Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition ...

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Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) .... students to put themselves in the leader's shoes to make critical.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) This map was prepared by an editor at HBS Publishing, not by a teaching professor. Faculty at Harvard Business School were not involved in analyzing the textbook or selecting the cases and articles. Every case map provides only a partial list of relevant items from HBS Publishing. To search for alternatives, or to get more information on the cases listed below, visit our web site at www.hbsp.harvard.edu. PART I: MARKETING STRATEGY Chapter 1: Why is Marketing Management Important

Abstract

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Hocol Elsa Margarita Uribe, Roberto Gutierrez, Andres Barragan Type: Social Enterprise Knowledge Network case Pub. Date: March 15, 2009 Product #: SKE141-PDF-ENG Length: 27p Teaching Note: Yes

This business case illustrates how Hocol competed in the exploration and extraction of oil in Colombia. What distinguished this oil company was the dynamic construction of a particular business model based on a deep understanding of the external context, allowing the simultaneous creation of economic value (profitability) and social value (promotion of social development). Hocol conceived a business model based on the conciliation and mutual reinforcement of different forces that impacted its performance at different moments in its history. The case describes the ability of Hocol to understand and transform multiple contextual forces, adverse and convergent, to develop internal capacities and to apply its business competencies to achieve positive results in the economic, social and environmental realms. Hocol designed a business model under the following principle: "the success of the company is founded on the success of the people and groups that surround it." While the company claimed "not to have a model," it was clear that it was one of learning, experimentation and incremental and permanent adaptation to the demands of its external context. The conception of a business model with these characteristics redirected the development of Hocol s activities, in particular the work of the Government and Community Affairs and Industrial Protection team, and shaped the activities of the Foundation wherever it operated. Hocol maintained that to achieve better economic and social results it needed to understand and manage a variety of pressures that stemmed from the environment in which it worked. At the same time, it needed to build internal resources and abilities that would allow it to convert threats into opportunities and to respond to the expectations of shareholders, sub-contractors, surrounding communities and other stakeholders. In sum, Hocol sought to understand the evolution of needs in the society of which it was a part and to help satisfy these needs through strengthening community-based organizations and governmental institutions. Learning Objective: Business model as a cycle of positive feedback among different forces that intervene in the creation of value. Stakeholder management to reach more competitive surroundings and greater well being. The socio-environmental dimension as part of the competitive environment of a business. To identify the forces in the environment and to observe their relationship with and impact on the internal conditions of an organization. Openness towards the joint generation of social and economic value, combining philanthropy with profitability.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Fiat-Chrysler Alliance: Launching the Cinquecento in North America Gary P. Pisano, Phillip Andrews, Alessandro Di Fiore Type: HBS case Pub. Date: May 11, 2011 Product #: 611037-PDF-ENG Length: 24p Teaching Note: N/A

TripAdvisor Sunil Gupta, Kerry Herman Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 24, 2011 Product #: 511004-PDF-ENG Length: 19p Teaching Note: N/A

Homeless World Cup George Foster, Jocelyn Hornblower, Norm O’Reilly Type: Stanford case Pub. Date: Jun 04, 2010 Product #: E367 Length: 26p Teaching Note: Yes

Chapter 2: Customer Behavior

Fiat ended its 27-year absence in the North American automobile market when the first Cinquecento (500)-a very small, iconic Italian car that had strong sales in Europe-was delivered on March 10, 2011. The Italian automaker re-entered the market through an alliance with Chrysler, the American automaker Fiat acquired in April 2009. For Laura Soave, Chrysler Group's head of Fiat Brand North America, the first delivery marked a watershed in a journey that began 12 months before when she first took responsibility for re-launching the Fiat brand in North America. As the first product of the Fiat-Chrysler alliance, the outcome of the Cinquecento launch would indicate how the integration of operations, and in particular the sharing of technology, platforms, components, manufacturing plants, and distribution networks would drive the long-term health of both Fiat and Chrysler. This case looks at the various strategic and operational challenges Soave faced throughout the process. Learning Objective: The case can be used to explore: 1) approaches for new market entry into foreign markets, and the associate challenges of brand positioning 2) strategies for managing and integrating global alliance partnerships 3) leadership issues associated with corporate turnarounds. By 2010, TripAdvisor was the largest travel site in the world operating in 24 countries and 16 languages, with listings for 455,000 hotels, 92,000 attractions and 564,000 restaurants in over 71,000 destinations worldwide. It had over 40 million reviews from 35 million unique monthly visitors who were contributing 21 new reviews every minute. Known for its hotel reviews, TA expanded into flights, vacation rentals and international markets like China. Each of these expansion paths provided unique opportunities as well as new challenges. In August 2010, Stephen Kaufer, CEO, was debating how to prioritize his growth plans for the company. Learning Objective: To understand how user-generated content (UGC) can be leveraged and what are the challenges of replicating that model in different countries (e.g., China) and different categories (e.g., vacation rentals and flights). The case follows Mel Young, Founder and President of Homeless World Cup, a non-profit organization whose mission is to eliminate homelessness around the world. Homeless World Cup organizes annual football (i.e. soccer) tournaments in host cities and through its grassroots partner organizations, recruits and trains homeless people to play in the events. The case highlights the early days of founding and building the organization, including Young's inspiration for the idea, and also covers the importance of branding and marketing and the organization's relationship with Nike. Learning Objective: This case aims to highlight an example of social entrepreneurship and the role of cause marketing. The objective is to guide students through a few of the many challenges that accompany building and marketing a social (entrepreneurial) venture and asks students to put themselves in the leader's shoes to make critical decisions. The goal is to have students better understand the management decision making process. Abstract

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Pillsbury Cookie Challenge Allison Johnson, Natalie Mauro Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Jan 27, 2011 Product #: W11020-PDF-ENG Length: 14p Teaching Note: Yes

PatientsLikeMe: An Online Community of Patients Sunil Gupta, Jason Riis Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 16, 2011 Product #: 511093-PDF-ENG Length: 22p Teaching Note: Yes

The Canadian Pillsbury ready baked goods cookie line is experiencing less than stellar performance, and the marketing manager is under pressure to make strategic decisions that will help turn around the segment. The marketing manager engages the help of the consumer insight team to conduct market research studies that will shed light on consumers and their attitudes, behaviours and preferences towards the product. The results from the market research studies are in, and the students, assuming the role of the marketing manager, must filter through them to determine how this information can be used to improve the performance of the cookie segment. More specifically, students will need to determine where the greatest opportunities lie, who the team should target, what brand messaging is the most relevant and what type of communication plan would be most effective. Learning Objective: The case highlights a common problem faced by marketers - how to improve the performance of a business. In addition to this aspect, the case focuses on how to attain and interpret consumer information. The following topics are covered in the case: Introduction to consumer insights and market research; Customer segmentation and targeting, and Brand positioning. This case is best suited for an Introduction to Marketing course (either HBA or MBA level) or a course that digs deeper into how firms can employ customer-oriented strategies, such as the Consumers and Customers course. The objectives are to: familiarize students with different types of consumer research and how it can help marketers make better business decisions; develop students' ability to recognize relevant customer insights and to show how these insights can help determine strategies; highlight ways to segment the market, other than by demographics; explore the ways in which marketing managers can improve business performance. PatientsLikeMe (PLM) is an online community where patients share their personal experiences with a disease, find other patients like them, and learn from each other. The company was founded by Jamie and Ben Heywood when their 29-year-old brother was diagnosed with ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease. In less than five years, PLM has grown to 15 patient communities where over 80,000 patients discuss 19 diseases. In December 2010, PLM is discussing its planned launch of a General Platform that would expand the number of diseases covered from 19 to over 3,500. Is it the right move, and what does PLM need to do to make it a success? Learning Objective: To understand how an online community is built and monetized and to highlight the challenges in growing the platform to a larger scale.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Vestas' World of Wind Thomas Steenburgh, Elena Corsi Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Mar 16, 2011 Product #: 511121-PDF-ENG Length: 38p Teaching Note: N/A

The wind turbine manufacturer Vestas launched the industry's first highly localized and customized new product launch campaigns which used also new tools such as web 2.0 platforms. Used to operate in a market where demand exceeded supply, Vestas had lost contact with its customer base and had a limited marketing budget, mainly used to finance global media advertisement campaigns. The world economic downturn which followed the U.S. credit crunch crisis of 2008 and the increased competition in the wind turbine market had brought about a sudden drop in Vestas orders of new turbines. Vestas thus decided to focus more on marketing and developed a new department, Global Marketing and Customer Insights. Morten Albaek was hired to manage and develop the department and to transform Vestas into the undisputed most customer focused company in the industry by 2012 and among the most customer centric B2B brand by 2015. He tested his new approach for the first time with the launch of their new V112 turbine for which he developed 72 customized campaigns targeting its main existing and potential customers and major stakeholders. Yet, had the campaign been effective in bringing Vestas closer to its customer base? Were they using the right tools? Learning Objective: The case should bring students to think about the importance for B2B companies of customer focused marketing approaches and evaluate the new marketing tools used by the company.

Paydiant Jose B. Alvarez, Elizabeth C. Williamson, James Weber Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 24, 2011 Product #: 511065-PDF-ENG Length: 23p Teaching Note: N/A

Kevin Laracey, founder of Paydiant, needed to figure out how to launch a payment processing company with a new technology based on smart phones. Consumers had increasingly turned to electronic payment methods such as credit cards and debit cards to make purchases. Retailers, however, felt that major credit and debit card issuers had too much market power which was leading to higher costs for retailers to accept such payment forms. Consumers were increasingly adopting smart phones and using those phones to manage their lives. Market watchers believed that consumers would soon demand to use their smart phones to make purchases. Retailers liked this because it increased competition in the payments industry. Paydiant had developed a software-based product that required no new hardware for retailers and enabled consumers to use their smart phones to make purchases. The company needed to decide how to bring this new product to market. The case also describes the existing payment processing market structure, identifies some of its major players, and introduces some other new entrants into the payment industry. Learning Objective: This case will help students understand the difficulties involved in and potential strategies used in entering a retail environment as a supplier. The case is also helpful for students interested in learning about adoption of a technology where multiple players (e.g. retailers, banks, network owners, card issuers, and consumers) must all cooperate in order to allow for adoption.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) The NFL's Digital Media Strategy Anita Elberse, Kelsey Calhoun, Daven Johnson Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Oct 20, 2010 Product #: 511055-PDF-ENG Length: 19p Teaching Note: Yes

Red Lobster David E. Bell, Jason Riis Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Sep 08, 2010 Product #: 511052-PDF-ENG Length: 26p Teaching Note: Yes

Chapter 3: Segmentation Porsche: The Cayenne Launch John Deighton, Jill Avery, Jeffrey Fear Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 15, 2011 Product #: 511068-PDF-ENG Length: 22p Teaching Note: Yes

In late 2009, Brian Rolapp, senior vice president of media strategy and digital media for the NFL, was faced with the challenge of determining the league's strategic approach to the wireless market - and presenting his views to NFL team owners. What was the league's best strategy for the mobile space? The case describes the antecedents of what is widely regarded as a landmark deal for the NFL, its $780-million, fouryear exclusive partnership with Verizon. Provides in-depth information on the NFL's digital media revenues, and relates those to the league's overall media and other revenues. Enables a rich discussion of new distribution opportunities and ensuing marketing and channelmanagement challenges. Learning Objective: To understand how sports industries, leagues, and teams are affected by and can capitalize on new forms of digital distribution; to assess viable business models for content owners and distributors in the context of online media. Red Lobster, a 40-year-old chain of seafood restaurants, has just completed some market research revealing an opportunity to shift their target customer segment. The chain is in the final stages of a 10-year plan of rejuvenation under CEO Kim Lopdrup. When he took over as CEO in 2004 the chain was closing restaurants and suffering declining same store sales and declining customer satisfaction. But in 2010, even in a recession, the fortunes of the chain are improving. A recently commissioned market research study has revealed, unexpectedly, that 25% of Red Lobster's customers are "experientials," people coming for a "good evening out" rather than Red Lobster's traditional core customer who came because of a craving for seafood. Should this news cause Lopdrup to do anything differently? Learning Objective: The case was written with three purposes in mind (i) to permit a discussion about segmenting customers (ii) as a general case about the marketing of restaurants and (ii) about the potential of seafood as a source of protein especially in light of the growth of aquaculture as a source. Abstract Can an online discussion forum supply insight into the evolution of brand meaning? In 2003 Porsche launched a sport utility vehicle, dividing Porsche purists from newcomers to the brand. Vocal members of online and offline Porsche communities ridiculed the Cayenne SUV and disapproved of the new breed of driver. Some opposed offering Porsche Club membership to them, and some even refused to extend the fraternal Porsche "wave" or headlight flashing to them on the road. Porsche's values of speed, luxury, and a certain masculine zeal resonated strongly with its devotees, while drivers of the Cayenne (which came to be known as "the SUV for soccer moms") tended to be safety-conscious, family-oriented, and conservative. Evolving debates on forums allow a class to debate whether the brand had strayed too far from its core values and was at risk. Learning Objective: To facilitate understanding of the uses and limitations of online forums as a source of consumer insight.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Fiat-Chrysler Alliance: Launching the Cinquecento in North America Gary P. Pisano, Phillip Andrews, Alessandro Di Fiore Type: HBS case Pub. Date: May 11, 2011 Product #: 611037-PDF-ENG Length: 24p Teaching Note: N/A

Fortis Industries, Inc. (A) Rowland T. Moriarty Jr., David May, Gordon Swartz Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Dec 16, 2011 Product #: 511079-PDF-ENG Length: 18p Teaching Note: N/A

Fiat ended its 27-year absence in the North American automobile market when the first Cinquecento (500)-a very small, iconic Italian car that had strong sales in Europe-was delivered on March 10, 2011. The Italian automaker re-entered the market through an alliance with Chrysler, the American automaker Fiat acquired in April 2009. For Laura Soave, Chrysler Group's head of Fiat Brand North America, the first delivery marked a watershed in a journey that began 12 months before when she first took responsibility for re-launching the Fiat brand in North America. As the first product of the Fiat-Chrysler alliance, the outcome of the Cinquecento launch would indicate how the integration of operations, and in particular the sharing of technology, platforms, components, manufacturing plants, and distribution networks would drive the long-term health of both Fiat and Chrysler. This case looks at the various strategic and operational challenges Soave faced throughout the process. Learning Objective: The case can be used to explore: 1) approaches for new market entry into foreign markets, and the associate challenges of brand positioning 2) strategies for managing and integrating global alliance partnerships 3) leadership issues associated with corporate turnarounds. Fortis Industries' packaging division manufactures steel and plastic strapping. In 2007, the company underwent a leveraged buyout. The case focuses on the packaging division's need to maintain high profitability in a declining market for steel strapping. Since 1998, Fortis has been losing 1% per year of the steel strapping market. Since then, there has also been significant erosion of prices. The division president is faced with 1) decreasing price to increase market share, or 2) maintain/increase cash flow. The specific decision revolves around the potential adoption of a price-flex system that is designed to authorize selective discounting by the division's sales personnel.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Ontela PicDeck (A) Mohanbir Sawhney, Kent Grayson, Patrick Duprss, et al. Type: Kellogg case Pub. Date: Dec 01, 2009 Product #: KEL450 Length: 7p Teaching Note: Yes

Ontela, a technology start-up company, has introduced an innovative service called PicDeck that improves the mobile imaging experience for wireless subscribers. Ontela sells PicDeck to wireless carriers, who in turn private-label the service to their subscribers. Ontela must decide which customer segments it should target for the service and how to create a positioning strategy and a marketing communication plan to promote it. It must also consider the value proposition of the PicDeck service for wireless carriers (its direct customers), who need to be convinced that the service will lead to higher monthly average revenue per user (ARPU) and/or increased subscriber loyalty. Part A of the case provides qualitative information on customer personae that represent different customer segments. Students are asked to develop a targeting and positioning strategy based on this qualitative information. Part B provides quantitative data on customer preferences that can be used to identify response-based customer segments, as well as demographic and media habits information that can be used to profile the segments. Students are asked to revise their recommendations based on the additional quantitative data. Learning Objective: The case reinforces the principles of data-driven customer segmentation, discusses the appropriate criteria for selecting segments, and provides a deeper understanding of the benefits and drawbacks of different approaches to identifying and evaluating segments. The case illustrates how the results of data-driven segmentation may run counter to approaches that rely on "gut feel" or qualitative information alone.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Making Waves in Rural Kenya Sebastian Herrmann, Glenn Brophey, Denyse LafranceHorning Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Jul 21, 2009 Product #: 909A15-PDF-ENG Length: 10p Teaching Note: N/A

The developers of a simple, inexpensive, locally produced rain water harvesting system tackle the social marketing issues in the undeveloped market of rural Kenya. The benefits of the product are obvious but the poverty levels and entrenched traditions create significant and unique marketing challenges. Learning Objective: This case is best suited for advanced marketing students. The case setting is unique and challenges students beyond traditional textbook applications of core marketing concepts. In the context of a foreign and undeveloped market, advanced marketing students should explore the following issues: Understanding the unique needs of various possible segments. Appreciating the impact of social influences on the decision-making process. Creating awareness, education and acceptance for new behavior and a new product concept. This case is intended to push students beyond the conventional application of marketing concepts. Students will be introduced to the unique needs of the hardcore poor consumers in rural Kenya and challenged to adapt marketing strategies to this exceptional and undeveloped environment. Truly understanding consumer needs and the various social influences in the problemsolving process are central to this case.

