Financial Markets and Institutions - McGraw-Hill

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Financial Markets and Institutions A Modern Perspective

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The McGraw-Hill/Irwin Series in Finance, Insurance and Real Estate Stephen A. Ross Franco Modigliani Professor of Finance and Economics Sloan School of Management Massachusetts Institute of Technology Consulting Editor FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Benninga and Sarig Corporate Finance: A Valuation Approach Block and Hirt Foundations of Financial Management Ninth Edition Brealey and Myers Principles of Corporate Finance Sixth Edition Brealey, Myers and Marcus Fundamentals of Corporate Finance Third Edition Brooks FinGame Online 3.0 Bruner Case Studies in Finance: Managing for Corporate Value Creation Third Edition Chew The New Corporate Finance: Where Theory Meets Practice Third Edition Graduate Management Admissions Council, Robert F. Bruner, Kenneth Eades and Robert Harris Essentials of Finance: With an Accounting Review Fully interactive CD-ROM derived from Finance Interactive 1997 Pre-MBA Edition Finance Interactive: Pre-MBA Series 2000 Second Edition Grinblatt and Titman Financial Markets and Corporate Strategy Helfert Techniques of Financial Analysis: A Guide to Value Creation Tenth Edition Higgins Analysis for Financial Management Sixth Edition

Nunnally and Plath Cases in Finance Second Edition Ross, Westerfield and Jaffe Corporate Finance Fifth Edition Ross, Westerfield and Jordan Essentials of Corporate Finance Third Edition Ross, Westerfield and Jordan Fundamentals of Corporate Finance Fifth Edition Smith The Modern Theory of Corporate Finance Second Edition White Financial Analysis with an Electronic Calculator Fourth Edition

Rose Money and Capital Markets: Financial Institutions and Instruments in a Global Marketplace Seventh Edition Rose and Kolari Financial Institutions: Understanding and Managing Financial Services Fifth Edition Santomero and Babbel Financial Markets, Instruments, and Institutions Second Edition Saunders Financial Institutions Management: A Modern Perspective Third Edition INTERNATIONAL FINANCE

INVESTMENTS

Eun and Resnick International Financial Management Second Edition

Bodie, Kane and Marcus Essentials of Investments Fourth Edition

Kester and Luehrman Case Problems in International Finance Second Edition

Bodie, Kane and Marcus Investments Fourth Edition Cohen, Zinbarg and Zeikel Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management Fifth Edition Corrado and Jordan Fundamentals of Investments: Valuation and Management Farrell Portfolio Management: Theory and Applications Second Edition Hirt and Block Fundamentals of Investment Management Sixth Edition Jarrow Modelling Fixed Income Securities and Interest Rate Options Shimko The Innovative Investor Excel Version

Levi International Finance Third Edition

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND MARKETS

Hite A Programmed Learning Guide to Finance

Cornett and Saunders Fundamentals of Financial Institutions Management

Kester, Fruhan, Piper and Ruback Case Problems in Finance Eleventh Edition

Rose Commercial Bank Management Fourth Edition

Levich International Financial Markets: Prices and Policies Second Edition REAL ESTATE Brueggeman and Fisher Real Estate Finance and Investments Tenth Edition Corgel, Smith and Ling Real Estate Perspectives: An Introduction to Real Estate Fourth Edition Lusht Real Estate Valuation: Principles and Applications FINANCIAL PLANNING AND INSURANCE Allen, Melone, Rosenbloom and VanDerhei Pension Planning: Pension, Profit-Sharing, and Other Deferred Compensation Plans Eighth Edition Crawford Life and Health Insurance Law Eighth Edition (LOMA) Harrington and Niehaus Risk Management and Insurance

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Hirsch Casualty Claim Practice Sixth Edition Kapoor, Dlabay and Hughes Personal Finance Fifth Edition

Skipper International Risk and Insurance: An Environmental-Managerial Approach

Williams, Smith and Young Risk Management and Insurance Eighth Edition

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Financial Markets and Institutions A Modern Perspective Anthony Saunders Stern School of Business New York University

Marcia Millon Cornett Southern Illinois University

Boston Burr Ridge, IL Dubuque, IA Madison, WI New York San Francisco St. Louis Bangkok Bogotá Caracas Lisbon London Madrid Mexico City Milan New Delhi Seoul Singapore Sydney Taipei Toronto

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McGraw-Hill Higher Education A Division of The McGraw-Hill Companies FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS Published by McGraw-Hill/Irwin, an imprint of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. 1221 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY, 10020. Copyright © 2001 by The McGrawHill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written consent of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., including, but not limited to, in any network or other electronic storage or transmission, or broadcast for distance learning. Some ancillaries, including electronic and print components, may not be available to customers outside the United States. This book is printed on acid-free paper. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 VNH/VNH 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 ISBN 0-07-234892-5 Vice president/Editor-in-chief: Michael W. Junior Developmental editor: Sarah Pearson Marketing manager: Senior project manager: Susan Trentacosti Production supervisor: Melonie Salvati Coordinator freelance design: Supplement coordinator: Cathy Tepper Media technology producer: Barb Block Cover design: tbd Interior design: tbd Compositor: GAC Indianapolis Typeface: 10.5/12 Times Roman Printer: Von Hoffmann Press, Inc. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data CIP Data to come

www.mhhe.com

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To my father, Myer Saunders (1919–1998). TONY SAUNDERS

To Galen MARCIA MILLON CORNETT

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About the Authors

ANTHONY SAUNDERS

MARCIA MILLON CORNETT

Anthony Saunders is the John M. Schiff Professor of Finance

Marcia Millon Cornett is a Professor of Finance at Southern

and Chair of the Department of Finance at the Stern School

Illinois University at Carbondale. She received her B.S. de-

of Business at New York University. Professor Saunders re-

gree in Economics from Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois,

ceived his Ph.D. from the London

and her M.B.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Finance from Indiana

School of Economics and has

University in Bloomington, Indiana. Dr. Cornett has written

taught both undergraduate

and published several articles in the areas of bank perfor-

and graduate level courses at

mance, bank regulation, corporate finance, and investments.

