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Mar 15, 2011 - 2011 Systematic & Applied Acarology Society. ISSN 1362-1971. A new species of Aegyptobia (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) from Myrtaceae in Aus-.

Systematic & Applied Acarology (2011) 16, 73–89.

ISSN 1362-1971

A new species of Aegyptobia (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) from Myrtaceae in Australia OWEN D. SEEMAN1 & JENNIFER J. BEARD1,2 1

Queensland Museum, PO Box 3300, South Brisbane, Qld 4101, Australia. E-mail: [email protected]

2

Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA.

Abstract Aegyptobia yertle sp. nov. from Calytrix fraseri is described from adult females, deutonymphs and protonymphs. The palp and leg chaetotaxy is presented and reviewed for an additional 31 species of Aegyptobia. Of these species, 15 have a palp and leg chaetotaxy identical to A. yertle sp. nov. Amongst the remaining 16 species, there are 17 different variable setae. Within Aegyptobia, the greatest number of setae lost by any one species is eight. These results show that leg chaetotaxy is an informative addition to descriptions in the Tenuipalpidae. With respect to Aegyptobia, we suggest that leg chaetotaxy could help subdivide this large genus. Key words: taxonomy, systematics, new species, leg chaetotaxy, palp chaetotaxy, generic diagnosis

Introduction Aegyptobia Sayed is a large genus of the Tenuipalpidae comprising 93 species (Mesa et al. 2009). Amongst the flat mites only Brevipalpus Donnadieu, 1875, and Tenuipalpus Donnadieu, 1875, have more described species, with 282 and 307 species respectively. Most Aegyptobia are described from the Nearctic and Western Palearctic regions (32 and 26 species, respectively), 10 from the Oriental region and only one species recorded from each of Australia and New Zealand (Table 1 in Mesa et al. 2009). Although flat mite systematists have traditionally placed a great deal of significance on the chaetotaxy of the dorsal opisthosoma, a consistent interpretation has been slow to develop. A standard system of notation based on that of Grandjean (1939) was first applied to the Tenuipalpidae by Quiros-Gonzalez (1986) and is slowly being adopted across the world. Without the adoption of a standard system, it is difficult to make any meaningful morphological comparisons between taxa. Leg chaetotaxy and patterns of ontogenetic additions have long been considered paramount to understanding the Tetranychoidea (Grandjean 1948; Robaux & Gutierrez 1974; Lindquist 1985); however, these data are rarely presented by authors. Tenuipalpid leg chaetotaxy has been published only twice, for Dolichotetranychus ancistrus Baker & Pritchard by Zhang and Fan (2004) and Tenuipalpus orilloi Rimando by Xu and Fan (2010). Here we include details of leg chaetotaxy for each known stage of a new species of Aegyptobia. Using dorsal chaetotaxy alone, Aegyptobia bears a strong resemblance to Pentamerismus McGregor from which it is separated by the position of the dorsal opisthosomal setae. Both Aegyptobia and Pentamerismus have 12–13 opisthosomal setae, with setae e2 being rarely absent in Aegyptobia and commonly absent in Pentamerismus (Mesa et al. 2009). In Aegyptobia, dorsal setae e2 (if present) and f2 are placed sublaterally, i.e. mesad the lateral margin of the opisthosoma. In Pentamerismus, setae e2 (if present) and f2 are aligned with the lateral margin and setae c3, d3, e3 and f3. In contrast to Mesa et al. (2009), we feel the variable seta is f2, not e2. According to © 2011 Systematic & Applied Acarology Society

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Mitrofanov’s (1973) concept of the family, these two genera comprise the tribe Pentamerismini. Members of the genus Phytoptipalpus Trägårdh are also morphologically similar to Aegyptobia, though three species have six-legged larviform adults, and those that retain the usual octopod form are traditionally separated by the presence of two pairs of anal setae (ps1–2), not three as in Aegyptobia. The genus Aegyptobia as a whole shows no great host specificity, being found on 27 families of plants, including grasses (Mesa et al. 2009). In Australia, Aegyptobia is represented by a single species, Aegyptobia delfinadae (Smiley, Frost & Gerson, 1996), since Mesa et al. (2009) designated Meyeraepalpus a junior synonym of Aegyptobia. Aegyptobia delfinadae was collected from an Australian endemic plant, Allocasuarina muelleriana (Miq.) (Casuarinaceae) and our new species is the first Aegyptobia to be described from the family Myrtaceae.