Chapter 4: Targeting

Abstract

The Ford Fiesta John Deighton, Leora Kornfeld Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 15, 2011 Product #: 511117-PDF-ENG Length: 24p Teaching Note: N/A

Executives at Ford wondered if social media could be the marketing solution for the launch of the youth-oriented 2010 Fiesta. But with social media came a ceding of control. Some at the company believed that if Ford was going to move beyond its conservative brand image for the launch of the new subcompact chances had to be taken. Others erred on the side of caution. Chantel Lenard, Ford's Group Marketing Manager for Global Small Car and Midsize Vehicles and Connie Fontaine, Manager of Brand Content and Alliances championed a new approach for the new vehicle and set into motion a comprehensive 6month social media initiative targeting a younger, ethnically diverse, and urban-based market, called "The Fiesta Movement". In doing so, a large portion of the marketing campaign was handed over to 20 and 30-somethings across America, and Ford had to acclimate to a new way of doing marketing. To what extent should the company guide the activities and messages of their army of bloggers? The case is set two months into the Movement, as the team evaluates the metrics from YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and their website, and wonder if they're doing everything they need to do in order to make the Fiesta a success with a new target market. Learning Objective: To examine the variety of marketing techniques in the new social media toolbox; is the ultimate objective to 'go viral', or are there other metrics to consider when evaluating a social mediabased marketing campaign?

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Nike Football: World Cup 2010 South Africa Elie Ofek, Ryan Johnson Type: HBS case Pub. Date: May 31, 2011 Product #: 511060-PDF-ENG Length: 29p Teaching Note: N/A

L'Oreal: Global Brand, Local Knowledge Rebecca Henderson, Ryan Johnson Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jun 08, 2011 Product #: 311118-PDF-ENG Length: 14p Teaching Note: Yes

Nike's Football division needs to devise a strategy to excel at the 2010 World Cup games in South Africa. Nike has gone from a niche player in the market for football apparel and footwear in 1994 to a formidable competitor to Adidas in 2008 (with revenues of over $1 billion for the sport). The case traces how Nike has gone about making this transformation and its activities at each of the World Cups since 1994. For the upcoming World Cup in South Africa, Nike has decided to change its target market focus and to use digital and social media platforms to connect more extensively with consumers. In addition, Nike plans to launch innovative new boots and engage in corporate social responsibility and sustainability initiatives. The company has to do so in light of competition from archrival Adidas and the pressure of succeeding on the biggest stage in football, with billions of people around the world watching. The case allows students to analyze how a company can best integrate several value propositions into a cohesive plan and how it can best communicate with its chosen target market. It also allows for a rich discussion of the brand image the company needs to portray to leverage success beyond the World Cup event. Learning Objective: Devise a marketing strategy and communication plan to reach a new target market; how to integrate and promote several value propositions by the same company and use a high profile event to build brand connection Worldwide, and in the U.S. marketplace in particular, the French cachet of L'Or al was one of its most powerful marketing tools. However, with the opening up of emerging markets, L'Or al had to cater to a diverse customer base: an aging population in the West, ethnic groups, aspiring and younger customers in the East, emerging markets, and growing interest in health and beauty care among men all over the world. Employing both traditional and innovative marketing techniques, L'Or al worked to double its customer base to two billion by 2020 and increase to half from a third its share of sales from emerging markets. Learning Objective: To learn from and analyze the best practices of L'Or al with regard to marketing. To examine how they use their strong brand, traditional media, digital media, celebrity endorsements and interactive marketing contests to reach a diverse array of loyal and potential consumers. Also to examine how a large company shifts marketing and messaging efforts around a changing world view and changing global economics.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Benecol Spread and Media Planning Richard Johnson, Robert I Carraway, Ervin R. Shames, Paul W. Farris Type: Darden case Pub. Date: Dec 03, 2010 Product #: UV2930-PDF-ENG Length: 21p Teaching Note: Yes Marketing Analysis Toolkit: Customer Lifetime Value Analysis, Spreadsheet Supplement Thomas Steenburgh, Jill Avery Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jul 27, 2010 Product #: 511029-PDF-ENG Length: 9p Teaching Note: N/A

Marketing Analysis Toolkit: Market Size and Market Share Analysis Thomas Steenburgh, Jill Avery Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 04, 2010 Product #: 510081-PDF-ENG Length: 7p Teaching Note: N/A

Benecol Spread, a cholesterol-lowering margarine, was a product with unusual media-planning challenges. With a narrow target group and unproven market potential, Johnson & Johnson needed to get the most "bang for the buck" from its Benecol advertising. Would a mediaplanning model (optimizer) requiring executives to quantify their judgment on several key inputs be helpful in this process? A spreadsheet accompanying the case allows students to weight the target groups and to choose among different advertising vehicles to form the best possible media plan. Customers are increasingly being viewed as assets that bring value to the firm. Customer lifetime value is a metric which allows managers to understand the overall value of their customer base and relate it to three customer strategies firms employ: asset acquisition - attracting new customers to the firm, asset maximization - maximizing the value the firm extracts from each customer, and asset retention - retaining existing customers for the long term. The note gives students a foundation for analyzing marketing cases, as well as providing an analytical structure and process for completing a marketing plan. The note is accompanied by a free Excel worksheet which contains sample problems, prebuilt Excel models to calculate customer lifetime value, and charts and graphs which help visualize the results. Learning Objective: To provide students with analytical tools that they can use to more rigorously analyze marketing cases and decisions and to develop a strategic marketing plan. Marketers frequently need to estimate the size of their markets -- both for existing products so that sales forecasts can be developed, and for new products so that market opportunities can be assessed. This toolkit enables students to size a market and generate a sales forecast using a market build-up methodology. Students learn to measure market demand and company demand and calculate market and product penetration rates and market share. The note gives students a foundation for analyzing marketing cases, as well as providing an analytical structure and process for completing a marketing plan. The note is accompanied by a free Excel worksheet (available only to authorized faculty) which contains sample problems, pre-built Excel models to calculate market size, market penetration, and market share, and charts and graphs which help visualize the results. Learning Objective: To provide students with analytical tools that they can use to more rigorously analyze marketing cases and decisions and to develop a strategic marketing plan.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) NFL UK Elie Ofek, David B. Godes, Peter Wickersham Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Mar 17, 2010 Product #: 510105-PDF-ENG Length: 32p Teaching Note: N/A

Chapter 5: Positioning Clean Edge Razor: Splitting Hairs in Product Positioning John A. Quelch, Heather Beckham Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 19, 2011 Product #: 4249-PDF-ENG Length: 10p Teaching Note: Yes

The NFL faces a decision on how to continue efforts to grow its fanbase in the UK. The decision needs to take into account lessons learned from previous NFL activities in Europe, market research on the UK sports fan and the implications of any move on the U.S. fan. Moreover, the decision should be couched within the broader context of the NFL's goal to expand internationally. Alistair Kirkwood, head of NFL UK, and Chris Parsons, VP of NFL International, must propose a course of action that the London-based team can both execute and that will receive the approval of the NFL's commissioner and owners. Learning Objective: Examine the consumer and strategic implications of taking a brand with a rich history and tradition in one country/culture and exporting that to another country/culture (how can one "innovate globally with a local tradition?) Abstract After three years of development, Paramount Health and Beauty Company is preparing to launch a new technologically advanced vibrating razor called Clean Edge. The innovative new design of Clean Edge provides superior performance by stimulating the hair follicles to lift the hair from the skin, allowing for a closer shave. The company has already decided to introduce Clean Edge into the men's market where it has a strong presence. Jackson Randall, the product manager for Clean Edge, struggles with how best to position the product for the launch. One strategy is to release Clean Edge as a "niche" product, targeting the high-end market of fastidious groomers looking for superior skin care products. Another strategy is to release the product into the highly competitive mainstream razor market where the product can be positioned as the most effective razor available. Randall meets internal resistance to the mainstream strategy from the product manager for the company's current, but aging, mainstream razor products and he must consider the effects of cannibalization in his plan. Randall must recommend an optimal strategy and provide supporting economic analysis of his decision--not just for Clean Edge, but for its effect on the entire company. Learning Objective: Explore issues associated with strategic product positioning. Review new product development process and understand the importance of evaluating product-company and product-market fit in assessing new product opportunities. Understand the importance and marketing implications of determining whether a new product is a big breakthrough or a simple line extension.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Porsche: The Cayenne Launch John Deighton, Jill Avery, Jeffrey Fear Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 15, 2011 Product #: 511068-PDF-ENG Length: 22p Teaching Note: Yes

The Eleganzia Group Elie Ofek, Elena Corsi, Bharat Sajnani, Sorina Casian-Botez, Francesco Tronci Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Apr 18, 2011 Product #: 511115-PDF-ENG Length: 35p Teaching Note: N/A

Can an online discussion forum supply insight into the evolution of brand meaning? In 2003 Porsche launched a sport utility vehicle, dividing Porsche purists from newcomers to the brand. Vocal members of online and offline Porsche communities ridiculed the Cayenne SUV and disapproved of the new breed of driver. Some opposed offering Porsche Club membership to them, and some even refused to extend the fraternal Porsche "wave" or headlight flashing to them on the road. Porsche's values of speed, luxury, and a certain masculine zeal resonated strongly with its devotees, while drivers of the Cayenne (which came to be known as "the SUV for soccer moms") tended to be safety-conscious, family-oriented, and conservative. Evolving debates on forums allow a class to debate whether the brand had strayed too far from its core values and was at risk. Learning Objective: To facilitate understanding of the uses and limitations of online forums as a source of consumer insight. Eleganzia Group management faces tough decisions heading into the summer of 2010. With tourism on the decline due to the global economic recession, General Manager Giannuzzi must decide how to set prices at the Forte Village Resort, the Group's most well-known property. His management team is further divided on whether the pricing model at the resort should change to being all-inclusive (as opposed to one where guests are charged for each additional activity or dining option on a pay-as-you-go basis), and whether to convert a large number of the 4-star rooms into 5-star suites. Recently acquired properties, such as the Castel Monastero in Tuscany and the Maddalena Hotel & Yacht Club in north Sardinia, pose a branding challenge. Can all the properties, including the Forte Village, be successfully brought under one umbrella brand, namely, Eleganzia? Moreover, what should the character of each these new properties be? Learning Objective: Pricing and Branding strategy in a luxury consumption setting; balancing short term revenue with long term brand goals.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Reed Supermarkets: A New Wave of Competitors John A. Quelch, Carole Carlson Type: HBP Brief case Pub. Date: Jun 17, 2011 Product #: 4296-PDF-ENG Length: 12p Teaching Note: Yes

Alpen Bank: Launching the Credit Card in Romania (Brief Case) V. Kasturi Rangan, Sunru Yong Type: HBS case Pub. Date: May 19, 2010 Product #: 4559-PDF-ENG Length: 8p Teaching Note: Yes

Reed Supermarkets is a high-end supermarket chain with operations in several Midwestern states. Meredith Collins, vice president of marketing, visits stores located in Columbus, Ohio, an important region with the largest market and the greatest impact on revenue growth. She is concerned about increased competition from dollar stores and limited-assortment stores offering very low, appealing price points. Reed's market research shows that as a result of the economic downturn, customer loyalty is dwindling and consumers are willing to go to multiple stores to get the best deals. Collins must decide whether to change the current marketing and positioning plan in an effort to increase market share to meet challenging corporate targets. Her options include retreating from price competition and focusing on quality or embracing more private-label brands and competing more aggressively on price. She can also maintain the current positioning and appeal to customers looking for a quality shopping experience. The case contains an implicit quantitative assignment that instructors can emphasize to the degree they choose. Learning Objective: Explore elements of marketing strategy, market segmentation, product differentiation, and product positioning for a retail organization. Analyze and differentiate among conflicting strategic perspectives. Understand the "cycle of retailing," which suggests that new retail stores naturally evolve from low-price, lowoverhead stores to become upscale retailers offering additional services and product lines. In 2006, the country manager for Alpen Bank in Romania, Gregory Carle, considers whether to recommend the launch of a credit card business. The firm rejected the idea several years earlier because of poor economic conditions in Romania. However, Romania is experiencing a period of economic growth after joining the European Union and Carle believes it is time to reconsider the opportunity despite continued skepticism within the company. Carle faces several important decisions before he can present his plan to the head of International Consumer Businesses. He must decide whether to launch a credit card business in Romania, how to position the credit card, and how to acquire new customers most effectively. This case is appropriate for use in the product policy module of a general marketing course, in a new product course, or in a services management course. Students are required to complete a quantitative assignment as part of case analysis. Learning Objective: 1. To expose students to key elements of services marketing, especially target market selection, acquisition cost, and lifetime value of a customer. 2. To introduce students to international marketing issues.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Mary Kay Inc.: Asian Market Entry (B) John A. Quelch Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jun 01, 2009 Product #: 509067-PDF-ENG Length: 1p Teaching Note: N/A

By 2008, over half of Mary Kay Cosmetics' $2.8 billion sales were from outside the USA. Sales from China exceeded $500 million in 2008 through over 450,000 beauty consultants. China was Mary Kay Cosmetics' second most important national market with revenues growing at over 20 percent each year. In contrast, Mary Kay Cosmetics had decided to exit the Japanese market in 2001. Learning Objective: Brand Stretching; Adaptation in Emerging Markets; Strategic Growth in Emerging Markets.

Verne Global: Building a Green Data Center in Iceland Thomas Steenburgh, Nnamdi Okike Type: HBS case Pub. Date: May 18, 2009 Product #: 509063-PDF-ENG Length: 28p Teaching Note: N/A

Verne Global, a pioneering startup created to build the first large-scale data center in Iceland, faces critical challenges regarding its green strategy. Verne Co-Founder Isaac Kato is tasked with evaluating how the company can most successfully market and sell the green components of its service offering. Using only renewable energy in its data center facility, Verne can drastically reduce customers' carbon emissions, enabling customers to meet emerging government regulations and to capture the financial benefit of public goodwill arising from green initiatives. But how valuable are Verne's green benefits, and are they sufficient to compel customers to pay a premium for Verne services? Further, how can Verne best integrate its green strategy into its marketing and sales message? Finally, will Verne's green benefits enable the company to overcome obstacles in the sales process, or will they alternatively overcomplicate an already complex sales message? Kato's decision allows discussion of the emerging role of green marketing and sales and helps identify how a product or service which is good for the environment can also be good for the bottom line. Learning Objective: To examine green marketing and sales in-depth, with a focus on identifying the potential financial benefits of a green service offering. This case encompasses a wide range of topics in business marketing, including quantifying a customer value proposition, defining the optimal marketing and sales strategy for an innovative product or service, identifying key decision-makers within the customer organization, and identifying potential obstacles to a successful sale.

PART 2: PRODUCT POSITIONING Chapter 6: Products: Goods and Service

Abstract

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Marvel Enterprises, Inc. (Abridged) Anita Elberse Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 24, 2011 Product #: 511097-PDF-ENG Length: 10p Teaching Note: Yes

Coca-Cola on Facebook John Deighton, Leora Kornfeld Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 15, 2011 Product #: 511110-PDF-ENG Length: 11p Teaching Note: N/A

The management team of Marvel Enterprises, known for its universe of superhero characters that includes Spider-Man, the Hulk, and X-Men, must reevaluate its marketing strategy. In June 2004, only six years after the company emerged from bankruptcy, Marvel has amassed a market value of more than $2 billion. Originally known as a comic book publisher, the company now also has highly profitable toy, motion picture, and consumer products licensing operations. However, doubts about Marvel's business model and its growth potential continue to exist. Had Marvel's winning streak been just a fluke? Was Marvel's success dependent on a limited set of blockbuster characters, most notably Spider-Man, and should Marvel continue to capitalize on those characters? Or was it time to seek growth in a larger set of lesser known characters? In exploring growth opportunities, was it wise for Marvel to venture outside its current business model and move into more capital-intensive activities? What marketing strategy would allow Marvel to sustain its success in the coming years? Learning Objective: To study a best-practice example of an intellectual property (entertainment) licensing model. Also, to examine sources of sustainability in industries characterized by products with relatively short life cycles and explore how companies can build and manage brand franchises. In late 2008, executives at Coca-Cola had to decide what to do with a fan-created page on Facebook that had amassed over one million followers in three months. From a legal point of view the fan-created page was in violation of Facebook's terms of service, because a noncopyright holder was using the imagery and logo associated with a known brand. Facebook contacted Michael Donnelly, Group Director, Worldwide Interactive Marketing for The Coca-Cola Company, to let him know that he was in the position to take down the hugely popular fan-created site or, conversely, he could take it over and make it an official marketing channel for the company. Coke was already revisiting its social media policies, with the Diet Coke and Mentos usergenerated video incident fresh in its memory. Those videos, which featured elaborate geysers with Diet Coke as their main ingredient, were among the most viewed online videos at the time but were not initially sanctioned by the company. Donnelly knew that opening up the brand to creative consumers was necessary, but he and his team had to figure out how and to what extent they should do so while still protecting one of the world's most valuable brands. Learning Objective: To illustrate the changing marketing landscape as social media evolves as a mass and mainstream marketing platform.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Porcini's Pronto: "Great Italian cuisine without the wait!" James L. Heskett, Richard Luecke Type: HBS Brief case Pub. Date: Apr 04, 2011Product #: 4277-PDF-ENG Length: 12p Teaching Note: Yes

