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Arkansas has been building considerable strength in Energy. EfficiencyRenewable Energy Systems, Mixed-Signal, and. Wireless Packaging areas. This effort is ...

Curriculum Restructure to Answer Critical Needs in Packaging for Energy EfficiencylRenewable Energy Systems, Wireless, and Mixed-Signal Systems Areas W. Brown, A. Elshabini, S. Ang, J. Balda, F. Barlow, R. Couyillion', A. Malshe*, R. Malstrom*, A. Mantooth, T. Martin, H. Naseem, R. Jones, W. Waite, R. Brown, N.Schmitt,.D. Nutter, G. Salamo**,L. Schaper, W. Schmidt', R. Selvam', S. Singh*, K. Olejniczak, R. Ulrich-, J. Yeargan, E. Yaz, and W. White

Electrical Engineering Department ** *MechanicalEngineering Department, Physics Department, 'Civil Engineering Department, '+Industrial Engineering Department, and * Chemical Engineering Department University of Arkansas 3217 Bell Engineering Center Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 Phone: 501-575-3005l3009 Fax: 501-575-7967 e-mail: [email protected]

Abstract The Electrical Engineering Department at University of Arkansas has been building considerable strength in Energy EfficiencyRenewable Energy Systems, Mixed-Signal, and Wireless Packaging areas. This effort is in coordination with critical other Departments within the College of Engineering; specifically Industrial Engineering and Mechanical Engineering Departments, in addition to the Physics Department within the College of Arts and Science. The High Density Electronics Center (HiDEC), established in 1992 with DARPA funds to conduct research on advanced electronic packaging technologies, enables the educators to interact within the various disciplines to achieve the set objectives of packaging in these areas. The paper will outline the mission of each area, the vision and objectives of the administration, the technical issues to be addressed, the technological challenges and barriers for the Department to face and overcome to make this vision a true reality, and the curriculum restructure. The paper will also outline how critical these strategic areas are for a national academic institution recognition and fulfillment of critical needs for our nation's global competitiveness.

1. Introduction and Background During the past 15 years, remarkable growth in wireless was promoted by technological, economical, and regulatory factors. Particularly, the microelectronics revolution has brought an advent of low cost digital electronics and electronic systems. The key components of radio transmitters and receivers became available as low priced integrated circuits with performance extending to the tens of gigahertz. Cellular telephone technology created an entire new industry. Meanwhile, optical fibers became the long distance transmission medium of choice for fixed users, offering ever increasing bandwidth at a low cost. The whole concept of communications changed with the birth of the Internet. Currently, telecommunications means a multimedia exchange of information between networks of people and machines. Also, the microelectronicsrevolution allowed global access to information. This fact, coupled with the increased value that society places on individuality and decentralization, promoted deregulation and increased competition in the telecommunications industry. A rising demand for wireless services and technology was the direct result of the competition

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and consumers demand, since none was willing basically to wait for a wire to be installed. One has to realize important facts; the intelligence of telecommunications used to be i n , the hardware with sophisticated and complex execution of sizeable amount of analog signal processing, with the bandwidth being a scarce resource, and computer memory being relatively expensive. Functions are currently executed digitally, and the hardware making binary decisions achieve the objectives. Therefore, the real intelligence' lies in the software. One additional factor, while analog obeys one standard, three major digital cellulars still compete in a common territory. The radio link connecting devices to the remainder of the world is the common feature that all wireless devices share. Most wireless devices transmit and receive. The most visible sector of the wireless industry is associated with mobile and portable telephones: cellular, Personal Communications Services (PCS), and satellite based. Cellular telephones operate at frequencies around 900 MHz and connect to the public switched telephone network through cell sites that cover geographic areas. Clearly, users are handed off from one cell site to another as they move geographically. PCS systems operate around 1800 MHz and have largely developed into a higher frequency form of cellular. The oldest wireless service was paging, and it is continuing to grow as competitive features are offered. A growing use of consumer wireless devices ranging from cordless telephones, garage door openers, and radio controlled toys is experienced. These devices consume bandwidth and radiate RF energy, although they are considered 'low tech' devices. In embedded radios, wireless replaces a wired link in a manner transparent to the user, with the cost factor being a prime concern. Wireless location devices include radio frequency tags to identify for example laboratory animals, longer range devices to track cargo, vehicles, and even people, and Global Positioning Satellite system (GPS) that has revolutionized navigation, with remarkable cost reduction. Wireless multimedia distribution systems are still considered in their infancy, but they promise to grow rapidly. These systems consist of terrestrial microwave systems such as microwave multipoint distribution systems (MMDS) at 5 GHz, or local multipoint distribution systems (LMDS) at 28 GHz, wireless local area networks, or satellite based systems.

