Heavy Metals

0 downloads 0 Views 3MB Size Report
weight) sample is digested with repeated additions of nitric acid (HNO3) and hydrogen ... Microwave Assisted Acid Digestion Of Aqueous Samples And Extracts.

CONTENTS

Heavy Metals Liu Donghui Department of Applied Chemistry Email: [email protected]

1

2

Definition of Heavy Metals • The  US  EPA’s  Terms  of  Environment  defines  heavy  metals as “Metallic elements with high atomic weights;  (e.g. mercury, chromium, cadmium, arsenic, and lead);  [that]  can  damage  living  things  at  low  concentrations  and tend to accumulate in the food chain. ”

INTRODUCTION OF HEAVY METALS

– High atomic weights – Toxicity – Bioaccumulation

3

4

Toxicity of heavy metals  

Relationship to living organisms • Living organisms require varying amounts of  "heavy metals” (Fe, Co, Cu, Mn, Zn, etc.) . 

• Damage mental and central nervous function, lower  energy levels, and damage to blood composition,  lungs, kidneys, liver, and other vital organs. 

• Excessive levels can be damaging to the  organism. 

• Long‐term exposure may result in slowly  progressing physical, muscular, and neurological  degenerative processes, and some metals (or their  compounds) may cause cancer.

• Other heavy metals such as Hg, Pb, As, Cd,  and Cr are toxic metals and their  accumulation over time in the bodies of  animals can cause serious illness.  5

6

Characteristic of heavy metal

Sources of Heavy metals

• Natural components of the Earth's crust; • Cannot be degraded or destroyed;  • Dangerous because of bioaccumulate and  biomagnification;   • Cannot be destroyed in the environment, it  can only change its form, or become attached  to or separated from particles.

• • • • • • •

Food,Water,air Purification of metals Nuclear fuels Electroplating  Smoking Released as dust on road surfaces Daily necessities

7

8

Heavy Metals Pollution

Heavy metals pollution process

9

10

Typical heavy metals

What can we do to reduce the risk of exposure?  •

Arsenic (a metalloid*)
Beryllium (a very light metal)
Cadmium
Chromium (particularly the  hexavalent form)
Lead
Mercury Aluminum
Antimony (a metalloid*)
Barium
Cobalt
Copper
Iron
Lithium (another very light  metal)
Manganese
Molybdenum
Nickel
Selenium (a  metalloid*)
Silver
Thallium
Tin
Uranium
Vanadium
Zinc



*a metalloid is an element possessing both metallic and non‐metallic properties.



11

12

Lead

Lead-Sources in the environment • Lead used in paint, batteries, metal products, ceramic glazes,  ammunition, medical equipment, scientific equipment and military equipment.

• bluish‐gray metal  • no characteristic taste or  smell • not dissolve in water and  does not burn • can combine with other  chemicals to form lead  compounds or lead salts

• Some chemicals containing lead, such as tetraethyl lead and  tetramethyl lead.  • Human activities have spread lead and substances that contain lead  to all parts of the environment.  • Lead is in air, drinking water, rivers, lakes, oceans, dust, and soil. • Lead is also in plants and animals that people may eat.

13

Lead-Fate & Transport

14

Lead-Fate & Transport

• Lead occurs naturally in the environment. 

• Once lead goes into the atmosphere, it may travel thousands of miles if  the lead particles are small or if the lead compounds easily evaporate.

• Most of the high levels found throughout the  environment comes from human activities. 

• Lead is removed from the air by rain and by particles falling to the ground  or into surface water. • The release of lead to air is now less than the release of lead to land. 

• Leaded gasoline, burning fuel, industrial  processes, and burning solid waste.

• Sources of lead in surface water or sediment include deposits of lead‐ containing dust from the atmosphere, waste water from industries. • Lead compounds in water may combine with different chemicals. • The levels of lead may build up in plants and animals from areas where air,  water, or soil are contaminated with lead. 

15

Lead-Exposure Pathways

16

Lead——Health Effects

• by eating foods or drinking water that contain lead • by spending time in areas where leaded paints have  been used and are deteriorating • by touching dust or dirt that contains lead.  • by working in jobs where lead is used • by using cosmetics • by using health‐care products or folk remedies that  contain lead • cigarette smoke also contains small amounts of lead • Lead may also be released from soldered joints in  kettles used to boil water for beverages.

• The main target for lead toxicity is the nervous  system.  • Lead exposure may also cause weakness in  fingers, wrists, or ankles.  • At high levels of exposure, lead can severely  damage the brain and kidneys in adults or  children. 