Porcini's Inc. operates a chain of 23 full-service restaurants located near shopping malls and downtown areas in the northeastern United States. Known for providing excellent service, Porcini's serves highquality Italian cuisine made from fresh ingredients. Looking for expansion opportunities, management considers launching a new chain of lower-cost, limited-menu restaurants called Porcini Pronto. The new outlets will be located along busy interstate highway exits in the region and will serve outstanding Italian food at reasonable prices to both travelers and local residents. Management is concerned that a poor customer experience at Porcini Pronto could tarnish the company's well-established and successful restaurant brand. The management team asks the vice president of marketing to develop the concept and to create an operating strategy for the new outlets. The VP must also analyze three alternative expansion strategies before management will make any commitments to the project. If Porcini's builds and operates the new restaurants, the company will maintain complete control of operations and the customer experience but expansion will take a very long time. Franchising and syndication are two other options which provide faster expansion but introduce the risk of losing control of the brand. The VP must analyze the options and make his final recommendation. Learning Objective: Describe the role of HR programs and measurement systems in supporting product and service quality. Understand how employee selection and training, customer feedback, product offerings, and other elements of a business concept must work together to support both the strategy and the customer value proposition. Identify the implications for product and service quality associated with different growth alternatives including company ownership, franchising, and syndication.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. Sunil Gupta, Kerry Herman Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Oct 13, 2010 Product #: 511002-PDF-ENG Length: 20p Teaching Note: N/A

Understanding Buyer Choice/Rejection/Experience Processes for Complex Services: The Example of Montessori Private Schools Roger A. More Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Feb 22, 2010 Product #: 910A02-PDF-ENG Length: 8p Teaching Note: N/A Understanding Buyer Choice/Rejection/Experience Processes for Complex Business-to-Business HighTechnology Product/Service Bundles: The Example of Nuclear Power Plants Roger A. More Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Feb 22, 2010 Product #: 910A03-PDF-ENG Length: 9p Teaching Note: N/A

In September 2010, faced with increasing threat from social game companies such as Zynga, Ben Feder, the CEO of Take-Two Interactive Software. Inc., had to decide the long-term strategy of his video-game company. As a publisher of traditional video games for Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 and Nintendo, Take-Two had several popular video games, such as Grand Theft Auto, to its credit. However, the video game industry was undergoing a major transition. In addition to digital downloading and cloud gaming, casual and social games were transforming the video game industry. Electronic Arts, one of TakeTwo's major competitors, acquired a social gaming company in November 2009 for $400 million. In August 2010, Disney bought another social gaming company for $763 million. Social games were developed, marketed and monetized very differently from traditional console games. Should Take-Two follow the lead of its competitors or continue to focus on its core business? Learning Objective: To understand how companies navigate through the digital transition; to understand how development, marketing and monetization differs across business models; to assess the economics of traditional and new business models. This note develops a comprehensive new set of concepts to understand buying processes of parents choosing among complex educational services using the example of Montessori private schools.

This note develops a comprehensive new conceptualization of the complex processes that accompany large scale high technology product/service bundles using the example of nuclear power plants.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Understanding Buyer Choice/Rejection/Experience Processes for Complex HighTechnology Consumer Products: The Example of Notebook Computers Roger A. More Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Feb 22, 2010 Product #: 910A04-PDF-ENG Length: 13p Teaching Note: N/A Chapter 7: Brands

This note develops a comprehensive new set of concepts to understand buyer behaviour for complex high technology consumer products using the example of notebook computers.

Rebranding Gallagher Rohit Deshpande, Keith Chi-ho Wong Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 25, 2011 Product #: 511098-PDF-ENG Length: 12p Teaching Note: N/A

Steve Tucker, the Deputy CEO of Gallagher Group Limited (GGL), the world's largest electric fence company, was about to present a new branding strategy to the company's senior managers and Bill Gallagher, Jr., CEO. After spending more than 18 months with brand consultants, Tucker devised an umbrella brand strategy that would instill a uniform brand across all three business units: Animal Management Systems, Security Management Systems, and Fuel Pumps, which marketed themselves under the respective brand names of Gallagher, Cardax, Powerfence, and PEC. However, Tucker knew that the unit heads believed the differences in their clienteles, product categories, and distributor relationships made it impractical to adopt one single brand. GGL's overseas distributors had also raised concerns about a uniform brand. In many cases, GGL only owned minority interests in these distributors and retained limited control over their activities. Learning Objective: Managing international distributors; managing global branding. Barcelo Hotels and Resorts must decide whether to allow its many hotels to continue to undertake separate promotional campaigns or to run, for the first time, a broad corporate-level promotion. Complicating the decision is the fact that the many hotels in its portfolio vary greatly in their character, clientele, positioning, and locations. Learning Objective: Looks at the costs and benefits of a corporate level branding and price promotion strategy. Also, when used with the Harrah's case (HBS Case # 502-011), allows for a discussion of centralized versus decentralized management of a portfolio of service entities.

Barcelo Hotels and Resorts (A) John T. Gourville, Marco Bertini Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 18, 2011 Product #: 511108-PDF-ENG Length: 29p Teaching Note: N/A

Abstract

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Health Care Center for the Homeless: Changing with the Times Mary Conway Dato-on, Eileen Weisenbach Keller Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Mar 08, 2011 Product #: 910A32-PDF-ENG Length: 12p Teaching Note: Yes

Bakari Burns, CEO of the Health Care Center for the Homeless (HCCH), located in Orlando, Florida was faced with the daunting task of rebranding the organization he lead. Burns knew the organization experienced difficulty with recognition and marketplace distinction, primarily due to the public's misperceptions about the relationship between HCCH and the Coalition for the Homeless of Central Florida. An external consulting team offered several recommendations for change, including an amended name and redesign of all marketing materials. This advice and changes in the external environment provided an excellent opportunity to reposition and refocus the organization. Recognizing the need for a new strategy and implementing that strategy were not the same; Burns was not sure how to lead the organization through the change process. Learning Objective: The objectives of this case are to: Utilize internal and external analysis as a means of understanding the current situation and Burns' need to rebrand the organization; Understand how brand orientation is critical to strategy for NPOs (nonprofit organizations); Improve understanding of brand orientation through the application and analysis of the construct to the subject NPO; Apply Kotter's change model in order to understand Burns' role in introducing and leading change toward the acceptance of the new brand image and orientation; Facilitate discussion of the mission-driven nature of social service organizations and social issues of homelessness and health care. This case is suitable for use in undergraduate and firstyear graduate courses in change management and branding. The detailed treatment of environmental analysis may also make the case useful in marketing management or strategy courses. The contentious, socially relevant issues of health care and homelessness make the case particularly relevant to courses in public administration and nonprofit management.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Porcini's Pronto: "Great Italian cuisine without the wait!" James L. Heskett, Richard Luecke Type: HBP case Pub. Date: Apr 04, 2011 Product #: 4277-PDF-ENG Length: 12p Teaching Note: Yes

Procter & Gamble: Marketing Capabilities Rebecca Henderson, Ryan Johnson Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jun 10, 2011 Product #: 311117-PDF-ENG Length: 17p Teaching Note: Yes

Porcini's Inc. operates a chain of 23 full-service restaurants located near shopping malls and downtown areas in the northeastern United States. Known for providing excellent service, Porcini's serves highquality Italian cuisine made from fresh ingredients. Looking for expansion opportunities, management considers launching a new chain of lower-cost, limited-menu restaurants called Porcini Pronto. The new outlets will be located along busy interstate highway exits in the region and will serve outstanding Italian food at reasonable prices to both travelers and local residents. Management is concerned that a poor customer experience at Porcini Pronto could tarnish the company's well-established and successful restaurant brand. The management team asks the vice president of marketing to develop the concept and to create an operating strategy for the new outlets. The VP must also analyze three alternative expansion strategies before management will make any commitments to the project. If Porcini's builds and operates the new restaurants, the company will maintain complete control of operations and the customer experience but expansion will take a very long time. Franchising and syndication are two other options which provide faster expansion but introduce the risk of losing control of the brand. The VP must analyze the options and make his final recommendation. Learning Objective: Describe the role of HR programs and measurement systems in supporting product and service quality. Understand how employee selection and training, customer feedback, product offerings, and other elements of a business concept must work together to support both the strategy and the customer value proposition. Identify the implications for product and service quality associated with different growth alternatives including company ownership, franchising, and syndication. P&G had become known and recognized as a marketing machine. It was the largest advertiser in the world, with 2010 spending of $8.68 billion. From the company's early exploitation of broadcast media (radio and television) for its soap products to more recent experiments in digital media for its men's hygiene brand Old Spice, P&G was a seasoned marketer with strong consumer research, a powerful innovation network, and the world's largest financial commitment to advertising. Learning Objective: To learn from and analyze the best practices of P&G the world's largest advertising spender and a renowned marketer of consumer products. To understand their marketing strategies, where marketing innovation is developed, how it is applied across different categories and how marketing shifts with changes in structure and culture.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Herborist: A Chinese Personal Care Brand Goes Abroad Kevin Zhou, Grace Loo Type: Uni. of Hong Kong case Pub. Date: Jun 13, 2011 Product #: HKU927-PDF-ENG Length: 24p Teaching Note: Yes

Taj Hotels, Resorts and Palaces Rohit Deshpande, Mona Sinha Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Sep 28, 2010 Product #: 511039-PDF-ENG Length: 16p Teaching Note: N/A

Herborist, a high-end Chinese personal care brand, had been steadily expanding its share in global markets since 2008. The brand distinguished itself by integrating traditional Chinese medicine with modern biotechnology and emphasising its green and organic ingredients. Whereas Chinese were familiar with the concept, how would Herborist sell it to consumers outside mainland China who were used to using established Japanese brands, such as Shiseido and SKII, or western brands, such as Estee Lauder and Sisley? In 2001, Herborist chose to enter the Hong Kong market and test its product in this very competitive market that was dominated by the major Japanese and western cosmetics brands. The company opened two Herborist-branded stores in major shopping centres but was forced to close them down two years later due to bad results. The company tried again in 2007, this time distributing its products through the Hong Kong personal health and beauty chain Mannings. In 2008, Herborist entered the Paris market with the help of the cosmetics chain store Sephora. Results were mixed; although some of its products became top sellers, the overall sales figures were not very promising. By 2011, Herborist was ready for the next step in its international expansion plan. Which markets should it target and what strategy should it adopt? Learning Objective: This case provides students with an opportunity to explore the challenges faced by a personal care brand from an emerging market in converting to a global brand and requires students to analyze different markets and as well as different modes of market entry strategy. The Taj Hotels, Palaces, and Resorts introduced a new brand architecture to counter lack of differentiation and confused positioning of its mixed bag of brands. After launching an economy and an upscale brand, it dithered over the launch of its upper upscale and luxury brands. The case illustrates the marketing and organizational challenges of a hybrid brand extension strategy that lies in between a 'house of brands' and a 'branded house'. Learning Objective: To develop understanding of how brand architecture is shaped by corporate growth.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) The Dannon Company: Marketing and Corporate Social Responsibility (A) Christopher Marquis, Pooja Shah, Amanda Tolleson, Bobbi Thomason Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Apr 01, 2010 Product #: 410121-PDF-ENG Length: 23p Teaching Note: Yes

Classic Knitwear and Guardian: A Perfect Fit? (Brief Case) John A. Quelch, Patricia Girardi Type: HBP Brief case Pub. Date: Jun 18, 2010 Product #: 4217-PDF-ENG Length: 8p Teaching Note: Yes

At the end of 2009, The Dannon Company was considering pro actively communicating its CSR efforts to consumers. With the strong connection between Dannon's production of health foods and its commitment to health and nutrition-based CSR activities, communicating these activities to consumers could enhance the company's success, but risked tainting its deeply ingrained CSR as a marketing ploy. Dannon wanted to maintain its holistic approach to social responsibility and commitment to social values. Dannon's CSR focused on three areas: Nutrition and Health, People and Nature. The case follows the perspectives of various stakeholders within the organization, including members of the Marketing, Human Resources and Corporate Affairs departments. Some of the specific questions examined are: Should we communicate Dannon's CSR activities? What would be the best means to do so? Should it be a corporate or brand level campaign? How would the parent company, Danone, respond? Can CSR remain sincere when being leveraged for PR purposes? Learning Objective: To discuss how a company develops, implements and communicates a strategic corporate social responsibility program that is aligned with the organization's business operations and commitment to social values. Classic Knitwear manufactures and distributes casual apparel, either unbranded or under a private-label brand name. Partly because Classic has no brand recognition with consumers, gross margins are low. To improve margins, the company considers partnering via a licensing agreement with Guardian, a manufacturer of insect repellent that has developed superior repellent technology for clothing. Unlike Classic Knitwear, Guardian is a well-known and well-respected brand in its target market of outdoor enthusiasts, and Classic Knitwear wants to take advantage of this by selling the new clothing line under the Guardian brand. The partnership presents many new opportunities for Classic Knitwear along with many risks. The CEO wants a quick decision in time for the company's upcoming investor call. The case explores challenges in product development, brand management, and consumer marketing. Students are required to complete a breakeven analysis and estimate product demand based on data presented in the case. Learning Objective: To evaluate a new product opportunity in which the firm built exclusively on manufacturing private label and unbranded products enters into a partnership to launch a line of branded "value added" products. To conduct a break-even analysis and to estimate sales potential of a new opportunity.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) LeBron James Anita Elberse, Jeff McCall Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 31, 2009 Product #: 509050-PDF-ENG Length: 4p Teaching Note: Yes

Manchester Products: A Brand Transition Challenge John A. Quelch, Heather Beckham Type: HBP Brief case Pub. Date: Jun 28, 2009 Product #: 4043-PDF-ENG Length: 11p Teaching Note: Yes

In 2005, to the astonishment of many sports industry insiders, superstar basketball player LeBron James fired his agent and established his own firm, LRMR, to handle all aspects of his business ventures and marketing activities and named his childhood friend Maverick Carter as the CEO. LRMR is tasked with turning James into a global icon as well as help him reach his personal goal of becoming basketball's first billionaire. In late 2008, James has entered various lucrative endorsement deals, and is considering three exclusive videogame endorsement opportunities from Electronic Arts, 2K Games, and Xbox Live to add to his portfolio. Allows for a rich discussion about how superstar athletes and other celebrities can create and capture value from their brands as well as what role talent agencies and other intermediaries play in that process. Provides indepth information on three endorsement opportunities that each represent a common way in which talent can (choose to) get compensated: through a fixed-fee payment, a bonus payment structure, or a revenue-sharing agreement. Learning Objective: To examine marketing issues and, more specifically, celebrity endorsement opportunities in the context of a world-class athlete. To explore ways in which superstars in the creative industries create and capture value from their brands. In January of 2005, Manchester Products Inc., a longtime leader in office furniture that only recently entered into the home furniture market, acquired Paul Logan's Furniture Division (PLFD). The acquisition of PLFD made Manchester an instant market leader in household furniture. A key factor in the value of PLFD has been the name of the company founder -- arguably the premiere name in highend fashion and accessories, and a true lifestyle brand. However, Manchester has acquired rights to use the Paul Logan brand name for only three years. Jason Adams, VP of Marketing for Manchester, is responsible for designing a plan to transition the brand from the Paul Logan name to Manchester. He must develop the optimal timing and sequencing of the brand transition, assess the implications, and establish the appropriate mix of advertising and promotion programs to support the transition. Learning Objective: 1. Evaluate alternative product policies and communications programs for implementing a brand transition. 2. Discuss the horizontal and vertical stretching of a brand name in relation to product line breadth and depth. 3. Evaluate the marketing strategy behind an acquisition, including considerations of productcompany and product-market fit. and product-market fit.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Fiat and Chrysler: Gaining on Global Automakers? Robert E. Spekman, Jacki Fritz Type: Darden case Pub. Date: Oct 06, 2009 Product #: UV2975-PDF-ENG Length: 21p Teaching Note: N/A

This case examines the formation of an alliance between Fiat and Chrysler during the height of the financial crisis as a mechanism to save Chrysler from liquidation. The case traces the events leading up to the alliance, discusses the early stage issues with which the partners have to deal, addresses some of the governance issues, and examines the past merger between Chrysler and Daimler that ended in a failure. The case presents a normative approach to alliance management and conjectures about the success of the Fiat-Chrysler alliance. We address whether Chrysler is a suitable partner and whether there is a strong enough rationale for the alliance and whether the two partners are compatible. Finally, the case explores the lessons learned and the cautions that might derail the alliance. Learning Objective: 1) Examine an alliance in the automotive industry to see if the rationale for the alliance makes sense; 2) Explore the alliance-formation process to see if the proper steps were taken during the due diligence; 3) See what lessons can be gleaned from previous mergers; 4) Understand better how alliances can be used to gain competitive advantage.

