(Acari: Tenuipalpidae) from Iran - BioOne

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The family Tenuipalpidae (Acari: Prostigmata: Tetranychoidea), commonly known as flat mites or false spider mites, is worldwide in distribution. Aegyptobia is an ...

Systematic & Applied Acarology 20(8): 955–960 (2015) http://dx.doi.org/10.11158/saa.20.8.10 Article

ISSN 1362-1971 (print) ISSN 2056-6069 (online)

http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:611CCA58-F8E9-4C5D-81C1-557926203664

A new species of Aegyptobia Sayed, 1950 (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) from Iran SADEGH FARZAN1 & MAHDIEH ASADI1,2 1

Department of Plant Protection, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman, Iran. E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], 2 Corresponding author

Abstract A new flat mite species (Acari: Trombidiformes: Tenuipalpidae), Aegyptobia kermaniensis sp. nov. from Berberis vulgaris (Berberidaceae) is described and illustrated. This species belongs to the A. tragardhi group and has been collected from the Kerman province, Iran. Key words: Prostigmata, Kerman, Trombidiformes, leg chaetotaxy, description, Berberidacea

Introduction The family Tenuipalpidae (Acari: Prostigmata: Tetranychoidea), commonly known as flat mites or false spider mites, is worldwide in distribution. Aegyptobia is an important genus in the family Tenuipalpidae, comprising 97 species (Mesa et al. 2009; Seeman & Beard 2011; Khanjani et al. 2008, 2012, 2013a,b; Farzan et al. 2012a,b, 2013). Twelve species of this genus have been reported from Iran (Khanjani et al. 2013a; Khanjani et al. 2013b; Farzan & Asadi 2013), namely: A. tragardhi group—A. beglarovi Livshitz & Mitrofanov 1967, A. hormozgani Farzan et al. 2012b, A. iraniensis Khanjani et al. 2008, A. jiroftiensis Farzan et al. 2012b, A. khanjanii Farzan & Asadi 2013, A. nazarii Khanjani et al. 2012, A. pavlovskii (Reck, 1951), A. pirii Khanjani et al. 2013, and A. tragardhi Sayed 1950; A. macswaini group—A. bromi Khanjani et al. 2012, A. glyptus Pritchard & Baker 1958, and A. persicae Khosrowshahi & Arbabi 1997 belonging to macswaini group. In this paper a new species of tragardhi group is described from Berberis vulgaris. This plant that is also known as European barberry or simply Barberry, is a shrub in the genus Berberis. It produces edible but sharply acidic berries, which people in many countries eat as a tart and refreshing fruit. The shrub native to central and southern Europe, northwest Africa and western Asia. Another species (A. beglarovi) was also collected from this plant (Farzan, 2012) in Iran and this is the second report of Aegyptobia on this host plant from the country.

Material and methods Leaves and twigs with the presence of mites were collected, placed into plastic bags and transferred to the laboratory. Samples were washed in a solution of commercial detergent (5%). This solution was filtered by overlapping two sieves with different mesh sizes (16 Mesh; 400 Mesh) respectively. Mites retained in the smaller sieve were washed with 70% ethanol into a Petri dish. False spider mites were collected from the ethanol solution under a stereomicroscope, cleared with lactic acid (at 45°C in oven) and mounted in Hoyer’s medium. © Systematic & Applied Acarology Society

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The terminology and abbreviations used for the descriptions of the new species follow those of Lindquist (1985), Mesa et al. (2009) and Seeman & Beard (2011). Leg chaetotaxy is adapted from Lindquist (1985), Zhang & Fan (2004), and Seeman & Beard (2011), and is labeled on the figures. Measurements were performed using a DINO-EYE® soft imaging system and are presented in micrometers (μm) as the holotype followed in parentheses by a range for the paratypes. The drawings were made using a drawing tube attached to an Olympus® Research Microscope. Figures were drafted in Microsoft Office Power Point 2003.Specimen depositories are cited using the following abbreviations: ARC-Plant Protection Research Institute, Pretoria, South Africa; SBUC—Collection of the Acarology Laboratory, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman, Iran.