17

18

Mercury

Mercury——Fate & Transport • The total amount of mercury in the environment caused by natural processes throughout the world is far greater than the total amount  caused by human activities.  • Air, water, and soil can contain mercury from both natural sources and  human activity. • The mercury in air, water, and soil is thought to be mostly inorganic  mercury.  • Metallic mercury is a liquid at room temperature. It can evaporate easily  into the air and be carried a long distance before returning to water or soil  in rain or snow.  • Some microorganisms in the water or soil can change inorganic forms of  mercury to organic forms.  • Organic forms of mercury can enter the water and remain there for a long  time.  • Small fish and other organisms living in the water can take up the organic  forms of mercury.  • Plants may also have a greater concentration of mercury.

• Mercury is a shiny, silver‐white,  odorless liquid with a metallic taste.  • Mercury can also combine with other  elements, such as chlorine, carbon, or  oxygen, to form mercury compounds.  • In pure form, these mercury compounds  are usually white powders or crystals.  • All forms of mercury are considered  poisonous. 

19

Mercury——Exposure Pathways

20

Mercury——Health Effects

• Because mercury occurs naturally in the  environment, everyone is exposed to very low  levels of mercury in air, water, and food. 

• Long‐term exposure to either inorganic or organic  mercury can permanently damage the brain, kidneys,  and developing fetus. 

• Using skin care and medicinal products

• The most sensitive target of low level exposure to  metallic appears to be the nervous system. 

• Eating contaminated fish

• The most sensitive target of low level exposure to  inorganic mercury appears to be the kidneys. 

21

Arsenic

22

Arsenic——Fate & Transport

• Classified as a metalloid, having both  properties of a metal and a nonmetal; 

• Occurs naturally in soil and minerals; • Volcanic eruptions ;

• Steel grey solid material;

• During mining and smelting;

• Used as a preservative for wood,  pesticides and additives in animal feed;

• Incinerators; • May enter the air, water, and land from wind‐blown dust and may  get into water from runoff and leaching;

• Usually found in the environment  combined with other elements( inorganic  arsenic, organic arsenic)

• Usually attached to very small particles and transport far away;

• Most inorganic and organic arsenic  compounds are white or colorless  powders that do not evaporate. 

• Most arsenic ends up in the soil or sediment.  • Most of arsenic is in an organic form(arsenobetaine) in fish tissues.

23

24

Arsenic——Exposure Pathways

Arsenic——Health Effects

• By eating food;

• Most simple organic arsenic compounds are less 

– seafood, rice/rice cereal, mushrooms, and poultry

toxic than the inorganic forms. 

• By drinking water;

• Arsenic may cause fatigue, abnormal heart rhythm, 

• By breathing air;

blood‐vessel damage resulting in bruising, and 

• Children may also be exposed to arsenic by  eating soil;

impaired nerve function causing a "pins and  needles" sensation in your hands and feet.

• By arsenic production; – lead smelting, wood treating, or pesticide application 25

Cadmium

26

Cadmium——Fate & Transport Cadmium can enter the environment in several  ways:

• An element occurs naturally in the earth's crust; • Pure cadmium is a soft, silver‐white metal;  • Usually found as a mineral combined with other  elements such as oxygen, chlorine , or sulfur;

•Air :Burning of coal and household waste, metal  mining and refining ;

• Not evaporate or disappear from the environment;; 

•Water:Disposal of waste water from households  or industries. 

• Often found as part of small particles in air; • Not have any definite odor or taste;

•Soil:Fertilizers use,Spills and leaks from  hazardous waste sites;

• Cadmium has many uses in industry and consumer  products, mainly batteries, pigments, metal coatings,  and plastics. 27

Cadmium——Fate & Transport

28

Cadmium——Exposure Pathways

• Cadmium attached to small particles may get into the air  and travel a long way before coming down to earth as dust  or in rain or snow. • Cadmium does not break down in the environment but can  change into different forms. 

• Food and cigarette smoke • Air  • Drinking water

• Some of the cadmium that enters water will bind to soil but  some will remain in the water.  • Cadmium in soil can enter water or be taken up by plants.  • Fish, plants, and animals take up cadmium from the  environment. 29

30

Chromium

Cadmium——Health Effects

• A naturally occurring element found in rocks,  animals, plants, soil, and in volcanic dust and  gases. 

Cadmium has no known good  effects on your health.  •damages the lungs and can cause  death; •cause kidney disease; •fragile bones; •have an increased chance of  getting lung cancer; •get high blood pressure, iron poor  blood, liver disease, and nerve or  brain damage. 