Chapter 8: New Products

Abstract

Serious Materials Thomas Steenburgh, Liz Kind Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 18, 2011 Product #: 511111-PDF-ENG Length: 20p Teaching Note: N/A

Serious Materials is a start up who is moving into clean tech markets. The company's first product, QuietRock, originated the sound proofing drywall category and created a steady stream of revenue. It was now considering how to expand its product line to compete in the rapidly developing green building markets. How should Serious Materials go to market when they launch their highly anticipated Serious Windows and EcoRock product lines? What do they need to do to develop their brand? Learning Objective: How to create product line extensions in green markets.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Clean Edge Razor: Splitting Hairs in Product Positioning John A. Quelch, Heather Beckham Type: HBP Brief case Pub. Date: Jan 19, 2011 Product #: 4249-PDF-ENG Length: 10p Teaching Note: Yes

Porsche: The Cayenne Launch John Deighton, Jill Avery, Jeffrey Fear Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 15, 2011 Product #: 511068-PDF-ENG Length: 22p Teaching Note: Yes

After three years of development, Paramount Health and Beauty Company is preparing to launch a new technologically advanced vibrating razor called Clean Edge. The innovative new design of Clean Edge provides superior performance by stimulating the hair follicles to lift the hair from the skin, allowing for a closer shave. The company has already decided to introduce Clean Edge into the men's market where it has a strong presence. Jackson Randall, the product manager for Clean Edge, struggles with how best to position the product for the launch. One strategy is to release Clean Edge as a "niche" product, targeting the high-end market of fastidious groomers looking for superior skin care products. Another strategy is to release the product into the highly competitive mainstream razor market where the product can be positioned as the most effective razor available. Randall meets internal resistance to the mainstream strategy from the product manager for the company's current, but aging, mainstream razor products and he must consider the effects of cannibalization in his plan. Randall must recommend an optimal strategy and provide supporting economic analysis of his decision--not just for Clean Edge, but for its effect on the entire company. Learning Objective: Explore issues associated with strategic product positioning. Review new product development process and understand the importance of evaluating product-company and product-market fit in assessing new product opportunities. Understand the importance and marketing implications of determining whether a new product is a big breakthrough or a simple line extension. Can an online discussion forum supply insight into the evolution of brand meaning? In 2003 Porsche launched a sport utility vehicle, dividing Porsche purists from newcomers to the brand. Vocal members of online and offline Porsche communities ridiculed the Cayenne SUV and disapproved of the new breed of driver. Some opposed offering Porsche Club membership to them, and some even refused to extend the fraternal Porsche "wave" or headlight flashing to them on the road. Porsche's values of speed, luxury, and a certain masculine zeal resonated strongly with its devotees, while drivers of the Cayenne (which came to be known as "the SUV for soccer moms") tended to be safety-conscious, family-oriented, and conservative. Evolving debates on forums allow a class to debate whether the brand had strayed too far from its core values and was at risk. Learning Objective: To facilitate understanding of the uses and limitations of online forums as a source of consumer insight.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Nanda Home: Preparing for Life After Clocky Elie Ofek, Jill Avery Type: HBS case Pub. Date: May 23, 2011 Product #: 511134-PDF-ENG Length: 27p Teaching Note: N/A

Ad-lider Embalagens, SA: Marketing Research for Drawstring Trash Bags in Brazil Rosane Gertner, Dennis Guthery, Richard Ettenson Type: Thunderbird case Pub. Date: Oct 18, 2009 Product #: TB0141-PDF-ENG Length: 21p Teaching Note: Yes

Gauri Nanda, the inventor of Clocky, the alarm clock that rolls off the bed stand and forces its owner to find it, has to make critical decisions regarding the future of her nascent company. As sales of Clocky show signs of declining, she must decide whether to continue her focus on the alarm clock category or to branch out into new categories. If the former, the question is which segments to pursue and what features to develop, and, if the latter, the question is whether the concept of "humanizing technology" is something consumers would value in other domains. In addition, Nanda must decide how to continue marketing Clocky and its successors, given the potential for cannibalization. Clocky's success was largely attributable to the media's intense interest and coverage, and it is not clear such attention would carry over to other new product endeavors. Students are presented with a number of new product concepts and the findings from both qualitative and quantitative market research. This allows for a rich discussion of how managers can think creatively about consumer experiences to inform their innovation strategies. Learning Objective: Consider consumer input and market factors to determine optimal next generation innovation strategies. This case presents market research data concerning the launch of a new drawstring trash bag in Brazil. Ad-lider, one of the leaders in the Brazilian plastic bag industry, has purchased the production machinery for producing the trash bag, and now must decide how the new product should be launched. Data for focus groups and field interviews are included for analysis. The case touches on many areas of marketing, including new product development, marketing research, and creating customer value. Learning Objective: This is appropriate for both undergraduate and graduate marketing classes. It's ideally suited for the marketing research component of a marketing management class. Alternatively, it's also appropriate for the market research session of the new product development course or for a qualitative data session of a marketing research course. The teaching note is useful for all three purposes.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Geox: Breathing Innovation into Shoes Ali Farhoomand, Havovi Joshi Type: Uni. Of Hong Kong case Pub. Date: Oct 18, 2009 Product #: HKU895-PDF-ENG Length: 29p Teaching Note: Yes

On 28 July 2009, the board of directors of Geox approved the footwear and apparel company's half-year results, which showed consolidated sales of US$653 million. This was a remarkable achievement and recognition for a company that had only been in the business since 1995. In the early 1990s, inventor, entrepreneur and erstwhile winemaker Mario Moretti Polegato, suffering from hot and sweaty feet, used a pocketknife to cut holes in the soles of his sneakers, thereby creating the first pair of "shoes that breathe". Convinced that his creative solution could be transformed into a commercially successful product, Polegato spent several years developing a breathable membrane for shoes that allow the feet to breathe while remaining watertight. When he succeeded in producing the prototype of such a technology in the laboratory, he immediately patented it and began marketing it to existing shoe manufacturers. However, none showed any interest in his product. He thus decided to embark on his own, and commenced manufacturing these "breathing" shoes under the Geox brand name. Since then, Geox's innovative products have continued to carve out a niche for themselves in the global footwear market. By 2002, the company had extended its "breathability" technology to fabric and entered the apparel market. By 2009, after a mere 14 years, Geox had become a global name and was ranked the world's secondlargest casual lifestyle footwear sector operator. The company conducted its business in 68 countries around the world through over 10,000 multi-brand points of sale and 997 single-brand Geox shops. By introducing yet another product to the established and intensely competitive shoe industry, Geox had successfully demonstrated the power of innovation. But like any other innovative company, Geox has to fret about sustainability of its competitive advantage. Learning Objective: This case stimulates discussion on creativity and product innovation, and helps students understand how an innovative product can disrupt a mature industry. The teaching objectives of this case are: 1. To analyze how a creative innovation can impact existing industry dynamics 2. To discuss the key principles for a new firm to follow in introducing an innovative product and entering a mature market successfully 3. To discuss the strategy such a firm needs to adopt to maintain its presence in the market.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Local Motors: Designed by the Crowd, Built by the Customer Michael I. Norton, Jeremy B. Dann Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 19, 2010 Product #: 510062-PDF-ENG Length: 21p Teaching Note: N/A

Emotiv Systems, Inc.: It's the Thoughts that Count Elie Ofek, Jason Riis, Paul Hamilton Type: HBS Premier case Pub. Date: Oct 15, 2009 Product #: 510050-PDF-ENG Length: 28p Teaching Note: Yes

In the wake of the meltdown among US auto manufacturers in 2009, Jay Rogers - CEO of Local Motors - has a new approach for the automotive industry: Decide which models are produced through online design competitions, and then allow customers to "build their own cars" from the winning designs. The case focuses on two key issues: Can Local Motors build a thriving online design community at a reasonable cost? And can customers be convinced to add their own sweat and labor to the manufacturing process? The case is written from the perspective of a start-up company seeking funding while trying to implement a novel business concept. Learning Objective: This case highlights the promises and pitfalls of two increasingly common marketing tactics. First, the case explores the concept of involving consumers and communities in the design of one's products - inviting a broader discussion of similar initiatives such as open-source collaborative efforts. Second, the case examines the impact of involving customers in the manufacturing of one's products again part of a broader conversation about the increased push towards allowing consumers to customize product offerings. Emotiv is getting ready to launch its innovative brain-computer interfacing (BCI) technology. The company has developed a special headset, called EPOC, and highly sophisticated software that can translate a person's emotions, cognitive thoughts and facial expressions into digital outcomes. Emotiv wants the technology to be adopted by mainstream consumers and is leaning towards the video game market as its primary initial target. However, it needs to decide whether to continue efforts to convince one of the big three console makers (PS3, Xbox 360, Wii) to enable the EPOC on their platform or to settle for the PC gaming market. Alternatively, the company could have chosen a number of different markets to focus on (such as medical, military, market research). A host of additional marketing decisions (pricing, channels, bundling a demo game) need to be made. The case allows students to grapple with the issues of: selecting a target application for the launch of an innovation; determining the importance of having a big name partner for the launch by an unknown start-up; considering the wisdom of taking a B2C rather than B2B approach with a novel technology; using analogous products to forecast demand and sales for a new technology. Learning Objective: To analyze the launch strategy of a completely novel technology: selection of target application and target market; importance of big name partners for consumer adoption; forecasting adoption pattern.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Genzyme: The Renvela Launch Decision Tim Calkins, Lynn Harris Type: Kellogg case Pub. Date: Jul 01, 2009 Product #: KEL412-PDF-ENG Length: 14p Teaching Note: Yes

Backchannelmedia: Making Television 'Clickable' Sunil Gupta, Kavita Shukla, Zach Clayton Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Apr 13, 2009 Product #: 509026-PDF-ENG Length: 19p Teaching Note: N/A

Pharmaceutical company Genzyme has created a new drug, Renvela, which is a phosphate binder designed to be used primarily by patients with kidney failure. Renvela is a slightly different version of Genzyme's highly successful Renagel. Company executives must now decide how best to launch Renvela. Should it replace Renagel? Should it be a premium version of Renagel? Is it worth launching the product at all? The case appears rather simple on the surface, but the questions are challenging to work through. Learning Objective: This case, launched with great success in the 2009 Kellogg Biotech and Healthcare Case Competition, can be used to teach growth strategy and new product strategy. It also provides an introduction to the pharmaceutical industry. Students will be given the opportunity to think critically about the role of innovation, risk, and ethics in healthcare-related firms. Backchannelmedia (BCM), a three year old start-up, intended to completely disrupt the world of advertising by transforming the way Americans watched television. BCM had developed a technology to make television "clickable," enabling viewers to interact with the content on their television screens. By April 2009, BCM had conducted consumer studies and field tests and the results were very promising. However, the industry was dominated by large players who could impede the introductions of new technologies. BCM's founders would have to make critical decisions about how quickly to roll-out their technology, and to whom. Which industry players were allies? How would BCM monetize the value they would create? Would investors see as much potential in BCM as its founders? And how would the company's cash constraints impact the strategy in the current economic environment? Learning Objective: To understand the adaption of innovations, and the challenges faced by entrepreneurs.

PART 3: POSITIONING VIA PRICE, PLACE, PROMOTION Chapter 9: Pricing Barcelo Hotels and Resorts (A) John T. Gourville, Marco Bertini Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 18, 2011 Product #: 511108-PDF-ENG Length: 29p Teaching Note: N/A

Abstract Barcelo Hotels and Resorts must decide whether to allow its many hotels to continue to undertake separate promotional campaigns or to run, for the first time, a broad corporate-level promotion. Complicating the decision is the fact that the many hotels in its portfolio vary greatly in their character, clientele, positioning, and locations. Learning Objective: Looks at the costs and benefits of a corporate level branding and price promotion strategy. Also, when used with the Harrah's case (HBS Case # 502-011), allows for a discussion of centralized versus decentralized management of a portfolio of service entities.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) ABICI Mukti Khaire, Elena Corsi, Elisa Farri Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 18, 2011 Product #: 811085-PDF-ENG Length: 21p Teaching Note: N/A

Groupon Sunil Gupta, Ray Weaver, Dharmishta Rood Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Mar 22, 2011 Product #: 511094-PDF-ENG Length: 23p Teaching Note: N/A

The Eleganzia Group Elie Ofek, Elena Corsi, Bharat Sajnani, Sorina Casian-Botez, Francesco Tronci Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Apr 18, 2011 Product #: 511115-PDF-ENG Length: 35p Teaching Note: N/A

The co-founder of an Italian, design based bicycle manufacturer evaluates if reducing costs by outsourcing would impact its brand. The company was founded in 2005 in Italy by three friends and in its first five years, it had enjoyed steady growth and built a strong reputation for producing high-quality city bicycles, appreciated for their retro-look and style. Its country of origin had probably helped them exporting their products as their bicycles were 100% made in Italy and the Made in Italy label had a reputation of high quality, craftsmanship and creativity. Yet their profit margins were relatively low as their manufacturing costs were very high. Should they outsource their production? If so, to China or to Eastern Europe? Was there some other way to improve the profitability of the company? Learning Objective: To help students understand the importance of country of origin in export markets, and the challenges of reducing costs by outsourcing and the impact it might have on a brand. It also asks them to identify other ways to improve the profitability of a company. This case is set in early 2011 after a period of incredible customer and revenue growth for Groupon. Reviewing Groupon's rise, the case explores whether Groupon promotions are really good for local merchants, whether Groupon can continue to thrive amid increasingly intense competition, and the key reasons for the company's remarkable early success. Learning Objective: Help students understand the nature of a blockbuster entrepreneurial success, and to critically evaluate Groupon's value proposition for merchants and consumers. Eleganzia Group management faces tough decisions heading into the summer of 2010. With tourism on the decline due to the global economic recession, General Manager Giannuzzi must decide how to set prices at the Forte Village Resort, the Group's most well-known property. His management team is further divided on whether the pricing model at the resort should change to being all-inclusive (as opposed to one where guests are charged for each additional activity or dining option on a pay-as-you-go basis), and whether to convert a large number of the 4-star rooms into 5-star suites. Recently acquired properties, such as the Castel Monastero in Tuscany and the Maddalena Hotel & Yacht Club in north Sardinia, pose a branding challenge. Can all the properties, including the Forte Village, be successfully brought under one umbrella brand, namely, Eleganzia? Moreover, what should the character of each these new properties be? Learning Objective: Pricing and Branding strategy in a luxury consumption setting; balancing short term revenue with long term brand goals.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Pricing Simulation: Universal Rental Car V2 John T. Gourville, Tom Nagle, John Hogan Type: Simulation Pub. Date: Aug 02, 2011 Product #: 7005-HTM-ENG Length: 120 min. Teaching Note: Yes

Fortis Industries, Inc. (A) Rowland T. Moriarty Jr., David May, Gordon Swartz Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Dec 16, 2010 Product #: 511079-PDF-ENG Length: 18p Teaching Note: N/A

At a Florida rental car agency, students assume the role of a district manager responsible for setting prices for rental cars across three Florida cities: Miami, Orlando, and Tampa. Over 12 simulated months, students must analyze price sensitivity between leisure and business travelers and consider strategies that maximize rentals across weekdays and weekends in each city. Demand for rental cars can vary depending on the month and whether the location is more popular with business or leisure travelers. Unrented cars have associated holding costs while running out of cars is lost opportunity for profit. Students can make periodic inventory adjustments among the locations to match anticipated demand. The market for rental cars in Florida is intensely competitive and students must also consider the likely competitive response to their pricing decisions. Ultimately, students must analyze the economic, seasonal, and competitive forces of the rental car market and develop a pricing strategy to maximize the cumulative profit for the firm. Students benefit from running the simulation multiple times with increasing complexity. This single-player simulation includes three pre-set scenarios or faculty can design custom scenarios to meet specific learning objectives The second release of this popular simulation retains the immersive experience of the original while streamlining the information available to students and the debrief tools for faculty. Learning Objective: Understand the nature and dynamics of consumer response to price (price elasticity). Account for demand differences across customer segments and regions. Understand and plan for seasonal variations in demand. Explore the impact of pricing decisions on firm profitability. Use pricing strategies to optimize inventory. Anticipate and understand competitive reactions to pricing decisions. Understand how price and general economic conditions affect overall market demand. Fortis Industries' packaging division manufactures steel and plastic strapping. In 2007, the company underwent a leveraged buyout. The case focuses on the packaging division's need to maintain high profitability in a declining market for steel strapping. Since 1998, Fortis has been losing 1% per year of the steel strapping market. Since then, there has also been significant erosion of prices. The division president is faced with 1) decreasing price to increase market share, or 2) maintain/increase cash flow. The specific decision revolves around the potential adoption of a price-flex system that is designed to authorize selective discounting by the division's sales personnel.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Marketing Analysis Toolkit: Pricing and Profitability Analysis Thomas Steenburgh, Jill Avery Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jul 16, 2010 Product #: 511028-PDF-ENG Length: 8p Teaching Note: N/A

Marketing Analysis Toolkit: Breakeven Analysis Thomas Steenburgh, Jill Avery Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 04, 2010 Product #: 510080-PDF-ENG Length: 6p Teaching Note: N/A

