Karl Marx Comes to Wabash - The Bachelor - Wabash College

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Nov 8, 2007 ... Robert Weick portrays Karl Marx in the one-man play Marx in Soho last Thursday night in Salter Hall. Second City: First Rate Humor.
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Karl Marx Comes to Wabash

November 8, 2007

• volume 100 • issue 10

GARY JAMES

WABASH ’10

Karl Marx came back to life last week to clear his name. By way of public transportation and personal consternation, Marx exposed the rift between his philosophy and the faninduced dogma that resulted from the distortions of his devoted and, at times, deranged supporters. He also addressed current socials ills and economic disparities, arguing that dynamics today are not much different than they were during his own time 150 years ago. Marx in Soho was performed in Salter Hall Thursday, October, 25, 2007 by actor Robert Weick. Howard Zinn’s one-man play was brought to campus with the assistance of Dr. Stephen Morillio, the Hadley Fund, the History

Department, the Theatre Department, the Political Science Department, and the Philosophy Department. It focused on the life, philosophy, and vindication of the philosopher who created The Communist Manifesto and Das Kapital. “Thank God, an audience,” Marx said. “How good of you to come. You weren’t put off by all those who said Marx is dead. Well I am. And I am not. Now that’s dialectics for you. I did not expect to come back here. I wanted to return to SoHo. That’s where I lived in London. Because of a bureaucratic mix up, I’m here in Crawfordsville in Indiana. It’s alright. I always wanted to visit the Athens of Indiana. And why have I returned? To clear my name. I’ve been reading your newspapers. They’ve all been saying my ideas

Second City: First Rate Humor

ROB FENOGLIO

NEWS EDITOR

Last Friday Wabash was treated to quick-witted and improvisational comedy from the world-renowned Second City. The Second City Theatre, originated in 1959, has one branch based in Chicago, which is the group that came to Wabash last weekend. The comedians in Second City specialize in improvisational comedy, as well as practiced material. Some famous Second Citizens from past Second City groups include

See, MARX, Page 3

Bill Murray (Caddyshack), Tina Fey (“SNL”), Steve Carell (“The Office”), and Stephen Colbert (“The Colbert Report”). Senior Council Activities Committee co-chair John Moore ’08 wanted to try something new and the SCAC decided to bring the comedy troupe to Wabash as one of the events to replace a Fall National Act. “We chose this alternative because we saw a wide appeal across the entire campus,” Moore said. “I think we’d like to have Second City return to campus at some point in time, but we’d also like to provide a wide variety of events or activities for

CHAD SIMPSON | WABASH ‘10

Robert Weick portrays Karl Marx in the one-man play Marx in Soho last Thursday night in Salter Hall.

students to enjoy so there isn’t any overkill.” Second City performed in Ball Theater to about 75-percent capacity – around 281 people. The troupe’s different sketches varied from improvisational skits that required topics given from audience members, to a record company trying to censor a rap group’s offensive lyrics, to what happens when a Saudi women and an American soldier express their love to “I’ve Had The Time Of My Life.” The one thing that caught the audience off-guard immediately was how blunt and freely the comedians expressed them-

selves. There was no censoring or inhibitions – it was a no-hold bars performance. This, however, did not disturb the crowd – it only helped the audience to relax and realize this comedy group was going to go places not originally expected and create an entertaining atmosphere. The six comedians - three men and three women - showed their versatility as true comedians by becoming different races, nationalities, and sexualities. The entire cast may have been Caucasian, but that did not stop them from impersonating Maya Angelou, Saudis, and a hardcore black rap group called Di— and

Balls. The sketch with the rap group consisted of four record executives, who in recent light of the backlash against rap music, decided to start censoring some of their groups, one being PHD. The group was made of a male rapper named PHD (Pretty Hard Di—) and a female rapper named Lil’ Snatch. The group sang songs like “Gangbang Town.” This sketch seemed to be the one that stood out the most to attendees. “The Second City performance was a lot better than I See, HUMOR, Page 3

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BACHELOR 301 w. wabash Ave. crawfordsville, IN 47933 EDITOR IN CHIEF

Patrick Smith . [email protected] MANAGING EDITOR

Aaron Parrish . [email protected] NEWS EDITOR

Rob Fenoglio . [email protected] OPINION EDITOR

Josh Harris . [email protected] SPORTS EDITOR

Chuck Summers . [email protected] STUFF EDITOR

Patrick McAlister . [email protected] PHOTO EDITOR

Clayton Craig . [email protected] ONLINE EDITOR

Patrick McAlister LAYOUT EDITOR

Aaron Parrish COPY EDITOR

Jacob Stump

BACHELOR ADVISOR

Howard Hewitt

The purpose of The Bachelor is to serve the school audience, including but not limited to administrators, faculty and staff, parents, alumni, community members and most importantly, the students. Because this is a school paper, the content and character within will cater to the student body’s interests, ideas and issues. Further, this publication will serve as a medium and forum for student opinions and ideas. Although an individual newspaper, the Board of Publications publishes The Bachelor. The Bachelor and BOP receive funding from the Wabash College Student Senate, which derives its funds from the Wabash College student body.

Letters (e-mails) to the editor are welcomed and encouraged. They will only be published if they include name, phone, or e-mail, and are not longer than 300 words. The Bachelor reserves the right to edit letters for content, typographical errors, and length. All letters received become property of this publication for the purposes of reprinting and/or redistribution.

Profanity may appear in the publication, but only in cases of direct quote or if profanity is necessary to the content of the story. Please do not confuse profanity with obscenity. No article or picture of an obscene nature will appear in this publication. The Bachelor is printed every Thursday at the Journal Review in Crawfordsville. It is delivered freely to all students, faculty, and staff at Wabash College. To receive a year’s subscription, send a $40 check to The Bachelor.

All advertising published in The Bachelor is subject to the applicable rate card. The Bachelor reserves the right to deny requests for publication of advertisements. Student organizations of Wabash College may purchase advertisements at half the listed rate. The Bachelor is a member of the Hoosier State and Indiana Collegiate Press Associations (HSPA and ICPA).

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Brass and Jazz Ensembles Showcase Diverse Talents

The Bachelor

JACOB STUMP

WABASH ‘11

Wabash students, faculty, and Crawfordsville residents alike were entertained by the sounds of brass and jazz Tuesday night at the first ensemble combination performance of the year. Professor Hulen, Director of the Brass Ensemble, said Tuesday’s concert was the middle step for both the Brass Ensemble and Jazz Band. “Our repertoire develops over the course of the year,” Hulen said. “Each ensemble plays a couple of numbers for Homecoming or Family Day, then keeps adding to their song collection so in the spring all the ensembles do their own stand alone concert.” The Brass Ensemble, which has more than doubled in the past four years, opened the evening’s concert with a lively piece from a Bach cantata, then moved into a more reflective Sanctus by Schubert. Professor Hulen said the ensembles practice once a week, but the students do not receive a grade for their ensemble participation. “I think there are probably two schools in the whole country like that,” said Hulen. “We’re one of them.” So, without earning a grade, what incentive do Wabash students have to join an ensemble? “We develop loyalty to the group in different ways,” said Hulen, “because we’re not holding a grade over the performer’s head.” Professor Hulen mentioned that music is a “mode of expression;” perhaps it is this merit that attracts inventive students who want a creative outlet. Patrick Griffith ‘10, trombonist in the Brass Ensemble, said the Ensemble has “been a great part of Wabash” for him.