Materials and methods Leaves were taken from the field and examined under a stereomicroscope. Mites were removed and placed into 70% ethanol; specimens were cleared in Nesbitt’s solution and mounted in Hoyer’s medium. Specimens of the new species were examined, measured and drawn with a Nikon Eclipse 80i microscope equipped with a camera lucida; other specimens were examined with a Zeiss Axioplan microscope. Setae were measured from the centre of the setal base to the tip of the seta; distances between setae were measured as the distance from the inside edge of one setal base to the other (i.e. the minimum distance between two setal bases). Body size was measured by v2–h1 and sc2–sc2 (Saito et al. 1999). All measurements are in micrometers (µm). Leg and palp setal numbers are written as the total number of setae followed by the number of solenidia in parentheses. Leg chaetotaxy is derived from Lindquist (1985).

List of abbreviations WAM

Western Australian Museum, Locked Bag 49, Welshpool DC, Perth, Western Australia, 6106, Australia. QM Queensland Museum, PO Box 3300, South Brisbane, Queensland, 4101, Australia. ANIC Australian National Insect Collection, CSIRO Entomology, GPO Box 1700, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, 2601, Australia. USNM United States National Mite Collection, US National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian located at the Systematic Entomology Laboratory (SEL), BARC West, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Building 005, 10300 Baltimore Ave, Beltsville, Maryland, USA, 20705

Taxonomy Aegyptobia Sayed, 1950a Diagnosis (based mostly on Meyer & Van Dis 1993) All life stages: palps five-segmented; rostral shield absent; opisthosoma with 12–13 pairs of setiform, lanceolate or palmate dorsal setae; c2, d2 and e2 present; setae e2 and f2 (rarely absent) in sublateral position, not on margin; setae h2 similar in size and form to other dorsal setae; ventral plate weakly developed or absent; three pairs of anal setae on well-developed anal plates. Adult female: 74

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anterior margin of prodorsal shield smooth or with medial lobe (notched or rounded); genital plate weakly developed; metapodal plates developed. Type species. Aegyptobia tragardhi Sayed, 1950b. Remarks Bury and Krantz (1978) considered the genital-ventral plate configuration as distinctive. The notched anterior medial lobe on the propodosoma is occasionally mistakenly referred to as a rostral shield (e.g. Collyer 1969; Bury & Krantz 1978), which should refer only to the shelf of cuticle of rostral origin located beneath the propodosomal shield and above the subcapitulum. This shield is well-developed in taxa such as Brevipalpus. Mesa et al. (2009) proposed that the presence of seta e2 is variable in the genera Aegyptobia and Pentamerismus. Based on setal patterns through ontogeny, we feel the variable seta is actually f2. However, we agree with Mesa et al. (2009) that seta e2 is variable in the genus Phytoptipalpus. The only species of Pentamerismus that lacks seta e2 is P. collinus Meyer & Van Dis, and as it has just two pairs of ps setae, we expect this species should be moved to the genus Phytoptipalpus pending examination of type specimens. The genus has been split into two groups (Meyer 1979; Baker & Tuttle 1987; Meyer & Van Dis 1993): the A. macswaini group has pad-like tarsal claws with one to three sets of tenent hairs, and the A. tragardhi group has uncinate tarsal claws and one set of tenent hairs. The species described herein belongs to the latter group.