Pricing is one of the most difficult decisions marketers make and the one with the most direct and immediate impact on the firm's financial position. This toolkit will introduce the fundamental terminology and calculations associated with pricing and profitability analysis. Users will learn how to produce and interpret demand curves and calculate the price elasticity of demand. The concepts of revenue, costs, and contribution margin, gross margin, and net income will be introduced to inform profitability analyses. Finally, retailer profitability metrics including retailer margin and penny profit are discussed. The note gives students a foundation for analyzing marketing cases, as well as providing an analytical structure and process for completing a marketing plan. The note is accompanied by a free Excel worksheet which contains sample problems, prebuilt Excel models to calculate demand curves, price elasticity, and profitability metrics for firms and their channel partners, and charts and graphs which help visualize the results. Learning Objective: To provide students with analytical tools that they can use to more rigorously analyze marketing cases and decisions and to develop a strategic marketing plan. Marketing managers are often called upon to make recommendations for or against programs that cost money to implement. Before expenditures are made, managers want to be sure that they will be getting a return on their investment. One way of assessing this is by calculating the breakeven point. In this note, we introduce the concept of breakeven analysis and show how it is used to guide marketing decision making. This analysis helps students assess the feasibility of proposed fixed and variable marketing expenditures, the feasibility of permanent pricing changes, and the feasibility of a new product introduction. The note gives students a foundation for analyzing marketing cases, as well as providing an analytical structure and process for completing a marketing plan. The note is accompanied by a free Excel worksheet which contains sample problems, pre-built Excel models to calculate breakeven, and charts and graphs which help visualize the results. Learning Objective: To provide students with analytical tools that they can use to more rigorously analyze marketing cases and decisions and to develop a strategic marketing plan.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Better World Books Michael I. Norton, Fiona Wilson, Jill Avery, Thomas Steenburgh Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Oct 21, 2010 Product #: 511057-PDF-ENG Length: 24p Teaching Note: N/A

Global Wine War 2009: New World versus Old Christopher A. Bartlett Type: HBS Premier case Pub. Date: Aug 13, 2009 Product #: 910405-PDF-ENG Length: 23p Teaching Note: Yes

Chapter 10: Channels of Distribution and Logistics WineInStyle Arar Han, George Foster Type: Stanford case Pub. Date: Jan 19, 2011 Product #: E401-PDF-ENG Length: 17p Teaching Note: Yes

Better World Books, a young start-up, provides a socially-conscious alternative to Amazon, collecting and selling used books to keep them out of the wastestream, while providing a portion of their profits to support global literacy efforts. The case presents an emerging new business model: the for profit "B corporation" designed to combine profits and mission. Founder Xavier Helgesen struggles with how to price his products to capture the value of their social good, how to manage multiple channels of distribution, including selling direct to consumers, and managing negative public perceptions of the social impact of the business once the company turns profitable. Learning Objective: To introduce a new type of business model which combines for-profit and social mission. To explore the challenges and opportunities associated with having a social mission. The case contrasts the tradition-bound Old World wine industry with the market-oriented New World producers, the battle for the US market, the most desirable export target in 2009 due to its large, fastgrowing, high priced market segments. The case allows analysis of the way in which newcomers can change the rules of competitive engagement in a global industry. It also poses the question of how incumbents can respond, especially when constrained by regulation, tradition, and different capabilities than those demanded by changing consumer tastes and market structures. Learning Objective: To explore global industry analysis and competitive dynamics. Abstract Robert Eberhart is an American electronics executive living abroad in Japan as market president. He's ready to move on to something new and discovers that the changing distribution laws in Japan may provide him a chance to upend the supply chain for California wines. Legal, marketing, operational, and executive management challenges ensue. Learning Objective: To demonstrate the beginnings and development of a startup import-export business, and to illustrate management challenges thereof.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Rebranding Gallagher Rohit Deshpande, Keith Chi-ho Wong Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 25, 2011 Product #: 511098-PDF-ENG Length: 12p Teaching Note: N/A

DBK: The Power of Direct Sales John Deighton, Sarah L. Abbott Type: HBP Brief case Pub. Date: Apr 19, 2011 Product #: 4284-PDF-ENG Length: 10p Teaching Note: Yes

Steve Tucker, the Deputy CEO of Gallagher Group Limited (GGL), the world's largest electric fence company, was about to present a new branding strategy to the company's senior managers and Bill Gallagher, Jr., CEO. After spending more than 18 months with brand consultants, Tucker devised an umbrella brand strategy that would instill a uniform brand across all three business units: Animal Management Systems, Security Management Systems, and Fuel Pumps, which marketed themselves under the respective brand names of Gallagher, Cardax, Powerfence, and PEC. However, Tucker knew that the unit heads believed the differences in their clienteles, product categories, and distributor relationships made it impractical to adopt one single brand. GGL's overseas distributors had also raised concerns about a uniform brand. In many cases, GGL only owned minority interests in these distributors and retained limited control over their activities. Learning Objective: Managing international distributors; managing global branding The sales representatives at Designs by Kate (DBK) sell private label jewelry at hosted parties and through online social media channels. They are also responsible for recruiting, training, and managing new sales reps. CEO and founder Kate Creevey designed the commission plan to encourage sales reps to build teams and become "leaders" for their teams. The strategy has been very successful over the company's first five years. Now the CEO is concerned that growth in top-line revenue is slowing, possibly due to an unwillingness by current sales representatives to build and manage their own sales teams. A survey reveals that many sales reps believe their incomes from jewelry sales decline when they add members to their sales teams due to increased competition for hosting parties within the same geographic area. The CEO must revisit the commission structure to determine if it is still an effective incentive. The case includes a quantitative assignment that students should complete as part of case analysis. Learning Objective: 1. Understand the importance of the perceptions of incentives by sales representatives and the effect these perceptions can have on company performance. 2. Explore the use of compensation structure as a motivational tool for maximizing key financial objectives. 3. Understand the value proposition associated with a direct sales model.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) The Lao Coffee Industry: Implementing Vertical Integration for a Social Cause at Bolaven Farms Marta K Dowejko, Gilbert Wong Type: Uni. Of Hong Kong case Pub. Date: Jun 09, 2011 Product #: HKU933-PDF-ENG Length: 19p Teaching Note: Yes

Founded in 2007, Bolaven Farms is a coffee business with a social purpose. Set up in Laos and Hong Kong, Bolaven Farms aims at providing high-quality coffee to the worldwide public while helping to alleviate poverty among coffee farmers in Laos. The business model involves a full integration of the coffee supply chain, from planting the coffee seed to selling the final branded product to wholesale and retail customers. Consequently, farmers and the company benefit from excluding intermediaries from the supply chain and keeping profit margins for themselves. The company's vision of educating farmers and providing them with higher income for their work is very compelling to the public and was quickly picked up by the media. However, the business model has yet to be tested. For one thing, once the farmers graduate from the programme, they need employment assurance and additional land to cultivate. For another, the coffee market is a mature one, with many players and a multitude of competing and lower-priced offers to choose from. People find the company's vision very inspiring, but it is also very difficult to translate into viable actions. The company has already invested US$4.0 million in the project, but is still a long way from educating the public and finding customers willing to pay premium prices for the coffee. Both ends of the supply chain need further refinement, and Say is not willing to compromise on quality or price. The case begins with an introduction of the coffee industry and its practices. A description of Laos as a business environment for Bolaven Farms follows. The case describes the development and implementation of a business model that incorporates vertical integration supported by social networks. It allows for an advanced analysis of issues related to choosing an appropriate business model and focuses on the risks related to future expansion and resulting from the strategic choices of the entrepreneur. Learning Objective: 1. To understand the role of social capital and a value network in developing a new venture 2. To uncover Bolaven Farms' strengths, weaknesses and performance in integrating its value chain 3. To learn about the strengths and weaknesses of vertical integration 4. To discuss the types of risks and difficulties that a new venture faces while implementing its vision and mission.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Nanda Home: Preparing for Life After Clocky Elie Ofek, Jill Avery Type: HBS case Pub. Date: May 23, 2011 Product #: 511134-PDF-ENG Length: 27p Teaching Note: N/A

Herborist: A Chinese Personal Care Brand Goes Abroad Kevin Zhou, Grace Loo Type: Univ. of Hong Kong case Pub. Date: May 23, 2011 Product #: HKU927-PDF-ENG Length: 24p Teaching Note: Yes

Gauri Nanda, the inventor of Clocky, the alarm clock that rolls off the bed stand and forces its owner to find it, has to make critical decisions regarding the future of her nascent company. As sales of Clocky show signs of declining, she must decide whether to continue her focus on the alarm clock category or to branch out into new categories. If the former, the question is which segments to pursue and what features to develop, and, if the latter, the question is whether the concept of "humanizing technology" is something consumers would value in other domains. In addition, Nanda must decide how to continue marketing Clocky and its successors, given the potential for cannibalization. Clocky's success was largely attributable to the media's intense interest and coverage, and it is not clear such attention would carry over to other new product endeavors. Students are presented with a number of new product concepts and the findings from both qualitative and quantitative market research. This allows for a rich discussion of how managers can think creatively about consumer experiences to inform their innovation strategies. Learning Objective: Consider consumer input and market factors to determine optimal next generation innovation strategies. Herborist, a high-end Chinese personal care brand, had been steadily expanding its share in global markets since 2008. The brand distinguished itself by integrating traditional Chinese medicine with modern biotechnology and emphasising its green and organic ingredients. Whereas Chinese were familiar with the concept, how would Herborist sell it to consumers outside mainland China who were used to using established Japanese brands, such as Shiseido and SKII, or western brands, such as Estee Lauder and Sisley? In 2001, Herborist chose to enter the Hong Kong market and test its product in this very competitive market that was dominated by the major Japanese and western cosmetics brands. The company opened two Herborist-branded stores in major shopping centres but was forced to close them down two years later due to bad results. The company tried again in 2007, this time distributing its products through the Hong Kong personal health and beauty chain Mannings. In 2008, Herborist entered the Paris market with the help of the cosmetics chain store Sephora. Results were mixed; although some of its products became top sellers, the overall sales figures were not very promising. By 2011, Herborist was ready for the next step in its international expansion plan. Which markets should it target and what strategy should it adopt? Learning Objective: This case provides students with an opportunity to explore the challenges faced by a personal care brand from an emerging market in converting to a global brand and requires students to analyze different markets and as well as different modes of market entry strategy.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Franz Collection, Inc.: The Road From Subcontracting to Brand Marketing Lien-Ti Bei, Shih-Fen Chen Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: May 26, 2010 Product #: 910M30-PDF-ENG Length: 21p Teaching Note: Yes

The case describes the three-stage transformation of a Taiwanese company - from an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) of small gifts for Western European customers, to an original design manufacturer (ODM) providing design and production of home d cor and gifts to customers in Europe and the United States, to an own brand manufacturing (OBM) company launching its brand of porcelain tableware targeted at the global market. The story of Franz Collection is a story of product outsourcing and international cooperation, where OEM subcontractors in Asia have tried to set up their own marketing channels and brand names to bypass their Western clients and appeal directly to consumers. This case describes the managerial dilemmas in establishing a global brand faced by manufacturers in Taiwan and the neighbouring countries.

Nettwerk: Digital Marketing in the Music Industry John Deighton, Leora Kornfeld Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Oct 29, 2009 Product #: 510055-PDF-ENG Length: 20p Teaching Note: Yes

How is music marketed in the digital era? Nettwerk Music Group built on its foundation as a social, grassroots marketer of music and artists, and emerged as a leader in the Internet-enabled social media environment. For most of the past decade Nettwerk CEO Terry McBride let fans consume music on their own terms. He encouraged file-sharing, the remixing of his artists' songs and videos, and an environment in which "the audience is the record company." In the digital marketplace compact discs mattered much less, said McBride. "Digital assets" were the currency, in the form of ad, television, movie, and videogame song placement, ringtones, mixes, and communitycreated content. But new artist-label contracts were needed if digital assets were going to flow freely. Moving away from the infrastructure of the music business also meant having to do without the financial, logistical, and promotional power of the major labels. To provide an alternative to the muscle of the major labels, the company is launching a venture capital project called "Polyphonic." Learning Objective: The teaching objectives of the case are: - to examine the mechanisms of social marketing in an era of widely available digital tools - to analyze the use of traditional digital media such as the Internet for such activities as ecommerce and promotion, and new media tools such as blogs, YouTube, Facebook, My Space and the collaborative, user/fan-based activities they enable - to examine the 'long tail' argument as it pertains to the digital music marketplace - to compare and contrast the relationship of old media/broadcast media to the mass market with the resonance of new media and fragmented, niche markets.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Major League Baseball Advanced Media: America's Pastime Goes Digital Anita Elberse, Brett Laffel Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Mar 20, 2010 Product #: 510092-PDF-ENG Length: 24p Teaching Note: Yes

Bank of America: Mobile Banking Sunil Gupta, Kerry Herman Type: HBS Premier case Pub. Date: Mar 02, 2010 Product #: 510063-PDF-ENG Length: 22p Teaching Note: Yes

In January 2010, Bob Bowman, chief executive officer of Major League Baseball Advanced Media -- MLB's digital arm -- is facing a number of decisions related to its app for Apple's new iPad. For example, what are the best name, price, and set of features for MLBAM's iPad app? The case describes what is often seen as one of the most successful paid-content businesses in sports and media. Provides in-depth information on MLBAM's four main sources of revenues and relates those to the league's overall revenues. It also describes the company's online and mobile offerings in considerable detail and outlines the choices facing MLB's offering for Apple's iPad device, enabling a rich discussion of viable marketing strategies. Learning Objective: To understand how sports industries, leagues, and teams are affected by and can capitalize on new forms of digital distribution; to assess viable business models for content owners and distributors in the context of online media. In January 2010, Jen McDonald, head of Bank of America Corporation's (BoA) Digital Marketing group, was discussing the bank's mobile strategy with Douglas Brown, senior vice president, Mobile Product Development. BoA launched mobile banking in 2007 and within three years it had 4 million active customers. This success prompted line-of-business managers to request Jen and Doug to include more functionality in the bank's mobile app that were specific to their businesses such as credit cards and mortgages. Jen and Doug had to decide how to leverage the mobile platform for various businesses of the bank without creating confusion or increasing complexity for the consumers. Recognizing the potential impact mobile technology could have on the entire banking industry, they also had to decide on how to position BoA's mobile banking in the long run.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Zappos.com: Developing a Supply Chain to Deliver WOW! Michael Marks, Hau Lee, David W. Hoyt Type: Stanford case Pub. Date: Feb 13, 2009 Product #: GS65-PDF-ENG Length: 28p Teaching Note: Yes

eBay Partner Network (A) Benjamin Edelman, Ian I. Larkin Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Sep 28, 2009 Product #: 910008-PDF-ENG Length: 14p Teaching Note: Yes

Chapter 11: Advertising Messages and Marketing Communications

Zappos was founded in 1999, during the Internet boom, to sell shoes online. The company's founding premise was to provide the ultimate in selection to its customers--all brands, styles, sizes, and colors. Zappos organized all aspects of its business (including recruiting, culture, call center, inventory, website, and supply chain) to provide the best possible service--it wanted to "wow" everyone who interacted with the company, from customers to employees to corporate partners. Zappos grew rapidly, and by 2008 was profitable with net sales (after returns) of about $650 million. The company faced a number of issues as it looked forward. While it had penetrated only about 3 percent of the U.S. market for shoes, Zappos had expanded its product lines to items such as camping gear and video games. It needed to determine those elements of its strategy had contributed to its success in shoes, and whether it would be able to duplicate that success in other product lines. It also needed to determine how it could scale its business-much of the effort it had made to "wow" its customers was labor intensive and expensive--could this be scaled to a company with revenues of tens of billions? Finally, the economic landscape changed dramatically in late 2008, with the financial market collapse and recession. The service-intensive Zappos.com business was based on sales at little to no discount, unlike many websites that relied on selling at the lowest possible price. Would the company need to make changes to respond to the changed economic environment, and if so, what were those changes? The case provides an opportunity to evaluate the core competences of an Internet retailer that has experienced rapid, initial success. The case enables students to consider supply chain issues, which are critical to the company's success, in the broader context of the business: the bases of Zappos' success, its core competencies, culture, and competitive environment. Learning Objective: The case highlights an Internet retailer that has grown rapidly, but faces significant issues, including scope of product offerings, supply chain costs, customer service costs, and scalability. The teaching objective of the case is to examine these issues, and the considerations that the company must make in choosing a way forward. eBay considers adjustments to the structure and rules of its affiliate marketing program, eBay Partner Network (ePN). In particular, eBay reevaluates affiliate compensation structure, the role of bonuses for especially productive affiliates, and the overall rationale for outsourcing online marketing efforts to independent affiliates. The case presents the history and development of ePN, ePN's importance to eBay, and the mechanics of online affiliate marketing. Learning Objective: Management of commission-based referral systems, including their structure, implementation, and incentives. Abstract

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Trip Advisor Sunil Gupta, Kerry Herman Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 24, 2011 Product #: 511004-PDF-ENG Length: 19p Teaching Note: N/A

Procter & Gamble: Marketing Capabilities Rebecca Henderson, Ryan Johnson Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jun 10, 2011 Product #: 311117-PDF-ENG Length: 17p Teaching Note: Yes

By 2010, TripAdvisor was the largest travel site in the world operating in 24 countries and 16 languages, with listings for 455,000 hotels, 92,000 attractions and 564,000 restaurants in over 71,000 destinations worldwide. It had over 40 million reviews from 35 million unique monthly visitors who were contributing 21 new reviews every minute. Known for its hotel reviews, TA expanded into flights, vacation rentals and international markets like China. Each of these expansion paths provided unique opportunities as well as new challenges. In August 2010, Stephen Kaufer, CEO, was debating how to prioritize his growth plans for the company. Learning Objective: To understand how user-generated content (UGC) can be leveraged and what are the challenges of replicating that model in different countries (e.g., China) and different categories (e.g., vacation rentals and flights). P&G had become known and recognized as a marketing machine. It was the largest advertiser in the world, with 2010 spending of $8.68 billion. From the company's early exploitation of broadcast media (radio and television) for its soap products to more recent experiments in digital media for its men's hygiene brand Old Spice, P&G was a seasoned marketer with strong consumer research, a powerful innovation network, and the world's largest financial commitment to advertising. Learning Objective: To learn from and analyze the best practices of P&G the world's largest advertising spender and a renowned marketer of consumer products. To understand their marketing strategies, where marketing innovation is developed, how it is applied across different categories and how marketing shifts with changes in structure and culture.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Health Care Center for the Homeless: Changing with the Times Mary Conway Dato-on, Eileen Weisenbach Keller Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Mar 08, 2011 Product #: 910A32-PDF-ENG Length: 12p Teaching Note: Yes