• No known taste or odor  • Steel‐gray solid with a high melting point.  • Present in the environment in several  different forms.  • Chromium(III) occurs naturally in the  environment and is an essential nutrient  required by the human body.  • Chromium(VI) and chromium(0) are generally  produced by industrial processes. 

31

32

Chromium——Exposure Pathways

Chromium——Fate & Transport • Chromium enters the air, water, and soil mostly in the chromium(III) and  chromium(VI) forms as a result of natural processes and human activities. 

• Breathing air

• Emissions from burning coal,oil,industry and electric utilities;

• Drinking water

• In air, chromium compounds are present mostly as fine dust particles. 

• Eating food 

• Rain and snow help remove chromium from air.  • A small amount may dissolve in the water. Soluble chromium  compounds can remain in water for years before settling to the bottom.  • Fish do not accumulate much chromium in their bodies from water. • Most of the chromium in soil does not dissolve easily in water and can  attach strongly to the soil.

33

Chromium——Health Effects

• Skin contact  • People who work in chromium industries can be  exposed to higher‐than‐normal levels of  chromium. 

34

What can we do to reduce the risk of exposure? 

• Chromium(III) is an essential nutrient that helps  the body use sugar, protein, and fat.  • An intake of 50 to 200 ug of chromium(III) per  day is recommended for adults. • Long‐term exposure to chromium has been  associated with lung cancer. • Caused stomach upsets and ulcers, convulsions,  kidney and liver damage, and even death.  35

36

Analysis procudure

ANALYSIS OF HEAVY  METALS

37

38

Pretreatment for Heavy Metals

Dry Ashing Method Procedure:  •The samples were placed in a muffle furnace and heated  consecutively at 180 °C for 3 h, at 220 °C for 1 h, at 260 °C for 1h,  at 300°C for 1h, and at 400°C for 1h, and were further ashed  overnight at 500 °C (16 h).  •The ash residue was dissolved in 5 mL of HCl (37%) and quantitatively  transferred to 50 mL volumetric flasks. The flasks were sonicated for  10 min (Bransonic 52, Branson, Danbury, CT) and placed in a hot‐water  bath (95 °C) for 1 h.  •The resulting matrix solutions were filtered (DG2M, Microgon, Laguna  Hills, CA) and diluted 10‐fold before they were injected.  • EPA‐Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO) 40

39

Wet Digestion Method •

EPA METHOD 3050B‐‐ACID DIGESTION OF SEDIMENTS, SLUDGES, AND SOILS



SUMMARY OF METHOD

Microwave Digestion Method

– For the digestion of samples, a representative 1‐2 gram (wet weight) or 1 gram (dry  weight) sample is digested with repeated additions of nitric acid (HNO3) and hydrogen peroxi de (H2O2). – For GFAA or ICP‐MS analysis, the resultant digestate is reduced in volume while  heating and then diluted to a final volume of 100 mL. – For ICP‐AES or FLAA analyses, hydrochloric acid (HCl) is added to the initial  digestate and the sample is refluxed. In an optional step to increase the solubility of some me tals(see Section 7.3.1: NOTE), this digestate is filtered and the filter paper and residues are rin sed, firswith hot HCl and then hot reagent water. Filter paper and residue are returned to the digestion flask,  refluxed with additional HCl and then filtered again. The digestate is then diluted to a final vol ume of 100 mL.

• • • •

EPA METHOD 3015A Microwave Assisted Acid Digestion Of Aqueous Samples And Extracts SUMMARY OF METHOD A representative aqueous sample is extracted with concentrated nitric acid or, optionally, concentrated nitric acid and concentrated hydrochl oric acid, using microwave heating with asuitable laboratory microwav e unit. The sample and acid(s) are placed in a fluorocarbon  polymer (such as PFA or TFM) or quartz microwave vessel or vessel line r. The vessel is sealedand heated in the microwave unit for a specified period of time. After cooling, the vesselcontents are filtered, centrifug ed, or allowed to settle and then diluted to volume and analyzedby the appropriate determinative method.

– If required, a separate sample aliquot shall be dried for a total percent solids determination.

