Chiroptera Neotropical 16(2), December 2010 New

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millimeters) as follows: body mass (BM); total length (TL); tail .... The known record is. Barra do Corda, MA (Eger 2007). ... Seplan/Ideme,. João Pessoa. pp. 58.

Chiroptera Neotropical 16(2), December 2010

New records of three bat species for the Caatinga of the state of Paraíba, northeastern Brazil. José Anderson Feijó1*, Paloma Araujo2, Maria Paula Aguiar Fracasso3, Katharine Raquel Pereira dos Santos4 1. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Biológicas (Zoologia), Departamento de Sistemática e Ecologia, Centro de Ciências Exatas e da Natureza, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Campus I, João Pessoa, Paraíba, CEP 58059-900, Brazil. 2. Laboratório de Mastozoologia, Departamento de Sistemática e Ecologia, Centro de Ciências Exatas e da Natureza, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Campus I, João Pessoa, Paraíba, CEP 58059-900, Brazil. 3. Departamento de Biologia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, Rua Juvêncio Arruda, s/n, Bodocongó, Campina Grande, Paraíba, CEP 58109-790, Brazil. 4. Núcleo de Biologia, Centro Acadêmico de Vitória, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Rua do Alto do Reservatório, s/n, Bela Vista, Vitória de Santo Antão, Pernambuco, CEP 55608-680, Brazil * Corresponding author. Email: [email protected]

Abstract The aim of this paper is to document three additional species of bats for the Caatinga of the state of Paraíba. The specimens were captured with ground-level mistnets in the Parque Estadual Pedra da Boca (July 2004) and in the Reserva Particular do Patrimônio Natural Fazenda Almas (September 2009). The morphology and measurements of the specimens studied match to those described in literature. This paper represents the first record of Diaemus youngi (Jentink, 1893), Micronycteris sanborni Simmons, 1996 and Eumops perotis (Schinz, 1821) for the State of Paraíba, extending their geographic distribution in northeastern Brazil. A total of 28 bat species are now known for the state of Paraíba, being 13 of them registered for the Caatinga. Further studies are necessary to better understand the taxonomy, ecology, geographical distribution and conservational state of bats from Paraíba. Keywords: Distribution, Eumops perotis, Micronycteris sanborni, Diaemus youngi. Introduction Traditional geography divides the state of Paraíba in four mesoregions, namely Coastal Zone, Agreste, Borborema and Sertão (IBGE 2006). The latter three constitute the semi-arid areas, and their definition is closely related to the Caatinga biome (Feliciano & Mélo 2003; Prado 2003). The Caatinga is characterized by extreme temporal and spatial climatic variability (Mares et al. 1981; Willig 1983). Annual rainfall may reach 1,600 mm in some areas, yet during the drought years other localities may not receive any precipitation at all (Mares et al. 1981; Willig 1983). The vegetation is constituted by decidual arboreal and shrubby forest with several species presenting xerophytic traits (Prado 2003). Although the bats from Caatinga has been object of recent studies (e.g. Astúa & Guerra 2008; Fábian 2008; Gregorin et al. 2008; Sbragia & Cardoso 2008), the chiropteran fauna of Paraíba remains poorly studied, with only two publications, Cruz et al. (2005) and Gregorin & Ditchfield (2005). Here, we record three additional species of bats for the Caatinga of the state of Paraíba, Diaemus youngi (Jentink 1893), Micronycteris sanborni Simmons 1996 and Eumops perotis (Schinz 1821), extending their geographic distribution in northeastern Brazil.