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Another fact lies in unique design problems are stemming from mixed analog and digital systems on the same carrier or chip. The revolution in digital electronics has basically fueled tremendous advances in innovative portable/wireless electronic products. One has to realize the world surrounding us is basically analog. Therefore, advances in mixed-signal electronics have become the major limiting factor altering the revolution of digital electronics. As mixed-signal circuits become more complex function, the design and test issues become increasingly difficult to handle, especially for high frequency, andlor high power applications. Mixed-signal devices and systems are becoming increasingly important in the electronics industry. With integrated circuits moving from tens of millions to hundreds of millions of transistors on a chip, entire systems are being moved onto a single chip. There is pressure to place both the analog and digital components of a product onto the same chip, creating a mixed-signal chip, or in the same MCM part. This is especially true in wireless telecommunications. Another force creating mixed-signal devices is the increasing use of digital processing of analog signals. A digital signal-processing device requires analog filters, samplers, A D Converters, among other functions, at the front and back end of the digital processing circuitry. Yet another factor is the increasing use of analog circuitry within digital circuitry. A DRAM chip, for example, is very much a mixed signal device. Its sense amplifiers, and the data storage cells themselves, are very much analog circuitry; while the rest of the circuit is basically digital. Problems with signal distribution on digital chips at deep submicron geometries lead to the use of analog circuitry for increased speed of signal propagation (primarily amplifiers and comparators). Noise and signal degradation problems that result from line width shrinkage are also best analyzed by analog simulation. The increasing importanceof mixed-signal devices for cutting edge technologies makes the study of mixed-signal design somewhat of a national priority. Finally, in the area of energy efficiencylrenewable energy programs, one has to realize the ever-increasing demand for electric power cannot be met by conventional fossil fuels forever. Therefore, a sustainable energy policy must emphasize new, economically-viable,renewable energy sources, and more energy-efficientmotor drive systems. Instruction and research has centered around polysilicon thin films using laser assisted metal-induced low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicon for solar cell and large display applications. It has also extended to cover the development of optimum integrated, energy-efficient electric motor systems for air-conditioning equipment.

spectrum, irreducible size of antennas, and rising level of RF radiation. Although optical fibers seem to offer nearly infinite bandwidth for terrestrial point to point applications, deregulated and unlicensed operation offer the clear limited wireless radio spectrum the opportunity to use this spectrum more efficiently. The current proliferation of cellular and PCS towers has made the public more aware of radio transmitters and more sensitive to possible health hazards associated with RF radiation. Opposition has faced PCS and barriers likely will face LMDS, a situation quite similar to the electric power industry to the public reluctance in the past to support the infrastructure to deliver this power. While most electronic components continue to shrink in size, the limiting size and performance of wireless devices will be ultimately dictated by antenna considerations such as size and wavelength relationship to produce antennas with high directivity (must be many wavelengths in size), transmitter power, antenna sensitivity, and radio path length. Challenges for the future of mixed-signal include various issues. These issues encompass design issues especially with increasing complexity and functionality, test issues especially with increasing complexity and functionality, low competitive cost of modules, yield and reliability, standardization, miniaturization ability, especially with higher frequency and/or higher power applications, and ease of manufacturability addressing new evolving technologies. Challenges for energy efficiencylrenewableenergy programs include the development of clean, competitive power technologies, including renewable solar energy in order to lower energy costs, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and pollutants, and improve reliability of service. Other challenges include reduction of energy consumption, effectively addressing issues and create solutionslanswers to energy issues, increase awareness regarding limited natural resources, use of renewable energy, and developing more efficient energy systems.