“It allows me to keep up my instrumentation and still continue my studies in the academic area I have chosen,” said Griffith. “I absolutely love it. We’re able to have fun while practicing, and it just makes for a good ‘ole time.” Six Brass Ensemble student performers are also a part of the Jazz Band, and they were back on stage for the Jazz Band performance. The show opened with a quick Mercer Ellington piece titled “Things Ain’t What They Used To Be,” and the crowd was immediately taken from the triumphant, regal sounds of the Brass Ensemble to a smoky late-night jazz bar in some downtown city. “We really opened that first one up,” said Jazz Band Director Steve Robinett after the

song ended. The Jazz Band adapted the song to fit the improvisation talents of pianist Jason Allen, trumpeter Jay Brouwer, trombonist Jarod Brock, saxophonist Emmanuel Aouad, and guitarists Haris Amin, Omar Guajardo, and Russ Winfrey, who were all soloists during the song. Later pieces included “I Can’t Get Started With You,” “Autumn Leaves,” “The Nearness of You,” and the Duke Ellington classic “It Don’t Mean A Thing If It Ain’t Got That Swing.” Eileen Bowen, Administrative Assistant in the Fine Arts Center, thought the concert was superb. “The Jazz Band and Brass Ensemble’s level of performance,” said Bowen, “has just

gone up so much in the last three years. They’ve really improved, and I’m so sorry so few people heard this program tonight because they just rocked the hall!” If you missed the concert Tuesday night, you can catch the Brass Ensemble and Jazz Band next in the spring semester. But there might be an earlier opportunity than that. Professor Hulen mentioned wanting to involve the ensembles more on the campus - perhaps by playing outside as students walk to the mall for Thursday chapel. And in the mind of Duke Ellington, that would be O.K., because Wabash “don’t mean a thing if it ain’t got that swing.” Lucky for us, the Brass Ensemble and Jazz Band keep us right in place.

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news

The Bachelor

Marx From Page 1

are dead. Well I’ve had it up to here. So spread the word. Marx is back. But please understand one thing: I am not a Marxist.” Marx spoke of his supporters in London, where he lived after being expelled from continental Europe. Peepa, an oft-mentioned character in Marx’s life, epitomized the Marxists, of which Marx himself wanted no part. Peepa formed the Marxist Society of London, where he gathered with other Marx supporters to discuss every sentence of the philosopher’s works. They believed fully and whole-heartedly in everything Marx wrote but applied their own interpretations to it. Marx was afraid the distortions of his philosophy by Marxist would become popularized, and define the philosophy more than he could. He was afraid that the world would interpret “Marxism” through the accounts of men like Peepa, rather than the text and context of his writing. “Do you know what my fear is,” Marx asked his wife Jenny. “That the revolution will come and be taken over by men like Peepa. That they will speak for the proletariat and they will interpret my ideas for the world. They’ll organize a new priesthood, a new hierarchy of excommunications and indexes, inquisitions and firing squads. All this to be done in the name of Communism, delaying for a few years the communism of freedom.” Marx gave the example of religion to show how Marxists had ruined his meaning. He described religion as the sign of an oppressed person, the soul of

Humor soulless traditions, and a type of opium to the people. However, the true meaning of the passage, he said, was to make the point that, while opium is not a solution, it might be necessary to relieve pain caused by a bad system. Marx also lamented that the problems of poverty and ill-distribution of wealth are still with society today. “If I were to walk through the streets of American cities today, I’d be surrounded by garbage, breathing foul air,” Marx said. “I’ll walk past a bunch of men and women sleeping on the streets. Do you call this progress because you have motor cars, cell phones, flying machines, and a thousand potions to make me smell better? And people sleeping on the streets. An official report. The US gross national product. Yes. Gross. Last year, 10 thousand billion dollars. Most impressive. But tell me, where is it? Who is profiting from it? Who is not? Less than 500 individuals control 3 thousand billion dollars in business assets. Are these people more noble, more hard-working, more valuable to society than the single parent nursing three children through the venter with no money to pay the heating bill? Did I not say 150 years ago that capitalism would enormously increase the wealth of society but this wealth would be concentrated in fewer and fewer hands?” Faculty and students from all political persuasions were in attendance. While some in attendance may still take issue with Marx’s philosophy. Everyone agreed it was a great performance. “I thought it was a very inter-

esting play,” said Adam Brasich ’11, “with a very interesting message. I think the message is relevant today because you see a widening of the gap between the rich and the poor. But I disagree with his idea that the government must force the widening of the gap to decrease. I disagree that the state has the obligation to do that. I think the individual has the obligation to do that.” Dr. Stephen Morillo thought the play was useful, if only to introduce a different way of approaching Karl Marx. “There are many topics that don’t always get covered in a lot of detail in our curriculum — it’s a small college, people have different interests and areas of expertise,” he said. “This play acts sort of as a guest lecture in dramatic form, thereby not only introducing the ideas of one of the most influential thinkers of the 19th century (like him or not), but also providing some entertainment and the opportunity for folks to think about drama, history, and philosophy from different angles.”

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expected it to be,” freshman Deonte Singfield said. “The funniest part was the rapper scene because the female rapper was hilarious. Throughout the whole night she kept cracking me up. I had a blast!” Senior John Kasey echoed Mr. Singfield’s comments. “One of my favorite acts was the one about editing hip-hop lyrics,” Kasey said. “I was impressed because some of the stuff they were coming up with for rap songs actually sounded pretty decent, and it was absolutely hilarious, too.” Mr. Kasey, along with others, mentioned how impressed they were with the comedy troupe’s ability to be so creative on-thespot. “The act seemed to combine the best qualities of ‘SNL’ and ‘Whose Line Is It Anyway?’ to make something original and entertaining,” junior Dan Schwanekamp said. “Where the National Acts such as Guster do a good job of making for good parties, Second City was actual-



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ly entertaining and worth the time.” Even though Mr. Kasey thoroughly enjoyed the performance, he was left with a bad taste in his mouth related to the politically motivated finale. “I understand that satire is an important part of comedy, but at times it seemed like Second City stopped being funny and started trying to deliver a politically charged message sans humor,” Kasey said. The students who attended the performance agreed that Second City was a great performance and a step in the right direction to changing entertainment brought to the College, but Mr. Moore encourages students to keep the SCAC informed on their thoughts. “I strongly encourage anyone with additional ideas to let myself or Leander Jones know,” Moore said. “We’ll be finalizing our plans for the spring semester over the next few weeks, so we’re welcoming suggestions at this time.”