NYU since 1978. Through-

Articles authored by Dr. Cornett have appeared in such aca-

out his academic career, his

demic journals as the Journal of Finance, the Journal of

teaching and research have

Money, Credit, and Banking, the Journal of Financial Eco-

specialized in financial institu-

nomics, Financial Management, and the Journal of Banking

tions and international banking.

and Finance. She served as an Associate Editor of Financial

He has served as a visiting professor

Management and is currently an Associ-

all over the world, including INSEAD, the Stockholm School

ate Editor for the Multinational Fi-

of Economics, and the University of Melbourne. He is cur-

nance Journal. Dr. Cornett is

rently on the Executive Committee of the Salomon Center for

currently a member of the

the Study of Financial Institutions, NYU.

Board of Directors and the

Professor Saunders holds positions on the Board of Aca-

Finance Committee of the

demic Consultants of the Federal Reserve Board of Gover-

Southern Illinois University

nors as well as the Council of Research Advisors for the

Credit Union. Dr. Cornett has

Federal National Mortgage Association. In addition, Dr.

also taught at the University of

Saunders has acted as a visiting scholar at the comptroller of

Colorado, Boston College, and

the Currency and at the Federal Monetary Fund. He is the ed-

Southern Methodist University. She is

itor of the Journal of Banking and Finance and the Journal of

a member of the Financial Management Association, the

Financial Markets, Instruments and Institutions, as well as

American Finance Association, and the Western Finance

the associate editor of eight other journals, including Finan-

Association.

cial Management and the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking. His research has been published in all of the major money and banking journals and in several books. He has just published a book on Financial Institutions Management: A Modern Perspective with McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

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Preface

T

he 1990s was characterized as a period in which financial markets in the United States boomed. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose from a level of 2,800 in January 1990 to more than 11,000 by the end of the decade; this compared to a move from 100 at its inception in 1906 to 2,800 thirty-four years later. While security values in U.S. financial markets rose dramatically, financial markets in Southeast Asia, South America, and Russia plummeted. For example, on July 2, 1997, the Thai baht fell nearly 50 percent in value relative to the U.S. dollar. Countries such as Russia, Thailand, and South Korea required an international bailout by the International Monetary Fund to prevent a complete collapse of their financial markets and their economies. Nevertheless, Indonesia had to declare a moratorium on some of its debt repayments, while Russia defaulted on payments on its short-term government bonds. Meanwhile, the financial services industry is approaching a full historical cycle. Originally the banking industry operated as a full-service industry, performing directly or indirectly all financial services (commercial banking, investment banking, stock investing, insurance provision, etc.). In the early 1930s, the economic and industrial collapse resulted in the separation of some of these activities. In the 1970s and 1980s, new, relatively unregulated financial services industries sprang up (e.g., mutual funds, brokerage funds, etc.) that separated the financial service functions even further. Now, at the turn of the century, regulatory barriers, via the Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999, technological innovation, and financial innovation has resulted in changes such that a full set of financial services may again be offered by a single financial institution (FI) such as Citigroup. Not only are the boundaries between traditional industry sectors weakening but competition is becoming global in nature as the Germans, French, and other Europeans enter into U.S. financial service markets, and vice versa. As the economic and competitive environments change, attention to profit and, more than ever, risk becomes increasingly important. This book offers a unique analysis of the risks faced by investors and savers interacting through both financial institutions and financial markets, as well as strategies that can be adopted for controlling and managing these risks. Special emphasis is also put on new areas of operations in financial markets and institutions, such as asset securitization, off-balance-sheet activities, and globalization of financial services. While maintaining a risk measurement and management framework, Financial Markets and Institutions: A Modern Perspective provides a broader application of this important perspective. This book recognizes that domestic and foreign financial ix

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markets are increasingly connected and that financial intermediaries are evolving towards a single financial services industry. The analytical rigor is mathematically accessible to all levels of students, undergraduate and graduate, and is balanced by a comprehensive discussion of the unique environment within which financial markets and institutions operate. Important practical tools such as how to issue and trade financial securities or how to analyze financial statements and loan applications will arm students with skills necessary to understand and manage financial market and institution risks in this dynamic environment. While descriptive concepts, so important to financial management (financial market securities, regulation, industry trends, industry characteristics, etc.) are included in the book, ample analytical techniques are also included as practical tools to help students to understand the operation of modern financial markets and institutions.

Intended Audience Financial Markets and Institutions: A Modern Perspective is aimed at the first course in financial markets and institutions at both the undergraduate and MBA levels. While topics covered in this book are found in more advanced textbooks on financial markets and institutions, the explanations and illustrations are aimed at those with little or no practical or academic experience beyond the introductory level in financial courses. In most chapters, the main relationships are presented using figures, graphs, and simple examples. The more complicated details and technical problems related to in-chapter discussion are provided in appendixes to the chapters.

