departmental Summary of General Teaching Qualities – Undergraduate Students Course Instructor’s as a Contribution Whole

Course as a Whole

Instructor’s Contribution

4.5

4.8

4.7

5.0

5.5

4.7

Departmental Summary of General Teaching Qualities – Graduate Students

College Summary of General Teaching Qualities

College Summary of General Teaching Qualities – Undergraduate Students Course Instructor’s as a Contribution Whole

Course as a Whole

Instructor’s Contribution

Course as a Whole

Instructor’s Contribution

4.6

4.3

4.2

4.9

5.1

4.5

5.2

5.6

5.3

5.6

4.8

5.0

4.9

5.0

4.6

5.0

5.0

4.9

4.8

5.1

5.1

5.0

5.1

5.0

4.5

4.6

4.4

4.5

4.8

4.7

5.0

4.6

4.9

4.9

5.1

4.8

4.4

4.6

5.0

College Summary of General Teaching Qualities – Graduate Students Course as a Whole

Instructor’s Contribution

5.0

5.0

5.2

4.7

5.0

5.2

5.4

5.2

4.8

5.1

5.0

5.2

5.0

5.2

4.9

5.2

5.2

5.3

4.9

4.8

5.1

4.8

5.1

5.1

5.4

5.8

5.9

4.9

5.1

4.8

5.1

5.2

5.5

5.1

5.0

5.2

5.0

5.3

5.0

5.3

5.2

5.4

4.4

4.5

5.5

5.8

4.7

5.0

4.7

4.9

5.2

5.3

5.4

4.9

5.4

5.3

5.8

5.1

5.3

5.0

5.3

5.1

5.4

5.4

5.6

5.3

5.5

5.8

5.9

4.9

5.2

4.9

5.1

5.5

5.6

5.4

5.7

5.4

5.6

5.4

5.7

4.9

5.1

4.9

5.1

5.1

5.3

4.9

5.2

4.9

5.2

n/a

n/a

5.0

5.3

5.0

5.2

5.3

5.6

Scored on a 0-4

G-15

Accreditation Standard VII: University Credentials and Support University Credentials and Accreditation Oregon State University has always been a place with a purpose — making a positive difference in quality of life, natural resources and economic prosperity in Oregon and beyond. Through discovery, innovation and application, we are meeting challenges, solving problems and turning ideas into reality. Founded in 1868, Oregon State is the state’s Land Grant university and is one of only two universities in the U.S. to have Sea Grant, Space Grant and Sun Grant designations. Oregon State is also the only university in Oregon to have earned the Carnegie Foundation’s top designation, awarded to institutions with “very high research activity.” As Oregon’s largest public research university, with a record $275 million in external research funding in 2009-10, Oregon State’s impact reaches across the state and beyond. With 12 colleges, 15 Agricultural Experiment Stations, 35 county Extension offices, the Hatfield Marine Sciences Center in Newport and OSU-Cascades Campus in Bend, Oregon State has a presence in every one of Oregon’s 36 counties, with a statewide economic footprint of $1.5 billion. Oregon State welcomes a diverse student body of nearly 24,000 students from across Oregon, all 50 states and more than 100 countries. They can choose from more than 200 undergraduate and more than 80 graduate degree programs, including over 20 degrees offered online. Oregon State increasingly attracts high-achieving students, with nationally recognized programs in areas such as conservation biology, agricultural sciences, nuclear engineering, forestry, fisheries and wildlife management, community health, pharmacy and zoology. Oregon State also ranks high in sustainability, fourth among universities nationwide for using renewable energy and first in the Pac-10 Conference. And our students literally help power the university: 22 exercise machines at Dixon Recreation Center are connected to the grid. The 400-acre main campus in Corvallis includes a Historic District, making Oregon State one of only a handful of U.S. university campuses listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The district includes such icons as Weatherford Hall, the Memorial Union and Benton Hall, the oldest building on campus. Accreditation Oregon State University is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. The university is authorized by the Oregon State Board of Higher Education to offer undergraduate-, postbaccalaureate-, and graduate-level certificates, as well as baccalaureate, master’s, doctorate, and first professional degrees. A full university accreditation was conducted in 2001. H-1

Link to Oregon State University web site: http://oregonstate.edu Link to College of Agricultural Sciences web site: http://agsci.oregonstate.edu Link to the Rangeland Ecology and Management web site: http://oregonstate.edu/dept/range

OSU Libraries OSU Libraries has nearly 2 million volumes. We add approximately 20,000 monographs annually and purchase approximately 34,000 current serials. Recognizing the desire of students and faculty to have 24×7 access to information, the Libraries is rapidly shifting from a print collection to a digital one. As of 2009, the Libraries provided access to more than 250 databases and 71,972 unique electronic journal titles. This increase in coverage corresponds with an increase in usage. In 2005, there were 1,852,533 searches performed in 113 databases. In 2009, usage increased to 4,083,486 searches in 225 databases. In addition to database and e-journals, the Libraries continues to add electronic books to the collection. In 2005 the number of e-books was 2,986. By 2009 the number was at 20,547 and trends support an increase in 2010. As students and faculty become more comfortable with e-books, their use increases. In 2000 over 20,547 electronic books were downloaded. These resources may be accessed remotely through the OSU Libraries homepage. OSU Libraries is a member of the Orbis/Cascades Alliance which includes 36 Washington and Oregon universities, colleges and community colleges with total holdings of 9.2 million titles. Membership in the Alliance not only expands access to information but also provides OSU Libraries with significant ability to leverage its collection dollars, participate in innovative programs, and offer library faculty and staff developmental opportunities. Membership in the Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA) in addition to enabling us to leverage buying power, provides opportunities to increase our digital presence through such sites as the Western Waters Digital Library. GWLA, a consortium of 32 research libraries from 17 Midwestern & Western states, also enhances our services and programs related to interlibrary loan and scholarly communication. As libraries move away from ownership to access, membership in consortia becomes a critical factor in giving our faculty and students a wide variety of information in a timely and efficient manner. Finally, consortia membership gives us the ability to provide in-depth support to those programs that are important to the University but are not within the three signature areas. OSU Library Collections specific to Rangeland Ecology and management are listed in Appendix 5, pages 7-19

H-2

Rangeland Ecology and Management - Teaching and Research Labs A list of current teaching and research rooms and facilities is provided in Appendix 5, pages 1-4 EOU The OSU Agriculture Program, including the Range Program, at EOU are housed in a state-of-the-art science complex, Badgley Hall. The teaching and research labs are in excellent condition. EOARC The OSU Agriculture Program at EOU and the Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center (EOARC Burns and Union) are being merged into an administrative unit. The merger will enhance opportunities for students to access research facilities at the experiment stations, particularly at Union. The merger will also enhance student access to OSU, ARS, and Forest Service research scientists associated with the Experiment Station. EOARC contains two separate fully functional rangeland livestock research stations. The Union Station was Oregon State University’s first branch research station (established in 1901). The station’s primary mission is to conduct research unique to beef production in the intermountain west. The Union Station contains the oldest “university owned” agroforestry research sites and is uniquely suited to address long-term sustainability questions relative to domestic livestock grazing and subsequent impacts on wildlife and vegetation diversity on forested rangelands. In recent years, threatened and endangered species (including Chinook salmon, bull trout and steelhead) and a rapid increase in predators (including mountain lion, bear and wolves) has created a significant research need to address the issues these changes create for agriculture in the region. The Burns Station is similar to the Union Station in terms of facilities and resources, but, is located in an entirely different ecosystem. The “sagebrush steppe” or Great Basin region extends from Southeastern Oregon to southern Wyoming and extends south through most of Nevada and Utah. This region is often referred to as the “cold desert” and is dominated by high elevation rangelands (greater than 1000 meters) and annual precipitation that is highly variable and often less than 20 cm per year. As a result, this region is challenged by limited and variable forage resources. The region has substantial issues with invasive species that include native species such as Juniper and Sagebrush, as well as, non-natives such as cheatgrass, medusahead, knapweeds and perennial pepperweed . Both research stations have a long history of providing research that is specific to their region but recognized on a national and international basis. These locations have demonstrated proactive research programs in multi-disciplinary, multi-agency research for the past 3 decades. In addition, the branch stations have a long history of conducting H-3