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opinion

The Bachelor

November 8, 2007

The Bachelor’s opinion The voice of Wabash since 1908 EDITOR IN CHIEF

STUFF EDITOR

Patrick Smith

Patrick McAlister

Rob Fenoglio

Josh Harris

MANAGING EDITOR Aaron Parrish

Personal Responsibility and Bell Week NEWS EDITOR

It’s Bell Week, but that doesn’t mean that the administration has magically suspended the Gentleman’s Rule. Indeed, it is our opinion that this week requires more effort at upholding the Rule. The eyes and ears of alumni, parents, friends, and a national television audience will be on us Saturday. The only question that confronts us is not whether Wabash will win (we will), but, rather, what message do we want to send? Wabash men are held to an extraordinarily high standard of conduct, “both on and off the campus.” We are expected to behave like gentlemen. Failure to do so may or may not have consequences, but that shouldn’t matter. The Rule is as much about personal responsibility than accountability to anyone in Center Hall. Obscene T-shirts, vulgar chants, and other clearly ungentlemanly actions will be amplified and magnified by high definition television cameras. Wabash alumni all around the country will be watching the game, and – while retaining the ringing trophy is of significant importance – don’t kid yourself into thinking they won’t be seeing what kind of students are at their Alma Mater. DePauw has cracked down on its own obscene Bell-related apparel. How will it look when Wabash men are alone and in high definition wearing “aggressive” anti-DePauw T-shirts? How will it look when we are chanting vicious slogans? Such things might, though we’re not sure these days, be acceptable at a Big 10 school. Wabash is dif-

OPINION EDITOR

SPORTS EDITOR

Chuck Summers

ferent: she demands more of her students’ conduct than Ohio State or Michigan. There is also the logically fallacious proposition that hating DePauw implies a love for Wabash. Rose-Hulman students don’t love DePauw any more than we do, but neither do they love Wabash. Loving Wabash doesn’t imply a hatred of DePauw, and hating DePauw doesn’t imply a love for Wabash. We will be blunt: failure to carry yourself as a gentleman, even at DePauw, makes a mockery of the Gentleman’s Rule. Various individuals and groups can proclaim the Rule is at various stages of necrosis, but it is ungentlemanly behavior that really kills it. You can talk about tradition, what it means to be a Wabash man, and how much you love the College all you want; however, if you smear the Rule with your actions, then one must ask how much you really do love Wabash. We have been given a chance to show DePauw how much we love Wabash, which is something more than merely hating DePauw. We have been given an opportunity to show a world in the process of forgetting what a gentleman really is. We have been given a challenge by our College, a challenge that we face both in the classroom and on the playing field. How we take that chance, that opportunity, and that challenge is up to us. Wabash always fights, and now is not the time to quit.

Changed National Act Worth It

This past weekend, in lieu of the usual Fall National Act that comes to campus, students were given a few events spread throughout the weekend. Those activities were the performance of the renowned comedy troupe, Second City, which took place Friday night in Ball Theater, and the progambling Casino Night that transformed Chadwick Court into any gambler’s wet-dream. While some students wanted a National Act, many felt the acts we were getting to perform at the school were “lame” or “past their prime.” For instance, everyone remembers the controversy of Hootie & the Blowfish last year (even though it had a huge turnout) or the bomb that was Guster. I have gone to all of the National Acts that have come to the College since I have been a student here. Perhaps the only National Act that no one opposed and caused a great turnout was O.A.R. two years ago. The Senior Council Activities Committee is the committee that chooses what acts will come to the College and, this semester, chose what we would do instead of hosting another Hootie. I went to both activities this

ROB FENOGLIO

NEWS EDITOR

weekend and the verdict is in: Second City and Casino Night blew the usual Fall National Act out of the water. The comedy troupe from Chicago was unbelievably hysterical. The hot-button issues they parodied only made the show that much more fun – racism, political turmoil in America, the war in Iraq, and the Spice Girls reuniting. I sat toward the back so I could see everyone’s reaction, and in every direction there was someone hanging on another person’s arm in laughter, laughing so hard they were cringing, or a group of students clapping with smiles on their faces. Obviously, this was a great choice on the SCAC’s part. Hats off to you guys - this alone was so much better than Hootie & the Blowfish, and I actually enjoyed that concert.

“This new experiment that the SCAC tried was definitely a gamble, but it turned out to be a huge success.”

Not one person I talked to had something bad to say about it. The only negative comment I got was one student loved it overall, but thought it was a little bit too politically motivated. If that was the only bad comment I could get, I would definitely call this an upgrade from last year. On Saturday night, the SCAC treated students to Casino Night, a legal way to gamble away money. Well, it wasn’t “real” money, but for every 10,000 chips won playing blackjack, rouelette, poker, or slot machines, a student could buy one raffle ticket. The more raffle tickets one had, the higher the chance to win one of the many prizes up See, WORTH IT, Page 5

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Worth It From Page 4

for grabs. Some of those items included a 32” LCD television from Vizio, a Playstation3, and an Xbox 360. Many students feared that Casino Night would be a gamble, pardon the pun, and would just be a waste of time. But, in fact, it was the fastest two-and-a-half hours I’ve had in a long time. I guess the old saying, “Time flies when you’re having fun,” really is true. I ended up dragging my 25 year-old sister with me, just in case it was a bust (sorry…these puns are just too easy), but she ended up loving the event. She asked if we did this every year and when I told her why we did it, she suggested we do more stuff like this. Even non-Wabash students loved it. must admit that playing blackjack for over two hours is not healthy, but now I understand how people become addicted to gambling. Just to be safe and not promote unhealthy gambling addictions, there were pamphlets available to help define the symptoms of a gambling problem. Unfortunately, I didn’t have enough time to read those informational pamphlets because I was too busy gambling away my chips with our dealer Jenny. Yeah, I was at that one table for so long, I learned my dealer’s name. Maybe I should have read one of those pamphlets after all. This new experiment that the SCAC tried was definitely a gamble (I promise that was my last one!), but it turned out to be a huge success. I think giving us some diversity is the way to go. Whether the reason for this new format was to save money for one big act in the spring or just to try something fresh, it was a great idea, and SCAC should be commended for their efforts to please students. Now where is Jenny? I have been itching to play just one more round of blackjack. Just one more, I promise.