Organization Since our focus is on return and risk and the sources of that return and risk in domestic and foreign financial markets and institutions, this book relates ways in which a modern financial manager, saver, and investor can expand return with a managed level of risk to achieve the best, or most favorable, return-risk outcome. The book is divided into five major sections. Part One provides an introduction to the text and an overview of financial markets and institutions. Chapter 1 defines and introduces the various domestic and foreign financial markets and describes the special functions of FIs. This chapter also takes an analytical look at how financial markets and institutions benefit today’s economy. In Chapter 2, we provide an in-depth look at interest rates. We first review the concept of time value of money. We then look at factors that determine interest rate levels, as well as their past, present, and expected future movements. Chapter 3 then applies these interest rates to security valuation. In Chapter 4, we describe the Federal Reserve System and how monetary policy implemented by the Federal Reserve affects interest rates and, ultimately, the overall economy. Part Two of the text presents an overview of the domestic securities markets. We describe each securities market, its participants, the securities traded in each, the trading process, and how changes in interest rates, inflation, and foreign exchange rates impact the FI managers’ decisions to hedge risk. These chapters cover the money markets (Chapter 5), bond markets (Chapter 6), mortgage markets (Chapter 7), stock markets (Chapter 8), foreign exchange markets (Chapter 9), and derivative securities markets (Chapter 10). Part Three of the text summarizes the operations of depository institutions. Chapter 11 describes the key characteristics and recent trends in the commercial banking sector. Chapter 12 does the same for the thrift institution sector. Chapter 13 describes the financial statements of a typical depository institution and the ratios used to analyze those statements. This chapter also analyzes actual financial statements for representative financial institutions. Chapter 14 provides a comprehensive look at the

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regulations under which these financial institutions operate and, particularly, at the effect of recent changes in regulation. Part Four of the text provides an overview describing the key characteristics and regulatory features of the other major sectors of the U.S. financial services industry. We discuss insurance institutions in Chapter 15, securities firms and investment banks in Chapter 16, finance companies in Chapter 17, mutual fund firms in Chapter 18, and pension funds in Chapter 19. Part Five concludes the text by examining the risks facing a modern FI and FI managers, and the various strategies for managing these risks. In Chapter 20, we preview the risk measurement and management chapters that follow with an overview of the risks facing a modern FI. We divide the chapters on risk measurement and management along two lines: measuring and managing risks on the balance sheet, and managing risks off the balance sheet. In Chapter 21, we begin the on-balance-sheet risk measurement and management section by looking at credit risk on individual loans and bonds and how these risks adversely impact an FI’s profits and value. The chapter also discusses the lending process, including loans made to small households and small, medium-sized, and large corporations. Chapter 22 covers liquidity risk in financial institutions. This chapter includes a detailed analysis of ways in which FIs can insulate themselves from liquidity risk, and the key role deposit insurance and other guarantee schemes play in reducing liquidity risk. In Chapter 23, we investigate the net interest margin as a source of profitability and risk, with a focus on the effects of interest rate risk and the mismatching of asset and liability maturities on FI risk exposure. At the core of FI risk insulation is the size and adequacy of the owner’s capital stake, which is also a focus of this chapter. The management of risk off the balance sheet is examined in Chapter 24. The chapter highlights various new markets and instruments that have emerged to allow FIs to better manage three important types of risk: interest rate risk, foreign exchange risk, and credit risk. These markets and instruments and their strategic use by FIs include forwards and futures, options, and swaps. Finally, Chapter 25 explores ways of removing credit risk from the loan portfolio through asset sales and securitization.

Walk-Through Main Features The following special features have been integrated throughout the text to encourage student interaction and to aid them in absorbing the material. •

Chapter-opening outlines offer students a snapshot view of what they can expect to learn from each chapter’s discussion.

Reserve System, Monetary Policy, and Interest Rates

Major Duties and Responsibilities of the Federal Reserve System: Chapter Overview Structure of the Federal Reserve System Federal Reserve Banks Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System Federal Open Market Committee

Chapter Navigator 1.

What are the major functions of the Federal Reserve System?

Balance Sheet of the Federal Reserve Monetary Policy Tools

2.

What is the structure of the Federal Reserve System?

Open Market Operations

3.

What are the monetary policy tools used by the Federal Reserve?

The Discount Rate

4.

How do monetary policy changes affect key economic variables?

Reserve Requirements (Reserve Ratios)

5.

How do U.S. monetary policy initiatives affect foreign exchange rates?

The Federal Reserve, the Money Supply, and Interest Rates Effects of Monetary

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Chapter Navigators list the chapter topics in order, providing numbers that correspond with the section in which they can be found in the chapter.

3

Monetary Policy Tools

In the previous section of this chapter, we referred briefly to tools or instruments that the Federal Reserve uses to implement its monetary policy. These included open market operations, the discount rate, and reserve requirements. Regardless of the tool the Federal Reserve uses to implement monetary policy, the major link by which monetary policy impacts the macroeconomy occurs through the Federal Reserve influencing the market for bank reserves (required and excess reserves held as depository institution reserves balances in accounts at Federal Reserve Banks plus vault cash on hand of commercial banks). Specifically, the Federal Reserve’s 7. The minimum daily average reserves that a bank must maintain are computed as a percentage of the daily average net transaction accounts held by the bank over the two-week computation period, called the reserve computation period. Transaction accounts include all deposits on which an account holder may make withdrawals (for example, demand deposits, NOW accounts, and share draft accounts—offered by





Bold key terms and a marginal glossary emphasize the main terms and concepts throughout the chapter. Pertinent website addresses are also referenced in the margins throughout each chapter providing additional resources to aid in the learning process. www.ny.frb.org/ Federal Reserve Board Trading Desk Unit of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York through which open market operations are conducted.

policy directive Statement sent to the Federal Reserve Board Trading Desk from the FOMC that specifies the money supply target.