Aegyptobia yertle Seeman & Beard sp. nov. (Figs 1–15) Diagnosis Adult female, nymphs: opisthosoma with 13 pairs of barbed, lanceolate setae (f2 present); broad transverse striae between at least setae 1a to 3a and partway between 4a and ag; ventral plate marked by lightly punctate cuticle; setae ps3 slightly further from medial anal plate margin than ps1 and ps2; seta l' present on femur I–II; seta d present on femur III; seta l′ present on genu I–III; seta tc present on tarsi I–IV; femur I–III d, genu I–II d lanceolate; trochanter III l′, femur II l", 2c, thin, lightly barbed; palp 0, 1, 0, 2, 3(1); setae ps1–3, g1–2, ag fine, with few barbs. Adult female, deutonymph: l", d present on genu I–III. Adult female only: medial lobe on prodorsal shield small, weakly notched; prodorsal and opisthosomal shields with longitudinal lineate sculpturing; cuticle between shields with transverse broken striae; pore-like structure between d1–d2. Material examined Holotype. ♀. Australia, ex. summer pink calytrix or summer starflower, Calytrix fraseri (Myrtaceae), Watheroo National Park, 50 km N Moora, 10 km E Watheroo, Western Australia, 30°19’04”S 115°58’26”E, 15.iv.2009, coll. J.J. Beard (WAM T108233). Paratypes. 16 ♀♀, 2 deutonymphs, 1 protonymph, same data as holotype (9 ♀♀ WAM T108234–T108242); 3 ♀♀ (QM S88875–S88877), 2 deutonymphs (QM S88878–S88879), 1 protonymph (QM S88880); 2 ♀♀ ANIC; 2 ♀♀ USNM. Host plant voucher registered in Queensland Herbarium (BRI: AQ814937), Australia. Female (n = 17; Figs 1–10) Dorsum (Figs 1, 2). Body size measurements: distance between setae v2–h1 208–230; sc2–sc2 139–145; other measurements: v2–v2 43–46, sc1–sc1 103–108, c1–c1 48–57, c2–c2 115–124, c3– c3 174–188, d1–d1 35–43, d2–d2 110–118, d3–d3 153–162, e1–e1 21–24, e2–e2 96–107, e3–e3 2011

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133–151, f2–f2 78–89, f3–f3 118–135, h1–h1 29–44, h2–h2 83–97. Gnathosoma not concealed by prodorsum. Anterior margin of prodorsum produced into medial lobe, notch weakly developed. Prodorsal shield well-defined (90–97 long down midline; 165–175 wide between posterior corners) with longitudinal lineate sculpturing; shield surface finely punctate. Opisthosomal shield welldefined (143–160 long, 163–173 wide) with longitudinal lineate sculpturing, except for transverse to oblique striae between d1–d2–c2, with pore-like structure between d1–d2; shield surface finely punctate. Cuticle laterad shields smooth, posterior lateral margin of body corrugate; cuticle between shields with broken transverse striae. All dorsal setae short, lanceolate to palmate laterally, barbed. Setal measurements: v2 18–22, sc1 19–22, sc2 15–18, c1 17–19, c2 16–19, c3 13–15, d1 12–14, d2 12–13, d3 10–13, e1 10–13, e2 16–19, e3 11–14, f3 10–12, h1 10–14, h2 11–13.

FIGURE 1. Aegyptobia yertle sp. nov. adult female, dorsum.

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FIGURE 2. Aegyptobia yertle sp. nov. adult female, photograph of dorsal idiosoma.

Venter (Fig. 3). Cuticle with broad transverse striae between setae 1a to midway between 4a and ag; pregenital area with ventral plate weakly indicated by cuticle folds, sparsely punctate, broadly separated longitudinal striae laterad pregenital and genital areas. Genital setae inserted in more or less transverse row along posterior margin of weakly developed genital plate; genital plate with weak transverse striae and finely punctate cuticle, 30–35 long, 54–65 wide; pair of sclerotised plates in soft

FIGURES 3–4. Aegyptobia yertle sp. nov. adult female. 3, opisthoventer; 4, spermathecal apparatus. Scale bar = 50 μm. 2011

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FIGURES 5–7. Aegyptobia yertle sp. nov. adult female. 5, leg I; 6, leg II; 7, tarsus I (right legs, adaxial aspect).

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cuticle laterad pregenital area, with striate ornamentation and finely punctate; anal setae ps1–3 inserted longitudinally along medial margin of well-defined anal plates, ps3 set back slightly from medial shield margin. Coxal setae fine, smooth, except 2c barbed; setae ag, g1–2, ps1–3 fine, with few barbs. Setal measurements: 1a 44–60, 1b 20–25, 1c 12–15, 2b 16–20, 2c 17–20, 3a 13–17, 3b 14–16, 4a 12–16, 4b 15–17, ag 13–15, g1 12–13, g2 12–13, ps1 7–9, ps2 9–10, ps3 6. Spermatheca (Fig. 4). Spermathecal tube narrow, straight for ca. 30–50, narrowing from external opening between setae ps3, becoming convoluted for ca. 50. Spermathecal vesicle narrow, elongate, 2 wide, 5–6 long. Legs (Figs 5–9). Setal formula for legs I–IV (coxae to tarsi) 2-1-4-3-4-9(1), 2-1-4-3-4-9(1), 12-2-1-3-5, 1-1-1-0-3-5, respectively. Tarsi I and II each with one thin abaxial solenidion ω′′ (ta I 8– 9, ta II 7–8) and two eupathidia p′–p′′ (ta I 8–9, 8–9; ta II 8–9, 8). Leg chaetotaxy as follows: trochanters I, II, IV v′; tr III l′, v′; femora I–II d, v′, bv′, l′; fe III d, ev′; fe IV ev′; genua I–II l′, d, v′′; ge III l′; ge IV nude; tibiae I–II d, l′, v′–v′′; ti III–IV d, v′–v′′; ta I–II u′–u′′, p′–p′′, tc′–tc′′, ft′–ft′′, ω′′; ta III–IV u′–u′′, tc′–tc′′, ft′. Dorsal setae on femora and genua palmate. Palps (Fig. 10). Palps 5-segmented. Setal formula 0, 1, 0, 2, 3 (1s+2e). Femoral seta d 7; tibial setae l’–l” 10–11, 11–12; tarsal eupathidia ul′–ul′′ 6, 6; solenidion ω 5–6.