Bakari Burns, CEO of the Health Care Center for the Homeless (HCCH), located in Orlando, Florida was faced with the daunting task of rebranding the organization he lead. Burns knew the organization experienced difficulty with recognition and marketplace distinction, primarily due to the public's misperceptions about the relationship between HCCH and the Coalition for the Homeless of Central Florida. An external consulting team offered several recommendations for change, including an amended name and redesign of all marketing materials. This advice and changes in the external environment provided an excellent opportunity to reposition and refocus the organization. Recognizing the need for a new strategy and implementing that strategy were not the same; Burns was not sure how to lead the organization through the change process. Learning Objective: The objectives of this case are to: Utilize internal and external analysis as a means of understanding the current situation and Burns' need to rebrand the organization; Understand how brand orientation is critical to strategy for NPOs (nonprofit organizations); Improve understanding of brand orientation through the application and analysis of the construct to the subject NPO; Apply Kotter's change model in order to understand Burns' role in introducing and leading change toward the acceptance of the new brand image and orientation; Facilitate discussion of the mission-driven nature of social service organizations and social issues of homelessness and health care. This case is suitable for use in undergraduate and firstyear graduate courses in change management and branding. The detailed treatment of environmental analysis may also make the case useful in marketing management or strategy courses. The contentious, socially relevant issues of health care and homelessness make the case particularly relevant to courses in public administration and nonprofit management.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) United Breaks Guitars John Deighton, Leora Kornfeld Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 06, 2010 Product #: 510057-PDF-ENG Length: 13p Teaching Note: Yes

Bank of America Sports Sponsorship Stephen A. Greyser, John L. Teopaco Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Aug 12, 2009 Product #: 910406-PDF-ENG Length: 19p Teaching Note: Yes

Giant Consumer Products: The Sales Promotion Resource Allocation Decision (Brief Case) Neeraj Bharadwaj, Phillip D. Delurgio Type: HBP Brief case Pub. Date: Jun 15, 2009 Product #: 4131-PDF-ENG Length: 14p Teaching Note: Yes

When social media propagate a complaint about poor customer service, an international media event ensues. How do viral videos spread and what can firms do about them? This case dissects an incident in which a disgruntled customer used YouTube and Twitter to spread a music video detailing United's mishandling of his $3,500 guitar and the company's subsequent refusal to compensate him. The song was called "United Breaks Guitars." Within one week it received 3 million views and mainstream news coverage followed, with CNN, The Wall Street Journal, BBC, the CBS Morning Show, and many other print and electronic outlets picking up on the story. The mechanics of viral propagation are uncovered and the limited opportunities for response by the firm are revealed. The case supports the notion of the Internet as an insurgent medium, better at attack than at defense. Learning Objective: To examine the mechanisms of social media and its effects on the perception of a company and its brand. What strategies can companies deploy in order to operate effectively when the power to craft messages and images is shared between marketer and consumer? A major sports sponsor must decide on new, renewal, or withdrawal from significant relations with teams/leagues/events, using a distinctive approach to assessment. Learning Objective: Decision-making on specific sponsorship situations and understanding of sponsorship.

This case provides students with an opportunity to become familiar with some major strategic issues that firms face when formulating and implementing a sales promotion, including: cannibalization, brand equity erosion, forward-buying, pass-through, and consumer stockpiling. It also provides them an opportunity to utilize retail scanner purchase data in order to evaluate the historical performance of sales promotions. Based on calculating top-line revenue, marketing margin, and return on marketing investment (ROMI) for prior promotions, students can recommend the most financially and strategically defensible initiative from a choice of several competing sales promotions. The setting is the frozen foods category in the consumer packaged goods industry. Learning Objective: To provide students with a greater appreciation of how such strategic issues as cannibalization, brand equity erosion, forward-buying, pass-through, and consumer stockpiling can factor into decision-making pertaining to sales promotion activity. To provide students with an understanding of the multi-disciplinary nature of brand management. To provide students with some insight into how annual brand plans and sales promotions are developed and implemented. To provide students with exposure to financial analytics, including return on marketing investment (ROMI), commonly utilized by brand managers at consumer packaged goods firms.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) The Power of Persuasion: An Exercise in Creating Persuasive Advertising Michael Parent, Leyland Pitt, Stacey Morrison Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Jan 08, 2009 Product #: 909A01-PDF-ENG Length: 1p Teaching Note: Yes

Chapter 12: Integrated Marketing Communications and Media Choices BBVA Compass: Marketing Resource Allocation Sunil Gupta, Joseph DaviesGavin Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 27, 2011 Product #: 511096-PDF-ENG Length: 16p Teaching Note: Yes

Do subliminal cues have an effect on behavior? This question is at the heart of many debates in advertising. In this exercise, students can determine, through their own experience, the impact of subconscious cues on their decisions. In this simulation, the instructor places a number of specific cues throughout the building. Students, in turn, are tasked with creating an advertising poster for a chain of children's play centers. Inevitably, their posters incorporate some, and sometimes all, of the cues. The exercise can lead to a deep and constructive discussion on the effect of subconscious cues on consumers. Learning Objective: The goal of this exercise is to allow students to determine for themselves, through their own experience, the impact, if any, of subconscious cues on their cognition. This exercise exposes students, by way of their own susceptibility, to the influence that subliminal visual cues can have on the creative process. Subliminal persuasion is something that has been the subject of controversy in both social psychology and the business world for over 100 years. Psychologists and marketers have been debating whether perception can occur without awareness or consciousness. Specifically, are there things that people experience that influence their actions, despite whether or not they are consciously or knowingly perceived? Using an experiential learning pedagogy, this exercise introduces students to how and why marketers may choose to use this technique and allows for the students to decide for themselves whether they are believers or critics. The experiment can also generate an in-depth discussion on the ethical considerations inherent in marketing and advertising. Teaching about subliminal persuasion in this way will help to emphasize the practical nature of its usage, as well as allow for students to debate the issue in terms of their own experiences with the exercise. Furthermore, knowing what types of elements work in subliminal persuasion will aid in understanding theories in consumer behavior. The case is appropriate for courses in Marketing and Advertising at both the undergraduate and graduate levels Abstract BBVA Compass, the 15th largest commercial bank in the U.S., is a part of the BBVA Group of Spain, the second largest bank in Spain with $755 billion in assets. In December 2010, Frank Sottosanti, Chief Marketing Officer of BBVA Compass, was reviewing the marketing performance of the company and deciding how to allocate next year's marketing budget across various offline and online channels. Learning Objective: To highlight the challenges involved in allocating marketing resources between (a) offline and online advertising, (b) display and search advertising, and (c) various display ad networks.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Vestas' World of Wind Thomas Steenburgh, Elena Corsi Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Mar 16, 2011 Product #: 511121-PDF-ENG Length: 38p Teaching Note: N/A

Demand Media John Deighton, Leora Kornfeld Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Mar 17, 2011 Product #: 511043-PDF-ENG Length: 18p Teaching Note: Yes

The wind turbine manufacturer Vestas launched the industry's first highly localized and customized new product launch campaigns which used also new tools such as web 2.0 platforms. Used to operate in a market where demand exceeded supply, Vestas had lost contact with its customer base and had a limited marketing budget, mainly used to finance global media advertisement campaigns. The world economic downturn which followed the U.S. credit crunch crisis of 2008 and the increased competition in the wind turbine market had brought about a sudden drop in Vestas orders of new turbines. Vestas thus decided to focus more on marketing and developed a new department, Global Marketing and Customer Insights. Morten Albaek was hired to manage and develop the department and to transform Vestas into the undisputed most customer focused company in the industry by 2012 and among the most customer centric B2B brand by 2015. He tested his new approach for the first time with the launch of their new V112 turbine for which he developed 72 customized campaigns targeting its main existing and potential customers and major stakeholders. Yet, had the campaign been effective in bringing Vestas closer to its customer base? Were they using the right tools? Learning Objective: The case should bring students to think about the importance for B2B companies of customer focused marketing approaches and evaluate the new marketing tools used by the company. Google search had helped Demand Media grow to be a $1.9 billion online publisher. Then, social media and smartphone apps began to change the way people navigated the Internet. How should Demand Media respond? The business ran on a radically new model in which a stable of 10,000 freelance contributors supplied content, the Internet's search engines brought it 75 million readers each month, and advertising generated revenue. It took the guesswork out of content production, with algorithms that indicated which topics were being searched and created content accordingly. Demand treated its 5,000 online articles published per day as an investment, not a cost, a reversal of the traditional media model. In addition to being able to infer consumers' interests with its algorithm, the company had a formula for estimating the lifetime value of each piece of content. As the business models of print and broadcast media declined, Demand had figured out how to leverage digital and social media tools to bring down the costs of creating content and to find an audience. In spring 2011, executives at the five-year-old company were pleased with the company's billion dollar IPO, the biggest Internet IPO since Google's, but changes in consumer behavior on the Internet were obliging a review of the model. Learning Objective: To examine the new forms and models of content creation and distribution in the digital publishing environment.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) DBK: The Power of Direct Sales John Deighton, Sarah L. Abbott Type: HBP Brief case Pub. Date: Apr 19, 2011 Product #: 4284-PDF-ENG Length: 10p Teaching Note: Yes

The NFL's Digital Media Strategy Anita Elberse, Kelsey Calhoun, Daven Johnson Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Oct 20, 2010 Product #: 511055-PDF-ENG Length: 19p Teaching Note: Yes

Benecol Spread and Media Planning Richard Johnson, Robert I Carraway, Ervin R. Shames, Paul W. Farris Type: Darden case Pub. Date: Dec 03, 2010 Product #: UV2930-PDF-ENG Length: 21p Teaching Note: Yes

The sales representatives at Designs by Kate (DBK) sell private label jewelry at hosted parties and through online social media channels. They are also responsible for recruiting, training, and managing new sales reps. CEO and founder Kate Creevey designed the commission plan to encourage sales reps to build teams and become "leaders" for their teams. The strategy has been very successful over the company's first five years. Now the CEO is concerned that growth in top-line revenue is slowing, possibly due to an unwillingness by current sales representatives to build and manage their own sales teams. A survey reveals that many sales reps believe their incomes from jewelry sales decline when they add members to their sales teams due to increased competition for hosting parties within the same geographic area. The CEO must revisit the commission structure to determine if it is still an effective incentive. The case includes a quantitative assignment that students should complete as part of case analysis. Learning Objective: 1. Understand the importance of the perceptions of incentives by sales representatives and the effect these perceptions can have on company performance. 2. Explore the use of compensation structure as a motivational tool for maximizing key financial objectives. 3. Understand the value proposition associated with a direct sales model. In late 2009, Brian Rolapp, senior vice president of media strategy and digital media for the NFL, was faced with the challenge of determining the league's strategic approach to the wireless market - and presenting his views to NFL team owners. What was the league's best strategy for the mobile space? The case describes the antecedents of what is widely regarded as a landmark deal for the NFL, its $780-million, fouryear exclusive partnership with Verizon. Provides in-depth information on the NFL's digital media revenues, and relates those to the league's overall media and other revenues. Enables a rich discussion of new distribution opportunities and ensuing marketing and channelmanagement challenges. Learning Objective: To understand how sports industries, leagues, and teams are affected by and can capitalize on new forms of digital distribution; to assess viable business models for content owners and distributors in the context of online media. Benecol Spread, a cholesterol-lowering margarine, was a product with unusual media-planning challenges. With a narrow target group and unproven market potential, Johnson & Johnson needed to get the most "bang for the buck" from its Benecol advertising. Would a mediaplanning model (optimizer) requiring executives to quantify their judgment on several key inputs be helpful in this process? A spreadsheet accompanying the case allows students to weight the target groups and to choose among different advertising vehicles to form the best possible media plan.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Matchstick Inc.: Word of Mouth Marketing (A) Ken Mark, Allison Johnson Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Sep 17, 2010 Product #: 910A19-PDF-ENG Length: 3p Teaching Note: N/A

Infineon Raceway (Sears Point Raceway): Marketing in the Motorsports World George Foster, Norm O'Reilly, David W. Hoyt Type: Stanford case Pub. Date: Jun 15, 2010 Product #: SPM41-PDF-ENG Length: 44p Teaching Note: Yes

Matchstick Inc. (A) case introduces students to how brands are starting to put in place non-traditional advertising, such as word-of-mouth campaigns. The founder of Toronto-based Matchstick Inc. is working on a campaign for the Ketel One vodka brand. Ketel One, managed by Diageo, a global beverage firm, is trying to increase its awareness and sales in the Canadian market. Ketel One's brand manager has turned to Matchstick to generate awareness among its elusive target audience. Learning Objective: The cases introduces students to how brands are starting to put in place non-traditional advertising, such as word-ofmouth campaigns. This case describes the history, operations, and economics of Infineon Raceway (Sears Point Raceway) in Sonoma, California, and the challenges facing the racetrack as a result of the economic recession of 2008-9. The racetrack's most important race is a NASCAR Sprint Cup event. It also hosts IndyCar, NHRA drag races, and other events. Speedway Motorsports Inc. purchased the track in 1996, and made substantial a capital investment to improve the spectator experience. The track is heavily dependent, financially, on corporate sponsorship. Its naming rights agreement with Infineon Technologies was expiring in 2012, and many of its other corporate sponsors were cutting back or ending their sponsorships due to economic stress. The case describes the advantages of corporate sponsorship, and the ways in which a company can utilized sponsorship to build its brand, reward and motivate employees, drive retail traffic to stores and distributors, and entertain customers. The case includes a 10 page appendix with background information of the basic types of motor racing and descriptions of major racetracks in California. Learning Objective: This case provides the basis for discussion of marketing in the motorsports industry, particularly as it applies to facilities. The concepts of sponsorship renewal, title sponsorship, activation and sponsorship evaluation are also implicated. If the facility component of the case is emphasized, it could be adapted to a facility management course as well. Finally, the case could be used to supplement material in a sport finance course related to revenue generation through sponsorship.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Air France Internet Marketing: Optimizing Google, Yahoo!, MSN, and Kayak Sponsored Search Mark Jeffery, Lisa Egli, Andy Gieraltowski, Jessica Lambert, Jason Miller, Liz Neely, Rakesh Sharma Type: Kellogg case Pub. Date: Mar 06, 2009 Product #: KEL319-PDF-ENG Length: 18p Teaching Note: Yes

Air France Internet Marketing: Optimizing Google, Yahoo!, MSN, and Kayak Sponsored Search Exhibit Spreadsheet, Spreadsheet Supplement Mark Jeffery, Lisa Egli, Andy Gieraltowski, Jessica Lambert, Jason Miller, Liz Neely, Rakesh Sharma Type: Kellogg case Pub. Date: Mar 06, 2009 Product #: KEL321-XLS-ENG Length: N/A

Rob Griffin, senior vice president and U.S. director of search for Media Contacts, a communications consulting firm, is faced with the task of optimizing search engine marketing (SEM) for Air France. At the time of the case, SEM had become an advertising phenomenon, with North American advertisers spending $9.4 billion in the SEM channel, up 62% from 2005. Moving forward, Griffin wants to ensure that the team keeps its leading edge and delivers the results Air France requires for optimal Internet sales growth. The case centers upon Air France's and Media Contacts' efforts to find the ideal SEM campaign to provide an optimal amount of ticket sales in response to advertising dollars spent. This optimal search marketing campaign is based on choosing effective allocation of ad dollars across the various search engines, as well as selecting appropriate keywords and bid strategies for placement on the search result page for Internet users. In determining the optimal strategy, the case presents background information on the airline industry as well as the Internet search options available at the time, including Google, Microsoft MSN, Yahoo!, and Kayak. Additionally, background information is provided on SEM and its associated costs and means of measuring the successfulness of each marketing effort. The case illustrates how one must first determine the key performance indicators for the project to guide analysis and enable comparison of various SEM campaigns. Cost per click and probability to produce a sale differ among publishers. Therefore, using a portfolio application model's quadrant positions can be used to determine optimal publisher strategies. Additionally, pivot tables help illustrate campaigns and strategies that have historically been most successful in meeting Air France's target Internet sales. Multiple recommendations on how Media Contacts can assist Air France in improving its SEM strategy can be derived from the data provided. Learning Objective: Students learn how to optimally leverage the Internet in generating customer sales in a cost-effective manner. Students will analyze and manipulate a variety of data using pivot tables to determine optimal strategies for obtaining maximum total online bookings through the various online channels available. Using a portfolio application model, students can determine an optimal publisher strategy and complete copy improvement analysis. Subjects Covered: Customer relationship management; Customer retention; Customer satisfaction; Global business; International business; Internet; Internet marketing; Marketing communications

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) HubSpot: Inbound Marketing and Web 2.0 Thomas Steenburgh, Jill Avery, Naseem Dahod Type: HBS Premier case Pub. Date: May 15, 2009 Product #: 509049-PDF-ENG Length: 21p Teaching Note: Yes