2. Challenges For the Future of These Critical Areas The rapid growth in the wireless industry is basically the direct convergence between computer and communications technology. Universal one-number multimedia service and Internet protocol (IP) dial tone service seems to be the objective. In this vision, everyone will basically have one number (or one network address) to reach them regardless of their location. Everyone can access to the world’s electronic information resources Erom wherever the geographic location. Technological barriers to this future vision include issues such as finite radio 1279

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Business For These Critical Areas Nationwide Wireless Area 1. Satellite Communications. 2. Fixed Satellite Service. 3. Mobile Satellite Service. 4. Direct to Home Service. 5 . Terrestrial Wireless. 6. Wireless Local Area Networks (LANs). 7. Wireless Monitoring and Position Location (position location, remote monitoring, enhanced 91 1 service). 8. Prototype Software Radio Based on Configurable Computing (multimode operation, fewer discrete components, ease of manufacture, use of advanced signal processing techniques, ease of design, flexibility of incorporation of additional functionality with new regulations imposed by the Federal Communications Commission or FCC), Configurable Computing Machine (CCM) Soft Radio Test Bed, Application of the CCM Soft Radio to Direct Sequence Code Division Multiple Access (DS/CDMA) Mutiuser Detection, and Application to Simulation Accelerator. 9. Code Division Multiple Access For Wireless Communications. 10. International Opportunities.

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Mixed-Signal Area Design CAD Tools (capable of analyzing parasitics with coupled devices and interconnects, ease of design and ability for standardization). 2. Design Automation. 3. Modeling, Modeling Tools, and Modeling Algorithms. 4. Creation of Simulator Algorithms. 5 . Software and Instrumentation. 6. RF Design and Modeling. 7. Mixed Analog-Digital (electrothermal, and 8. Mixed-Technology electromechanical). 9. Design, - Simulation, Layout, and Testing- of Analog- and Mixed-Signal Circuits. 10. High Frequency Packaging. 11. Addressing Density of Interconnects, and Ease of Manufacturability of Systems. 12. Integrated Passives, Sensors, Heat Removal Techniques. 13. Time Domain and Frequency Domain Measurement Techniques. 14. Applications include automotive, consumer products, aerospace, and others. 4. Issues and Areas of Instruction and Research in These Areas

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Wireless Area Wireless WANs and LANs .Hardware and Software -Strategic Market Analysis of Wireless LAN and Wireless Internet Access -Terrestrial Location .Financing for Wireless .Business and Regulatory Issues .Business opportunities in wireless Wireless Systems and Hardware -Industry Standards for Personal communications Services (Wireless, and networking capabilities) Current Development and Building Blocks .Future Projection -Simulationand Performance of Analysis of Wireless Systems .Wireless Infrastructure Devices Cost Analysis Systems and Signal Processing Current trends and Next Generation Planning for Direct Sequence code Division Multiple Access (DC-CDMA) Technology .Blind Channel Identification for Mobile Radio Fading Channels Cellular Range Extension with Narrow Beam Antennas .Smart Antennas Congestion Relief on CDMA Networks .Simulation Study of Interference and Signal-toInterference Ratio in Wireless DS-CDMA Networks .Inductive Crosstalk Between Integrated Passive Components in RF Wireless Modules Characterization of Digital Modulation CDMA / TDMA -Distortion

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Active Devices and Integrated Circuits .Technology & Fabrication .Electrical & Thermal Modeling & Simulation -Wideband Electrical Characterization & Evaluation .Power HEMTs, MMICs, and RF Power Amplifiers .Novel Applications and Supporting Technologies Passive Components Integration .Design and Processing of Embedded Passives, and Filters .Applications of MCM Modules with Passive Components Integration .Wideband Electronic Materials Evaluation .Devices and Components Wideband Electrical Characterization Electronic Packaging .Package and Module Design and Development (Multichip Mixed (MCMs)y Chip Packaging (CSP), etc.) .Plastic and Ceramic Packaging Cost Package .Simulation, Modeling, and Characterization .Testing and Testing Strategies, BIST. .Area Array Interconnects (Flip Chips, Underfills, Ball Grid Arrays7etc..) .Microcircuits Applications Antennas and Propagation .Low Profile Antennas .Analysis and Characterization .Antenna Design .Low Profile Antenna .Propagation Control Techniques Wireless LAN and Indoor Propagation -High speed wireless LANs .Modeling Indoor Propagation