Open Market Operations When a targeted monetary aggregate (M1, M2, etc.—see definition below) or interest rate level is determined by the FOMC, it is forwarded to the Federal Reserve Board Trading Desk at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY) through a statement called the policy directive. The manager of the Trading Desk uses the policy directive to instruct traders on the amount of open market purchases or sales to transact. Open market operations are the Federal Reserves’ purchases or sales of securities in the U.S. Treasury securities market. This is an over-the-counter market in which traders are linked to each other electronically (see Chapter 5). Open market operations are particularly important because they are the primary determinant of changes in bank excess reserves in the banking system and thus directly impact the size of the money supply and/or the level of interest rates (e.g., the fed funds rate). When the Federal Reserve purchases securities, it pays for the securities by either writing a check on itself or directly transferring funds (by wire transfer) into the seller’s account. Either way, the Fed credits the reserve deposit account of the bank that sells it (the Fed) the securities. This transaction increases the bank’s excess reserve levels. When the Fed sells securities, it either collects checks received as payment or receives wire transfers of funds from these agents (such as banks) using funds from

“Do You Understand?” boxes allow students to test themselves on the main concepts within each major chapter section. banks (reserve account) deposits at the Fed.

Example 4–1

Purchases of Securities by the Federal Reserve

Suppose the FOMC instructs the FRBNY Trading Desk to purchase $500 million of Treasury securities. Traders at the FRBNY call primary government securities dealers of major commercial and investment banks (such as Goldman Sachs and Chase)9 who provide a list of securities they have available for sale, including the denomination, maturity, and the price on each security. FRBNY traders then seek to purchase the target number of securities (at the desired maturities and lowest possible price) until they have purchased the $500 million. The FRBNY then notifies its government bond department to receive and pay the sellers for the securities it has purchased. The securities dealer sellers (such as banks) in turn deposit these payments in their accounts held at their local Federal Reserve Bank. As a result of these purchases, the Treasury securities account balance of the Federal Reserve System is increased by $500 million and the total reserve accounts maintained by these banks and dealers at the Fed is increased by $500 million. We illustrate these changes to the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet in Table 4–6. In addition, there is also an impact on commercial bank balance sheets. Total reserves (assets) of commercial banks will increase by $500 million due to the purchase of securities by the Fed, and demand deposits (liabilities) of the securities dealers (those who sold the securities) at their banks will increase by $500 million.10 We also show the changes to commercial banks’ balance sheets in Table 4–6.

Note the Federal Reserve’s purchase of Treasury securities has increased the total supply of bank reserves in the financial system. This in turn increases the ability of



In-chapter examples provide numerical demonstrations of the analytical material described in many chapters. money supply. Gold and Foreign Exchange and Treasury Currency. The Federal Reserve holds Treasury gold certificates that are redeemable at the U.S. Treasury for gold. The Fed also holds small amounts of Treasury-issued coinage and foreign-denominated assets to assist in foreign currency transactions or currency swap agreements with the central banks of other nations. Do You Understand? 1. What the main functions of Federal Reserve Banks are? 2. What the main responsibilities of the Federal Reserve Board are? 3. How the FOMC implements monetary policy? 4. What the main assets and liabilities in the Federal Reserve System are?

Loans to Domestic Banks. As mentioned earlier, in a liquidity emergency, depository institutions in need of additional funds can borrow at the Federal Reserve’s discount window (discussed in detail below). The interest rate or discount rate charged on these loans is often lower than other interest rates in the short-term money markets (see Chapter 5). To prevent excessive borrowing from the discount window, the Fed discourages borrowing unless a bank is in serious liquidity need (see Chapters 14 and 22). As a result, (discount) loans to domestic banks are normally a relatively small portion of the Fed’s total assets.8

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“In the News . . .” boxes demonstrate the application of chapter material to real, current events.

In the News N 4–1

A

lan Greenspan, U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman, said yesterday he

expected “a lot of problems” to emerge in the

U.S. Prints Cash to Cope with Demands of Millennium Bomb

global financial payments

and the end of 1999. In July, the Fed estimated it had $460 billion in banknotes in circulation with an additional $153 billion in its vaults, a total of $613 bil-

system because of the Year



for banknotes between July

lion. As part of the Fed’s

2000 computer problem.

is we are going to run into a

contingency planning, it had

The Fed had already or-

lot of problems. And as a

ordered increased printing

dered the printing of extra

consequence we are doing

of currency for the fiscal

banknotes for the next year

a great deal of planning on

year starting in October

End-of-chapter problems. At least 20 problems per chapter are written for varied levels of difficulty. Summary This chapter described the Federal Reserve System in the United States. The Federal Reserve is the central bank charged with conducting monetary policy, supervising and regulating depository institutions, maintaining the stability of the financial system, and providing specific financial services to the U.S. government, the public, and financial institutions. We reviewed the structure under which the Fed provides these functions, the monetary policy tools it uses, and the impact of monetary policy changes on credit availability, interest rates, money supply, security prices, and foreign exchange rates.