research that addressed the interface of domestic livestock grazing and biodiversity long before these became known as a challenging issue for public and private rangeland management throughout the western United States. Both stations have long-term cooperative relationships with the USDA. The Burns Station has a strong partnership with the USDA Agricultural Research Service with 8 USDA ARS research scientists stationed on-site that are conducting rangeland ecology research in the Great Basin. OSU faculties at the Burns Station provide the beef cattle research component to the rangeland ecology research. The Union Station, in turn, has a strong partnership with the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station in La Grande. This is particularly evident in the collaboration that has developed with the Starkey Project. That partnership with federal wildlife and forest ecologists has allowed Station faculty to craft a unique team that addresses difficult questions plaguing the long-term management of forested rangelands and the agriculture communities located in the mountain valleys throughout the western US. OSU On the OSU campus in Corvallis, Strand Agriculture Hall, current home of REM, is scheduled to undergo seismic upgrade within the next year or so. As a result of the expected need to vacate space within Strand to facilitate the seismic work, the Range Program will move to Withycombe Hall to be co-located with Animal Science faculty in the Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences. Office space for faculty should not be an issue, at least initially. However, teaching space and suitable labs may be an issue. The College of Agricultural Sciences has committed to upgrading Withycombe, including labs, as budgets allow. Construction on the new Oldfield Education and Research Pavilion will begin as soon as the ground dries enough to permit construction activities. The facility will provide new, excellent teaching labs for both Animal and Rangeland Sciences. It should be completed for use beginning Fall 2012. The Oldfield Education and Research Pavilion provides a teaching laboratory, classrooms, an arena, and avian laboratories for teaching, research and outreach; a metabolism barn providing housing for animals used in research and teaching; and an Ag Education and Farm Service Shop providing shop teaching support for General Agriculture –Agriculture Education and support services to AnRS Farms. Support for teaching, research, and extension functions of the department requires a variety of facilities both on and off campus. Current facilities on or near campus include: Soap Creek Ranch, Berry Creek Ranch, and field units supporting dairy, horse, poultry, sheep, and swine. These facilities provide research opportunities for pasture management; forage utilization, sustainable use; riparian grazing management; feeding trials; pasture-based dairy; animal behavior (including diet modification); in addition to animal science specific programs. Student employment and internship opportunities are available for hands-on class projects for departmental and interdepartmental courses; and potential for ongoing student group projects related to pasture improvement and management.

H-4

Strategic Plan Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences (AnRS) 2011 - 2016 Introduction The Strategic Plan was prepared by the faculties of the Departments of Animal Science and Rangeland Ecology and Management. The two departments will be merged into the Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences (AnRS) effective July 1, 2011. This merger fits within the College of Agricultural Sciences strategic restructuring plan as part of the overall OSU restructuring process. The OSU and College intent is to achieve optimum configuration to make the best use of Oregon’s investments in providing academic programs, conducting research, and delivering Extension and outreach. The intent of merging the Departments of Animal Sciences and Rangeland Ecology and Management into the Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences is to enhance synergy among faculty in livestock production, animal welfare and behavior, and forage management to deliver programs that stakeholders value and depend upon for the economic viability of their businesses. AnRS will also continue to provide teaching, research, and outreach activities related to the companion animal industry, equine science, and arid and semi-arid ecosystem structure, function, and management. Each department has been an integral part of Oregon State University and the College of Agricultural Sciences for many years. The Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences will continue to be an integral component of Oregon State University and the College of Agricultural Sciences. Animal Sciences include companion animal and livestock production emphases, both of which contribute substantially to Oregon’s economy. The program provides both a science track, which prepares students for veterinary school or graduate school, and an animal management track, which prepares students for careers oriented to careers in animal management or animal related industries. Rangelands are important to the economy of Oregon and the lifestyle of its citizens. The majority of Oregon’s land (87%) is currently in rangeland or forest. The half of this wildland that is rangeland is mostly grazed by livestock as is about a quarter of the forestland. Integration of range and forest management principles is a common practice and multiple use management is the norm for Oregon’s land. About half of the state is public land and about 60% of the non-forested rangeland is public land. The majority of Oregon’s rangelands lie east of the Cascades in the arid and semi-arid environments of central and eastern Oregon. Departmental programs in this area emphasize the discovery of new knowledge and the development of sustainable management strategies focused on arid and semi arid ecosystem structure and function. West of the Cascade Mountains the rangelands have a different character than the intermountain types of eastern Oregon. The climate in western Oregon is mild and precipitation is high (30+ inches per year). 1-1

Departmental programs in this area emphasize the 3 million acres suitable for intensive livestock production and the interface of animal grazing in high yielding commercial forest lands. In addition to the above emphasis areas historically provided by the two departments, the Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences will provide a focus on forage production which is critical to livestock production in Oregon and has not received adequate attention due to distributed responsibilities. Mission Statement and Vision Mission: The Department of Animal & Rangeland Sciences contributes to the statewide mission of Oregon State University through innovative research, instruction of Baccalaureate, Master’s and Ph.D. students and by providing formal and informal instruction of the citizens of Oregon. Research: The Department discovers, develops and disseminates new knowledge about the biology, production and care of domestic animals, animal agribusiness and the structure, function and sustainable use of Oregon’s rangelands. Research is designed to solve Oregon, regional and global problems while elucidating fundamental principles and knowledge. Education: The Department educates and trains students in the science of animal biology, rangeland ecology, and sustainable management so they can become leaders in agricultural or allied industries, managerial and regulatory agencies, research-based institutions, the companion animal industry, and post-graduate programs of study. Outreach: The Department develops, synthesizes and disseminates knowledge that addresses the needs of the citizens of Oregon to make timely, informed decisions related to animal use, human-animal interactions and management of rangeland. Vision The Animal and Rangeland Sciences Department at Oregon State University will:   1. Address research issues in Oregon that relate to animal agriculture, grazing land ecology and sustainable management of arid lands and pasture systems. 2. Provide a center of excellence for sustainable range livestock production, environmental and ecosystem protection of rangelands, and management of ecosystem services provided by rangelands. 3. Develop new processes and technologies for profitable and environmentallyfriendly dairy cattle production and management. 1-2

4. Advance knowledge and improve fundamental understanding of animal reproductive biology. 5. Advance the science of nutritional metabolism of animals. 6. Discover and disseminate principles of animal behavior through the study of both range livestock and companion animals.  7. Provide student training, research and support to the companion animal industry. Goals At a combined faculty retreat during August 16-17, 2010, five goals were adopted for the Animal and Rangeland Sciences Department. Goal 1: Create a Center of Excellence for Ecological Land and Animal Management in the Mountain West. Through its current faculty on the OSU campus in Corvallis, the College of Agriculture Program at Eastern Oregon University in LaGrande, the Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center in Burns and Union, and in county Extension offices, the department has substantial expertise to address this goal. We have expertise in range animal nutrition, production systems, and behavior; and rangeland ecosystem structure, function, and management. Collectively we have established collaborative working relationships with researchers, teachers, and Extension faculty in surrounding states. Our department has the expertise and critical mass to be the lead institution in the Mountain West for range animal production. We are the only department in the OUS system that provides a focus on the ecology and management of arid and semi-arid ecosystems which comprise over 50% of Oregon’s land base. Goal 2: Strengthen collaborative teaching, extension, and research opportunities across disciplines with OSU, other schools of higher education in Oregon and other universities in the Mountain West. Declining state support for higher education, including for OSU, will require collaborative efforts within and beyond OSU to address teaching, research, and outreach needs inherent in the Land-Grand mission of Oregon State University. Other OUS institutions and state supported institutions in surrounding states are suffering from similar deficiencies of state support. It is imperative that we find ways to collaborate with other departments, colleges, universities, and federal research agencies to address these needs. Discussions and collaborative efforts have been ongoing with regional universities and federal research agencies, but much more is possible. Within the OSU system we will forge collaborative efforts with the School of Horticulture, Crop, Soil, and Insect Sciences; the Linus Pauling Institute; Departments of Fish and Wildlife, Food Science, Zoology, and Biochemistry; Colleges of Veterinary Medicine and Forestry; and Branch Experiment Stations. These collaborations will address primarily teaching and research needs. 1-3