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Mixed-Signal Area Mixed Signals Hardware and Software. Srategic Market Analysis of Mixed-Signal Systems. Financing for Mixed-Signal. Business and Regulatory Issues. Business opportunities in Mixed-Signal. Mixed-Signal Systems Software and Hardware Industry Standards and Cost Analysis. Current Development and Building Blocks. Future Projection. Simulation and Performance of Analysis of Mixed-Signal Systems. Mixed-Signal Infrastructure Devices. Systems and Signal Processing Modeling, Design, and Simulation of Mixed-Signal Systems. .Inductive Crosstalk Between Integrated Passive Components in Mixed-Signal Systems/Modules. Characterization Electrical, Thermal, Mechanical, and Physical Characterization of Circuits and Modules. Active Devices and Integrated Circuits Technology & Fabrication. 2000 Electronic Components and Technology Conference

3. Electrical & Thermal Modeling & Simulation. 4. Wideband Electrical Characterization & Evaluation. 5. Power HEMTs, MMICs, and RF Power Amplifiers.

6 . Novel Applications and Supporting Technologies. 0 Passive Components Integration 1. Design and Processing of Embedded Passives, and Filters. 2. Applications of MCM Modules with Passive Components Integration. 3. Wideband Electronic Materials Evaluation. 4. Wideband Electrical Characterization of Devices and Components. 0 Electronic Packaging 1. Package and Module Design and Development (Multichip Modules Mixed Technologies (MCMs), Chip Scale Packaging (CSP), etc.). 2. Plastic and Ceramic Packaging. 3. Low Cost Package Development. 4. Simulation, Modeling, and Characterization. 5 . Testing and Testing Strategies, BET. 6. Area Array Interconnects (Flip Chips, Underfills, Ball Grid Arrays, etc.). 7. Microcircuits Applications. 0 High Frequency Packaging 1. FW and Microwave Package Simulation. 2. RF and Microwave Package DesigdFabrication 3. RF and Microwave Package Measurement and Characterization Mixed-SignalTesting 1. Built-in Self Test (BIST) 2. Design For Test (DFT) 3. Test Algorithms 5. Vision and Objectives The vision for Mixed-Signal design at the University of Arkansas is the Creation of an infrastructure to establish an Internationally recognized research program in the areas of mixed-signal and mixed-technology CAD including modeling, simulation, design, and testing, a critical need for our Nation’s global competitiveness. Issues related to miniaturization and compactness, electrical/thermal/mechanicalperformance, and ease of designhanufacturehesting of mixed-signal and mixedtechnology systems will be addressed and will receive special emphasis in this Center. In order to realize this vision, five tasks were outlined. 0 Task I: Foster a strong educational program for in-depth learning in the area through the development of educational curricula and an array of courses necessary for the research program to succeed while maintaining a good undergraduate educational program. This task entails reintegration of analog, interface, and system design practices into a welldefined digital curriculum, and dissemination of newly developed techniques through innovative outreach activities. Task 11: Foster collaborations with industry to maintain relevance in the research, graduate education program, and undergraduate education program. A critical need for companies associated with tools, materials, components, interconnect, subsystems, and system sectors of the electronics industry for participation as active members in

the Center. Such input is valuable for guidance, closer working relationship to support the transfer of technologies to corporate members for commercialization 0 Task 111: Creation of active research and educational programs between the Electrical Engineering Department at University of Arkansas and relevant interested industry. It is envisioned Texas Instruments as the most logical partner in the mixed-signal area; to include contracts, grants, co-op programs, internships, and fellowships for graduate studies. The goal is to extend this effort with other companies in the future such as Conexant. Task IV: Commitment of administration (hiring of new tenure-track faculty members in these areas during the present academic year). In addition, joint appointment as an Adjunct Professor in the Electrical Engineering Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, has been extended to professionals in industry and academia. These two steps are considered critical to support an infrastructure in the area of mixed-signal systems. 0 Task V: Creation of a critical mass of faculty to realize a well-respected research programs in this area. The ElectricalEngineering Department will be hiring additional tenure track faculty members within this academic year in this area. The vision, for the energy efficiency/renewable energy systems, is to set up manufacturing facilities within the Sate, promoting technology transfer in an important area to the State industrial base since efficient energy is the moving force of industry, providing energy-related educational and research opportunities for graduates, undergraduates, and high-school students, retaining and strengthening the State human resources devoted to energy-related education and training, and finally, providing the critical mass in terms of funds and manpower to bring energy-related research to the forefront of the State’s research activities.