Sphinx Club: A Monon Bell Snapshot opinion

The Bachelor



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November 8, 2007

CHRIS SERAK

WABASH ‘08

Wabash is alive, stirred by the pubescent proclamations of DePauw’s tendency to swallow and the first good excuse to drink on a Monday. It must be Bell Week. But beyond the freezing freshman and warm beer lie 113 years of tradition and the oldest rivalry west of the Alleghenies. Birthed in same decade as our famed victory over Notre Dame, the declaration of our title as “Little Giants” and the all-important coaching stint of Francis Cayou, the passion for the Monon Bell and Wabash athletics is, as Byron Trippet claimed, a true symbol of the “virility of Wabash as a college for men.” Taken from the train engine used to connect the Athens of the Midwest with its southern enemy, the only co-ed school in America with no men, the bell was first used as the game’s trophy in the second quarter of the 20th Century (I don’t

know the exact year). Since, the bell’s worth has been displayed through the emotion, and articulated in the hyginx, of many generations of Wabash Men. The salience of lore revolving around our hatred of those ‘Sisters’ to the south has no better embodiment than the alleged genus of Opie Immel. As related by Glenn Stewart ’19, Immel, having a particularly potent love for the degradation of DePauw, hired the use of a real elephant to drag a hearse, serving as an effigy to the Dannies, in a parade through Indianapolis. Whether the events thus related are factual is a mute point, because the story serves more as tangible proof of our long superior ingenuity in the field of heckling. The most famous example of the Cavemen ability to “think critically” did not involve an elephant, but instead a Cuban refugee, scholarships for needy Mexican students, a couple hundred sombreros and, of course, the stupidity of the DePauw administration.

Although this story has been told and retold a thousand times, it’s the one tale that really never gets old. Posing as a Mexican reporter interested in American schools, Wallies Jim Shanks and Ray Santos, Shanks’ ‘Cuban refuge driver,’ met for a lunch engagement with Danny President Dr. William Kerstetter and Admissions Director Lou Fontaine. The two Hispanic imposters were granted permission to take a picture with the Monon Bell. Having uncovered the Bell’s location, the two returned to campus to recruit the help of two other men and a separate group of backup. Their plan was stifled, however, by police who were suspicious of their lingering presence at the Bell’s storage barn hideaway. Their misfortune led the police away from the bell, allowing the successful heist of the other group. Posters celebrating the event were plastered in prolific quantities in both towns, and read: “Congratulations! To Pres. Kerstetter and His Dannies for 1. Winning the No-

reporting that “there are no freshmen guarding the press box.” These messages are rather useless and pretentious. After all, what current student can recall a time when Dannies actually showed up? The purpose of this article is not to beat the dead horse that is further complaining about !everyone emails. That will be left to Professor Morillo’s weekly comic strip and more !everyone emails complaining about the number of !everyone emails. So, then, why do we guard campus? This author proposes it is, in essence, the same reason freshmen paint the bench and participate in Homecoming events—these are bonding experiences that should not be missed out on. Some of the best memories come from staying up all night talking with our brothers of Wabash. Ask any senior what

he recalls being the best part of “student life” at Wabash. His answer will probably refer to some experience equivalent to standing around a fire barrel, drinking a few beers, and discussing whatever comes to mind with those who would come to be his best friends. The Wabash experience is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. No upperclassman will ever be able to relive his freshman year. The first exposure to the traditions that surround Monon Bell may seem rather unnecessary. However, this is not the case. The risk that some Danny is actually going to make his way up to our palatial institution is rather minimal. However, that is not the point. Guarding campus is about embracing the freshman experience. So, fellow students, have a good time this week. Enjoy the company of one another. Have a mean-

Bell prize 2. Granting $20,000 in scholarships to needy Wabash students.” To tarry in the luminous glory of so much tradition, however, we are charged with the duty of both its maintenance and proliferation. The conception of the Monon Mohawk last fall (and its continuity at the hands of intoxicated Rhynes each evening this week), along with the unfailing intensity of each word of Coach Crieghton’s Monon Chapel Talk, represent a few of the traditions unique to our time here. Although not in its infancy, the Monon Keg Game is another relatively recent addition to festivities. The game, although marred by the baffled confusion inherent to most of our understanding of what the hell the rules of rugby actually are, represents an important aspect of the rivalry today, as there could be no greater sight to behold on the eve of the Bell, then the emasculation of collar-popping Dannies at the whim of real men, vested with innumer-

Campus Guard: A Vital Freshman Tradition

JEFF KESSELS

WABASH ‘10

Your author was approached by a few freshmen recently inquiring as to the actual necessity of “guarding campus.” A question the author, himself, had asked last year when informed about the tradition. It seems that guarding campus has become more of a tradition than the actual necessity it once was. Each year freshman pledging fraternities gather around fire barrels to ring the bell most of the night and enjoy the company of one another. All of this in disguise of guarding campus from the yellow-bellied Danny who might attempt to show his face on our beloved soil. Guarding campus is a fun event but, in reality, probably does not require the emails

See, SNAPSHOT, Page 7

“The experience gained in traditions such as guarding campus is invaluable.”

ingful conversation while trying to keep warm around a fire barrel. This is Wabash College. Although the description of the job may disguise the intent of the position, do not be fooled. The experience gained in traditions such as guarding campus is invaluable. This writer encourages everyone to take part in this event. After all, one never knows who he might meet or the conversations he may have that could impact his life for years to come.

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The Half-filled Firkin PAGE 6



stuff

The Bachelor

November 8, 2007

Let me be the first to recognize that attempts to inform this community regarding the beauty and appeal of true refreshment is not the first to appear in this paper. But just as your classes are offered from year to year and generation to generation, so too ought our eyes be opened to that which a great deal of us are painfully naïve - beer, Gentlemen, beer. Let me establish my own definition of beer. It is based on amendments to the Reinheitsgebot Purity Law of 1516, which is a good place to start. The law states, in summation, that those ingredients used in brewing must be barley, hops, and water. Naturally, this excludes such sensory delights as wheat beers, oatmeal stouts, and everything else ever made, because it excludes yeast. So my own, and the Greater Brew Society’s standards are to include wheat, oats, yeast, and occasional elaborate and fanciful botanicals such as the coriander and orange peel in Belgian witbiers. In a general sense, I hope to accomplish at least two things within my writing efforts: to educate both the masses and myself in the greater appreciation of beer, and to discriminate the fine from the mean. We must learn types of beer, times for beer, and how beer best flows through the veins of life, offering careful intemperance and relaxed satisfaction to its drinkers. We must think critically, sirs and madams; indeed, critically of the sad place “beer” has been placed.