Within the OUS system, several areas of potential collaboration have been identified. Portland State University has programs that address aquatic weeds and riparian restoration. The University of Oregon has strengths in global warming and social impacts of natural resource issues. OHSU has programs that are relevant to animal diseases. Community Colleges provide an opportunity for students to take courses that apply to core curricula. They can then apply to OSU (including at EOU and OSU Cascades) with many of the core course requirements already completed. Western Oregon has a unique environment suitable for pasture based grazing systems in addition to irrigated forage production throughout the state, The Animal and Rangeland Sciences Department can be a catalyst and become the center of a nationally recognized program in forage based production systems within the Mountain West. Within the Mountain West we have numerous existing and potential collaborators in areas of invasive weed ecology, management, and control; rangeland ecosystem ecology, structure, function, and management issues; sustainable food systems; and livestock production, including dairy, programs. Academic institutions include Universities of Alaska, Idaho, Nevada-Reno, Utah and Washington; Washington State University; and U.C. Davis. The USDA Agricultural Research Service has programs in Burns, OR, Reno, NV, and Dubois, ID that are relevant to our programs and can collaborate on both research and graduate education. Goal 3: Competitive undergraduate curriculum serving a broad student population by providing tracks emphasizing basic science and management. On the OSU campus in Corvallis, our department has the teaching and research pavilion and Equine facilities to provide a high quality education for students interested in qualifying for veterinary school, companion animal related careers, and equine science. With an investment in tenure-track faculty positions, the department can become a regional center of excellence in these areas. Our students come from diverse backgrounds and are pursuing an education that will take them in diverse directions in their post-graduate careers. We provide a science track that helps students prepare for acceptance into a veterinary medicine or other graduate programs. We provide a management track, with a science basis, that prepares students for employment with a Bachelor of Science degree in a wide variety of fields ranging from companion animal oriented disciplines, to qualifying as range conservationists for federal land management agencies, to managing agricultural based enterprises. We will provide a variety of opportunities for hands-on learning. The use of domestic animals in laboratory learning experiences is a unique and important part of the curriculum. Herds and flocks of beef and dairy cattle, sheep, horses, poultry and a small 1-4

swine herd are maintained. Several classes incorporate field trips for students to apply in an on-the-ground field setting what they have been learning in the classroom. Some field trips are relatively close but still require transportation. Others (e.g. range courses) are in central and eastern Oregon and are logistically challenging and require transportation. We are developing internship programs for students to get more extensive hands-on learning in clinics, in industry, in production agriculture environments, and in agency settings. Field trips, laboratory sections, and internships require funding. We will engage in fund raising and assess laboratory fees to cover these costs. The Curriculum Committee assesses current course offerings, prerequisites, and electives to make sure students are receiving the appropriate level of science based learning as well as opportunities to improve speaking and writing skills and develop professionalism. Our students have an opportunity to become competitive for post-graduate education and for employment. Faculty will be involved in advising, with staff support, to provide guidance for students to be on track to achieve their education goals and to help them become as competitive as possible for their future endeavors. Undergraduate education will address the following considerations: -

-

-

-

-

-

Undergraduate education for Animal Science majors will emphasize: exposure to all industry segments (conception to consumption) and to all species; business skills and marketing; and production management.  Core Animal Science curriculum will continue to be a strong basic grounding for all students in the biological core of physiology, nutrition and metabolism, and animal genetics.  Through advising continually inform Animal Science undergraduate students about the broad range of options open to them in addition to Vet School.  Advise all undergraduate management-track majors to take Rangeland Ecology and Management (intro course), Plant Identification, and Rangeland Analysis.  Undergraduate curriculum for Range majors will qualify students for the federal government OPM GS-454 Range Conservationist rating.  All undergraduate education will stress broad based problem solving; leadership development; communications, including writing, speaking, and human relations; and a balance of classroom and out-of-class activities.  Maintain a strong undergraduate advising program with faculty available to students.  Develop a pool of non-tenure-track faculty to cover several of the higher demand courses. These faculty could be eligible for professorial as well as instructor rank.

1-5

-

Develop a position for an Internship Coordinator. Increase opportunities for internships. Develop and implement the Silvies Ranch Internship program, which is under development as of this writing (November 2010).

Goal 4: Graduate programs that provide the training and experience to generate the future leaders and resource managers needed by our disciplines and stakeholder groups. Our graduate programs have produced graduates who have moved on to successful careers, including many in leadership positions, in academia, industry, government, and international programs. Over the years our graduates have been very satisfied with their graduate education. Currently (2010-2011) our ability to provide graduate level courses to support a quality graduate program has been diminished through loss of faculty to transfers and retirements without the resources to fill behind vacant positions. This constraint is being partially addressed through initiation of recruitment for a new department head with up to five additional faculty lines. Specific graduate level courses will be offered through the department, but will be augmented by courses from related disciplines and supporting disciplines such as Statistics. Graduate only courses offered through the department include: Wildland Plant Ecophysiology, Range Ecology, Lipid Metabolism, Hormone Action, and Biology of Mammalian Reproduction, Review of Applied Ruminant Research Techniques, Biology of Lactation. Senior/Graduate (4XX/5XX) courses offered through the department include: Wildland Restoration and Ecology, Rangeland Analysis, Rangeland-Animal Relations, Rangeland Management Planning, Digestive Physiology and Nutrition of Ruminant Animals, Monogastric and Poultry Nutrition, Comparative Nutrition of Domestic and Wild Animals, Equine Systems I: Exercise Science, Equine Systems II: Nutrition, Equine systems III: Reproduction, Poultry Meat Production Systems, Egg Production Systems, Applied Animal Behavior, Sheep Production Systems, Dairy Production Systems, Topics in Animal Learning, Beef Production Systems, Livestock Housing and Waste Management, Animal Breeding and Genetics, Consensus and Natural Resources, Toxicants and Poisonous Plants. Some of our graduate program needs can be addressed through interdepartmental or interdisciplinary degrees. The Rangeland Program can take advantage of the planned Plant Sciences Graduate program once it is in place for graduate students with a primary focus on arid and semi-arid plants and plant community dynamics. It might be possible to select graduate students to participate in the Ecosystem Informatics Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (EIIGERT). Students with an Animal Science focus might be able to participate in the Molecular and Cellular Biology program or the Linus Pauling Institute. For other students an Environmental Sciences integrated graduate program, Professional Science Masters degree programs, or a Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies (MAIS) might be appropriate avenues to pursue.

1-6

The department and the College of Agricultural Sciences have been exploring opportunities to collaborate with Washington State University and the University of Idaho to provide graduate courses for students across the universities. To provide quality graduate programs, the department must have graduate faculty to provide excellence in specific research areas. To achieve excellence in research areas it is necessary to prioritize research emphases. Research areas for which we should be known and priority research disciplines: Research Areas: - Sustainable range livestock production   - Environmental and ecosystem protection of rangelands  Management of ecosystem services provided by rangelands  - Processes and technologies for profitable and environmentally friendly dairy cattle production and management  - Sustainable pasture and forage based livestock production systems.  - Animal reproduction biology  - Animal behavior for both range livestock and companion animals  - Companion animal industry.  Priority Research Discipline Areas: - Avian nutrition and metabolism  - Bovine and avian reproductive biology  - Dairy pre- and post-partum cow nutrition and management  - Beef cattle nutrition and management  - Environmental quality related to livestock production (e.g. air quality, odor control, waste management)  - Use of harvested forage for livestock production  - Pasture management (grazing management, fertilization, etc.)  - Animal welfare  - Food safety of animal products  - Animal behavior  o Intensive grazing – pasture environments  o Extensive grazing - rangeland environments (seasonal forage quality and quantity, water availability and distribution, topography, predator impacts, etc.)  o Companion animal  - Watershed structure and function (arid and semi-arid environments)  - Riparian ecology, function, management (with respect to livestock use)  - Invasive species ecology and management  - Restoration ecology (arid and semi-arid systems)  - Use of livestock for vegetation management (targeted grazing).  1-7

Goal 5: An effective collaboration of research and teaching faculty with county and state extension faculty to develop integrated research and extension programs that provide relevant and timely information addressing national, state, and local issues important to our stakeholders. The department consists of research, teaching, and extension faculty housed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, the EOU campus in LaGrande, Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center at Burns and Union, and in Extension offices throughout the state. We have the critical mass and expertise to be pre-eminent in range-livestock systems throughout the Mountain West. We have the opportunity to collaborate with federal research scientists and university faculty throughout the West to address national and regional issues as discussed in Goal 2 above. We have the opportunity to collaborate among ourselves within Oregon to address state and local issues important to our stakeholders. We will collaborate in all three phases of the Land Grant mission. Experiment Station and county based faculty can contribute to research and teaching programs on campus. Campus-based faculty can contribute to research and outreach activities through collaboration with Station and county based faculty. For this to occur Information Technology needs must be adequately supported. Programs can be broadcast live via polycom and internet based programs such as Skype or other existing and developing media. It is critical that we actively collaborate and support each other. Senior faculty will mentor and support junior faculty to help facilitate tenure and promotion through collaborating on research, publications, and other scholarly activities. Each faculty member should contribute periodically to a departmental newsletter with a short article on their program. With current communications technologies, communications among departmental faculty should be prioritized and emphasized to build and foster an atmosphere of community. Faculty meetings can be scheduled for when off-campus faculty are in Corvallis for Outreach and Engagement functions and otherwise open to off-campus faculty via polycom and Skype, or similar technologies. Areas with high potential for collaboration among research and extension faculty within the department include: -

-

Animal management: nutrition, health/biosecurity, genetics and reproduction, animal care and welfare, and behavior. Plant ecology and management: forages (fertility, species variety, irrigation), invasive species (weeds, diseases, insects), plant communities (rangelands – native and altered, riparian, disturbance regimes, management), harvest management (grazing systems, conserved forages – hay, silage), bi-product utilization, renewable energy production and development (biofuels and biomass). Contemporary issues: local and state government, animal care and use, Endangered Species Act, Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, agencies (land management, regulatory) programs and policies.