FIGURES 8–10. Aegyptobia yertle sp. nov. adult female. 8, leg III; 9, leg IV (left legs, adaxial aspect); 10, palp, ventral aspect.

Male. Unknown. Deutonymph (n = 2; Fig. 11) Dorsum (Fig. 11). Body size measurements: distance between setae v2–h1 202–214, sc2–sc2 114–115; other measurements: v2–v2 34–41, sc1–sc1 86–89, c1–c1 34–38, c2–c2 100–104, c3–c3 2011

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148–153, d1–d1 29–33, d2–d2 80–84, d3–d3 125–128, e1–e1 18–20, e2–e2 78–79, e3–e3 111–117, f2–f2 62–67, f3–f3 100–103, h1–h1 21, h2–h2 64–66. Prodorsal shield 80–83 long, 116–119 wide, smooth, with few lines. Anterior prodorsal margin smoothly rounded, not produced. Opisthosoma with c1–c2 and d1–d2 on irregular, punctate shields; pygidial shield smooth with few lines, capturing setae e1, f2–3, h1–2. Cuticle between shields with broadly separated transverse striae. Setal measurements: v2 14–15, sc1 15–16, sc2 10–11, c1 11–13, c2 10–11, c3 11, d1 10, d2 9, d3 8–9, e1 9–10, e2 9, e3 9–10, f2 9–10, f3 9, h1 9, h2 9.

FIGURE 11. Aegyptobia yertle sp. nov. deutonymph, opisthodorsum.

Venter. Cuticle with coarse transverse striae between setae 1a–ag, longitudinal and coarse around anal region. Coxal setae fine, smooth, except 2c barbed; setae ag, g1, ps1–3 finely barbed. Setal measurements: 1a 40, 1b 20–24, 1c 10, 2b 8–10, 2c 14–15, 3a 9–11, 3b 12–13, 4a 9–12, 4b 11–12, ag 12–13, g1 9–10, ps1 5–6, ps2 5–6, ps3 5–6. Legs. Setal formula for legs I–IV same as adult, except trochanter IV nude (seta v′ absent). Tarsi I and II each with one abaxial solenidion ω′′ (ta I 8–9, ta II 7–8) and two eupathidia p′–p′′ (ta I 8–9, 8–9; ta II 8–9, 8). Palps. Palps similar to adult. Femoral seta d 6–7; tibial setae l’–l” 7, 7–8; tarsal eupathidia ul’– ul” 5, 5–6, solenidion ω 4–5.

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FIGURES 12–15. Aegyptobia yertle sp. nov. protonymph, legs I–IV. Solenidia ω'' (ribbed) and unguinal setae u'–u'' (dotted bases only) are not labelled on tarsus I. Right legs: 12–13, dorsal-adaxial aspect; 14–15, ventralabaxial aspect.