ROSS

MCKINNEY

CULTURE Do many of us not painfully associate beer with images of corpulent bellies strained in the confines of a too small tee shirt? Or perhaps the unfortunate iced-down cans of liquid foolishness freely distributed on the weekends? We must not accept this tenuous and forsaken existence, for the fine ought not have been made in vain. My first struggle is to overcome that which plagues our poor, collegiate palates. What certainly does not help beer’s reputation in our great nation is corn and rice. We must recognize that it is very difficult for good beer to come from mediocre ingredients. Is it best to accept that with which the brewing conglomerates have effused the markets? Who would make the terrible decision to use corn, the new world staple, in such an old world delight? That person was not concerned with quality; nay, instead they were concerned with cost. Corn is cheaper than barley. According to my Lilly Library correspondent at press time, Fil Drambarean, The Wall St. Journal reports $6.55/bushel for barley and $3.64/bushel for corn. This

certainly explains being able to buy 360 ounces of hopped alcoholic corn-water for less than $14. My second issue is to urge you to become familiar with different types of beer. I calculate there to be at least 55 types of beer. From the hoppiest of India Pale Ales to the lightest of Pilsners, there is plenty of room for everyone to develop their own preferences. All the while you can create an appreciation for the craftsmanship and quality that brewers strive toward. Visit microbreweries, patron the farthest end of the beer aisle at Kroger, do not soak the beer bottle in ice, and drink out of a glass. There are plenty of reasons to learn about that gilded water you throw back so carelessly. Support the little guy, look clever and learned in front of your friends and dates, and show the world that higher quality is worth the price. Hopefully we can understand that the finer things in life are often not the cheap options that come in ‘dirty thirty’ packs. With this in mind, we can start learning about how to appreciate the complexities and different flavor profiles that are available. It may take more time, it may take more money, but I contend that it is well worth the extra money to spring for the unknown, the undiscovered, and the probably better tasting brew. We’ll get into beer specifics as the column progresses, but until then: To happier hops and better brews.

“We must learn types of beer,times for beer, and how beer best flows through the veins of life.”

Meet The Staff

CHRISTOPHER NELSON WABASH ‘11

Where are you from? I’m from Indianapolis, Indiana

Why did you choose Wabash? I chose Wabash because of financial aid and the fact that my first and second visits here were both pretty damn amazing. The campus was beautiful. The people were nice. I just thought it was an awesome place. Why do you write for the Bachelor? I joined the Bachelor because I enjoy writing and it seemed like a good opportunity.

What is your favorite non-Wabash related thing to do? My favorite non-Wabash pastimes are playing Guitar Hero, DDR, and pretty much any other music related game. Besides that, I enjoy making techno music. Is there anything every other Wally should know about you? With a mohawk, I kinda look like Mr. T.

What do you plan on doing after Wabash? After Wabash I want to go to graduate school for psychology.

11.08.07

11/7/07

8:38 PM

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“Normal to Me:” Scott’s American Gangster stuff

The Bachelor



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November 8, 2007

Frank Lucas is the American Dream. Having grown up a protégé to a revered Harlem crimelord, Lucas used the Vietnam War as cover to import pure heroin from Southeast Asia and cut out the Mafia middlemen. No less than Thurgood Marshall or Jackie Robinson, Lucas was a pioneer. Certainly, to the people of Harlem, he was almost as heroic a figure. Played with stately dignity by Denzel Washington, Lucas is a devoted family man, a churchgoer, and a loving husband. He believes that he is bringing order to the chaos of Harlem and that his newfound wealth can be reinvested into the very community his product is destroying vein by vein. Detective Richie Roberts is a painfully honest cop and a womanizing, neglectful husband and

father. His official activities are above reproach (to his detriment at times; his turning in a million dollars in unmarked cash makes him a laughingstock in his department), but his personal life is a self-centered mess. You may be picking up on a theme here, and it’s one that Scott will hammer at for the bulk of the film. The two stories are told in parallel. The men don’t meet in person until virtually the end of the film, but Scott clearly intends at least this corner of the film as a meditation on virtue. It gets a little laborious towards the end, as the audience is suddenly pushed to consider the thoroughly corrupt Detective Trupo (played with slimy glee by Josh Brolin) the real villain of the piece. If the film had stopped two

KYLE CASSIDY

THE MALE GAZE minutes before it did, I would have considered it a failure. It clearly has pretensions of grandeur, seeking to be more than the irresponsible glorification crime that most gangster films are. Indeed, it fairly hammers you over the head with its own seriousness; the film has more shots of needles jamming into flesh than the Hellraiser series. Scott is clearly too enamored of Frank Lucas to really con-

demn him. It’s hard not to be; he is devilishly charismatic and a real self-made man. Scott must have known what he was doing when he cast Denzel Washington; the man simply can’t do villainy. But then there’s that last two minutes, which I won’t spoil here. In two wordless minutes, Scott reduces Lucas to a pathetic, even contemptible, figure and suggests that he may have gotten exactly what he deserved after all. I really want to say that American Gangster is Ridley Scott’s best film. It’s not; but I really want to say that it is. It’s certainly a marked improvement over the jumbled ecumenical mess that was Kingdom of Heaven, but it stands on the shoulders of giants to get there. Gangster film devotees will note a number

of winks and homages, and at least one scene apparently lifted directly from the first Godfather. I just can’t decide if the film was great setpiece that stumbled into a sublime ending, or if the entire thing, Denzel and all, was carefully crafted to hoodwink the audience before socking them with the denouement. But here’s something I’m sure about. What I know is this: you should go see this film. The acting is excellent; the story is fascinating; the re-creation of 1970s Harlem is astounding. This is honest-to-God one of the best films of the year. And it even turns out that Common is a good actor. So go see it and decide the questions it poses for yourself.

11.08.07 news2

11/7/07

8:27 PM

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Wabash Men at Play...

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photos

The Bachelor

November 8, 2007

Above: At saturday’s Casino Night, Sean Foster risked it all at the Texas Hold’em Table. Top Right: From left to right. Jay Brouwer ’09, Michael Jordon ’11, Nathan Colglazier ’10 Right: Adam Current ‘11 swimming the Butterfly at Saturday’s triple double meet against Rose Hulman and Illinois Wesleyan

Photos By: Clayton Craig ’08 Steve Abbott ’09

...and at Work

11.08.07 news2

11/7/07

8:28 PM

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Two Sides of Same-Sex Education news

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PAGE 9

November 8, 2007

Talk looks at conservative and liberal views of same-sex education in America

JUAN CRICCO

WABASH ‘10

Sex differences and the emerging science that studies them was the focus point of the lecture by Dr. Leonard Sax at Hays 104 on Monday night. Dr. Sax, whose visit was sponsored by the Gender Issues Committee and the Center of Inquiry into the Liberal Arts, presented fundamental biological differences in how men and women learn. Sax pointed to the general disparity in achievement across high schools and colleges to show that a problem exists. He prescribed single sex education at some point in a person’s educational career as the best way to address sex differences in learning. Denying gender differences, in Dr. Sax’s view, only reinforces gender stereotypes, while understanding them breaks down these stereotypes and aids education for both men and women. Dr. Sax began with what he referred to as a “not particularly important” event that occurred on January 14, 2005. He related the publishing of comments by the ex-President of Harvard University, Dr Lawrence Summers, regarding the differences in learning between men and women.