41

42

Detection Methods for Heavy Metals •

EPA METHOD 3052



MICROWAVE ASSISTED ACID DIGESTION OF SILICEOUS AND



ORGANICALLY BASED MATRICES



SUMMARY OF METHOD



A representative sample of up to 0.5 g is digested in 9 mL of concentrated nitric acid  and usually 3 mL hydrofluoric acid for 15 minutes using microwave heating with a suitable laboratory  microwave system. The method has several additional alternative acid and reagent combinations  including hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The method has provisions for scaling up the  sample size to a maximum of 1.0 g. The sample and acid are placed in suitably inert polymeric  microwave vessels. The vessel is sealed and heated in the microwave system. The temperature  profile is specified to permit specific reactions and incorporates reaching 180 ± 5 ºC in approximatel y less than 5.5 minutes and remaining at 180 ± 5 ºC for 9.5 minutes for the completion of specific  reactions (Ref. 1, 2, 3, 4). After cooling, the vessel contents may be filtered, centrifuged, or allowed  to settle and then decanted, diluted to volume, and analyzed by the appropriate SW‐846 method.

43

Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer(AAS) • Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) is  a spectroanalytical procedure for the  quantitative determination of chemical  elements employing the absorption of  optical radiation (light) by free atoms in  the gaseous state.

44

Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry(AFS) • AtomicFluorescence spectroscopy is a type of  electromagnetic spectroscopy which analyzes  fluorescence from a sample.

• In analytical chemistry the technique is  used for determining the concentration  of a particular element in a sample to be  analyzed.  • AAS can be used to determine over 70  different elements in solution or directly  in solid samples. 45

46

Inductively Coupled Plasma‐Atomic  Emission Spectrometry(ICP‐AES)

X Ray Fluorescence(XRF) • X‐ray fluorescence (XRF) is the  emission of characteristic  "secondary" (or fluorescent) X‐rays  from a material that has been  excited by bombarding with high‐ energy X‐rays or gamma rays. 

• Inductively coupled plasma atomic  emission spectroscopy (ICP‐AES), also  referred to as inductively coupled plasma  optical emission spectrometry (ICP‐OES),  is an analytical technique used for the  detection of trace metals. 

• The phenomenon is widely used for  elemental analysis and chemical  analysis, particularly in the  investigation of metals, glass,  ceramics and building materials,  and for research in geochemistry,  forensic science and archaeology.

• It is a type of emission spectroscopy that  uses the inductively coupled plasma to  produce excited atoms and ions that emit  electromagnetic radiation at wavelengths  characteristic of a particular element. 

47

ICP atomic emission spectrometer.

48

Inductively Coupled Plasma‐Mass  Spectrometer(ICP-MS)

Inductively Coupled Plasma‐Mass  Spectrometer(ICP-MS)

• An ICP‐MS combines a high‐temperature ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma)  source with a mass spectrometer.

ICP‐MS has many advantages over other elemental analysis techniques  such as atomic absorption and optical emission spectrometry,  including:



The ICP source converts the atoms of the elements in the sample to ions.  These ions are then separated and detected by the mass spectrometer.

• ICP‐MS is an analytical technique used for elemental determinations.

•Detection limits for most elements equal to or better than those obtained by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy  (GFAAS) •Higher throughput than GFAAS •The ability to handle both simple and complex matrices with a  minimum of matrix interferences due to the high‐temperature of the  ICP source •The ability to obtain isotopic information.

49

50

UltraViolet‐Visible Spectrophotometer (UV‐VIS)

Chromatographic methods  • Gas Chromatography (GC) • High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)

• Ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy or ultraviolet‐visible  spectrophotometry (UV‐Vis or UV/Vis) refers to  absorption spectroscopy or reflectance spectroscopy in  the ultraviolet‐visible spectral region.  • It uses light in the visible and adjacent (near‐UV and  near‐infrared (NIR)) ranges. 

51

52

Rapid detection technique of  heavy metals

Comparison of the methods ICP‐MS, ICP‐AES, AAS

• • • •

•Linearity •Sensitivity •Operability •Cost

53

Biosensor  ELISA  Immunoassay Dipstick method

54

Heavy Metal Detectors • • • • • • • • •

Heavy metals analysis  • Correct measurement results are a prerequisite for compliance  with limit values, which are always specified as total metals. 

Lead Thallium Mercury Cadmium Colbalt Aluminum Iron Nickel Zinc

• Matrix factors (e.g. interference ions, colour, turbidities, etc.) may  have a negative impact on the measurement and cause false results  to be obtained.  • If the sample preparation is inadequate, frequently used  complexing agents such as EDTA, NTA and citric acid may also cause  low‐bias results to be obtained, as they bind the metal ions and  thus inhibit the detection reaction. In practice it is necessary to  carry out a sample digestion before the metals are analyzed. 