Protonymph (n = 1; Figs 12–15) Dorsum. Body size measurements: distance between setae v2–h1 175, sc2–sc2 92; other measurements: v2–v2 10, sc1–sc1 70, c1–c1 27, c2–c2 86, c3–c3 121, d1–d1 20, d2–d2 68, d3–d3 2011

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100, e1–e1 17, e2–e2 62, e3–e3 84, f2–f2 51, f3–f3 66, h1–h1 16, h2–h2 41. Prodorsal shield 61 long, 96 wide, smooth, with few lines. Opisthosoma with c1–c2 on irregular, smooth shield; d1–d2 on narrow band of smooth cuticle; pygidial shield smooth with few linear lines, incorporates e1, f2. Cuticle between shields with broadly separated transverse striae. Setal measurements: v2 10, sc1 11, sc2 9, c1 10, c2 8, c3 7, d1 8, d2 7, d3 8, e1 8, e2 8, e3 8, f2 7, f3 8, h1 8, h2 8. Venter. Cuticle with coarse transverse striae between setae 1a–3a, longitudinal to coxae IV, transverse almost to ag, longitudinal around anal area. Coxal setae fine, smooth; setae ag, ps1–3 fine, smooth. Setal measurements: 1a 35, 1b 12, 1c 10, 2b 11, 3a 9, 3b 10, ag 10, ps1 5, ps2 5, ps3 6. Setae 2c, 4a, 4b, g1, g2 absent. Legs. (Figs 12–15) Setal formula for legs I–IV (coxae to tarsi) 2-0-3-1-4-9(1), 1-0-3-1-4-9(1), 1-1-2-1-3-5, 0-0-1-0-3-3, respectively. Tarsi I and II each with one abaxial solenidion ω′′ (ta I 8–9, ta II 7–8) and two eupathidia p′–p′′ (ta I 8–9, 8–9; ta II 8–9, 8). Leg chaetotaxy same as deutonymph, except: trochanters I–II nude (setae v′ absent); genua I–II without d, v′'; tarsus IV without tc′, tc′′. Palps. Palps similar to adult. Femoral seta d 4; tibial setae l’–l” 5, 6; tarsal eupathidia ul’–ul” 4, 4, solenidion ω 4. Larva. Unknown. Remarks Live individuals are red in colour, with several black spots visible internally, which are presumed to be food packets located within the gut. The dorsal ornamentation and form of the dorsal setae are often used for identification of Aegyptobia. In this respect, A. yertle sp. nov. resembles A. arenaria Ehara, 1982 (except this species has irregular dorsal sculpturing), A. cedermontana Meyer & Van Dis, 1993 (except no seta on palp femur, pad-like claws), A. forma Chaudhri, 1972 (except dorsal setae with smooth margins, transverse ridges between d2–f2), A. parcus Akbar & Mushtaq, 1993 (except 2 pairs of anal setae, setae l′ absent on genu I–III) and A. semper Chaudhri & Akbar, 1985 (except 2 pairs of anal setae, setae l′ absent on trochanter III). Based on the apparent number of anal setae, the latter two species should probably be moved to Phytoptipalpus, pending an examination of the type specimens for confirmation of these characters. Seta bv′′ is thought to be restricted to femora I and II, and ev′, another fundamental seta of the basifemoral verticel, is present instead on femora III and IV (Grandjean 1942). This interpretation was also noted for some other raphignathoid taxa by Grandjean (1944). Although Lindquist (1985) accepted Grandjean’s interpretation when discussing leg chaetotaxy for the Tetranychoidea, the identity of these two setae is still unclear. It remains uncertain whether bv′′ is truly replaced by ev′ on femora III–IV or if it is actually displaced to a v′ position on legs III and IV in order to maintain the antiaxial position, as apparently occurs on legs I and II (Lindquist 1985).

Discussion The Tenuipalpidae comprise 34 genera, of which 25 have less than 10 described species. While this proliferation of small genera reflects to a certain degree a tendency for authors to erect new genera rather than to accommodate new species in modified concepts of existing genera, it does also indicate the tremendous diversity present within the family. Such habits were duly noted by Walter et al. (2009, p. 301), who considered many tenuipalpid genera to be based on trivial characters. This concern was aimed at recently established genera, but may well apply to Aegyptobia which, as mentioned previously, is separated from Pentamerismus and perhaps Phytoptipalpus by seemingly 82