Dr. Summer’s views composed a response to the question of why there are so few women professors in the fields of computer science, physics, and engineering. Summer’s theory was that “innate differences in intrinsic aptitude” caused these differences. In other words, by virtue of being female, women are innately less capable in said fields. Dr. Sax made clear he thought these comments were laughable, but went on to say his focus was not on the particularly “unimportant” event but on the political “firestorm” that ensued after the comments were published. There were two sides of the argument, according to Dr. Sax. The conservative side, led by conservative pundits and experts, rose to Dr. Summer’s defense and argued that indeed there exist intrinsic differences that lead men to play with trucks at a young age and women with dolls. The liberal argument argued that sex was nothing but a social construct, and the only differences between men and women were those attributed to them by society. “Both sides are wrong,” Sax said. The disparity in achievement between men and women across high school and college was made evidenced by Sax through a number of figures

[Sax] prescribed single sex education at some point in a person’s educational career as the best way to address sex differences in learning.

“He presented pretty surprising information from studies I’ve never heard of before.” Chris Beard, Wabash ‘10

and quoting of various studies. “At co-ed universities, four out of five graduates with honors are women” Sax said. He referred to studies that showed the disproportionate majority of overachievers in high schools across America are women. The problem is that, for men, “caring about school has become uncool,” said Sax. That is why the notion of a scholar athlete so prevalent in history and western civilization is now almost entirely absent. Instead, there is false

notion that “jocks are dumb.” Men, according to Sax, are turned off to certain subjects and to a certain extent from school altogether because their biological differences to women are not taken into account, which puts them at a social disadvantage. “But differences do not imply an order of rank,” said Sax. He presented biological studies that claimed a gender difference in vision. From these, Sax said, scientists can tell you a person’s gender. The idea that a man’s brain matures differently than a women’s brain was also presented. These differences, in Sax’s view, are large enough to warrant a separation of men from women for at least four years of their education. These four years would help biological differences to be acknowledged and therefore break gender stereotypes. If the education system

acknowledged the biological differences between men and women, men would not be discouraged from the language arts or women from subjects such as physics or computer science. Reaction to the talk was mixed. “He presented pretty surprising information from studies I’ve never heard of before,” said Chris Beard ’10. When asked how the talk affected the college, however, reactions were more onesided, although a general appreciation for scientific argument was acknowledged. “I don’t think it is really relevant,” said Dr. Barreto. “Surely at college age it is time to allow men and women to interact as intellectual equals.” Others refrained from making a comment altogether, fearing the political implications of taking sides on such a thorny issue.

11-08-07

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Time To Get Rid Of All-Campus E-mail

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opinion

The Bachelor

November 8, 2007

“!everyone” must be changed, if it must exist at all. It’s just that simple. It’s been made strikingly evident that students cannot abide by the Gentleman’s Rule in regards to the privilege. If that’s the case, it should be taken away or strongly monitored. Like a number of students around campus, my phone receives e-mails directly. This week, after walking into a meeting only to emerge less than an hour later, I was appalled to find my email box had accumulated over twenty e-mails in that brief time. Nearly all of them had to do with Monon Bell ticket sales - something of absolutely no interest to me. Most students got their tickets in advance. Those of us who took the bookstore seriously when they said that tickets were limited are now forced to read countless emails going on about the unfairness of the system. “2 For Sale;” “Need One;” “Be

JOSH HARRIS

OPINION EDITOR

Altruistic;” “Go Free Market;” “Stop !everyone:” “Go To Hell” are the topics filling the bodies of these e-mails. Only when I decided to write this article did I actually read them. Not only do I regret it, I feel dumber after doing so. The pattern is always the same. Student A wants to say something. Student B responds to everyone when he meant to write to Student A. Student C writes to everyone to remind Student B that people shouldn’t send emails to everyone if they mean to send and email to one individual. Student D disagrees with Student B. Student E calls for the stop to !everyone (as if

he’s the online traffic guard). Student F says in so many words for Student E to go to hell, which lands him a seat in Dean Rater’s Office. It’s just getting too tiresome. The proposal is simple: one shot, each year. If a student sends out one single e-mail which violates online conduct, his privilege to e-mail the entire campus is lifted for the year. That would provide some incentive for students to stop with their feckless e-mail banter. It would probably cut down on trips to the Dean’s Office, too. Or, if that’s too difficult to police, the more drastic alternative is to just get rid of it altogether. This writer is not entirely opposed to that option. For those that care little about gripping debates of ninjas v. pirates would no doubt agree—just get rid of it altogether. In my own tenure here, I’ve used the “!everyone” once. I can also recall that single instance in which it was used: it was to pro-

mote a campus-wide event. I’m probably in the minority that can count the number of times I’ve felt it necessary to send such an e-mail. Yet there are some names can be found participating in every e-mail war. What’s so enticing about being a participant in an e-mail war? Is it the sense of being a solitary voice on the campus, as if the rest of us are waiting for that one student to weigh in? One can be assured, that is not the case. It is clear what qualifies as an appropriate reason for using the listserv. Yet some students have no concept of online etiquette. What’s unbelievable is how emails from the staff and administration calling for a ceasefire are ignored by students. That’s simply disrespectable. There are the instances in which e-mail accounts are hijacked by “friends” or roommates, sending dim-witted messages that make little or no sense.

“It is clear what qualifies as an appropriate reason for using the listserv. Yet some students have no concept of online etiquette.”

These juvenile actions remind me how immature how students can be. The rest of us must wait patiently while they mature, and be constantly annoyed in the interim. If the student body wants to see the end of the “!everyone” capabilities, then keep it up. Those of us that are tired of all the adolescent tendencies will finally be relieved. Then, maybe for once, the rest of us won’t overlook important e-mails among a sea of irrelevancy.

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Non-Athletes Deserve Dean’s Excuse, Too opinion

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PAGE 11

November 8, 2007

Last April I was invited to present at the National ServiceLearning Conference in Albuquerque, NM. An organization of which I am a member was asked to present a workshop as well as involve ourselves in other aspects of the conference. Aside from presenting our workshop, the conference was a very important networking opportunity to meet leading community service and education advocates on a national scale. For example, my breakfast table one morning consisted of one of the founders of the Peace Corps, a senior vice president at State Farm and the President and CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service. My experience at the servicelearning conference mirrors experiences many Wabash students have every year. It is unfortunate the Dean’s Office doesn’t see any value in these opportunities. After learning about the conference in at the advent of the school year last year, and understanding that I would miss three

Snapshot From Page 5

ous means of violence by way of the seemingly rule less game of rugby. Further, the close proximity of the crowd and players allows for the unique opportunity to actually witness the ritual practice of Zima consumption by the The existence of Monon Bell as we know it, however, is not something that arises naturally. In order for it to survive, the men of every class and living unit must gaze toward the south with the same robust animosity as those before us. We must not, however, simply hate DePauw, but also love Wabash. Tradition can be guaranteed only through a universal dedication to remembering, preserving, and contributing to our fabled history.