1-8

-

Enterprise management (practical application and understanding of plant and animal science (management), and contemporary issues in an entrepreneurial setting): personnel, resource, economic.

Departmental Committees AnRS will maintain standing committees identified below, with additional committees formed on an ad hoc basis as needed. Animal Care and Safety Committee Reviews the Department’s animal care facilities and reports to the Department Head. The committee will also liaison with University committees. Computer Committee Reviews and makes recommendations for computer hardware and software needs to AnRS, FST, and FW Departments. Distinguished Alumnus/Distinguished Service Committee Advises the Department head of suggested nominees and prepares nomination materials. Faculty/Staff Awards Committee Makes recommendations and helps prepare materials for appropriate faculty/staff awards. Develops process for Classified and Exempt staff awards. Farms Committee Coordinates forage harvest, makes recommendations to Department Head on land assignments and utilization, prioritizes repair and maintenance and equipment purchases. Graduate Committee Review and advise the Department Head on acceptance of potential graduate students. Review and recommend to the faculty graduate student policy. Outreach and Engagement Committee Advise the Department Head of issues related to CAS Extension programming and Extension Administration. Provide Extension programming coordination as appropriate. Scholarships/Student Awards Committee

1-9

Receive applications and recommend departmental scholarships and other student awards for both undergraduate and graduate students.

Seminar Committee Organize departmental seminars. Social Committee Plan and organize departmental social functions including a fall and spring family gathering, a Winter Holiday party, AnRS Welcome BBQ for students, Withycombe Club Spring Awards Dinner, summer barbeques, and other events as appropriate. Teaching/Curriculum Committee Review and recommend to the faculty the courses and curriculum for the AnRS teaching program. Departmental Advisory Committee AnRS will form an Advisory Committee consisting of representatives of alumni, stakeholder groups and organizations, and employers. Committee members will serve 3years terms with optional renewal for an additional term. Terms will be staggered so that approximately 1/3 of the membership will be subject to replacement each year. The committee will meet at least annually with the option of meeting more often if needed. The Advisory Committee will advise the Department Head on staffing priorities, curricular needs and research and Extension priorities. The Department Head will be responsible for communicating with the Advisory Committee via semi-annual reports. The Department Head and the Chair of the Advisory Committee will develop the agenda for and identify the location of committee meetings. The Department Head will arrange the logistics for the committee meeting through AnRS staff.

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) through 2016 The KPIs identified below address the College of Agricultural Sciences Mission, Values, and Emphases. CAS Mission The College of Agricultural Sciences at Oregon State University is Oregon's principal source of knowledge relating to agricultural and food systems, and a major source of 1-10

knowledge regarding environmental quality, natural resources, life sciences, and rural economies and communities worldwide. The College provides undergraduate and graduate education leading to baccalaureate and graduate degrees, and extended education programs throughout Oregon and beyond. Its research programs create knowledge to solve problems and to build a knowledge base for the future. It is a source of information and expertise in integrating and applying knowledge with benefits that are felt in domestic and international settings. CAS Values The College of Agricultural Sciences reflects these values: -

Responsiveness to the needs of those it serves; Partnership and cooperation with individuals, organizations, businesses, and agencies outside the University; Teamwork and coordination among its units and with other units at the University; Credibility as a source of reliable, research-based information and education.

CAS Emphases To carry out its mission in a manner consistent with University goals, the College of Agricultural Sciences supports teaching, research, and extension in the basic and applied sciences essential for the education of new generations of students and clients to advance these areas of emphasis: -

New value-added products and markets that leverage the economic contributions of Oregon agriculture. Natural resources management and policy through discovery and learning to improve understanding of nature as a system. Integrated management systems that help assure economically sustainable, environmentally sound agriculture.

1-11

AnRS KPIs: 1. Undergraduate Education a. Offer both Animal Science and Rangeland Science majors. The Animal Science major will have both science and management options. The Rangeland Science major will not have formal options. b. Maintain the Animal Science major at 420 students. c. Increase Range undergraduate majors to at least 25 in the Corvallis program. d. Increase to, then maintain, a 3-year running average of 80 (at least 40 upper division, registered through OSU) Range majors in the CAS Agriculture Program at EOU (Eastern Oregon Agricultural Unit). e. Continue to offer an Animal Science minor in the CAS Agriculture Program at EOU (Eastern Oregon Agricultural Unit). f. Undergraduate curriculum for Range majors will qualify students for the federal government OPM GS-454 Range Conservationist rating. g. Meet or exceed OSU goals for first year retention (85%) and six year graduation rate (65%). 2. Graduate Education a. Through Priority Staffing, get approval for positions and recruit faculty to fill vacant positions to be able to offer graduate training in signature areas of: animal reproductive physiology; ruminant and non-ruminant nutrition and metabolism; animal behavior; wildland restoration ecology; riparian/watershed hydrology and ecology. Dean Ramaswamy has promised 5 faculty lines to the new department head. Refer to KPI #8 below for priorities. 3. Fundamental and applied research a. Over the next 5 years, develop a plan to balance fundamental (discovery, returned overhead) and application (problem solving, stakeholder driven, low or no returned overhead) research that addresses issues important to Oregon and the region. i. Develop collaborative proposals for NIH, NSF, etc. grants (fundamental) ii. Develop collaborative proposals for USDA-NIFA grants (fundamental and applied) iii. Continue to address industry identified issues via industry funded projects (applied) b. Develop collaborative research programs among disciplines within OSU and with researchers at other research organizations (e.g. ARS) and institutions. Each

1-12

faculty member should be participating in either research or outreach as part of at least 2 externally funded collaborative research projects. 4. Outreach (Extension): a. The Department Head or designee will appoint mentoring committees for new Extension faculty. b. The Department Head or designee will provide Promotion and Tenure support for Extension faculty with an AnRS tenure home. c. The Department Head or designee will work with the CAS Extension Program Leader and Extension Administration to foster collaborative PROF reviews for Extension faculty. d. The Department Head or designee will work with Extension and Research faculty to foster collaborative research programs where feasible and appropriate, including identifying grant opportunities and helping with grant writing. e. The Department Head will support teaching and research faculty travel to participate in off-campus extension programs when feasible and appropriate. 5. Maintain relationship with the Eastern Oregon Agricultural Unit at LaGrande/Union. a. Ensure that a Rangeland Science major and Animal Science minor are offered and supported at EOU b. Provide academic home for statewide Animal and Rangeland Sciences faculty c. Collaborate on research projects d. Provide courses both directions, when feasible, via television technology 6. Coordination/collaboration with EOARC Burns and Union a. Beef Extension Specialist located at EOARC Burns. b. Beef cattle nutrition and management research programs primarily located at EOARC in Burns and Union. c. Collaborate with ARS scientists at EOARC Burns on range ecology related research programs. d. Coordinate and collaborate with ARS scientists at Burns to provide extension/outreach programming. 7. Department farms/ranches/facilities (refer to Appendix 4) a. The Department Head, selected faculty, and unit managers will develop Strategic Plans for each unit to guide operations and investments for improvements based on teaching, research, and extension (outreach) objectives for each. A Strategic Plan for each will be developed and approved by July 1, 2012. See a listing and description in Appendix 4 for each of the units existing and under development. 1-13