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minor morphological characters (see Meyer & Van Dis 1993). Until comparative homologisation of certain characters, especially leg chaetotaxy, is accomplished for at least select taxa within not only the Tenuipalpidae but all the families of Tetranychoidea, our understanding of the systematics and classification of these groups can not progress (Lindquist 1985). Although we share such concerns, extremely large genera are cumbersome. Few, if any, acarologists could consider themselves knowledgeable in all 94 species of Aegyptobia, let alone the 282 species of Brevipalpus or 307 species of Tenuipalpus. The problem is caused by the fact that too many original descriptions are scant and unreliable, and type species are either lost or unavailable for study. Consequently, the chance of creating synonyms becomes high as many new species are described without careful comparison with all congeneric species (Mesa et al. 2009). Decisions on new species tend to be based on a comparison of species with similar host associations and/or geographic distribution, rather than assessing character distributions. Problems with unreliable past descriptions and unavailable type specimens plague all taxonomic endeavour and discussion of this is beyond the scope of this work. However, we encourage future workers on the Tenuipalpidae to include leg chaetotaxy in their descriptions, as do Xu and Fan (2010). Setal counts alone are useful but insufficient, as they provide incomplete information on what setae are actually present. Patterns of ontogenetic setal additions on the legs should also be considered and included by authors where possible, as these data may harbour information of systematic and phylogenetic value. We expect such data will help subdivide – or perhaps reclassify – some of the large genera into smaller groups. Phylogenetic relationships can also be tested with these data. For example, Kane (2003) formed a phylogeny based on body and leg chaetotaxy from exemplar taxa of most genera of Tenuipalpidae. We examined the palp and leg chaetotaxy of another 31 species of Aegyptobia (Tables 1, 2). Seta l′′ on genu I–II could also be considered v′′, and in some species is in a position more like one than the other. Here we have elected to name the seta l′′ because the seta is placed in this position most frequently. We expect that the setae in either position are homologous, and thus not the expression of two separate setae, because no Tenuipalpidae have l′′ and v′′ on the genu (Lindquist 1985; Kane 2003). Fifteen of 32 Aegyptobia spp. have the chaetotaxy of A. yertle sp. nov. (Table 1; e.g., A. alpinensis Baker & Tuttle, 1972, Figs 16–20). All species with different chaetotaxy have lost setae in comparison. The most commonly lost seta is d on the palp femur (10 species); the most commonly lost leg seta is l′ on genu III (6 species; e.g., A. pomaderrisae Collyer, 1969, Figs 21–24). Seta d on femur III is the only unique loss, being absent in A. delfinadae only. The ontogeny of these setae seems to have little impact on the likelihood of being lost. Setae d on the palp femur, l′′ on the palp tibia, l′ on femora I–II and genua I–III are larval setae; setae tc′′ on tarsi I–IV are protonymphal setae; and setae v′ on trochanters III and d and l′′ on genua I–II are deutonymphal setae. This lack of pattern seems unusual because the reductionist pattern across the Acari is a tendency to retain larval setae and lose setae added in later life stages. This ‘serial progenesis’ (Walter & Krantz 2009, p. 61) is observed in the Tenuipalpidae, in comparison to the Tetranychidae (Lindquist 1985), with one exception. Setae v′ and l′′ (and v′′), which usually appear in the larva of Tetranychidae, appear in the deutonymph of Tenuipalpidae. Our preliminary data on leg chaetotaxy suggest that leg chaetotaxy is of potential significance for dividing the genus into manageable subgeneric groups. Further, Brevipalpus and Tenuipalpus could also be subdivided based on leg chaetotaxy. Kane (2003) found differences in the leg chaetotaxy of Brevipalpus, and Meyer (1993) also reported differences in leg setal counts for Tenuipalpus. She split Tenuipalpus into groups and subgroups based on the number of dorsal setae and intercoxal setae, respectively, but we expect more robust groups could be formed with the incorporation of leg chaetotaxy and ontogenetic patterns of addition. 2011

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FIGURES 16–20. Aegyptobia alpinensis. 16–19, legs I–IV (right legs), tenent hairs omitted: 16–17, dorsal aspect; 18–19, abaxial aspect. 20, palp, dorsal aspect.

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FIGURES 21–24. Aegyptobia pomaderissae, legs I–IV (right legs), tenent hairs mostly omitted: 21, dorsal aspect; 22–23, dorsal–abaxial aspect; 24, abaxial aspect. 2011

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TABLE 1. Ontogenetic development of palp and leg setae in Aegyptobia. Data are derived from Lindquist (1985). Larval additions are assumed from Lindquist (1985) and from comparison with A. delfinadae. Setae in bold are present in all taxa examined. Coxa

Tro.