6. Plan to Proceed The Department has committed to the education mission on both the undergraduate and graduate levels by structuring ten (10) new courses in the areas of mixed-signal and wireless, and four (4)new courses in the area of energy efficiencyhenewable energy systems. In the first front, the courses cover the following subjects; (a) Mixed-Signal Microelectronics; Analog Integrated Circuits, Switch mode Power Conversion, (b) MixedSignal testing I, (c) Mixed-Signal Testing 11, (d) Analog and Sampled-Data Filters, (e) Modeling and Simulation of Mixed Signal Circuits and Systems, (f) High Frequency and Microwave Electronic Packaging, (g) Digital Communications, (h) FW and Microwave Measurements Techniques, and (i) Introduction to Telecom, and 6) Satellites and Antennas. In the second front, the courses cover the following subjects; Switch Mode Power Conversion, Digital Systems Design, Advanced Modeling of Electric Machines, and Electric Machines and Applied Mechatronics. Additional courses in other departments are also being implemented to complement a comprehensive education. The paper will describe these courses in section 8. Many of these courses are cross listed between two departments and other are team taught. The primary motivation has stem from the multidisciplinary nature of electronic packaging. 1281

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7. Approach The main objectives include the following; technology transfer from the State institutions of higher education to the increasing State manufacturing base, which generally offers higher paying jobs, increasing energy-related ’ R&D funding, increasing the number of graduates, undergraduates, and highschool students involved in research activities at State institutions of higher education, retention of productive research scientists at industry, academic institutions, and government laboratories. Research and instruction have gain ground in collaboration with National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a national center for photovoltaics NASNGlenn Research Center, Building Technology Center and Power Electronics Electric Machines Center encompassed within O W , ONR, JPLNASA, and several industrial partners such as Northrop-Grumman, Texas Instruments, Connexant, Advanced Microelectronic Devices Corporation (AMDC), Materials Research Group, MVSystems, Inc., Lockheed MartidSanders, GT Equipment and Technology, Baldor Motors and Drives, Emerson Motor Company, TB Woods, Inc., International Rectifier, Lennox Industries, Inc., Rheem-Ruud, Scroll Technologies, Trane Company, and Texas Instruments. An Industry Advisory Board (IAB) is formed for each of the three disciplines from industry. The role of the board is to provide up-to-date industry trends, needs, and requirements, and to set realistic milestones. and delineate metrics to measure progress. The objectives of the board include assisting in developing partnerships among industry, academic institutions, and government laboratories, helping in the long term to the formation of an energy-technology resource center at the UAF; not only useful to the increasing State manufacturing sector but an added incentive for new companies seeking to set up manufacturing facilities within the State, promoting technology transfer in an important area to the State industrial base since efficient energy is the moving force of industry, providing energy-related educational and research opportunities for graduates, undergraduates, and high-school students, retaining and strengthening the State human resources devoted to energyrelated education and training, and finally, providing the critical mass in terms of funds and manpower to bring energy-related research to the forefront of the State’s research activities.