Questions 1. Describe the functions performed by Federal Reserve Banks. 2. Define the discount window and the discount rate. 3. Describe the structure of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. 4. What are the primary responsibilities of the Federal Reserve Board? 5. What are the primary responsibilities of the Federal Open Market Committee? 6. What are the major liabilities of the Federal Reserve System? Describe each. 7. What are the major assets of the Federal Reserve System? Describe each. 8. What are the tools used by the Federal Reserve to implement monetary policy? 9. Suppose the Federal Reserve instructs the Trading Desk to purchase $1 billion of securities. Show the result of this transaction on the balance sheets of the Federal Reserve System and commercial banks. 10. Suppose the Federal Reserve instructs the Trading Desk to sell $850 million of securities. Show the result of this transaction on the balance sheets of the Federal Reserve System and commercial banks. 11. Explain how a decrease in the discount rate affects credit availability and the money supply. 12. Why does the Federal Reserve rarely use the discount rate to implement its monetary policy? 13. What is the difference between an adjustment credit, a seasonal credit, and an extended credit discount window loan? 14. Bank Three currently has $600 million in transaction deposits on its balance sheet. The Federal Reserve has

currently set the reserve requirement at 10 percent of transaction deposits. a. If the Federal Reserve decreases the reserve requirement to 8 percent, show the balance sheet of Bank Three and the Federal Reserve System just before and after the full effect of the reserve requirement change. Assume Bank Three withdraws all excess reserves and gives out loans, and that borrowers eventually return all of these funds to Bank Three in the form of transaction deposits. b. Redo part (a) using a 12 percent reserve requirement. 15. National Bank currently has $500 million in transaction deposits on its balance sheet. The current reserve requirement is 10 percent, but the Federal Reserve is decreasing this requirement to 8 percent. a. Show the balance sheet of the Federal Reserve and National Bank if National Bank converts all excess reserves to loans, but borrowers return only 50 percent of these funds to National Bank as transaction deposits. b. Show the balance sheet of the Federal Reserve and National Bank if National Bank converts 75 percent of its excess reserves to loans and borrowers return 60 percent of these funds to National Bank as transaction deposits. 16. Which of the monetary tools available to the Federal Reserve is most often used? Why? 17. Describe how expansionary activities conducted by the Federal Reserve impact credit availability, the money supply, interest rates, and security prices. Do the same for contractionary activities.

Supplements •



The Wall Street Journal Edition. Through a unique arrangement with Dow Jones, McGraw-Hill/Irwin is able to offer your students a 10-week subscription to The Wall Street Journal as part of the purchase price of the WSJ Edition text. The WSJ will keep students up to date on the world of finance. (ISBN 007239708X) The Instructor’s Manual, prepared by Tim Manuel of the University of Montana, includes detailed chapter contents, additional examples for use in the classroom,

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and complete solutions to end-of-chapter question and problem materials. (ISBN 0072397047) Also prepared by Tim Manuel, the Test Bank includes nearly 1,000 additional problems to be used for test material. (ISBN 0072397055) Our Brownstone Diploma Testing System offers the test items for Financial Markets and Institutions on computer disk. This program makes it possible to create tests based on chapter, type of questions, and difficulty level. It allows instructors to combine their own questions with test items created by the Test Bank author. This system can be used to edit existing questions and create several different versions of each test. The program accepts graphics, allows password protection of saved tests, and may be used on a computer network. (ISBN 0072397063) William Lepley, University of Wisconsin–Green Bay, has written a Study Guide that speaks directly to the student. It provides a conceptual outline and applications that include definitional and quantitative problems for each chapter. Detailed solutions explain how answers were derived. (ISBN 0072397039) The PowerPoint Presentation, prepared by Joseph Ogden of the State University of New York–Buffalo, includes full-color slides featuring lecture notes, figures, and tables. Found only on the book’s website, the slides can be easily downloaded and edited for a specific course. The Instructor’s CD-ROM provides the instructor with one resource for all supplementary material, including the Instructor’s Manual, Test Bank, and Powerpoint. (ISBN 0072397071) The Saunders/Cornett Custom Crafted Website is found at www.mhhe.com/ sc1e. In addition to information on the book and its features, the site also includes downloadable Powerpoint slides and Excel Spreadsheet examples and a sampler chapter from both the text and the Study Guide. PAGEOUT: THE COURSE WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT CENTER AND PAGEOUT LITE www.pageout.net This Web page generation software, free to adopters, is designed to help professors just beginning to explore website options. In just a few minutes, even a novice computer user can have a course website. Simply type your material into the template provided and PageOut Lite instantly converts it to HTML—a universal Web language. Next, choose your favorite of three easy-to-navigate designs and your Web homepage is created, complete with online syllabus, lecture notes, and bookmarks. You can even include a separate instructor page and an assignment page. Anthony Saunders Marcia Millon Cornett

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Contents in Brief Preface ix part

