Acceleration, maximum speed, and agility in relation

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From interest in soccer are three different sprint categories: acceleration ... DJ40, DJ60), using the coefficient of jump height/contact time for each drop height.

Acceleration, maximum speed, and agility in relation to strength parameters in elite female soccer players Sonderegger, K., Huebner, K., Luethy, F., Tschopp, M. Swiss Federal Institute of Sports (Magglingen, Switzerland)

Results Mean values for all variables are presented in Table 1. The t10 correlated significantly with CMJ, SJ, CMJone-leg, tapping, DJ40, and vertical stiffness. There was no correlation between t10 and leg stiffness. The t30-40 correlated with vertical stiffness, CMJ, CMJone-leg, SJ, and tapping. Only DJ20 correlated with t30-40. DJ40 and DJ60 did not. Unlike t10, t30-40 correlated

Speed

Introduction Sprinting plays an important role in elite female soccer (Andersson, 2010). From interest in soccer are three different sprint categories: acceleration, maximum speed and agility (Little, 2005). To improve sprinting, it is crucial to understand its limiting factors. Salaj and Markovic (2011) examined the specific jumping, sprinting and agility levels of male college athletes and suggested separate training regimes for these parameters. However, for elite female soccer players, little evidence exists regarding these determinants. The aim of this study is to analyze the interdependence of speed abilities assessed in field tests as well as the strength parameters of elite female soccer players, with special reference to acceleration, maximum speed, and agility.

Agility

Explosive strength

FOSPO 2532 Magglingen

Reactive strength

Tapping

Stiffness

t10 (sec)

t30-40 (sec)

SGT (sec)

CMJ (W/kg)

SJ (W/kg)

CMJone-leg (W/kg)

DJ20 (m/s)

DJ40 (m/s)

DJ60 (m/s)

(Hz)

kvert, 0-10

kleg, 0-10

kvert, 30-40

kleg, 30-40

2.02±0.06

1.32±0.06

5.11±0.14

48.0±4.5

42.7±3.1

29.0±3.3

1.6±0.2

1.7±0.2

1.5±0.3

13.5±1.4

61.4±10.9

10.6±1.8

96.4±21.3

11.3±2.1

Table 1: Physical testing parameters. Values are means±SD

Acceleration -1

-0.8

-0.6

-0.4

-0.2

0

0.2

0.4

Maximum speed 0.6

0.8

1

-1

-0.8

-0.6

-0.4

-0.2

0

0.2

0.4

Agility

0.6

0.8

t30-40

*

-1

1

*

CMJ

*

-0.8

-0.6

-0.4

-0.2

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

SJ

*

* CMJone-leg

*

CMJone-leg

*

t30-40 CMJ

CMJ

*

SGT

*

1

DJ40 *

kvert, 30-40

*

0

*

t10

*

*

CMJone-leg

SJ

*

DJ20

SGT

*

Tapping

*

DJ40

*

Tapping

*

kvert, 0-10

*

DJ20

DJ60

*

kleg, 30-40

*

t10

*

*

Method Thirty-eight female soccer players (age: 19.8 ± 2.8 y, height: 165.8 ± 6.2 cm, weight: 60.4 ± 5.5 kg, training hours/week: 8.8 ± 2.5 h), all members of a Swiss national team (A-team and U19), completed three standardized tests. Linear Sprint (photocells, Fusion Sport, Australia): linear speed was measured with a 40 m all-out sprint. Times were measured for the first (acceleration = t10 ) and the last (maximum speed = t30-40) ten meters. Agility-Test (photocells, Fusion Sport, Australia): a stop-and-go test to assess agility (SGT) was made. Players run a total of twenty meters with two 180 degrees changes in direction (5 m-10 m-5 m). Jump Test (force plate, SP Sport, Austria): explosive strength was measured by three different vertical jumps. The countermovement jump (CMJ), the squat jump (SJ), and the one leg countermovement jump (CMJone-leg). The measured parameter was maximal Watts relative to body weight. Reactive strength was measured by drop jumps from heights of 20 cm, 40 cm, and 60 cm (DJ20, DJ40, DJ60), using the coefficient of jump height/contact time for each drop height. Vertical and Leg Stiffness: vertical and leg stiffness (kvert and kleg respectively) were calculated based on the method used by Morin (2005). Therefore, the average step length, ground contact time, and step frequency were measured in the 40 m sprint for the first ten meter section (kvert, 0-10, kleg, 0-10) and the last ten meter section (kvert, 30-40, kleg, 30-40) with the Optojump Measurement System (Microgate, Italy). Tapping-Test (contact plate, TDS, Austria): the aim of this test was to perform as many foot contacts as possible during a three second period. Maximal frequency during a one second period was used for analysis. Pearson’s correlation coefficients (±90 % confidence limits) between acceleration, maximum speed, agility, and strength parameters were calculated. The level of statistical significance was set at p

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