Femur

Genu

Tibia

Tarsus

Larva

-

-

d

-

d l′′

ul′ ul′′ ω

Protonymph

-

-

-

-

-

-

Deutonymph

-

-

-

-

-

-

Adult

-

-

-

-

-

-

Larva

1a 1b

-

d v′ bv′′

l′

d l′′ v′ v′′

u′ u′′ p′ p′′ ft′ ft′′ ω′′

Protonymph

-

-

-

-

-

tc′ tc′′

Deutonymph

1c

v′

l′

d l′′

-

-

Adult

-

-

-

-

-

-

Larva

-

-

d v′ bv′′

l′

d l′′ v′ v′′

u′ u′′ p′ p′′ ft′ ft′′ ω′′

Protonymph

2b

-

-

-

-

tc′ tc′′

Deutonymph

2c

v′

l′

d l′′

-

-

Adult

-

-

-

-

-

-

Larva

3a

-

d ev′

l′

d v′ v′′

u′ u′′ ft′

Protonymph

3b

l′

-

-

-

tc′ tc′′

Deutonymph

-

v′

-

-

-

-

Adult

-

-

-

-

-

-

Protonymph

-

-

ev′

-

d v′ v′′

u′ u′′ ft′

Deutonymph

4a 4b

-

-

-

-

tc′ tc′′

Adult

-

v′

-

-

-

-

Palp

Leg I

Leg II

Leg III

Leg IV

Acknowledgements We would like to thank Paul Forster (Queensland Herbarium, BRI) for host plant identification, and Eddie Ueckermann (ARC-PPRI, South Africa) for examining the South African species of Aegyptobia. Beard was funded by the Australia Biological Resources Study (ABRS), an initiative of the Australian Government. All specimens were collected under permits issued by the Department of Environment and Conservation, Government of Western Australia, whom we thank for their assistance.

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TABLE 2. Palp and leg chaetotaxy of 32 species of Aegyptobia. Only variable setae are shown. For consistent setae see Table 1. Palp Fe

Palp Ti

Tr III

Fe I–II

Fe III

Ge III

Ta I–IV

Aegyptobia

d

l′′

v′

l′

d

d

l′′

l′

l′

tc′′

abuzabiensis

+

+

+

+

+

+

-

+

+

+

aletes

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

alpinensis

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

antenostoma

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

cedermontana

-

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

cupressus

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

curtipilis

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

delfinadae

-

+

+

-

-

+

+

+

+

+

edenvillensis

-

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

eremia

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

ericae

-

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

flourensis

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

forma

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

franseriae

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

hamus

-

-

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

haplopappus

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

lineati

-

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

macswaini

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

monocanthae

+

+

+

+

+

+

-

+

+

+

montana

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

nasicornensis

-

+

-

+

+

+

+

+

-

+

neobapta

-

+

-

+

+

+

+

+

-

+

nina

+

+

+

+

+

-

+

+

+

+

nomus

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

nothus

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

nummulus

-

-

+

-

+

-

-

+

+

+

odontopilus

-

+

-

+

+

+

+

+

-

+

pennatulae

-

+

+

+

+

+

+

-

-

-

pomaderrisae

+

-

+

-

+

+

+

-

-

+

prolixa

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

vannus

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

-

-

-

yertle sp.nov.

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

2011

Ge I–II

SEEMAN & BEARD: A NEW SPECIES OF AEGYPTOBIA FROM AUSTRALIA

87

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Smiley, R.L., Frost, W.E. & Gerson, U. (1996) A revision of the subfamily Tegopalpinae, with the descriptions of two new genera and five new species (Acarina: Tenuipalpidae). International Journal of Acarology, 22(3), 167–180. Walter, D.E. & Krantz, G.W. (2009) Oviposition and life stages. In: Krantz, G.W. & Walter, D.E. (eds.), A Manual of Acarology. Texas, Texas Tech University Press, pp. 57–61. Walter, D.E., Lindquist, E.E., Smith, I.M., Cook, D.R., & Krantz, G.W. (2009) Order Trombidiformes. In: Krantz, G.W. & Walter, D.E. (eds.) A Manual of Acarology. Texas, Texas Tech University Press, pp. 233– 420. Xu, Y. & Fan, Q-H (2010) Tenuipalpus orilloi Rimando, a new record to the Chinese fauna (Acari: Tenuipalpidae). Systematic and Applied Acarology, 15, 135–138. Zhang Z.-Q. & Fan Q.-H. (2004) Redescription of Dolichotetranychus ancistrus Baker & Pritchard (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) from New Zealand. Systematic and Applied Acarology, 9, 111–131. Accepted by Anne Baker: 15 Jan. 2010; published 15 Mar. 2011

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