Sony and the JK Wedding Dance John Deighton, Leora Kornfeld Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Dec 22, 2009 Product #: 510064-PDF-ENG Length: 9p Teaching Note: Yes

Chapter 13: Social Media

This case introduces the concept of inbound marketing, pulling customer prospects toward a business through the use of Web 2.0 tools and applications like blogging, search engine optimization, and social media. Students follow the growth of HubSpot, an entrepreneurial venture which, in its quest for growth, faces significant challenges including: developing market segmentation and targeting strategies to decide which customer to serve and which to turn away, configuring pricing strategies to align with the value delivery stream customers experience, and determining whether inbound marketing programs can generate enough scale or whether traditional outbound marketing methods need to be employed to accelerate growth. Learning Objective: To explore the opportunities and challenges presented by an emerging Web 2.0 inbound marketing model of marketing communications pertaining to segmentation and targeting, pricing, and driving growth for an entrepreneurial start-up. Executives at Sony Music Entertainment faced a dilemma: a usergenerated video featuring controversial artist Chris Brown's music was netting millions of views per week on YouTube. Sony held the copyright to the song, and was entitled to issue a takedown notice to the party that uploaded the video. How should Sony act? This case looks at the issues faced by marketers in an environment in which consumers disseminate content without the assistance, or approval, of gatekeepers. Learning Objective: To examine the new opportunities to create value for fans, and in turn companies, that arise in the dynamic social media environment. The role and positioning of the marketer shirts as new consumer attitudes and behaviors are brought about by popular participatory media destinations such as YouTube, blogs, and Twitter. Abstract

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Coca-Cola on Facebook John Deighton, Leora Kornfeld Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 15, 2011 Product #: 511110-PDF-ENG Length: 11p Teaching Note: N/A

The Ford Fiesta John Deighton, Leora Kornfeld Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 15, 2011 Product #: 511117-PDF-ENG Length: 24p Teaching Note: N/A

In late 2008, executives at Coca-Cola had to decide what to do with a fan-created page on Facebook that had amassed over one million followers in three months. From a legal point of view the fan-created page was in violation of Facebook's terms of service, because a noncopyright holder was using the imagery and logo associated with a known brand. Facebook contacted Michael Donnelly, Group Director, Worldwide Interactive Marketing for The Coca-Cola Company, to let him know that he was in the position to take down the hugely popular fan-created site or, conversely, he could take it over and make it an official marketing channel for the company. Coke was already revisiting its social media policies, with the Diet Coke and Mentos usergenerated video incident fresh in its memory. Those videos, which featured elaborate geysers with Diet Coke as their main ingredient, were among the most viewed online videos at the time but were not initially sanctioned by the company. Donnelly knew that opening up the brand to creative consumers was necessary, but he and his team had to figure out how and to what extent they should do so while still protecting one of the world's most valuable brands. Learning Objective: To illustrate the changing marketing landscape as social media evolves as a mass and mainstream marketing platform. Executives at Ford wondered if social media could be the marketing solution for the launch of the youth-oriented 2010 Fiesta. But with social media came a ceding of control. Some at the company believed that if Ford was going to move beyond its conservative brand image for the launch of the new subcompact chances had to be taken. Others erred on the side of caution. Chantel Lenard, Ford's Group Marketing Manager for Global Small Car and Midsize Vehicles and Connie Fontaine, Manager of Brand Content and Alliances championed a new approach for the new vehicle and set into motion a comprehensive 6month social media initiative targeting a younger, ethnically diverse, and urban-based market, called "The Fiesta Movement". In doing so, a large portion of the marketing campaign was handed over to 20 and 30-somethings across America, and Ford had to acclimate to a new way of doing marketing. To what extent should the company guide the activities and messages of their army of bloggers? The case is set two months into the Movement, as the team evaluates the metrics from YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and their website, and wonder if they're doing everything they need to do in order to make the Fiesta a success with a new target market. Learning Objective: To examine the variety of marketing techniques in the new social media toolbox; is the ultimate objective to 'go viral', or are there other metrics to consider when evaluating a social mediabased marketing campaign?

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) PatientsLikeMe: An Online Community of Patients Sunil Gupta, Jason Riis Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Feb 16, 2011 Product #: 511093-PDF-ENG Length: 22p Teaching Note: Yes

Groupon Sunil Gupta, Ray Weaver, Dharmishta Rood Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Mar 22, 2011 Product #: 511094-PDF-ENG Length: 23p Teaching Note: N/A

EMC2: Delivering Customer Centricity Thomas Steenburgh, Jill Avery Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Apr 04, 2011 Product #: 511124-PDF-ENG Length: 24p Teaching Note: N/A

PatientsLikeMe (PLM) is an online community where patients share their personal experiences with a disease, find other patients like them, and learn from each other. The company was founded by Jamie and Ben Heywood when their 29-year-old brother was diagnosed with ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease. In less than five years, PLM has grown to 15 patient communities where over 80,000 patients discuss 19 diseases. In December 2010, PLM is discussing its planned launch of a General Platform that would expand the number of diseases covered from 19 to over 3,500. Is it the right move, and what does PLM need to do to make it a success? Learning Objective: To understand how an online community is built and monetized and to highlight the challenges in growing the platform to a larger scale. This case is set in early 2011 after a period of incredible customer and revenue growth for Groupon. Reviewing Groupon's rise, the case explores whether Groupon promotions are really good for local merchants, whether Groupon can continue to thrive amid increasingly intense competition, and the key reasons for the company's remarkable early success. Learning Objective: Help students understand the nature of a blockbuster entrepreneurial success, and to critically evaluate Groupon's value proposition for merchants and consumers. This case introduces the concept of customer centricity and traces its development at EMC, the world's leading data storage hardware and information management software company. EMC's customers had historically relied on EMC salespeople to guide them through the complex, consultative buying process. However, with the rise of social media, prospective customers are getting more of the information they require earlier in the purchase process online. As they do so, their physical interactions with EMC salespeople are decreasing, while their digital interactions are increasing. Given the changing business environment, BJ Jenkins, senior vice president of Global Marketing, faces significant challenges as he tries to maintain EMC's culture of customer centricity. These include 1) translating EMC's platinum service levels, designed to appeal to the world's largest companies, to small businesses and B2C customers, 2) understanding how the replacement of physical interaction with digital interaction in the consultative selling process affects EMC's business, and 3) managing a VAR sales model that distances EMC from its customers. Learning Objective: The case allows students to grapple with the strategic and tactical decisions that accompany sales management and customer management strategy in a B2B technology setting. It also allows them to understand the shifting landscape of social media and how it enables and constrains customer relationship management and the practice of customer centricity.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) DBK: The Power of Direct Sales John Deighton, Sarah L. Abbott Type: HBP Brief case Pub. Date: Apr 19, 2011 Product #: 4284-PDF-ENG Length: 10p Teaching Note: Yes

The sales representatives at Designs by Kate (DBK) sell private label jewelry at hosted parties and through online social media channels. They are also responsible for recruiting, training, and managing new sales reps. CEO and founder Kate Creevey designed the commission plan to encourage sales reps to build teams and become "leaders" for their teams. The strategy has been very successful over the company's first five years. Now the CEO is concerned that growth in top-line revenue is slowing, possibly due to an unwillingness by current sales representatives to build and manage their own sales teams. A survey reveals that many sales reps believe their incomes from jewelry sales decline when they add members to their sales teams due to increased competition for hosting parties within the same geographic area. The CEO must revisit the commission structure to determine if it is still an effective incentive. The case includes a quantitative assignment that students should complete as part of case analysis. Learning Objective: 1. Understand the importance of the perceptions of incentives by sales representatives and the effect these perceptions can have on company performance. 2. Explore the use of compensation structure as a motivational tool for maximizing key financial objectives. 3. Understand the value proposition associated with a direct sales model. foursquare The cofounders of foursquare are deciding how to respond to Mikolaj Jan Piskorski, Thomas competitive threats and scale up the organization. Foursquare was a R. Eisenmann, Jeffrey J. location-based online service that allowed users to "check in" to a Bussgang, David Chen location using an application on a smartphone. Foursquare kept track Type: HBS case of a user's check-ins, shared them with users' friends, and unlocked Pub. Date: Jan 24, 2011 "Specials" that gave users discounts at nearby locations. Within a year Product #: 711418-PDF-ENG and a half of its founding the company had 45 employees and over 5 Length: 24p Teaching Note: N/A million users and was valued in excess of $100 million. However, many competitors, including Facebook, Twitter, and Yelp, developed competitive services requiring foursquare to respond. Learning Objective: To illustrate the promise of geo-location technologies and examine principles of lean start-up technologies. Matchstick Inc.: Word of Matchstick Inc. (A) case introduces students to how brands are starting Mouth Marketing (A) to put in place non-traditional advertising, such as word-of-mouth Ken Mark, Allison Johnson campaigns. The founder of Toronto-based Matchstick Inc. is working Type: Ivey case on a campaign for the Ketel One vodka brand. Ketel One, managed by Pub. Date: Sep 17, 2010 Diageo, a global beverage firm, is trying to increase its awareness and Product #: 910A19-PDF-ENG sales in the Canadian market. Ketel One's brand manager has turned Length: 3p to Matchstick to generate awareness among its elusive target Teaching Note: N/A audience. Learning Objective: The cases introduces students to how brands are starting to put in place non-traditional advertising, such as word-ofmouth campaigns. PART 4: POSITIONING: ASSESSMENT THROUGH THE CUSTOMER LEN

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Chapter 14: Customer Satisfaction and Customer Relationships State Bank of India: Transforming a State Owned Giant Rajiv Lal, Rachna Tahilyani Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Mar 28, 2011 Product #: 511114-PDF-ENG Length: 38p Teaching Note: N/A

Abstract February 2011: O.P. Bhatt reflected contentedly on his five-year term as Chairman of State Bank of India (SBI), India's largest commercial bank. He had led SBI on a journey of transformation from an old, hierarchical, transaction oriented, government bank to a modern, customer focused, and technologically advanced universal bank. In 2006, when Bhatt assumed leadership, SBI had been losing market share for over two decades to private and foreign banks. Analysts and industry observers had predicted that at the prevailing growth rates ICICI Bank, a private bank launched in 1994, would overtake SBI in terms of deposits in four years. However, by 2010, SBI had more than doubled its profits, deposits and advances; regained market share and won the Asian Banker Achievement award for the strongest bank in the Asia Pacific region. Learning Objective: Demonstrate successful turnaround and increased revenues by focusing on customer management and relationships.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) American Well: The Doctor Will E-See You Now Elie Ofek, Ron Laufer Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Mar 30, 2010 Product #: 510061-PDF-ENG Length: 28p Teaching Note: Yes

What is next for healthcare IT provider American Well, whose innovative Online Care technology allows physicians to deliver care to patients online in real time? Using American Well's platform, patients with non-emergency health concerns can communicate with physicians online or by phone and receive advice or even a diagnosis without having to visit the physician's office. American Well's cofounders, Ido Schoenberg and Roy Schoenberg, believe this platform will reduce the cost of care delivery, create new revenue-earning opportunities for providers, and contribute to a more efficient, convenient healthcare delivery system. While the platform could benefit insurers, providers, employers, and patients alike, the company has only marketed to a few health insurance companies to date. In November 2009, three insurers have adopted the technology and American Well expects several more to do so over the next 12 months. As the company plans to accelerate adoption by health insurers, it is also considering other growth options. Is it too early to commit resources to developing and marketing American Well's secondgeneration product, which facilitates real-time connectivity between primary care physicians and specialists? Should American Well pursue new markets in the U.S., such as hospitals, chains of clinics, and pharmacies, or even expand internationally? In a broader sense, American Well's technology solves the economic obstacle of time and place by connecting excess supply (of physician capacity) with excess demand (for patient care). Could this model be adapted to other industries, such as legal and accounting services? Alternatively, should American Well continue to focus solely only on its primary product and on becoming the leader in the Online Care Industry? Learning Objective: Examine how a novel service, in the context of healthcare, should think about its next-generation offerings and markets.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Green Hills Market Loyalty Program James Lattin, Meredith P. Jensen Type: Stanford case Pub. Date: Apr 20, 2009 Product #: M318-PDF-ENG Length: 29p Teaching Note: N/A

Chapter 15: Marketing Research Tools

With the competitive 2007 holiday season approaching, Gary Hawkins (CEO of Green Hills Market, an independent grocery retailer in Syracuse, NY) was looking for a promotional program that would keep his best customers coming to Green Hills for all of their holiday meal shopping. Hawkins knew that his larger competitors (such as Price Chopper, Wegmans, and Wal-Mart) would use their size and buying power to procure products at the lowest possible cost, enabling them to offer rock bottom prices. Hawkins was looking for a program that would take advantage of Green Hills' proprietary systems for tracking customers' buying patterns and shopping preferences. The promotional program under consideration was a continuity program, in which shoppers earned points that could be redeemed for pieces of Arzberg porcelain. Hawkins and his team needed to establish their objectives for the holiday season and decide whether or not the Arzberg promotion was right for Green Hills Market. The case can be accompanied by a data set ("M318 Green Hills Data Set") that captures weekly expenditures by a sample of 1000 households shopping at Green Hills Market before, during, and after the Arzberg promotional program. The students can use these data (and other information available in the case) to examine how well the Arzberg promotion actually worked. "M318 Green Hills Data Set" can be obtained from [email protected] Learning Objective: This case is intended for use in a course on marketing; the focus here is on reward programs and customer loyalty. Students are first asked to consider whether or not a particular promotional program (one in which shoppers earn points that they can redeem for pieces of Arzberg porcelain) is appropriate for Green Hills Market. The students must take into account promotional program costs, savings, expected redemption rates, etc., in making their determination. The case then presents results from the Arzberg program and asks whether or not the promotion was successful. Abstract

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Pillsbury Cookie Challenge Allison Johnson, Natalie Mauro Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Jan 27, 2011 Product #: W11020-PDF-ENG Length: 14p Teaching Note: Yes

The Canadian Pillsbury ready baked goods cookie line is experiencing less than stellar performance, and the marketing manager is under pressure to make strategic decisions that will help turn around the segment. The marketing manager engages the help of the consumer insight team to conduct market research studies that will shed light on consumers and their attitudes, behaviours and preferences towards the product. The results from the market research studies are in, and the students, assuming the role of the marketing manager, must filter through them to determine how this information can be used to improve the performance of the cookie segment. More specifically, students will need to determine where the greatest opportunities lie, who the team should target, what brand messaging is the most relevant and what type of communication plan would be most effective. Learning Objective: The case highlights a common problem faced by marketers - how to improve the performance of a business. In addition to this aspect, the case focuses on how to attain and interpret consumer information. The following topics are covered in the case: Introduction to consumer insights and market research; Customer segmentation and targeting, and Brand positioning. This case is best suited for an Introduction to Marketing course (either HBA or MBA level) or a course that digs deeper into how firms can employ customer-oriented strategies, such as the Consumers and Customers course. The objectives are to: familiarize students with different types of consumer research and how it can help marketers make better business decisions; develop students' ability to recognize relevant customer insights and to show how these insights can help determine strategies; highlight ways to segment the market, other than by demographics; explore the ways in which marketing managers can improve business performance.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Nanda Home: Preparing for Life After Clocky Elie Ofek, Jill Avery Type: HBS case Pub. Date: May 23, 2011 Product #: 511134-PDF-ENG Length: 27p Teaching Note: N/A

Procter & Gamble: Marketing Capabilities Rebecca Henderson, Ryan Johnson Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jun 10, 2011 Product #: 311117-PDF-ENG Length: 17p Teaching Note: Yes

Gauri Nanda, the inventor of Clocky, the alarm clock that rolls off the bed stand and forces its owner to find it, has to make critical decisions regarding the future of her nascent company. As sales of Clocky show signs of declining, she must decide whether to continue her focus on the alarm clock category or to branch out into new categories. If the former, the question is which segments to pursue and what features to develop, and, if the latter, the question is whether the concept of "humanizing technology" is something consumers would value in other domains. In addition, Nanda must decide how to continue marketing Clocky and its successors, given the potential for cannibalization. Clocky's success was largely attributable to the media's intense interest and coverage, and it is not clear such attention would carry over to other new product endeavors. Students are presented with a number of new product concepts and the findings from both qualitative and quantitative market research. This allows for a rich discussion of how managers can think creatively about consumer experiences to inform their innovation strategies. Learning Objective: Consider consumer input and market factors to determine optimal next generation innovation strategies. P&G had become known and recognized as a marketing machine. It was the largest advertiser in the world, with 2010 spending of $8.68 billion. From the company's early exploitation of broadcast media (radio and television) for its soap products to more recent experiments in digital media for its men's hygiene brand Old Spice, P&G was a seasoned marketer with strong consumer research, a powerful innovation network, and the world's largest financial commitment to advertising. Learning Objective: To learn from and analyze the best practices of P&G the world's largest advertising spender and a renowned marketer of consumer products. To understand their marketing strategies, where marketing innovation is developed, how it is applied across different categories and how marketing shifts with changes in structure and culture.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Red Lobster David E. Bell, Jason Riis Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Sep 08, 2010 Product #: 511052-PDF-ENG Length: 26p Teaching Note: Yes

Flare Fragrances Company, Inc: Analyzing Growth Opportunities (Brief Case) John A. Quelch, Lisa D. Donovan Type: HBP Brief case Pub. Date: Sep 08, 2010 Product #: 4550-PDF-ENG Length: 11p Teaching Note: Yes

Red Lobster, a 40-year-old chain of seafood restaurants, has just completed some market research revealing an opportunity to shift their target customer segment. The chain is in the final stages of a 10-year plan of rejuvenation under CEO Kim Lopdrup. When he took over as CEO in 2004 the chain was closing restaurants and suffering declining same store sales and declining customer satisfaction. But in 2010, even in a recession, the fortunes of the chain are improving. A recently commissioned market research study has revealed, unexpectedly, that 25% of Red Lobster's customers are "experientials," people coming for a "good evening out" rather than Red Lobster's traditional core customer who came because of a craving for seafood. Should this news cause Lopdrup to do anything differently? Learning Objective: The case was written with three purposes in mind (i) to permit a discussion about segmenting customers (ii) as a general case about the marketing of restaurants and (ii) about the potential of seafood as a source of protein especially in light of the growth of aquaculture as a source. Flare Fragrances, a manufacturer of perfumes for women, faces a growth challenge in a difficult economic environment. CEO Joely Patterson outlines two growth opportunities for her marketing staff to evaluate. One involves launching a new scent -- and possibly separating it from the trusty "umbrella brand" that comprises Flare's other scents; the other involves deepening Flare's penetration into the drugstore channel. In Patterson's view, the firm can pursue the first opportunity, the second, or both -- but it must do something . In helping Patterson to assess the opportunities, the marketing team must consider a wide range of factors, including brand management, consumer demographics, and positioning and pricing issues. The case requires students to complete a quantitative assignment as part of case analysis.Key topics include product line management, product positioning, and new product launch. Learning Objective: 1. To explore multiple considerations in generating stronger growth from a well-established consumer products business. 2. To develop quantitative skills necessary for systematic analysis and comparison of multiple growth opportunities.

