Do digital health behaviour change interventions lead ...

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Do digital health behaviour change interventions lead to an increase in self- efficacy? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Katie Newby1. Grace Teah1.

Dr Katie Newby Centre for Advances in Behavioural Science

Katie Newby1 Grace Teah1 Stefanie Williams1 Richard Cooke2 Katherine Brown1 Bradley Salisbury-Finch1 Kristina Curtis1 Kayleigh Kwah1 Emmie Fulton1 Xinru Li3 Elise Dusseldorp3 Joanne Parsons1 Coventry University, UK Aston University, UK Leiden University, The Netherlands

Do digital health behaviour change interventions lead to an increase in selfefficacy?

A systematic review and meta-analysis

• Health psychology has accumulated an extensive toolbox of BCTs in recent years

Introduction

• Meta-analyses have been used to identify which work best to change determinants of health behaviour • One important determinant of health behaviour is selfefficacy • But can digital interventions change self-efficacy? And if so, which BCTs work best?

Aims:

Study aims: 1. To examine the overall effect of digital behaviour change interventions on selfefficacy 2. To examine whether the overall effect of digital behaviour change interventions on selfefficacy varies as a function of the behaviour being addressed 3. To identify which BCTs are most effective in increasing self-efficacy

Method

1

2

3

4

Inclusion/exclusion criteria

Search and screening

Data extraction and coding

Statistical methods

Effect size info (pre and 1st measure post)

Means/SD, pre-post test

Coded: design and sample characteristics, BCTs

Moderation analysis

Automated digital intervention that aimed to have + impact on SE for one of five health behaviours RCT or quasi

CINAHL, Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science Forwards/backwards Requests Dual screening

CMA software Hedges’ g

Results

Results Characteristic Health Behaviour

Sexual Behaviour Smoking Healthy Eating Physical Activity Alcohol Use

Number of studies 2 4 3 7 0

• 6839 records after duplicates removed

Study design

• 16 studies reporting on 17 interventions

RCT Quasi-experimental

15 1

Study Country

High income Middle income Low income

15 1 0

Modes of delivery

IVR Text Email Website DVD

2 4 5 11 2

• 20 separate comparisons

What is the overall effect of digital behaviour change interventions on self-efficacy? Study interventions were successful at increasing selfefficacy g= 0.165, CI 95% 0.034 to 0.296, n= 4788 k= 20, p= 0.014, I² = 76.280

Does the overall effect of digital behaviour change interventions on self-efficacy vary as a function of the behaviour being addressed?

Smoking and sexual behaviour Interventions targeting smoking (g= 0.435, CI 95% 0.250 to 0.619, k= 4, p=

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