Material and Methods We examined three specimens of D. youngi (UFPB 5573, 5576, 5715) and two specimens of E. perotis (UFPB 6011, 6012) captured in July 2004 in the Parque Estadual Pedra da Boca (6º 31’ S and 35° 44’ W), muncipality of Araruna, north of the state of Paraíba. One specimen of M. sanborni (UFPB 6013) was collected in September 2009 in the Reserva Particular do Patrimônio Natural Fazenda Almas (7° 28’S and 36° 53’W), municipality of São José dos Cordeiros, central Paraíba. Both localities are situated in the Caatinga biome. All specimens were captured with ground-level mistnets (maximum height of three meters). The collected samples were handled in accordance with the Animal Care and Use Committee (1998), fixed in 10% formalin and preserved in ethanol 70°, with subsequent extraction of the skull. The material is deposited in the mammal collection of the Federal University of Paraíba (UFPB). The measurements were recorded (grams and in millimeters) as follows: body mass (BM); total length (TL); tail length (TAL); hind foot length (HFL); ear length (EL); length of forearm (FAR); greatest length of skull (GLS); condylobasal length (CBL); mastoidal breadth (MAB); zygomatic breadth (ZYG); breadth of braincase

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Chiroptera Neotropical 16(2), December 2010 (BBC); postorbital constriction (POC); palatal length (PL); palatal breadth (PB); breadth across upper canines (BAC); breadth across upper molars (BAM); length of maxillary toothrow (MXT); length of mandible (LM); High of the ramus at coronoid process (HCP); length of mandibular toothrow (MDT). Results and Discussion The three adult specimens (one male and two females) of D. youngi presents the diagnostic

characteristics indicated by Greenhall & Schutt Jr. (1996), such as the single pad under the metacarpals, an absente calcar, white tipped wings, and the anterior upper molar with a prominent medial cusp, which is absent in Desmodus and Diphylla. The morphometric characters of our specimens (Table 1) follow the pattern described for D. youngi by Greenhall & Schutt Jr. (1996), Falcão (2007) and Vizotto & Taddei (1973).

Table 1. Measurements of the studied specimens from the Caatinga of the state of Paraíba. Measurements D. youngi M. sanborni E. perotis Male (n=2) Female (n=1) Female (n=1) Female (n=2) BM 49; 38,5 48 7,5 78; 80 TL 80; 83 87 55.8 180; 185 TAL 12.7 62; 65 HFL 16 14 9.6 15; 18 EL 17; 20 18 17.4 41; 45 FAR 49; 53 55 33.6 78; 80 GLS 24.1 24 17.3 31.1 CBL 21.1 21.3 15.4 28.7; 29.8 MAB 11.7 11.9 8.2 14.8 ZYG 13.5 13.8 8.2 17.7; 18.9 BBC 12.4 12.8 7.2 14.6 POC 5.9; 6.3 6 4 5.4; 5.7 PL 7.5 7.3 7.1 13.7 PB 4.3 4.4 2.7 5.3; 5.4 BAC 5.9; 6 5.9 2.7 8; 8.5 BAM 6.1; 6.2 5.9 5.2 13; 13.3 MXT 3.3; 3.4 2.8 6.1 12.7 LM 15 14.9 10.7 23.4; 24.2 HCP 6.7; 7.4 7.7 3 5.8; 6 MDT 3.7; 3.2 4.1 6.4 13.6; 13.7 The geographic distribution of D. youngi ranges through the northeastern Mexico to northern Argentina (Simmons 2005). In Brazil, this species is widely distributed, but is locally rare or uncommon throughout most of its geographic range (Aguiar et al. 2006; Falcão 2007; Gimenez & Ferrarezzi 2004; Miretzki 2003). In northeastern region this specie is recorded for the Atlantic Forest of the states of Alagoas, Pernambuco, and Bahia (Aguiar et al. 2006; Falcão 2007; Mares et al. 1981) and for the Caatinga of the Piauí state (Pinto & Bento 1986). This is the first record of this species for the state of Paraíba and increase its distribution in 180 km northwest (Figure 1). The M. sanborni specimen, an adult female, presents the dorsal pelage composed of bicolored hairs with white bases and brown tips. The ventral fur is white and continues anteriorly onto the throat and chin, and posteriorly onto the base of the ventral surface of the uropatagium. The calcar and the hind foot have the same length (9.6 mm). Upper incisors are tiny and separated from upper canines by a small gap. P2 and P4 are also separated from each other by a narrow gap.