PART 5: CAPSTONE Chapter 16: Marketing Strategy

Abstract

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) foursquare Mikolaj Jan Piskorski, Thomas R. Eisenmann, Jeffrey J. Bussgang, David Chen Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 24, 2011 Product #: 711418-PDF-ENG Length: 24p Teaching Note: N/A

The Generics Pharmacy Jim Kayalar Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Apr 12, 2011 Product #: W11061-PDF-ENG Length: 16p Teaching Note: Yes

The cofounders of foursquare are deciding how to respond to competitive threats and scale up the organization. Foursquare was a location-based online service that allowed users to "check in" to a location using an application on a smartphone. Foursquare kept track of a user's check-ins, shared them with users' friends, and unlocked "Specials" that gave users discounts at nearby locations. Within a year and a half of its founding the company had 45 employees and over 5 million users and was valued in excess of $100 million. However, many competitors, including Facebook, Twitter, and Yelp, developed competitive services requiring foursquare to respond. Learning Objective: To illustrate the promise of geo-location technologies and examine principles of lean start-up technologies. The price of pharmaceuticals in the Philippines is second only to Japan in Asia and one of the highest in the world despite the Philippines being a less developed country and nearly half of its population living on US$2 a day. The case illustrates how The Generics Pharmacy a local pharmaceutical company challenged the existing industry business model and became the largest pharmaceutical retailer in the country within a period of only three years. Under the strategic leadership of CEO Benjamin Liuson, The Generics Pharmacy succeeded in formulating a superior value proposal by focusing on the supply and demand side constructs at the bottom of the pyramid and bringing affordable high quality medicines within reach of low income individuals. Superior leadership, management and strategic initiative succeeded in integrating and balancing tenets of corporate social responsibility, entrepreneurial foresight and resource based strategy to catapult the company into a leadership position. Learning Objective: The case can be best positioned for use in a strategic management/leadership class. The case can be used to teach the strategic management process, and it utilizes the value chain, SWOT, life cycle, Ansoff, and scenario planning tools.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Fiat-Chrysler Alliance: Launching the Cinquecento in North America Gary P. Pisano, Phillip Andrews, Alessandro Di Fiore Type: HBS case Pub. Date: May 11, 2011 Product #: 611037-PDF-ENG Length: 24p Teaching Note: N/A

Google in China (A) John A. Quelch, Katherine E. Jocz Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 21, 2010 Product #: 510071-PDF-ENG Length: 13p Teaching Note: Yes Google in China (B) John A. Quelch Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Apr 01, 2010 Product #: 510110-PDF-ENG Length: 1p Teaching Note: Yes

Fiat ended its 27-year absence in the North American automobile market when the first Cinquecento (500)-a very small, iconic Italian car that had strong sales in Europe-was delivered on March 10, 2011. The Italian automaker re-entered the market through an alliance with Chrysler, the American automaker Fiat acquired in April 2009. For Laura Soave, Chrysler Group's head of Fiat Brand North America, the first delivery marked a watershed in a journey that began 12 months before when she first took responsibility for re-launching the Fiat brand in North America. As the first product of the Fiat-Chrysler alliance, the outcome of the Cinquecento launch would indicate how the integration of operations, and in particular the sharing of technology, platforms, components, manufacturing plants, and distribution networks would drive the long-term health of both Fiat and Chrysler. This case looks at the various strategic and operational challenges Soave faced throughout the process. Learning Objective: The case can be used to explore: 1) approaches for new market entry into foreign markets, and the associate challenges of brand positioning 2) strategies for managing and integrating global alliance partnerships 3) leadership issues associated with corporate turnarounds. In January 2010, Google threatened in a public statement to stop censoring its search results on its google.cn website, as required by Chinese authorities. Should Google exit China? Or attempt a compromise with the Chinese government? Learning Objective: To discuss whether or not to exit a multinational market in response to a crisis in relations with the host government. In a January 2010 public statement, Google threatened to stop censoring its search results on its Google.cn website, as required by Chinese authorities. Should Google exit China? Or attempt a compromise with the Chinese government? Learning Objective: To discuss whether or not to exit a multinational market in response to a crisis in relations with the host government.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Soren Chemical: Why is the New Swimming Pool Product Sinking? (Brief Case) V. Kasturi Rangan, Sunru Yong Type: HBP Brief case Pub. Date: Apr 09, 2010 Product #: 4188-PDF-ENG Length: 8p Teaching Note: Yes

Natura: Exporting Brazilian Beauty Bruce McKern, Leonardo Yamamoto, Daniela Bouissou, David W. Hoyt Type: Stanford case Pub. Date: Jan 20, 2010 Product #: IB92-PDF-ENG Length: 41p Teaching Note: N/A

Topics include distribution channels, pricing, and new product marketing. Jen Moritz, the marketing manager for Soren Chemical Co. is struggling with the poor sales performance of Coracle, a new clarifier for residential swimming pools. The performance is puzzling because Coracle is chemically similar to another Soren product that has sold well for treatment of larger pools. Soren distributes the other product B2B through "chemical formulators" serving the commercial pools market -- but Soren uses wholesale distributors to sell Coracle. Given the slow start in establishing Coracle as a consumer brand, Moritz suspects that the go-to-market strategy may be flawed, but she is unsure where the problem lies; she examines channel strategy, distribution partners, the Coracle pricing scheme, the threat of competitors' offerings, and other potential problem sources. Learning Objective: 1. Examine the interactive nature of the elements of the marketing mix, i.e. the impact of pricing and branding policy on the incentives of channel partners 2. Evaluate different approaches to pricing, including value pricing, competitive parity pricing, and customer indifference pricing (cannibalization) 3. Understand the trade-offs in new product marketing between an ideal strategy and what is actually feasible and affordable This case describes the development and international expansion of Natura, a Brazilian cosmetics company. The company was founded in 1969, and developed products using environmentally sustainable practices, and that were distributed using a direct sales model. The company was highly successful in the Brazil, despite the challenging Brazilian economy. Natura had successfully entered the Mexican and French markets. In 2008, it considered entering the U.S. market. The case describes the company's growth, its principles of environmental and social responsibility, its culture and organization, and its international expansion to 2008. It describes the U.S. market, and the challenges and opportunities that Natura would face if it tried to expand into the U.S. Learning Objective: This case can be used to discuss ways that local factors can be used to create a company well suited to prosper in the local culture. When entering a foreign market, these unique attributes can distinguish the company from its competition, but must be made relevant to the market being entered. The case allows students to learn about Natura's experience in Mexico and France, and evaluate ways in which it may successfully compete in the U.S. market.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Paradise Vacations Jonathan Michel, Mark Vandenbosch Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Jun 26, 2009 Product #: 908A09-PDF-ENG Length: 10p Teaching Note: N/A

In February 2008, the president of Vacances Paradis Inc. (Paradise) was assessing his options for the company's competitive strategy for the future. Paradise was Quebec's market leader in the tour operating industry but was facing a significant challenge: FunTours Holidays (FunTours) had stolen a sizeable portion of Ontario's market share in only two years and was planning on conquering the Quebec market for the 2008/09 winter season. FunTours' aggressive strategy was to provide large capacity at low prices, thus creating a price war and decreased margins. The president had to consider how to meet FunTours' threat in the face of several challenges: the tour industry was fundamentally changing as a result of shifting from traditional travel agents towards Internet distribution; limited differentiation in product offering forced competing on price; and a growing customer base as more people could afford travel. Price had emerged as the dominant criteria for travelers and a huge consideration for tour operators. The president wondered which strategy would be best for the company's short- and long-term viability. Learning Objective: The teaching objectives are: To develop a strategic approach to competition and its effects on the industry, the company and the customer; To develop analytical and decisionmaking skills in the creation of a competitive pricing strategy; To highlight the importance of strategic alliances between competitors and suppliers; To build an understanding for competitive approaches in undifferentiated markets.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Nashville Predators: Marketing Strategy for an NHL Franchise June Cotte, Jamie Duncan Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Mar 12, 2009 Product #: 909A06-PDF-ENG Length: 30p Teaching Note: Yes

Chapter 17: Marketing Plans

In summer 2008, the Nashville Predators' management team was considering the strategy behind marketing the team. They thought it prudent to investigate the feasibility of opportunities in other hockey markets throughout North America, should a new owner want to move the team. Management had to consider both financial returns and onice success. They needed to create a comprehensive strategy, starting from a recommended location, and moving through specific recommendations on promotions, pricing and customer focus. To help create their strategy, the management team performed the following: developed a comprehensive tactical marketing plan, including income projections; identified the marketing challenges of operating in very different markets; recognized that the choice of a city location largely constrained the remaining decisions and tactics. Using this information, the management team could now identify their next steps, and what future plans should include. Learning Objective: The teaching objectives for this case include the following: To illustrate to students to the creation of a comprehensive tactical marketing plan, including income projections To promote an understanding of the marketing challenges of operating in very different markets To demonstrate the importance of consistency. For example, the choice of a city location largely constrains, and thus determines, the remaining decisions and tactics that are both possible and logical. The case can be successfully used in a marketing management course or in a course on promotion management. The entertainment focus of the firm makes the case suitable for a course on services, leisure and entertainment management. For all applications, this case provides a data-mining exercise: what's happening and what the next steps should be. Abstract

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Marvel Enterprises, Inc. (Abridged) Anita Elberse Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 24, 2011 Product #: 511097-PDF-ENG Length: 10p Teaching Note: Yes

BBVA Compass: Marketing Resource Allocation Sunil Gupta, Joseph DaviesGavin Type: HBS case Pub. Date: Jan 27, 2011 Product #: 511096-PDF-ENG Length: 16p Teaching Note: Yes Inspiratica Web Services Roger A. More, Rocky Campana Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Mar 08, 2011 Product #: W11050-PDF-ENG Length: 20p Teaching Note: N/A

The management team of Marvel Enterprises, known for its universe of superhero characters that includes Spider-Man, the Hulk, and X-Men, must reevaluate its marketing strategy. In June 2004, only six years after the company emerged from bankruptcy, Marvel has amassed a market value of more than $2 billion. Originally known as a comic book publisher, the company now also has highly profitable toy, motion picture, and consumer products licensing operations. However, doubts about Marvel's business model and its growth potential continue to exist. Had Marvel's winning streak been just a fluke? Was Marvel's success dependent on a limited set of blockbuster characters, most notably Spider-Man, and should Marvel continue to capitalize on those characters? Or was it time to seek growth in a larger set of lesser known characters? In exploring growth opportunities, was it wise for Marvel to venture outside its current business model and move into more capital-intensive activities? What marketing strategy would allow Marvel to sustain its success in the coming years? Learning Objective: To study a best-practice example of an intellectual property (entertainment) licensing model. Also, to examine sources of sustainability in industries characterized by products with relatively short life cycles and explore how companies can build and manage brand franchises. BBVA Compass, the 15th largest commercial bank in the U.S., is a part of the BBVA Group of Spain, the second largest bank in Spain with $755 billion in assets. In December 2010, Frank Sottosanti, Chief Marketing Officer of BBVA Compass, was reviewing the marketing performance of the company and deciding how to allocate next year's marketing budget across various offline and online channels. Learning Objective: To highlight the challenges involved in allocating marketing resources between (a) offline and online advertising, (b) display and search advertising, and (c) various display ad networks. Inspiratica Web Services was started by one owner in 2006, and since then the company was realizing six figure sales, had offices in downtown London, Ontario, hired six staff and expanded its product offering to a complete web services package. The owner was just finishing university and he finally would have time to fully commit to his business. The purpose of this case is to teach students how to make a strategic market plan for a company. It focuses on managing a company's portfolio by looking at opportunities in the market, determining where competition is in the market and determining a pricing model that would match the target customer.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) Marketing Planning at Just Us! Cafes Sara Loudyi, Julia Sagebien, Normand Turgeon, Ian McKillop Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Aug 26, 2009 Product #: 909A14-PDF-ENG Length: 21p Teaching Note: Yes

Jeff and Debra Moore are the founders of Just Us!, a fair trade coffee cooperative, retailer and wholesaler. Just Us!'s mission is to actively promote fair trade and its benefits for producers in developing countries. The Moores have maintained a strong commitment to educating consumers while building strong brand identity and upholding constant growth. To support the main distribution channel in grocery stores, management opened four caf s (two each in Wolfville and Halifax) and distributed products on university campuses. Just Us!'s overall sales continued to grow, but sales were leveling off. In addition, the prevailing economic climate in Canada and increasing competition were worrying the founders. Recently, the Moores hired a new marketing director who was required to incorporate unique knowledge of fair trade practices, ethical purchasing and social entrepreneurship, combine it with typical growth-driven marketing decisions and ultimately propose a marketing plan that would consolidate coffee shop operations. Learning Objective: This case would be best suited for an MBA-level introduction to marketing, marketing strategy or marketing management course. It may also be presented in other marketing courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. The case provides a great deal of industry and company information and the kind of qualitative analysis that is required to make strategic decisions about the distribution practices of Just Us! products and the consolidation of the coffee shops' operations. It illustrates to students: The concepts of fair trade, ethical purchasing, sustainable and equitable economic development, and cooperatives as a form of ownership. Examples of successful social entrepreneurs and how they manage tensions between values and growth. Some of the requirements of success in the fair trade market such as strong corporate culture, consistent brand equity and clear positioning. Typical marketing decisions of companies that aim to fuel their growth. Students can use the strategic knowledge gained to propose a marketing plan for Just Us! for the year 2009. The goal is to stimulate sales growth, while respecting the values of Just Us! as a cooperative and a promotion agent of fair trade.

Case Map for Iacobucci, MM: Marketing Management, 3rd Edition, (Cengage, 2013) GPS-To-Go Takes on Garmin Donald Pillittere Type: Ivey case Pub. Date: Dec 11, 2009 Product #: 909A27-PDF-ENG Length: 9p Teaching Note: N/A

"GPS-to-GO is a successful company that has a wealth of brilliant researchers and scientists who have created advanced global positioning systems (GPSs) for complex air-traffic control and logistics systems. Now, the vision of one of the up and coming managers is to use GPS-to-GO's knowledge to dominate the consumer market with premium-priced and feature-rich GPS units. Even though GPS-to-GO is far ahead in terms of GPS technology, the consumer market demands low-cost units and yearly follow-on products, which requires drastically different skills than GPS-to-GO's typical five- to 10-year cost-plus government projects. One of the managers is tasked with how to meet the cost target and market window for the new product, while working with the same engineering group that caused the unit manufacturing problem and launch delays in the first place. The key issues concern 1) engineering-centric companies and their culture, business strategies and processes for managing new product development 2) the implications these strategies and processes have on addressing the needs of customers, shareholders and employees in a totally new market segment 3) the role managers can play in making critical decisions with a keen eye on roadblocks to success, such as culture, inadequate skills and overly optimistic and myopic visionaries. Learning Objective: The potential audience for the GPS-toGO business case is graduate students in MBA, executive MBA and executive education programs taking courses in managing new product commercialization, managing technology and innovation, strategic thinking, operations management and leadership. Juniors and seniors in undergraduate business programs can also benefit from the business case. The case has several learning objectives: To discuss specific challenges faced by corporations in their ability to utilize cross-functional teams in order to develop and launch new products in unfamiliar markets that require different skills and order-winning criteria. The case gives students the opportunity to experience a realistic and difficult business decision of the sort that today's managers face daily -- a decision that requires careful analysis with often incomplete information when the expectation of the receiving audience is for an outcome that is assured; To give students a realistic understanding of team dynamics, individual motivations and challenges (technical and human resources) faced by project teams in successfully commercializing a new product (or service); To help enhance students' ability to analyze a business problem with both quantitative and qualitative data, ensure it is in line with the corporate strategy and gain the team's and management's commitment to proceed.