8. Faculty and Staff positions (refer to KPI 2 above and Appendices 1 and 2 below for background information) a. Tenure/tenure-track – highest priority for new department head i. Dairy Production and Management (pasture-based systems/carbon sequestration) ii. Riparian/Watershed Hydrology and Ecology b. Tenure/tenure-track – 2nd level priority for new department head i. Environmental Systems/Nutrient Management ii. Range Ecology/Invasive species iii. Animal Welfare/Bioethics c. Tenure/tenure track – future needs i. Dairy Reproduction (Withycombe Chair) ii. Animal Product Safety (would be with Food Science and/or Microbiology) iii. Functional Genomics d. Fixed-term Instructor/Professorial teaching positions i. Maintain a pool and fill as needed to cover courses e. Extension i. Campus/Experiment Station/Regional Specialists 1. Dairy specialist – western Oregon emphasis – currently open, high priority to fill when funding available 2. Beef specialist – based at EOARC-Burns – currently filled by R. Cooke – high priority to maintain 3. Range specialist – campus based, could move to central/eastern Oregon location after Borman retires currently filled by Borman at 0.5 FTE – high priority should be increased to at least 0.75 FTE when funding available, 4. Small ruminant/pasture management specialist – campus based – currently filled by Thompson - high priority to maintain, Peters to replace Thompson at retirement ii. County-based faculty 1. At least maintain current distribution of livestock/range/natural resources positions. f. Faculty Research Assistants i. Maintain current positions ii. Expand as resources allow g. Farm/facility management (refer to Appendix 4) i. Full-time managers are needed for each farm/facility 1-14

ii. Identify which units require permanent full or part-time employees for animal care and/or facility maintenance. Staff appropriately. iii. Use student labor/interns to the extent possible to provide both necessary labor and hands-on experience.

1-15

OSU is on a Term (Quarter Credit) system. To convert from semester to quarter credit hours, multiply the semester credits by 1.5 to calculate quarter credits (3 semester hours x 1.5 = 4.5 quarter credit hours). To convert OSU quarter credits to semester credit hours, multiply the number of quarter credits by .67 to calculate semester credits (4 quarter credit hours x .67 = 2.68 semester hours). 5 Quarter Credit Hours = 3.35 Semester 4 Quarter Credit Hours = 2.68 Semester 3 Quarter Credit Hours = 2 Semester 2 Quarter Credit Hours = 1.34 Semester 1 Quarter Credit Hour = .67 Semester

 

2‐1   

Requirements for an Office of Personnel Management GS-454 (Range Conservationist) rating are: A. Degree: range management; or a related discipline that included at least 42 semester hours in a combination of the plant, animal, and soil sciences, and natural resources management, as follows: o Range Management -- At least 18 semester hours of course work in range management, including courses in such areas as basic principles of range management, range plants, range ecology, range inventories and studies, range improvements, and ranch or rangeland planning. o Directly Related Plant, Animal, and Soil Sciences -- At least 15 semester hours of directly related courses in the plant, animal, and soil sciences, including at least one course in each of these three scientific areas. Courses in such areas as plant taxonomy, plant physiology, plant ecology, animal nutrition, livestock production, and soil morphology or soil classification are acceptable. o Related Resource Management Studies -- At least 9 semester hours of course work in related resource management subjects, including courses in such areas as wildlife management, watershed management, natural resource or agricultural economics, forestry, agronomy, forages, and outdoor recreation management. OR B. Combination of education and experience -- at least 42 semester hours of course work in the combination of plant, animal, and soil sciences and natural resources management shown in A above, plus appropriate experience or additional education. Requirements for an Office of Personnel Management GS-457 (Soil Conservationist) rating are: A. Degree: soil conservation or related agricultural or natural resource discipline such as agronomy, soil science, forestry, agricultural education, or agricultural engineering. The study must have included 30 semester hours in a natural resource or agricultural field, including at least 12 semester hours in a combination of soils and crops or plant science. Of the 12 semester hours, a minimum of 3 semester hours must have been in soils and 3 semester hours in crops or plant science. OR B. Combination of education and experience -- at least 30 semester hours in one or more of the disciplines as shown in A above, including at least 12 semester hours in a combination of soils and crops or plant science, plus appropriate experience

2-2

or additional education. Of the 12 semester hours, a minimum of 3 semester hours must have been in soils and 3 semester hours in crops or plant science. Evaluation of Education: Education that provided specialized knowledge and skills in soil and water conservation is more valuable than education that imparted broad but general knowledge and skills. Courses in soil fertility, soil chemistry, soil genesis, plant physiology, plant science, and field crops are examples of specialized courses that contribute towards meeting the required 12 semester hours as described above. Courses in the physical sciences or engineering such as geology, civil engineering, and hydrology also meet the soils, crops, or plant science course requirements where such courses included a complete introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. Evaluation of Experience: Experience that included the application of techniques, principles, and methods from a variety of agricultural and natural resource fields is appropriate, given the interdisciplinary character of the soil conservation occupation. For example, experience gained in a specialized field such as soil science, forestry, or agronomy is as fully acceptable as experience directly obtained in soil conservation wor

2-3

RANGELAND ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT MINOR OSU AGRICULTURE PROGRAM, LAGRANDE CHECKSHEET Name:

EOU ID#

Major:

OSU ID#

Completion of a Rangeland Ecology & Management Minor alone does not qualify students for Rangeland Conservationist positions with the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). Requirements: Rangeland Ecology & Management Rangeland Ecology I: Grassland or Rangeland Ecology II: Shrubland Wildand Restoration Ecology Rangeland-Animal Relations Rangeland Management Planning

RNG 341 RNG 351 RNG 352 RNG 421 RNG 442 RNG 490 Sub Total Credits

Credits (3) (3)

Term

Grade

Term

Grade

(3) (4) (4) (4) ( )

Select additional hours from this list for a total of 27 credits: Credits General Ecology Beef Production Systems: Cow/Calf Any other RNG classes:

BIOL 357 ANS 443

(4) (3) ( ( ( (

) ) ) )

Sub Total Credits Total Credits Major Advisor's Signature

Date

Minor Advisor's Signature

Date 2‐6

Revised: 05/06/10

(minimum of 27 credits)

OSU AGRICULTURE PROGRAM at EOU RANGELAND ECOLOGY & MANAGEMENT CHECKSHEET 2010/11 Name:

EOU ID#:

Minor:

OSU ID #:

*Credits Used to satisfy Baccalaureate Core

Some courses are offered ONLY on alternate years

SKILLS Expository Prose Writing Science Writing or Report Writing or Prof. Writing Interpersonal Communications

WR 121* WR 217* BA 225 WR 320 SPCH 111*

Credits (4) (3) (4) (3) (3)

or Fund of Public Speaking

SPCH 112*

(3)

College Algebra

MATH 111*

(4)

Survey Calculus

MATH 241

(4)

Health/Fitness for Life

HWS 298*

(3)

PERSPECTIVES (Only 2 courses allowed in same dept.) Biological Science: BIOL 101* Intro to Biology BOT 202* Plant Biol II Physical Science: CHEM 101* Intro to Chem CHEM 102* Intro to Chem (Organic) CHEM 103* Intro to Chem (Biochem)

(3) (5) (4) (4) (4)

Western Culture:

(

)

Cultural Diversity:

(

)

Literature & the Arts:

(

)

Social Processes: Microeconomics

ECON 201*

(5) (

Diff., Power & Discrim.:

SYNTHESIS (6) (Must be in different departments) Contemporary Global Issues: Natural Resource Economic and Policy AREC 351* Science, Tech & Society World Soils Resources CSS 395* or Cont. Soc. Iss. Animal Ag. or ANS 315*

)

(3) (3) (3)

Writing Intensive Course: Nutrient Management & Cycling

CSS 315*

(4)

RANGELAND RESOURCES CORE Animal Nutrition Beef Production Systems: Cow/Calf Ornithology or Prin. of Fish & Wildlife Conserv. Plant Taxonomy General Ecology or Soil Fertility Management Agrostology Plant Physiology

ANS 311 ANS 443 BIOL 320 FW 251 BIOL 334 BIOL 357 CSS 415 BIOL 421 BIOL 433

(3) (3) (2) (3) (5) (4) (3) (4) (5)

2-4

Term

Grade C- or above

C- or above

Principles of Soil Science Problem Solving: Soil Science Appl. Forage Production Soil Morphology & Classification Intro to Forestry Physical Geology Orient. To Careers in REM Rangeland Ecology and Management Rangeland Ecology I: Grassland Rangeland Ecology II: Shrubland Wildland Plant Identification Desert Watershed Management Wildland Restoration Ecology Rangeland Analysis Rangeland Animal Relations Rangeland Management Planning Elementary Statistics