Figure 1. Records of Diameus youngi in northeastern Brazil (● Known records; ▲ New record). The new record represents the municipality of Araruna, PB. The known records are as follow: (1) São Lourenço da Mata, PE (Mares et al. 1981); (2) Porto Calvo, AL (Aguiar

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Chiroptera Neotropical 16(2), December 2010 et al. 2006); (3) Mascote, BA (Falcão 2007); and (4) Picos, PI (Pinto and Bento 1986). First and second phalanges of digit IV are equal in length (9.4 mm). Thumb is relatively small (7.4 mm). The morphology and measurements (Table 1) of our specimen match to those described by Simmons (1996) for the type series of M. sanborni, except for the hind foot length (ours is slightly larger) and ear length (ours is slightly shorter). M. sanborni is registered for Bolivia (Brooks et al. 2002) and for the Brazilian states of Minas Gerais (Nogueira et al. 2007), Piauí (Gregorin et al. 2008), Ceará and Pernambuco (Simmons 1996), occurring in Caatinga and Cerrado. This is the first record for the state of Paraíba, the most oriental record for the species, and improves the known distribution in approximately 300 km east (Figure 2).

record of the genus Eumops for the state of Paraíba and improves the known distribution of E. perotis in approximately 1000 km east (Figure 3).

Figure 3. Records of Eumops perotis in northeastern Brazil (● Known record; ▲ New record). The new record represents the municipality of Araruna, PB. The known record is Barra do Corda, MA (Eger 2007).

Figure 2- Records of Micronycteris sanborni in northeastern Brazil (● Known records; ▲ New record). The new record represents the municipality of São José dos Cordeiros, PB. The known records are as follow: (1) Parque Nacional da Serra das Confusões, PI (Gregorin et al. 2008); (2) Crato, CE (Simmons 1996); and (3) Exu, PE (Simmons 1996). The two specimens of E. perotis (both female) presents the posterior crest of the third upper molar about ¼ length of the second molar (immediately anterior), and the first upper premolar centered on the maxillary toothrow between canine and second upper premolar, as indicated by Gregorin & Taddei (2002). The measurements are congruent with literature (Gregorin & Taddei 2002) (Table 1). E. perotis is known from United States, Mexico, Venezuela, Paraguay, Argentina, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador (Eger 2007; Simmons 2005). In Brazil, E. perotis occurs in most biomes (Fonseca et al. 1996) and in the states of Amazônia, Pará, Maranhão, Minas Gerais, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo e Rio Grande do Sul (Fabian & Gregorin 2007). This is the first

The new areas of occurrence of these three species represent extensions of the distribution and new records of bats for this state. Moreover, they also increase the actual knowledge of bats from Caatinga. A total of 28 bat species are now known for the state of Paraíba, being ten of them registered for the Caatinga (Alencar et al. 1994; Cruz et al. 2005; Gregorin & Ditchfield 2005; Percequillo et al. 2007; Sousa et al. 2004). Further studies are necessary to better understand the taxonomy, ecology, geographical distribution and conservational state of bats from Paraíba. Acknowledgements Special thanks to Jadson Luis da Silva Brito for technical support. This study was supported by the CNPq (Brazilian Research Council). References Aguiar L.M.S.; Camargo W. R. and Portella A.S. 2006. Occurrence of white-winged vampire bat, Diaemus youngi (Mammalia, Chiroptera), in the Cerrado of Distrito Federal, Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Zoologia 23: 893-896. Alencar A.O.; Silva G.A.P.; Arruda M.M.; Soares A.J. and Guerra D.G. 1994. Aspectos biológicos e ecológicos de Desmodus rotundus (Chiroptera) no nordeste do Brasil. Pesquisa Veterinária Brasileira 14(4): 95-103. Animal Care and Use Comittee. 1998. Guidelines for the capture, handling, and care of mammals as approved by the American Society of

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