8. Curriculum Curriculum has been restructured in the following technical areas to address the packaging issues; Electronics Manufacturing, Energy EfficiencyRenewable Energy Systems, Mixed-signal, and Wireless Telecommunications. 8.1. Electronics Manufacturing In the Electronics Manufacturing area, eleven courses have been structured in the area of Electronics Manufacturing. They are; CHEG 5613, Microelectronics Fabrication and Materials, ELEG 52 13, Integrated Circuit Fabrication Technology, ELEGMEEG 5273, Electronic Packaging, ELEG 5293L, Integrated Circuits Fabrications Laboratory, ELEGMEEG 6273, Advanced Electronic Packaging, INEG 45 13/ELEG 4273, Electronics Manufacturing Process (electronic components and products, and the processes of fabrication and assembly, with

emphasis on principles of design, productivity, quality, and economics), INEG 4533, Applications of Machine: Vision (applied to assembly and inspection tasks traditionally performed by human operators), INEG 4563, Applications of ‘Robotics (including off-line programming, teach pendant programming, feederdmaterial handlers, and end effector development), INEG 5423, Engineering in Global Competition, INEG 4223, Occupational Safety and Health Standards, and MEEG 4443, Thermal and Vibration Analysis and Testing of electronics.

8.2. Mixed-Signal and Wireless The Electrical Engineering Department has committed to the education mission on both the undergraduate and graduate levels in the area of mixed-signal and wireless telecommunicationsby structuring ten (10) new courses in these areas. The courses cover the following subjects; (1) Mixed-Signal Microelectronics; Analog Integrated Circuits (ELEG 4243), Switch mode Power Conversion (ELEG 4323), (2) MixedSignal testing I, (3) Mixed-Signal Testing I1 (ELEG 5873), (4) Analog and Sampled-Data Filters, (5) Modeling and Simulation of Mixed Signal Circuits and Systems (ELEG 4873), (6) High Frequency and Microwave Electronic Packaging, (7) Digital Communications, (8) RF and Microwave Measurements Techniques, and (9) Introduction to Telecom, and (10) Satellites and Antennas (originally, the course covered antennas and propagation subject only). The Mechanical Engineering Department has committed to the education mission on both the undergraduate and graduate levels in this area by structuring various courses. In the area of Mechanical Design, MEEG 4213 Control Systems (IR) Mathematical models of control root-locus, and frequency- response design techniques. Performance criteria and stability. Special topics. Credit may be earned for only 1 of CSEG 4403, ELEG 4403, OR MEEG 4213. (Same as CSEG 4403, ELEG 4403) Prerequisite: ELEG 3123. MEEG 5103 Structural Dynamics (FA) The forced and random vibration response of complex structural systems are studied through the use of the finite element method. Computational aspects of these problems are discussed and digital computer applications undertaken. Prerequisite: MEEG 4 103 and graduate standing. MEEG 5303 Physical Metallurgy (IR) Physical and chemical properties of solids and the application of materials in commerce. Lecture 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 3404. In general, MEEG 4703 Mathematical Methods in Engineering (IR) Determinants, matrices, simultaneous equations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and coordinate transformations of matrices; vector algebra and calculus, integral theorems, curvilinear coordinates, covariant and contravariant tensors. Applications of tensor algebra and calculus to mechanics. Prerequisite: MATH 2574. MEEG 4303 Materials Laboratory (SP) A study of properties, uses, testing, and heat treatment of basic engineering materials. Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 4 hours per week. Corequisite: MEEG 4300L. Prerequisite: MEEG 2303 and MEEG 3013. MEEG 4233 Microprocessors in Mechanical Engineering 1: Electromechanical Systems (IR) Microcomputer architectural, programming, and interfacing. Smart product design (microprocessor-based design). Control of DC and stepper motors and interfacing to sensors. Applications to robotics and real-time control. Mobile robot project. Digital