1

part

15

Insurance Companies 000

1

Introduction 2

16

Securities Firms and Investment Banks 000

2

Determinants of Interest Rates 00

17

Finance Companies 000

3

Interest Rates and Security Valuation 00

18

Mutual Funds 000

4

The Federal Reserve System, Monetary Policy, and Interest Rates 00

19

Pension Funds 000

2

SECURITIES MARKETS 121

5

Money Markets 122

6

Bond Markets 153

7

Mortgage Markets 000

8

Stock Markets 000

9

Foreign Exchange Markets

10 part

OTHER FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 000

INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW OF FINANCIAL MARKETS 1

part part

4

3

000

5 20

Types of Risks Incurred by Financial Institutions 000

21

Managing Risk on the Balance Sheet I: Credit Risk 000

22

Managing Risk on the Balance Sheet II: Liquidity Risk 000

23

Managing Risk on the Balance Sheet III: Interest Rate and Insolvency Risk 000

24

Managing Risk with Derivative Securities 000

25

Loan Sales and Asset Securitization 000

Derivative Securities Markets 000

DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS 000

11

Commercial Banks 000

12

Thrift Institutions 000

13

Depository Institutions’ Financial Statements and Analysis 000

14

Regulation of Depository Institutions

000

RISK MANAGEMENT IN FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 000

Glossary 000 Appendix 000 References 000 Index 000

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Contents part

1 1

Factors that Cause the Supply and Demand Curves for Loanable Funds to Shift 00

INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW OF FINANCIAL MARKETS 1

Movement of Interest Rates Over Time 00

Introduction 2

Determinants of Interest Rates for Individual Securities 00

Why Study Financial Markets and Institutions?: Chapter Overview 0 Overview of Financial Markets

Primary Markets versus Secondary Markets 0 Money Markets versus Capital Markets Financial Market Regulation 0 Foreign Exchange Markets 0

Overview of Financial Institutions

0

Globalization of Financial Markets and Institutions 0

Determinants of Interest Rates 00 Interest Rate Fundamentals: Chapter Overview 00 Time Value of Money and Interest Rates 00 Time Value of Money 00 Present Values 00 Future Values 00 Interest Rates on Securities with a Maturity of Less than One Year 00

Loanable Funds Theory 00 Supply of Loanable Funds 00 Demand for Loanable Funds 00 Equilibrium Interest Rate 00

00

Term Structure of Interest Rates 00

0

Unique Economic Functions Performed by Financial Institutions 0 Additional Benefits FIs Provide to Suppliers of Funds 0 Economic Functions FIs Provide to the Financial System as a Whole 0 Regulation of Financial Institutions 0

2

Inflation 00 Real Interest Rates 00 Fisher Effect 00 Default or Credit Risk 00 Liquidity Risk 00 Special Provisions or Covenants Term to Maturity 00

0

Unbiased Expectations Theory 00 Liquidity Premium Theory 00 Market Segmentation Theory 00

Forecasting Interest Rates 00

3

Interest Rates and Security Valuation 00 Interest Rates as a Determinant of Financial Security Values: Chapter Overview 00 Various Interest Rate Measures 00 Required Rate of Return 00 Expected Rate of Return 00 Required versus Expected Rates of Return: The Role of Efficient Markets 00 Realized Rate of Return 00 Coupon Rate 00

Bond Valuation 00 Bond Valuation Formula Used to Calculate Fair Present Values 00 Bond Valuation Formula Used to Calculate Yield to Maturity 00

Impact of Interest Rate Changes on Security Values 00 xvii

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Contents

Impact of Maturity on Security Values 00

Negotiable Certificates of Deposit Banker’s Acceptances 141 Comparison of Money Market Securities 142

Maturity and Security Price 00 Maturity and Security Price Sensitivity to Changes in Interest Rates 00

Money Market Participants 143

Impact of Coupon Rates on Security Values 00

The U.S. Treasury 143 The Federal Reserve 144 Commercial Banks 144 Brokers and Dealers 144 Corporations 145 Other Financial Institutions

Coupon Rate and Security Prices 00 Coupon Rate and Security Price Sensitivity to Changes in Interest Rates 00

Duration 00 A Simple Illustration of Duration 00 A General Formula for Duration 00 Features of Duration 00 Economic Meaning of Duration 00 Large Interest Rate Changes and Duration 00

Appendix: Equity Valuation 00

4

Euro Money Markets 145 Euro Money Market Securities 149

6

Bond Markets 153 Definition of Bond Markets: Chapter Overview 153 Bond Market Securities 154 Treasury Notes and Bonds 154 Municipal Bonds 164 Corporate Bonds 171 Bond Ratings 177 Bond Market Indexes 178

Major Duties and Responsibilities of the Federal Reserve System: Chapter Overview 000 Structure of the Federal Reserve System 000

Bond Market Participants 179

Federal Reserve Banks 000 Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System 000 Federal Open Market Committee 000 Balance Sheet of the Federal Reserve 000

Comparison of Bond Market Securities 179 International Aspects of Bond Markets

Eurobonds 184 Foreign Bonds 185 Brady Bonds and Sovereign Bonds

000

The Federal Reserve, the Money Supply, and Interest Rates 000

7

Mortgage Markets 000

Primary Mortgage Market

000

Mortgage Characteristics 000 Mortgage Amortization 000 Other Types of Mortgages 000

Impact of U.S. Monetary Policy on Foreign Exchange Rates 000

Secondary Mortgage Markets

2

SECURITIES MARKETS 121

5

Money Markets 122

000

History and Background of Secondary Mortgage Markets 000 Mortgage Sales 000 Securitization of Mortgages 000

Definition of Money Markets: Chapter Overview 122

Institutional Use of Mortgage Markets 000 International Trends in Securitization 000

Money Markets 123

Demand by International Investors for U.S. Mortgage-Backed Securities 000 International Mortgage Securities 000