days of classes in the spring, I was sure the Dean of Students’ office would see the innate pedagogical opportunities this conference would provide for me. I was prepared with documentation legitimizing my invitation to the conference, to dissuade any notion of truancy. Leaders of the organization I was a member of were more than willing to talk with anyone who had concern. I was told point blank by the Associate Dean of Students that no such ‘Dean’s Excuse’ exists. He said I would have to get approval from my spring semester professors. This was my intent all along, but since I had to confirm my intent to go on the trip with my organization before the spring semester, I had to hope that my professors would be empathetic to my situation and hope no major tests or assignments were due those days I would miss. I was left without the administration’s endorsement of a legitimate pedagogical pursuit. As Wabash is an educational institution based more on discussion than lecture, I understand

PATRICK

MCALISTER

STUFF EDITOR

the Deans Office’s hesitancy in allowing a free flow of Dean’s Excuses. Students find out quickly that the best way to do well in discussion-based courses at Wabash is to read the text and participate. Not attending class will inevitably adversely affect one’s overall grade. Nonetheless, I find it most aggravating that the Dean’s Office cannot recognize fantastic non-college related educational opportunities and legitimize the class absence so students can experience them. Some may find my argument pointless. Why not just approach the professors in the first place? I believe in talking with professors directly about potential absences – I would have even if I were able to obtain a Dean’s

Excuse. I think it is absolutely important that a professor knows why you will be missing class in the future. The stipulation on approved Dean’s Excuses even requires this, and coming up with an affable solution is paramount for planned absences to work. Nonetheless, I find it incredibly frustrating that my college refuses to endorse my completely legitimate reason to miss class. If a student can prove the activity advances education and that a significant effort is made to devise an affable solution for making up the absence, I see absolutely no reason the Administration should prevent nonCollege related activity to have access to Dean’s Excuses. A substantial level of student involvement with local, and increasingly national and international communities should be expected of Wabash men. Opportunities to attend educational conferences, important leadership summits and other workshops are only going to increase as the world gets smaller and the definition of ‘commu-

I find it incredibly frustrating that my college refuses to endorse my completely legitimate reason to miss class.

nity’ becomes more nuanced. I will be going to another one of these conferences on Monday and Tuesday to present on service-learning at a statewide education conference in Indianapolis. I will be missing two days of classes, and have contacted my professors about my absence. I will not have the endorsement of my college to go. If Wabash truly wants to educate men to lead effectively and lead humanely, it should expect excellent outside opportunities to arise for students during their years of study on campus and should wholeheartedly endorse those opportunities.

Letters To The Editor

New Initiates Announced

To The Editor: The Alpha-Alpha Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon is proud to announce the initiation of 16 new brothers: Scott Walker, Adam Phipps, Len Back, Austin Flynn, Michael Sexton, Josue Gutierrez, Jason Kwon, Gabriel Stancu, Dirk Garriott, James Morey, Chris McCauley, Steve Maynard, David Rude, Kyle Prifogle, Ben Burdett, Daniel Nagle-Pinkham The Brothers of Tau Kappa Epsilon

Lambda Chi Thanks Community

To the Editor: On behalf of the men of the Alpha-Kappa Zeta of Lambda Chi Alpha, I would like to thank the entire Wabash community for the support given during our time of mourning the loss of our brother, Patrick Woehnker ’11. As news spread that Patrick had passed away, faculty members, administrators, students, alumni, and parents showed up at the Lambda Chi Alpha house to offer their support. We received countless emails, cards, flowers, and messages expressing condolences. Several faculty members were present nearly all day to talk with our Brothers and Associates. The support shown is a testament to the greatness of our entire Wabash community. Furthermore, I would like to thank the men responsible for honoring Patrick in last week’s issue of The Bachelor. Your thoughtfulness was taken very kindly by the friends and family members of Patrick. Finally, I, along with many of my fraternity brothers, would like to show appreciation to a number of faculty members. The cooperation and understanding shown during our time of grieving has been extremely helpful. Your support and encouragement has proved invaluable over the past weeks. The support for our chapter has helped to ease the situation and, for this, I thank the great community that is Wabash College. Jeff Kessels ‘10, External Vice-President, Lambda Chi Alpha

11.08.07 news2

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Casino Night Was A Royale Success

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news

The Bachelor

November 8, 2007

JOHN MCGAUGHEY

WABASH ‘11

Saturday night Wabash students and their friends gathered in Chadwick Court for Casino Night, the third and final installment of the Fall National Act. The students were given raffle tickets and poker chips and gambled the night away, increasing their chances of getting their tickets drawn for fabulous prizes such as a PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Apple iPods, digital cameras, gift certificates to local restaurants, and two tickets to the Colts—Patriots game. Senior Council Activities Committee Co-chair Leander Jones was very enthusiastic about the event. “It was definitely successful,” said Jones. “I think it was a great event and we should definitely do it again.” Casino night marks hitherto unexplored territory for Wabash. “We heard about other schools doing it and [the SCAC] thought it would be a good idea.” The attendance at the event was good, according to Jones, who said that there were about five hundred people, “mostly students and the friends they brought.” Each student was given one raffle ticket and then a raffle ticket’s worth of chips. Using the chips to play casino games, students could raise more chips to purchase more raffle tickets. “It was an opportunity for students to come out, have fun, and not have to spend any money,” said Jones. Casino Night, which ended the three stage National Act,

was experimental. By splitting what usually was a single concert into the Bob and Tom comedian night, a performance by the comedic troupe Second City on Friday night, and Casino Night Saturday night, the SCAC hoped to make the National Act more diverse and appeal to a broader range of students. Also, by using the money saved by this format, the SCAC hopes to have a much bigger Spring National Act than in years past. Currently they have an oral agreement with the band Third Eye Blind, but no official agreement has been reached. “This definitely was experimental,” said Jones. “I can’t say it’s necessarily better than the original way of doing it.” Some students have protested the Fall National Act, wishing for a traditional concert or show. Others have praised the multifaceted Act, saying it reaches to more students because it encompasses more interests. SCAC members remain hopeful. “Seeing the excitement in the eyes of the hundreds of students and many a fair guest in attendance was well worth the efforts and money,” said Ross McKinney, Student Senate Treasurer, SCAC member, and Co-Emcee of Casino Night. “I also found it a very acceptable means of having a great time during the fall semester to hold off for a larger Spring National Act.” For more information about the SCAC or National Act, contact John Moore at [email protected], Leander Jones at [email protected], or Ross McKinney at [email protected]

CLAYTON CRAIG | WABASH ‘08

The lucky winner of the 32” LCD Vizio television poses with the emcees of the night, Jacob Peerman ‘09 (left) and Ross McKinney ‘09 (center).