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and analog electronics are reviewed where required. Prerequisite: ELEG 3913 or equivalent. MEEG 5213 Microprocessors in Mechanical Engineering I1 Real-time Control (IR) Feedback control system theory and design. C programming. Microcontroller interfacing. Real-time control of electromechanical systems in laboratory projects using a single-board computer as the controller. Prerequisite: MEEG 4233. MEEG 4213 Control Systems (IR) Mathematical models of control root-locus, and frequency- response design techniques.Performance criteria and stability. Special topics. Credit may be earned for only 1 of CSEG 4403, ELEG 4403, OR MEEG 4213. (Same as CSEG 4403, ELEG 4403) Prerequisite: ELEG 3 123. MEEG 5213 Microprocessors in Mechanical Engineering I1 Real-time Control (IR) Feedback control system theory and design. C programming. Microcontroller interfacing. Real-time control of electromechanical systems in laboratory projects using a single-board computer as the controller. Prerequisite: MEEG 4233. In the area of Thermal Systems, MEEG 5453 Advanced Heat Transfer (SP) More in-depth study of topics covered in MEEG 4413, Heat Transfer, and coverage of some additional topics. Prerequisite: MEEG 4413 or CHEG 3143 or equivalent. MEEG 5473 Radiation Heat Transfer (IR) Spectral analysis, radiant exchange in gray and non-gray enclosures, gas radiation, and multi-mode heat transfer. Prerequisite: MEEG 5453 or equivalent. In the area of NuclearEnvironmental, MEEG 4843 Environmentally Conscious Design and Manufacturing (IR) The course will provide an introduction to the environmental aspects of production design and illustrate the consequences and costs of waste generation and pollution abatement. The course will also define pollution prevention and waste minimization techniques and will introduce the student to the design for the environment (DE) concept, life cycle analysis, and total quality environmental management techniques. MEEG 4 123 Finite Element Methods in Mechanical Engineering (SP) Introduction to the use of the finite element method in mechanical engineering analysis and design. Applications to machine design, aerospace design, machine vibrations, heat transfer, and fluid flow. Prerequisite: MEEG 3123. MEEG 5403 Advanced Thermodynamics (FA) An in-depth review of classical thermodynamics, including availability analysis, combustion, and equilibrium, with an introduction to quantum mechanics and statistical thermodynamics. Prerequisite: (MEEG 3403 and MATH 3404) or equivalent. MEEG 5503 Advanced Fluid Dynamics I (FA) A basic survey of the characteristics of fluid flow under a variety of conditions with examples. Begins with a derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations and an evaluation of the dimensionless groups found from these equations. Topics to be covered include viscous laminar and turbulent boundary layers, jets and wakes, Stokes flow, inviscid flows with and without free surfaces and turbulence. Prerequisite: MEEG 3503 and MATH 3404.

8.3. Energy Efficiencymenewable Energy Systems Motor drives are one area where power electronics packaging is having a strong impact. The designer is challenged with packaging high-current high-voltage semiconductor devices together with passive components (inductors, resistors,

capacitors) and microcontrollers or digital signal processors. To this end, the instructors of Energy Conversion (ELEG 3303), Power Electronics and Motor Drives (ELEG 5533), and Introduction to Motion Control Topics (ELEG 5873) make the students aware of packaging issues when teaching topics such as motor speed control and converter configurations. In this manner, it is sought to provide a broad range of possible applications of the concepts taught in those courses, specifically dealing with power electronics packaging. In this area, the following courses have been restructured and/or created. (1) Electric Power Distribution Systems (ELEG 4503), (2) Electric Power Quality (ELEG 5513), (3) Power Electronics and Motor Drives (ELEG 5533), 3 credit hours course covers; V-I characteristics of Insulated Gate bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) and MOS-controlled Thyristors (MCTs), design of driver and snubber circuits, induction-, permanent magnet, brushless dc-motor drives; and resonant inverters. Prerequisite: graduate standing or ELEG 3223 and 3303. (4) Semiconductor Devices (ELEG 4203), 3 credit hours course covers; Crystal properties and growth of semiconductors, energy bands and charge carriers in semiconductors, excess carriers in semiconductors, analysis and design of pn junctions, analysis and design of bi-polar junction transistors, analysis and design of field-effect transistors. Prerequisite: MATH 3403. Corequisite: ELEG 3223. (5) Switch Mode Power Conversion (ELEG 4323), 3 credit hours course covers; Basic switching converter topologies: buck, buck, boost, buck-boost, Cuk, flyback, resonant; pulse-width modulation; integrated circuit controllers; switching converter design case studies; SPICE analysis of switching converters, state-space averaging and linearization; switching converter transfer functions. Prerequisites: ELEG 3223 and ELEG 3123. (6) Control Systems (ELEG 4403), Credit 3. Mathematical models of control systems. Performance criteria and stability. Ziegler-Nichols, root locus and frequency response design techniques. Special topics. Prerequisite: ELEG 3123 or consent. (7) Control Systems Laboratory (ELEG 4463), Credit 3. Experimental study of various control systems and components. The use of Programmable Logic Controllers in the measurement of system parameters, ladder-logic applications, process-control applications, and electromechanical systems. Prerequisite: ELEG 4403. (8) Introduction to Power Electronics (ELEG 4523), Credit 3. Power electronic systems, power semiconductor switches, Generic power electronic converters: line-frequency diode rectifiers, line-frequency phase-controlled rectifiers and inverters, switch-mode inverters, and zero-voltage and zero-current switching resonant inverters (e.g., resonant and actively-clamped resonant dc-link inverter). Prerequisites: ELEG 3123 and ELEG 3223. (9) Digital Systems Design (ELEG 4943), Credit 3, Number systems and codes, fundamentals of switching algebra, analysis and design of sequential switching circuits and memory elements. (Same as CSEG 4943.) Prerequisite: Junior standing. Advanced Modeling of Electric Machines (ELEG 4873), 3 credit hours. This course deals with the dynamic modeling and simulation of electric machines; in particular, induction machines and permanent magnet synchronous machines. Non-traditional electric machines like variable-reluctance electric machines and axial-flux machines are a1 so analyzed. Electric Machines and Applied Mechatronics