CSS 305 CSS 306 CSS 310 CSS 466 FOR 111 GEOL 201* RNG 101 RNG 341 RNG 351 RNG 352 RNG 353 RNG 355 RNG 421 RNG 441 RNG 442 RNG 490 STAT 243

(4) (1) (4) (4) (3) (5) (1) (3) (3) (3) (4) (3) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4)

OPTIONS (27 hours) Options course work must include a minimum of 15 upper division credits. Student must choose one option. Range Science Plant Genetics CSS 430 (3) Physics PHYS 201 (4) Physics PHYS 202 (4) Science & Natural Resource Electives (16)

Range Management Cartography GEOG 201 or Intro to GIS GEOL 310 Plant Genetics CSS 430 Weed Management CSS 440 Management in Agriculture AREC 211 Nutrient Management & Cycling (WIC Bac core req) CSS 315 Science & Natural Resource Electives (7 or 9)

General Rangeland Resources (Business) Nutrient Management & Cycling (WIC Bac core req) CSS 315 Weed Management CSS 440 Financial Accounting BA 211 Management in Agriculture AREC 211 Microeconomic Theory AREC 311 Agricultural Financial Management AREC 441 Agricultural Business Management AREC 442

revised: 09/09/09

Baccalaureate Core Rangeland Resources Core Option Total Credits 2-5

(3) (5) (3) (4) (4) (4)

(4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4)

at least 27 at least 180

     RANGELAND ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT  Advising Check List   (January 2011)    Name:________________________________  Advisor:______________________________    BACCALAUREATE CORE (48) 1    GENERAL SCIENCES AND COMMUNICATIONS (47)1    Course 

Term 

Grade 

Course 

Term 

Grade 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______    ______  ______   

  Skills Courses (15)  Writing I  (3) WR 121   Writing II (3) WR 327  Writing III (3) COMM 111  Mathematics (3) MTH 241  Fitness (3) HHS 231 (2) and HHS 241‐248 (1) 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

  ANS 313 Applied Animal Nutrition: Feeds and (4)  ANS 436  Sheep Prdn (3) or  ANS 445 Beef Prdn (3)  AREC 351* 2  Nat Res (3) or AREC 352* Env Econ (3)  BI 211* Principles of Biology (4)  BI 212* Principles of Biology (4)  BI 370 Ecology (3) or BOT 341 Plant Ecology (4)  BOT 321 Plant Systematics (4) 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  BOT 331 Plant Phys (4) or BOT 488 Env Phys (3) ______  BOT 414 Agrostology (4)  ______  CH 121 General Chemistry (5)  ______  CH 122* General Chemistry (5)  ______  CH 130 General Chemistry of Living Things (4)  ______  CSS 305 Principles of Soil Science (4)  ______  CSS 306 Problem Solving: Soil Science Appln (1)  ______  CSS 466 Soil Morphology and Classification (4)  ______  ECON 201* Intro Microeconomics (4)  ______  GEO 102* The Surface of the Earth (4)  ______  MTH 241* Calculus for Mgmt and Social Sci (4)  ______  ST 351 Intro to Statistical Methods (4) or         ST 201&209  Princip of Stat and Hypoth Test (4)  ______  WR 327 Technical Writing (3)  ______        NATURAL RESOURCES (10 MINIMUM)      Pick 3 of the 4          CSS 310 Forage Production (4)  ______  FOR 111 Introduction to Forestry (3)  ______  FOR 251 Recreation Resource Management (4)  ______  FW 251 Principles of Conservation (3)  ______      RANGELAND ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (32)    RNG 341 Rangeland Ecology and Management (3)  ______  RNG 351 Range Ecology I: Grasslands (3)  ______  RNG 352 Range Ecology II: Shrublands (3)  ______  RNG 353 Wildland Plant Identification (4)  ______  RNG 355 Desert Watershed Management (3)  ______  RNG 421 Wildland Restoration and Ecology (4)  ______  RNG 441 Rangeland Analysis (4)  ______  RNG 442 Rangeland‐Animal Relations (4)  ______  RNG 490 Rangeland Management Planning (4)  ______   

    ______  ______  ______  ______ 

  Perspectives Courses (24)  No more than 2 courses from any one dept may be used to satisfy  the perspectives category          Physical Science with Lab (4) CH 122  ______  ______  Biological Science with Lab (4) BI 211 or 212  ______  ______    or Bio or Phys Sci w/ lab GEO 102 or BI 212(4)  ______  ______  Western Culture (3)     ______  ______  Cultural Diversity (3)     ______  ______  Literature and the Arts (3)    ______  ______  Social Processes and Institutions (3) ECON 201  ______  ______  Difference, Power, Discrimination (3)  ______  ______         Synthesis Courses (6)    These 2 courses may not be from the same department    Contemporary Global Issues (3) AREC 351   ______  ______  Science, Technology and Society (3) AREC 352  ______  ______          Writing Intensive Course (3)      Writing Intensive Course (3)    ______  ______ 

 

 

 

FREE ELECTIVES (16 MAXIMUM) 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

       

                                                             1

 Certain classes (marked with an *) may be used to satisfy both the baccalaureate core and the rangeland ecology and management core.   Courses marked with * are Baccalaureate Core Courses 

2

2‐7   

RANGELAND ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OPTIONS  Option course work must include a minimum of 15 upper division credits.  Students must choose one option.   

Course 

Term 

Grade 

Course 

Term 

Grade 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

FOR 220 Air Photo Interp and Forest Measur (4) ______  FOR 321 Forest Mensuration (5)  ______  FOR 407 Seminar (1‐16)  ______  RNG/FOR/FW 436 Wildland Fire Sci Mgmt (4)  ______  RNG/FOR/FW 446 Wildland Fire Ecology (3)  ______ 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

 

GENERAL RANGELAND ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OPTION (27) 

 

Select 12 credits from the list below, plus 15 elective credits  ANS 420 Ethical Issues in Animal Ag  ______  ______  AREC 211 Management in Agriculture (4)  AREC 253 Evolution of US Environ NR Policy Law (4)  ______  ______  AREC 311 Intermediate Microeconomic (4)  AREC 353 Public Land Statutes and Policy (4)  ______  ______  AREC 434 Environ and Resource Econ (3)  AREC 441 Agricultural Financial Mgmnt (4)  ______  ______  AREC 442 Agric Business Management (4)  AREC 453 Public Land and Res Law (4)  ______  ______  BA 211 Financial Accounting (4)  CSS 316 Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems (4)  ______  ______  CSS 440 Weed Management (4)  FW 435 Wildlife in Agricultural Ecosystems (3)  ______  ______  RNG 477 Agroforestry (3)     RANGE/FORESTRY/FIRE MANAGEMENT OPTION (27)  Select 27 credits from the list below  BOT/FS 415 Forest Insect and Disease Manage (5)  FOR 241 Dendrology (5)  FOR 341 Forest Ecology (3)  FOR 420 Advan Air photo and Remote Sens (3)  FOR 441 Silviculture Principles (4) 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

  RANGE MANAGEMENT OPTION (27)  Select 19 credits from the list below, plus 8 elective credits  ANS 121 Introduction to Animal Sciences (4)  CSS 316 Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems (4)  CSS 440 Weed Management (4)  RNG/FOR/FW 436 Wildland Fire Science Mgmnt (4)   

______  ______  ______  ______ 

______  ______  ______  ______ 

AREC 211 Management in Agriculture (4)  ______  CSS 430 Plant Genetics (3)  ______  RNG/FOR/FW 446 Wildland Fire Ecology (3)  ______  RNG 455 Riparian Ecology and Management (3) ______ 

______  ______  ______  ______ 

RANGE SCIENCE OPTION (27)  ANS 378 Animal Genetics (4)  Biology and Range (13)     

______  ______  ______   

CSS 316 Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems (4)  CSS 535 Soil Physics (3)       

______  ______  ______  ______ 

______  ______  ______ 

Physics (8)    Elective (2) 

______  ______  ______ 

______  ______  ______ 

______  ______  _____  ______ 

______  ______  ______  ______ 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

RANGE SOILS OPTION (21)  ______  ______  _______  ______ 

CSS 455 Biology of Soil Ecosystems (4)  Other Soils/Range (10)     