Money Market Securities 125 Treasury Bills 126 Federal Funds 132 Repurchase Agreements 133 Commercial Paper 136

185

Mortgages and Mortgage-Backed Securities: Chapter Overview 000

International Monetary Policies and Strategies 000

part

181

Eurobonds, Foreign Bonds, and Brady and Sovereign Bonds 184

Monetary Policy Tools 000

Effects of Monetary Tools on Various Economic Variables 000 Money Supply versus Interest Rate Targeting 000

145

International Aspects of Money Markets 145

The Federal Reserve System, Monetary Policy, and Interest Rates 000

Tools of Monetary Policy

139

8

Stock Markets 000 The Stock Markets: Chapter Overview 000

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Stock Market Securities

xix

000

Currency Swaps 000 Swap Markets 000

Common Stock 000 Preferred Stock 000

Caps, Floors, and Collars 000

Primary and Secondary Stock Markets 000

Appendix: Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model 000

Primary Markets 000 Secondary Markets 000 Stock Market Indexes 000

Stock Market Participants 000 Other Issues Pertaining to Stock Markets 000

part

3 11

Definition of a Commercial Bank 000

International Aspects of Stock Markets 000

Balance Sheets and Recent Trends 000 Assets 000 Liabilities 000 Equity 000 Off-Balance-Sheet Activities 000 Other Fee-Generating Activities 000

Appendix: Event Study Tests 000

Foreign Exchange Markets 000 Foreign Exchange Markets and Risk: Chapter Overview 000

Size, Structure, and Composition of the Industry 000

Background and History of Foreign Exchange Markets 000

Economies of Scale and Scope 000 Bank Size and Concentration 000 Bank Size and Activities 000

Foreign Exchange Rates and Transactions 000 Foreign Exchange Rates 000 Foreign Exchange Transactions 000 Return and Risk of Foreign Exchange Transactions 000 Role of Financial Institutions in Foreign Exchange Transactions 000

Industry Performance 000 Regulators 000 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 000 Office of the Comptroller of the Currency 000 Federal Reserve System 000 State Authorities 000

Interaction of Interest Rates, Inflation, and Foreign Exchange Rates 000 Purchasing Power Parity 000 Interest Rate Parity 000

Balance of Payment Accounts 000 Current Account 000 Capital Accounts 000

10

Derivative Securities Markets 000 Derivative Securities: Chapter Overview 000

12

Thrift Institutions 000 Three Categories of Thrift Institutions: Chapter Overview 000 Savings Associations 000 Size, Structure, and Composition of the Industry 000 Balance Sheets and Recent Trends 000

Savings Banks 000

Forwards and Futures 000 Spot Markets 000 Forward Markets 000 Futures Markets 000

Options 000 Call Options 000 Put Options 000 Option Values 000 Option Markets 000

Size, Structure, and Composition of the Industry 000 Balance Sheets and Recent Trends 000

Regulators of Savings Institutions 000 Savings Association and Savings Bank Recent Performance 000 Credit Unions 000

Regulation of Futures and Options Markets 000 Swaps 000 Interest Rate Swaps

Commercial Banks 000 Commercial Banks as a Sector of the Financial Institutions Industry: Chapter Overview 000

Economic Indicators 000 Market Efficiency 000 Stock Market Regulations 000

9

DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS 000

000

Size, Structure, and Composition of the Industry 000 Balance Sheets and Recent Trends 000 Regulators 000 Industry Performance 000

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Off-Balance-Sheet Regulations

Depository Institutions’ Financial Statements and Analysis 000 Why Evaluate Performance of Depository Institutions: Chapter Overview 000

Product Diversification Activities 000 Global or International Expansion Activities 000

Financial Statements of Commercial Banks 000

Appendix A: Depository Institutions and Their Regulators 000

Balance Sheet Structure 000 Off-Balance-Sheet Assets and Liabilities 000 Income Statement 000 Direct Relationship between the Income Statement and the Balance Sheet 000

Appendix B: Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999: Summary of Provisions 000 Appendix C: Calculating Minimum Required Reserves at U.S. Depository Institutions 000

Financial Statement Analysis Using a Return on Equity Framework 000 Return on Equity and Its Components 000 Return on Assets and Its Components 000 Other Ratios 000

Impact of Market Niche and Bank Size on Financial Statement Analysis 000 Impact of a Bank’s Market Niche 000 Impact of Size on Financial Statement Analysis 000

14

Appendix D: Calculating Risk-Based Capital Ratios 000

part

4 15

Size, Structure, and Composition of the Industry 000 Balance Sheets and Recent Trends 000 Regulation 000

Types of Regulations and the Regulators 000 Safety and Soundness Regulation 000 Monetary Policy Regulation 000 Credit Allocation Regulation 000 Consumer Protection Regulation 000 Investor Protection Regulation 000 Entry and Chartering Regulation 000 Regulators 000

Property-Casualty Insurance Companies 000 Size, Structure, and Composition of the Industry 000 Balance Sheets and Recent Trends 000 Regulation 000

16

Regulation of Product and Geographic Expansion 000 000 000

History of Bank and Savings Institution Guarantee Funds 000 FDIC 000 The Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation and Its Demise 000 Causes of the Depository Fund Insolvencies 000 Non U.S. Deposit Insurance Systems 000 Regulations on Depository Institution Liquidity 000 Regulations on Capital Adequacy (Leverage) 000