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(ELEG 4873), 3 credit hours. This course deals integrated analysis, design and control of electric machines. Throughout this course, emphasis is placed on using Matlab/Simulink for simulating mechatronic systems. Introduction to Motion Control Topics (ELEG 5873), 3 credit hours. An introduction to topics of current interest in motion control systems. Examples: Open Control Automation, RS 485 Communication, RS 232 Communication and Ethernet Networks as related to Motion Control Systems, Control Area Network, Embedded Controllers, Motion Control Applications.

9. ‘One’ Case Study Electronic Packaging and Advanced Electronic Packaging, ELEG 5273MEEG 5273, ELEG 6273, respectively: These two courses are team taught from faculty of Electrical Engineering Department, Mechanical Engineering Department, Chemical Engineering Department, Industrial Engineering Department, and Industty. The courses are also cross listed between Electrical Engineering Department and Mechanical Engineering Department. The first course, ELEG 5273MEEG 5273, a threehour semester course, is an introductory treatment of electronic packaging, from single chip to multichip, including materials, electrical design, thermal design, mechanical design, package modeling and simulation, processing considerations,reliability, and testing. Prerequisites are ELEG 3213 (Electronics I) or ELEG 3913 (Electronics for non Elec, and MATH 3403. The second course, a three-hour semester course, is an advanced treatment of electronic packaging concentrating on multichip modules. Topics covered include advanced electrical design considerations, advanced thermal design considerations, advanced mechanical design considerations, processing limitations on MCM performance, tradeoffs and decisions, reliability considerations, testing and qualification, a TCM case study, and economic considerations. Prerequisite is E E G 5273.

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Program Status Due to the length limitation of this publication, only ‘one’ case study is reported. Texas Instruments has offered both co-op and internship opportunities to provide students a chance to make career decisions providing relevant, real-world experience working in Ti’s diversified areas of high technology, especially focused in the area of mixed-signal devices and systems. Student program participants do important work in all phases of engineering and manufacturing operations. These student work assignments and projects are meaningful, challenging, and educational. The supervisor plans and directs the participant’s assignment to optimize the student’s training and development, while making a contribution of value to TI. As a result of this activity, eleven students were permanently hired by TI in 19981999, ten students started co-op in the Fall 1999, and twelve graduate students have been supported annually by the program.

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Conclusion The paper has outlined the mission of the areas of energy efficiencyhenewable energy systems, wireless telecommunications, and mixed-signal systems packaging areas. The vision and objectives of the administration, the technical issues to be addressed, the technological challenges and barriers for the Department to face and overcome to make this vision a true reality, and the curriculum restructure. The paper also outlined how these critical these strategic areas are vital for a national academic institution recognition and fulfillment of critical needs for our nation’s global competitiveness.

63 C O L O R We alert you to the presence of color in the CD-ROMversion of this paper.

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