55

Heavy metals analysis 

56

Heavy metals analysis 

Homogenisation  •Turbid samples must be homogenised prior to  the digestion step, to ensure that the contents  are evenly distributed before sampling.  •The appropriate sample volume must then be  pipetted off while stirring continues. 

Setting the pH  •The pH setting before and after the digestion is  especially important for precise metal analysis. The  necessary pH of less than 1 before the digestion is  obtained by adding the sulphuric acid.  •If, in exceptional cases, the correct value is not reached  (e.g. when the sample has a high buffering capacity),  additional sulphuric acid must be added.  57

Heavy metals analysis 

58

Heavy metals analysis‐‐ICPMS 

• Sample digestion  • Undissolved and complexed heavy metals are dissolved by  heating in an acid environment in the presence of  an  oxidising agent (either 1 hour at 100 °C in a LT 200  thermostat or 15 minutes in a HT 200S high temperature  thermostat). 

• Typical detection limits for ICPMS are 0.01‐1 ug/L  (ppb) in solution. Sample preparation usually  consists of simply diluting the sample in 1%  nitric acid although we offer a variety of digestion  techniques.

• A comparison of the results obtained before and after the  digestion shows whether the digestion is necessary.

59

60

Analysis of Lead & its Compounds 

Analysis of Mercury & its Compounds

Pretreatment

• Pretreatment (Similar to that for Cd and Pb) 

– Ashing using sulphuric acid;  – Closed‐vessel digestion under pressure such as microwave digestion  method EN 13346:2000 or EPA 3052:1996;  – Nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide such as EPA 3050B Rev. 2:1996  – Sulphuric acid, Nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide wet decomposition method such as BS EN 1122:2001 etc; – By ICP‐AES/ICP‐OES, such as EN ISO 11885:1998  – By AAS such as EN ISO 5961:1995  – By ICP‐MS 

– Closed‐vessel microwave digestion method such as EPA  3052:1996;  – Commercially available Mercury Analyzer (inclusive of sample  pretreatment and analysis);  – Cool Condensing Digestion vessel (Kjeldahl), using sulphuric and nitric acid wet Decomposition Method; 

Maximum permissible level for Pb is 100 mg/Kg(ppm)  Cadmium can also be analyzed together when ICP‐OES and ICP‐ MS is  used 

• Analysis Method for low Concentrations: – By cold vapour Hydride Generation AAS Method or  Hydride  attachment to ICP‐OES/ICP‐MS 

61

62

EN‐1122: 2001 Method B – Procedure 

EN‐1122: 2001 Method B – Total Cd Analysis 

• 1. Add 10 mL of H2SO4 to accurately‐weighed 0.500gm of  sample in a beaker;  • 2. Heat for about 20 minutes until char; • 3. Cool for about 5 minutes; • 4. Add 5 mL of H2O2 to the residues, heat for a further 10  minutes for the reaction to complete;  • 5. Repeat steps 3‐4 until a pale clear yellow solution is  obtained. • 6. Cool the solution for about 5 minutes; Add 5 mL of  HNO3, until reaction is complete. • 7. Dilute to volume(100 mL) and filtered. 

Total Cd analysis  •Applicable Area: All plastics, except teflon  •Concentration ranges of 10 to 3,000 mg/Kg(ppm)  •Samples Types:  •At least 2 g of homogeneous samples cut using sharp  blades in small pieces of less than 0.1 g each piece.  •Digestion Procedure:  •Weigh about 0.5 g to the nearest mg, digested in  appropriate digester( In duplicates) 

63

64

EPA 3052 ‐ Microwave Digestion  Method 

EPA 3050B‐1 Analysis of Pb  • Weighed accurately about 1g of sample in a beaker • Add 2.5 mL (65%) HNO3 10 mL(37%) HCl • Heat at 95°C ± 5°C for 15 minutes • Collect the clear filtrate in a 100 mL volumetric flask Wash the residue and filter paper with 5mL hot HCl & 5 mL hot D.I.  water • Collect the wash in the same volumetric flask • Digest the residue with 5 mL HCl • Combine the above digestate with the filtrate in the same volumetric  flask • Make up the total filtrates to volume ‐ 100 mL  65

66

Variation Between Open Digestion &  Microwave Digestion 

Sony Environmental Monitored  Substances SS‐00259 3rd Edition  • Analysis of hexavalent Chromium, Cr 6+  • Pretreatment  – Using hot water extraction 

• Analysis Method:  – By UV‐VIS Spectrometry; 

• Maximum permissible level for Total Chromium is 5  mg/Kg(ppm)  •

NB: 1. Total concentration for Hg