Insurance Companies 000

Life Insurance Companies 000

Specialness and Regulation: Chapter Overview 000

Balance Sheet Regulations 000

OTHER FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 000 Two Categories of Insurance Companies: Chapter Overview 000

Regulation of Depository Institutions 000

Product Segmentation in the U.S. Depository Institutions Industry Geographic Expansion in the U.S. Depository Institutions Industry

000

Foreign versus Domestic Regulation of Depository Institutions 000

Securities Firms and Investment Banks 000 Services Offered by Securities Firms versus Investment Banks: Chapter Overview 000 Size, Structure, and Composition of the Industry 000 Securities Firm and Investment Bank Activity Areas 000 Investing 000 Investment Banking 000 Market Making 000 Trading 000 Cash Management 000 Mergers and Acquisitions 000 Other Service Functions 000

Recent Trends and Balance Sheets 000 Recent Trends 000 Balance Sheet 000

Regulation 000

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xxi

Finance Companies 000

Liquidity Risk 000

Finance Company Functions: Chapter Overview 000

Interest Rate Risk 000 The Federal Reserve and Interest Rate Risk 000 Maturity Mismatching and Interest Rate Risk 000

Size, Structure, and Composition of the Industry 000 Balance Sheets and Recent Trends 000 Assets 000 Liabilities and Equity

Market Risk 000 Off-Balance-Sheet Risk 000

000

Foreign Exchange Risk 000

Regulation 000

18

Country or Sovereign Risk 000

Mutual Funds 000

Technology and Operational Risk 000

Mutual Funds: Chapter Overview 000

Insolvency Risk 000

Size, Structure, and Composition of the Industry 000 Historical Trends 000 Different Types of Mutual Funds 000 Mutual Fund Prospectuses and Objectives 000 Size and Mutual Fund Performance: The Case of the Magellan Fund 000 Investor Returns from Mutual Fund Ownership 000 Mutual Fund Costs 000 Mutual Fund Share Quotes 000

Interaction Among Risks 000

21

Credit Risk Management: Chapter Overview 000 Credit Analysis 000 Real Estate Lending 000 Consumer (Individual) and Small-Business Lending 000 Mid-Market Commercial and Industrial Lending 000 Large Commercial and Industrial Lending 000

Balance Sheets and Recent Trends 000 Money Market Funds 000 Long-Term Funds 000

Calculating the Return on a Loan 000

Regulation 000

19

Return on Assets (ROA) 000 RAROC Models 000

Pension Funds 000 Pension Funds Defined: Chapter Overview 000 Size, Structure, and Composition of the Industry 000 Insured versus Noninsured Pension Funds 000 Defined Benefit versus Defined Contribution Pension Funds 000 Private Pension Funds 000 Public Pension Funds 000

Financial Asset Investments and Recent Trends 000 Private Pension Funds 000 Public Pension Funds 000

Regulation of Pension Funds 000

part

5

20

RISK MANAGEMENT IN FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 000

Types of Risks Incurred by Financial Institutions 000 Why Financial Institutions Need to Manage Risk: Chapter Overview 000 Credit Risk 000

Managing Risk on the Balance Sheet I: Credit Risk 000

Appendix: Loan Portfolio Risk and Management 000

22

Managing Risk on the Balance Sheet II: Liquidity Risk 000 Liquidity Risk Management: Chapter Overview 000 Causes of Liquidity Risk 000 Liquidity Risk and Depository Institutions 000 Liability Side Liquidity Risk 000 Asset Side Liquidity Risk 000 Measuring a Bank’s Liquidity Exposure 000 Liquidity Risk, Unexpected Deposit Drains, and Bank Runs 000 Bank Runs, the Discount Window, and Deposit Insurance 000

Liquidity Risk and Insurance Companies 000 Life Insurance Companies 000 Property-Casualty Insurance Companies 000 Guarantee Programs for Life and PropertyCasualty Insurance Companies 000

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Contents

Liquidity Risk and Mutual Funds 000

23

Managing Risk on the Balance Sheet III: Interest Rate and Insolvency Risk 000

25

Interest Rate and Insolvency Risk Management: Chapter Overview 000 Interest Rate Risk Measurement and Management 000

Insolvency Risk Management 000

24

000

Managing Risk with Derivative Securities 000 Derivative Securities Used to Manage Risk: Chapter Overview 000 Forward and Futures Contracts 000 Hedging with Forward Contracts 000 Hedging with Futures Contracts 000

Options 000

Swaps 000

000

Comparison of Hedging Methods 000 Writing versus Buying Options

Why Financial Institutions Securitize Assets: Chapter Overview 000 Types of Loan Sales Contracts 000 Bank Loan Sale Market 000 Secondary Market for Less Developed Country Debt 000 Factors Encouraging Future Loan Sales Growth 000 Factors Deterring Future Loan Sales Growth 000

Loan Securitization 000 Pass-Through Security 000 Collateralized Mortgage Obligation Mortgage-Backed Bond 000

Securitization of Other Assets 000 Can All Assets Be Securitized? 000

Basic Features of Options 000 Actual Interest Rate Options 000 Hedging with Options 000 Interest Rate Swaps 000 Currency Swaps 000 Credit Risk Concerns with Swaps

Loan Sales and Asset Securitization 000

Loan Sales 000

Repricing Model 000 Duration Model 000 Capital and Insolvency Risk

Futures versus Options Hedging 000 Swaps versus Forwards, Futures, and Options 000

000

Glossary 000 Appendix 000 References 000 Index 000

000

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