RANGE WILDLIFE OPTION (27)  Must complete BI 311 and 6 credits of Zoology.  Select 17 credits from remaining courses.    BI 311 Genetics (4)  FW 311 Ornithology (Biology of Birds) (3)  FW 317 Mammalogy (Biology of Mammals) (3)  FW 320 Introductory Population Dynamics (4)  FW 451 Avian Conservation and Management (3)  FW 481 Wildlife Ecology (4)  Z 365 Biology of Insects (4)     

______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______   

______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

Zoology Classes (6)    FW 318 Systematics of Mammals (2)  FW 321 Fisheries and Wildlife Ecology (3)  FW 458 Management of Big Game Animals (4)  FW 485 Consensus and Natural Resources (3)  Z 473 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles (3) 

WILDLAND ECOLOGY OPTION (27)  Select 2 courses from the left column, the 3 courses from the right column, plus 6 elective credits  CSS 535 Soil Physics (3)  FW 311 or 317 Biology of Birds or Mammals (3)  FW 321 Fisheries and Wildlife Ecology (3)  FW 458 Management of Big Game Animals (4)  RNG 455 Riparian Ecology and Management (3) 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

2‐8   

BI 371 Ecological Methods (3)  BOT 442 Plant Population Ecology (3)  FOR 341 Forest Ecology (3)  Electives (6)   

______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

______  ______  ______  ______  ______ 

Rangeland Ecology and Management Minor  Advising Check Sheet  10/2010   

Student__________________________  

 

 

Advisor_______________________ 

   

Course 

Credits 

Term 

Grade 

  RNG 341  Rangeland Ecology and Management (3)  _____  __________  __________  RNG 351  Range Ecology I – Grasslands (3)  _____  __________  __________  RNG 352  Range Ecology II – Shrublands (3)  _____  __________  __________  RNG 421  Wildland Restoration and Ecology (4)  _____  __________  __________  RNG 442  Rangeland – Animal Relations (4)  _____  __________  __________  RNG 490  Rangeland Management Planning (4)  _____  __________  __________    Select 7 additional credits from:    ANS 436  Sheep Production Systems (3)  _____  __________  __________  ANS 445   Beef Production  Systems (3)  _____  __________  __________  BOT 341  Plant Ecology (4)  _____  __________  __________  Any other RNG course  ______________________________  _____  __________  __________  ______________________________  _____  __________  __________  ______________________________  _____  __________  __________  ______________________________  _____  __________  __________        Total Credits = 28    NOTE: Completion of the Rangeland Ecology and Management minor alone does not qualify students for  rangeland conservationist positions with the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM).   

2‐9   

ORIENTATION TO CAREERS IN RANGELAND ECOLOGY & MANAGEMENT RNG 101 (EOU only) 1 credit, Fall Instructor: Dr. Ryan Limb COURSE DESCRIPTION: Orientation to the land grant university system and to the OSU Department of Rangeland Ecology & Management and major fields of study in the profession of Rangeland Resources and related fields of natural resources. Learn about curricula and careers in natural resources; employment opportunities including government employment; writing effective resumes; graduate school opportunities. PREREQUISITES: None ACADEMIC HONESTY CODE: Beginning Fall term, 2005, Eastern Oregon University initiated an Honor Code based on personal integrity, which is presumed to be sufficient assurance that in academic matters, one’s work is original and performed honestly. The policies and procedures of the Honor Code apply to all students. A component vital to the Honor Code is the inclusion of the Honor Pledge: “ I will never give nor receive unauthorized aid on any academic work nor will I represent the work or ideas of another as my own” (Kansas State, 2003) COURSE OBJECTIVES & LEARNING OUTCOMES Upon successful completion of this class a student should be able to: 1. Describe and compare careers in Rangeland Resources and related fields. 2. Demonstrate understanding of curricular requirements for graduation. 3. Identify and make use of academic and career resources available on campus and internet. 4. Create an effective resume and cover letter. 5. Discover, summarize and practice effective learning skills. 6. Evaluate graduate school opportunities. COMMUNICATION: We will announce changes in the schedule or distribute materials either in class or via your EOU email address. We will not use any other email address. If you have problems with your email account refer to the web site: http://www.eou.edu/comp/student/ or see me for individual assistance. EVALUATION OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE: Your grade will reflect successful completion of assignments, participation in class and attendance. Assignments must be neat and reflect your best effort. If unsatisfactory, assignments will be returned to you to be redone. You are expected to attend all class meetings. Unexcused absences will lower your course grade! Grading: Grades will be assigned on an A-F basis. To receive at least the letter grade of “C”, students must meet the following requirements: 1. Students must attend all classes. Only 2 pre-excused absences will be allowed. A preexcused absence means you must contact the instructor before class begins. Acceptable pre-

2-10

excused absences include school-sanctioned events such as field trips or participation as an athlete. A pre-excused absence from class does not relieve you of required assignments. More than 2 pre-excused absences or an unexcused absence will result in a letter grade below “C”. Unscheduled absences due to personal illness or family emergencies must be documented. 2. Students must come to class prepared to participate in discussion; 3. Students must satisfactorily complete the following 5 graded assignments by their deadlines: • In-Class writing assignments due the day assigned • Program of Study • Current Issue Article Presentation • Resume/Cover letter •

And any ONE of the following: Instructor or Alumni Interview Internet Job Search Summary Graduate School Search Summary

GRADED ASSIGNMENTS In-Class Writing Assignments There will be in-class writing assigned each Thursday except November 27 (Thanksgiving). The assignment will be relevant to the topic of that week. Sufficient time in class will be provided to complete the assignment. The assignment will be due at the end of class. If you miss class that day, you will not be able to make up the assigned writing unless prior arrangements have been made with the instructor. Program of Study It is essential students know requirements for the degree toward which they are working. In this assignment you will develop a list of courses for each term you are enrolled. The grade of “A” will be assigned when: the assignment is turned in by the deadline; accurately schedules all classes correctly according to term offered and prerequisite requirements. Resume Development of a resume is an important component of the job search. Students will develop a personal resume using in-class instruction and EOU Career Services web pages. You must have your resume reviewed by Career Services staff. Submit the marked-up draft copy and the final/revised copy. The grade of “A” will be assigned when: the assignment is turned in by the deadline; is free of grammatical errors; is in a proper format; reflects the true experiences of the student; include the draft copy marked up by Career Services staff. Cover Letter Preparation of a cover letter to support the resume is a normal task associated with applying for jobs. In this assignment students will be given a job announcement and will prepare a cover letter to accompany their resume. The grade of “A” will be assigned when: the assignment is handed in by the deadline; the cover letter reflects the content and format described in class and on an assigned web page; is neat and free of grammatical errors.

2-11

Current Issues Article Presentation Students should begin to develop awareness of current topics in their career field, where to find reliable sources of information and how to summarize information. On an assigned date, students will turn in a 100-word or less written summary of their selected article, orally present their summary and take 1-2 questions. The total in-class presentations will be no more than 5 minutes. The summary must be typed, double-spaced and have a complete reference at the top of the page. Use Citation Machine available at: http://www.citationmachine.net/ From that site, select MLA Style/Non-Print/Internet Journal or Magazine Article-One or More Authors/then fill in all blanks. (You do NOT need the “For in-text parenthetical citations” at the bottom of the website) Instructor or Alumni Interview Research indicates students who connect with professors and student organizations have a higher graduation rate compared to students who do not. This assignment is designed to encourage students to get to know at least one faculty member other than the instructor of this course. You are to select one instructor or one OSU Ag Program Alumni and arrange a visit to interview him/her. Final paper should be typed and double-spaced with a minimum of 2 pages. The grade of “A” will be assigned when: all items are turned in by the deadline; interview questions are thoughtful; the final paper provides the assigned information; the assigned work is free of grammatical errors. Internet Job Search Summary This assignment will encourage students to identify and utilize job-search resources. You will identify web sites such as www.usajobs.gov to search jobs pertaining to your area of study and interest. You are to write a summary of three jobs and include: job title, location, salary, duties, qualifications, application procedure and deadline. The grade of “A” will be assigned when: the assignment is submitted by the deadline; is complete. Graduate School Search Summary This assignment will allow students to explore graduate school opportunities. You will investigate web sites such as http://www.petersons.com/GradChannel/code/search.asp and summarize three graduate school opportunities by including: name of school and location; degree; requirements for application; admission requirements. The grade of “A” will be assigned when: the assignment is turned in by the deadline, is neatly typed and complete.