Results Genus Aegyptobia Sayed, 1950 Diagnosis as in Seeman & Beard (2011). Aegyptobia kermaniensis Farzan sp. nov. (Figs 1–8) Type material examined. Holotype female (SBUC) and 6 female paratypes (5 SBUC, 1 PPRIC), ex. Berberis vulgaris (Berberidaceae), IRAN: Kerman-Kerman Province, Kuhpayeh, 28°58’N 57°37’E, 22 October 2010, coll. S. Farzan. Diagnosis. Adult female: Hysterosoma with 13 pairs of dorsal setae (f2 present). Anterior margin of prodorsal shield weakly produced into broadly rounded median lobe, lobe weakly emarginate; cuticle of shield mostly with longitudinal strigate sculpturing. Cuticle of dorsal opisthosoma with band of fine transverse broken striae along anterior margin of shield; mostly longitudinal striate sculpturing centrally between c1–c1 and h1–h1, with some reticulate sculpturing laterad e1; transverse striate sculpturing along lateral margin between c2–e2 srtigate. Dorsal setae lanceolate, finely serrate. Genua III with seta l' present. Femora I–III and genua I–II with dorsal setae, d, narrow, serrate. Tarsal claws uncinate. Spermathecal duct approximately 260 µm long, with a small terminal membranous bulb. Palp with setal formula (from trochanter to tarsus): 0-1-0-23(1s+2e); seta d present of palp femur. Description. FEMALE (holotype). Dorsum (Fig. 1) Distances between setae: v2–h1 225 (225– 250), v2–v2 40 (37–40), sc1–sc1 89 (86–100), sc2–sc2 120 (115–125), c1–c1 53 (46–55), c2–c2 105 (105–115), c3–c3 165 (155–165), d1–d1 28 (28–36), d2–d2 100 (100–105), d3–d3 135 (130–140), e1–e1 31 (29–32), e2–e2 100 (90–105), e3–e3 120 (110–130), f2–f2 80 (72–81), f3–f3 105 (94–115), h1–h1 33 (33–42), h2–h2 74 (66–81). Body oval, anterior margin of prodorsum weakly produced into broadly rounded median lobe, lobe weakly emarginated centrally. Cuticle of prodorsum mostly with longitudinal striate sculpturing, becoming diagonal posterior to eyes; prodorsum bearing three pairs of lanceolate, serrate setae. Band of fine broken transverse striae present along anterior margin of opisthosomal shield. Cuticle of dorsal opisthosoma with longitudinal striate sculpturing centrally between c1–c1 and h1–h1, with a band of reticulate sculpturing laterad central setae, and an area of transverse striate sculpturing between c2 and e2. All dorsal setae lanceolate, finely serrate. Lengths of setae: v2 24 (22–24), sc1 33 (29–33), sc2 27 (19–27), c1 21 (20–21), c2 22 (19–22), c3 20 (1720), d1 21 (19–21), d2 22 (19–22), d3 21 (18–21), e1 16 (16–20), e2 23 (19–23), e3 18 (18 –20), f2 21 (17–21), f3 18 (17–20), h1 19 (16–19), h2 21 (17–21). Three pairs of opisthosomal pores present between c2–c3, between d2–d3, and between e2 and shield margin. 956

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Venter (Fig. 2). Cuticle transversely striate between 1a–3a and between 4a–ventral plate; cuticle pattern weaker and irregular between 3a–4a and longitudinal laterad 3a–4a. Aggenital setae (ag) smooth, longer than ps1–3, located on a weakly transversely striate ventral plate. Genital setae (g1– 2) smooth and located on a well defined genital plate pseudoanal setae ps1–3) smooth and located on smooth, weakly developed anal plates. Cuticle laterad genito-anal region with coarse, longitudinal striae. Intercoxal setae (1a, 3a, 4a) smooth, with 1a more than two times longer than 3a and 4a. All coxal setae smooth. Lengths of setae: 1a 84 (75–84), 1b 40 (37–40), 1c 16 (16–19), 2b 34 (30–34), 2c 28 (28–32), 3a 25 (21–26), 3b 26 (23–26), 4a 33 (27–33), 4b 24 (23–26), ag 25 (23– 25), g1 19 (19–21), g2 16 (16–18), ps1 11 (11–14), ps2 10 (10–13), ps3 11 (10–14).