2-12

2‐13 

 

   

 

2‐14 

2‐15 

 

Wildland Plant Identification, RNG 353 Syllabus Spring 2011 TR 3:00 – 4:50 pm, Badgley Hall Rm. 148 Dr. Ryan Limb Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center & Department of Rangeland Ecology & Management Badgley Hall, Rm. 205I, [email protected], 962-3812 Office Hours: MWR 9:00 – 10:30 am, also by appointment

Text: Stubbendieck, J., Hatch, S., and Landholt, L.M. 2003. North American Wildland Plants. University of Nebraska Press. Lincoln, NB. 501 p. Learning Objectives: This course will focus on plant identification and ecology of about 100 important species occurring in arid and semi-arid ecosystems of North America. Several plants will also be introduced that are important wildlife forage/habitat species. Students will learn scientific names, common names, ecological requirements, disturbance responses, and browse/forage/habitat values for each species. Students will learn basics of grass, forb, and shrub systematics and general rangeland ecology. Learning Outcome: Students will be able to identify and characterize about 100 wildland plant species as either collected specimens or as they occur in the field. Students will assess the ecological significance of these plants as well as their importance for land management and conservation. Students will be able to analyze the potential response of these plants to different types of disturbance or management practices. Students will predict the main species that can be found within major plant communities of arid and semiarid areas of North America. Grading: Grades will be based on 2 midterm exams, one term paper, plant collections, and one final exam. Several times throughout the term we will visit local field sites. These trips will serve to identify plants and collect data and specimens. There will be also a term paper on autoecology and economic/management significance of one selected species. Makeup exams will be given June 2 during class. Mid-term Exams (2) Term paper Plant Collections Final Exam Total

200 pts (100 each) 100 pts 100 pts 150 pts 550 pts

A = 90 and above B = 80-89 C = 70-79 D = 60-69 F = 59 or below

2-16

Course Outline: The course will be delivered in general by lecture for the first hour and demonstration of plant identification characteristics the second hour. Students will learn key plants, their uses and values for each of the ecosystems listed below: Tall grass prairie Short grass prairie Pacific bunchgrass Pacific annual grass Desert grassland Southern desert shrub Salt desert shrub Sagebrush steppe Pinyon- Juniper North American Forests Other (riparian, poisonous, introduced/revegetation) Eastern Oregon University is dedicated to a campus culture that upholds the highest standards of individual, interpersonal and academic excellence. The college experience involves a fusion of the learning process with the development of positive attitudes and standards of behavior. In addition to growing intellectually and academically, students should form attitudes of scholarship, personal responsibility, and respect for others by: •

Exemplifying personal and academic integrity;



Respecting the dignity, rights and property of all persons;



Opposing bigotry and prejudice and striving to be open to differences in people, ideas and opinions, encouraging community support of these differences;



Demonstrating concern for others, their safety and their need for conditions which support their work and development.

Commitment to these ideals requires students to refrain from and discourage behaviors which threaten the freedom and respect every individual deserves. The University may initiate disciplinary action and impose sanctions against any student, officially recognized student organization, or academic department/group which commits any of the following acts proscribed by the State Board of Higher Education and the University: See Eastern Oregon University Division of Student Affairs Student Handbook http://www.eou.edu/saffairs/handbook/condct.html

2-17

RNG 355 - Desert Watershed Management – EOU Campus – televised to OSU Campus 3 credits MWF 8:00 – 8:50 Kidder 278 Instructor:

Dr. Larry Larson (lectures) OSU Ag Program at EOU, LaGrande [email protected] Dr. Michael Borman (all course activities except lectures) 202 Strand Agriculture Hall 541-737-1614 [email protected] Office hours: M, W, F 09:00 – 10:00 or by appointment

Dr. Larson will provide the lectures by television from LaGrande. Dr. Borman will be in the classroom with the Corvallis students and will serve as the “Instructor” for all purposes, except providing lectures, for the Corvallis students. Dr. Borman will administer and grade all class assignments, midterm exams and the final exam and will be responsible for final course grades for the Corvallis students. Selected readings have been provided by Dr. Larson and will serve as the basis for lectures. The materials will be posted on Blackboard. It is your responsibility to download and read the materials on a timely basis. A hardcopy of the materials will be available to checkout in StAg 202. They are not to leave the office complex. Grading: Grades will be based on a total of 400 points and will be assessed based on homework assignments (100 points), 2 midterms (100 points each), and a final exam (100 points). The field trip is required. The field trip report will be one of the assignments and will be worth half of the assignment points (i.e. 50 points or 12.5% of the final grade). Other assignments and the midterms will be scheduled during the term. The Final exam is scheduled for Thursday March 17, 6:00 p.m. Grades will be administered as follows: A AB+ B BC+

372 – 400 360 – 371 352 – 359 328 – 351 320 – 327 312 – 319

C CD+ D DF

288 – 312 280 – 288 272 – 279 248 – 271 240 – 247 0 – 239

Field Trip: January 21 – 22 Prineville, OR. We will leave at 2:00 p.m. (subject to earlier departure depending on weather) Friday Jan. 21 from the OSU Motor Pool and return Saturday night Jan. 22. Field trip guidelines will be handed out in class. Unless specifically stated otherwise, all assignments are due 1 week after they are assigned. Late assignments will be reduced by 10 points and an additional 10 points for each additional week late.

2-18

Course Objectives: RNG 355 will provide students with: -

An Understanding of physical characteristics of water An understanding of watershed and riparian zone characteristics An introduction to stream channel classification An understanding of water movement through a drainage basin An understanding of factors involved in stream temperature An understanding of plant adaptations to anaerobic soil conditions Examples of bioengineering designs to address erosion problems A few examples of basic water law

Students with Disabilities: Accommodations are collaborative efforts between students, faculty and Disability Access Services (DAS). Students with accommodations approved through DAS are responsible for contacting the faculty member in charge of the course prior to or during the first week of the term to discuss accommodations. Students who believe they are eligible for accommodations but who have not yet obtained approval through DAS should contact DAS immediately at 737-4098. Academic Dishonesty: The University may initiate disciplinary action and impose sanctions against any student, who commits academic dishonesty. Academic dishonesty is defined as an intentional act of deception in which a student seeks to claim credit for the work or effort of another person or uses unauthorized materials or fabricated information in any academic work. It includes "cheating" (intentional use or attempted use of unauthorized materials, information, or study aid), "fabrication" (intentional falsification or invention of any information), "assisting in dishonesty" (intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another commit an act of dishonesty), "tampering" (altering or interfering with evaluation instruments and documents), and "plagiarism" (intentionally or knowingly representing the words or ideas of another person as one's own).

2-19

Wildland Restoration/Ecology, RNG 421 Syllabus Spring 2011 MWRF 8:00 – 8:50 am, Loso Hall Rm. 115 Dr. Ryan Limb Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center & Department of Rangeland Ecology & Management Badgley Hall, Rm. 205I, [email protected], 962-3812 Office Hours: MWR 9:00 – 10:30 am, also by appointment Text: There is no required text, but lectures will be drawn from several book chapters and current peer-reviewed literature. Required readings related to lecture topics will be distributed or posted to Blackboard prior to topic discussions. Restoration ecology is the science that supports the practice of ecological restoration, which is defined by the Society for Ecological Restoration International (SER) as “the process of assisting the recovery of an ecosystem that has been degraded, damaged, or destroyed”. This course builds on an understanding of ecology to review concepts inherent to ecosystem assembly and function driven by ecosystem response to disturbance including the natural process of succession. The understanding of processes incorporating both biotic and abiotic components in natural systems will be used to inform our review of practices that can be used to restore naturally and anthropogenically disturbed sites. The course will incorporate practical information on ecosystem restoration that is intermixed with the basic sciences necessary to design effective restoration programs. Overall Objectives: 1) Relate restoration ecology to current management practices and applications 2) Constructively critique the methods, results, and interpretation of scientific publications 3) Translate and communicate scientific concepts to applications pertinent to restoration 4) Improve writing ability and demonstrate clear, concise writing suitable for a professional presentation 5) Improve oral presentation skills and present an informative, easy-to-follow power-point presentation 6) Understand key concepts that can be extended to solve novel land management problems 7) Acknowledge that novel concepts are often complex and dynamic and that assimilation of new information is a part of lifelong learning Grading policy and point distributions: Your grade in this class will be based on a simple percentage basis of the total possible points during the semester: with 90% or greater being an A, 80% a B, 70% a C, 60% a D, and