FIGURES 1–4. Aegyptobia kermaniensis sp. nov. adult female. Dorsum (1), Venter (2), Palp (3), Spermatheca (4). 2015

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Gnathosoma (Fig. 2–3). Infracapitulum extending to tibia I; ventral infracapitular seta, m, smooth (10 long); palp 5 segmented; palp setation from trochanter to tarsus: 0–1–0–2–3(1s+2e). Dorsal femoral seta is present (commonly absent in the genus). Dorsal tibial seta 10–12 long and 1 solenidion (5–6 long) on palp tarsus (Fig. 3). Spermatheca (Fig. 4). Spermathecal duct long (260 long), slender, terminating in a rounded membranous bulb. Legs (Figs 5–8). Setal formula for legs I–IV: coxae 2-2-1-1; trochanters 1-1-2-1; femora 4-4-21; genua 3-3-1-0; tibiae 4-4-3-3; tarsi 9(ω)-9(ω)-5-5. Chaetotaxy as presented in figures. Seta l' is present on femora I-II, and is present on genu III (commonly absent in the genus). Tarsus I and II each with one solenidion (both 8 long). Dorsal setae (d) on femora I–III and genua I–II barbed. Tarsal claws uncinate.

FIGURES 5-8. Aegyptobia kermaniensis sp. nov. adult female. Right legs I–IV. 958

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Male and immature stages. Unknown. Remarks. Aegyptobia kermaniensis resembles the following species: 1. A. arbutusae Baker & Tuttle, 1987 (from Mexico, on Arbutus sp. (Ericaceae)) by sharing the same palp setation pattern and uncinate tarsal claws, transverse striae anterior to 3a and posterior to 4a, but they differ as follows: dorsal setae of A. arbutusae are slender, serrate and distinctly tapering (versus lanceolate, serrate in A. kermaniensis); there are three pairs of dorsal opisthosomal pores in A. kermaniensis (absent in A. arbutusae). 2. A. khanjanii Farzan & Asadi, 2013 (from Iran, on Astragalus sp. (Fabaceae)) by sharing a striate/strigate dorsal pattern, the same palpal setation pattern and uncinate tarsal claws. These species differ as follows: dorsal setae of A. khanjani are broadly spatulate and serrate (versus lanceolate, serrate in A. kermaniensis); there are three pairs of dorsal opisthosomal pores in A. kermaniensis (absent in A. khanjani). Barbed genital and anal setae (smooth in new species). 3. A. semper Akbar & Mushtaq 1993(from Pakistan, on an unidentified plant)) resembles the new species due to the similar pattern of the dorsal shields and also the existence of dorsal seta on palp femur, but it differs from new species by smooth margins of spatulate dorsal setae ( lanceolate serrate in A. kermaniensis) 4. A. hymenocleae Baker & Tuttle 1964 from Arizona on Hymenoclea pentalepis(Asteraceae) resembles new species because of similar pattern on dorsal cuticle; dorsal seta on palp femur; but due to the spatulate dorsal setae on some leg segments and one pair of dorsal opisthosomal pores can be seprated from it. 5. A. beglarovi Livschitz & Mitrofanov, 1967 is also collected from Berberis vulgaris in Iran, but it is easily separated from A. kermaniensis based on dorsal striation pattern, deep notch, broadly spatulate dorsal setae and also the absence of dorsal opisthosomal pores. Etymology. This species is named after the province where it was collected.

Acknowledgements The first author wishes to thank Mr. Mahrad Nassirkhani for helping collect samples.

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