Sports 11-8

11/7/07

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sports

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Vector Marketing Swimming Stays Undefeated FALL OPENINGS

November 8, 2007

DREW PARRISH

WABASH ‘10

It has been a long and tragic week for the Little Giants swimming and diving team, as they mourned the loss of one of their own, Patrick Woehnker. Swimming in Woehnker’s honor, however, the team ended the week on a higher note, winning their dual meet against Illinois Wesleyan and Rose-Hulman. The Little Giants defeated both opponents head-to-head by a wide margin. Wabash defeated Illinois Wesleyan 193-40 and Rose-Hulman 188-55. Teammates Zach Phillips, Evan Rhinesmith, Adam Petro, and Daniel Michael opened the meet with a win in the 400-yard medley relay with a time of 3:37.18. Elijah Sanders, Jordan Extine, Adam Current, and Nick Rockefeller took second with a time of 3:47.15. “It was good to get back on track to normalcy,” said Head

Coach John Weitz. “The team raced really well, and the times were very good. It was nice to perform so well after the mental exhaustion of the past week.” Daniel Michael, who swam the 400 freestyle, stepped up and performed excellently. He recorded the fastest time yet, and he usually swims the 50 freestyle. Many of the swimmers were not swimming their primary events. This was to give the swimmers a chance to swim a different race before the challenging schedule ahead and a chance for secondary swimmers to get some showcase time. Chad Woods took first in the 500 free with a time of 4:58.69 and teammate Craig Vetor took third. Senior Kyle O’Keefe finished second in the 200 breaststroke. The Little Giants also finished 1-2-3 in the 200 backstroke. Pete Hewitt took first See, SWIMMING, Page 14

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sports

The Bachelor

Bell

november 8, 2007

From Page 16

Another focus for the defense will be putting pressure on sophomore quarterback Spud Dick, which was key in last year’s 23-20 victory. Junior defensive end Darryl Kennon leads the Wabash pass rush, with 12.5 sacks on the year. There is a heightened sense of excitement for this senior class, who find themselves not only on the verge of a thirdstraight Bell victory, but also an undefeated season. This class has led the Little Giants to an incredible year, but they are hungry for a win in their final Monon Bell game. “It’s a pride thing,” Pynenberg said. “It’s a way for us to indirectly give back to this

school. It means a lot to everyone at this school. Every class wants to win the Bell game their senior year.” Pynenberg said with an even a match-up as this game appears, the key will be staying calm and executing in the midst of the bedlam that is the Monon Bell classic. “The more big game experience you have, you would like to think you would be more able to stay calm,” Pynenberg said. “But it’s still the Bell Game. I can get the goose bumps now. We have the responsibility to keep our heads level and do what we have to do.” The game is 1:05 pm at Depauw.

Swimming From Page 13

with a time of 2:05.63. Phillips finished second, followed by Rockefeller. The divers finished 1-2-3 on 3-meter with Rob Fenoglio ’09 taking first place with a score of 221.95. Cole Hatcher ’11 (181.65) and Tyler Foster ’11 (161.70) finished the sweep right behind. On 1-meter, Fenoglio took the top spot with a final score of 220.88. The two best distance swimmers, Sanders and Vetor, took first and second in the individual medley event, which was unusual. “Distance swimmers don’t do well in IM, usually. Vetor and Sanders not only took first and second, they swam pretty good times,” Weitz said.

With this win, the Little Giants moved to a perfect 4-0 on the season. The real challenges lie ahead with meets against two top 20 teams - the University of Indianapolis and DePauw in January. “It’s nice to get off to a strong start. It puts the team in a positive mental attitude going into our invitational in the first weekend of December. The team has a very positive attitude, which only helps for the second half of the season. January is going to be a very challenging month,” Weitz said. The team plans to rename their invitational for Patrick. The team faces many tests ahead of them, but none tougher than the one they worked to pass this week.

Good luck to rugby in Monon Keg Game Good luck to football in 114th Monon Bell Classic Beat DePauw!

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Sports Editors Face Off With Bell Game Predictions sports

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november 8, 2007

‘D’ Will Come Through in the Clutch

of the receivers So here we are. allowed Finally, It’s Bell CHUCK SUMMERS has quarterback Week. It’s been a Matt Hudson to hell of a season, step in and lead and despite all the the Little Giants obstacles and to a phenomeinjuries, this team nal season after is staring down All-American not only the quarterback despised Dannies, Dustin Huff but also history. And looking at this year’s went down with a broken leg. match-up, the game itself could The Tiger secondary will have no answer for the explosive be a historic one as well. Both teams feature ultra- passing game, and in particular, powerful offenses. Wabash fea- the pure speed of Russell, who’s tures an outstanding aerial had three 100-plus receiving attack.. DePauw has a nasty sen- games in the last four weeks. 39- the number of sacks the ior running back in Jeremiah Marks. Both teams have looked Wabash defense has this year. Last year, Spud Dick was clearreally strong down the stretch. But all year long, the experi- ly flustered by the Little Giants enced and opportunistic Wabash pass rush. Sure, Dick has defense has made the big plays improved since his freshman when they needed it most, and year, but so has the Little Giants that will again be the deciding pass rush. Defensive end Darryl factor in this one, which should Kennon has emerged as an absolute beast on the D-line, go right down to the wire. I’m not necessarily a “num- leading the team with 12.5 bers” guy when it comes to pre- sacks. I think the pressure will dicting the winner of a college get to Dick again in this one, football game, but here are a few forcing a crucial turnover or two. I think are important: And finally, 123- the number 11- the number of juniors and seniors on the Wabash defense. of tackles for All-American lineThe poise and experience on the backer Adi Pynenberg on the defensive side of the ball has season. Pynenberg, who just last allowed Wabash’s “bend-but- week became the all-time leadnever-break” approach. The ing tackler in Wabash history, defense has allowed 315 yards will be huge in his final Bell per game but only 13.3 points, Game. His performance against which speaks to Wabash’s Marks will be critical. But I preincredible red zone defense. I dict him doing what he does foresee the defensive seniors best- flying all over the field and coming through in the clutch sit- doing cruel, cruel things to uations again this week, and Marks and the DePauw offense. keeping DePauw out of the end Cruel like Spud Dick’s parents, when they decided to name their zone when they really need it. Three- the number of Wabash kid Spud Dick. DePauw, like many other receivers who have had at least one game with over 100 yards opponents, will put up plenty of receiving, not including the yards in this one, but will come other two who have been close, up just short. Whether it’s a late with games over 90. Mike Rus- turnover or another red zone sell, Ray Green, Andrew Rode, stand, he Wabash defense will Gabe Guerrero, Bart Banach and come through in the clutch and even the J-Back Brock Graham seal the undefeated regular seaare all threats to drop triple dig- son for the Little Giants. The its on any day, making up one of Bell remains in its rightful home the nastiest receiving corps in in another classic battle, Wabash the country. The depth and talent 35, DePauw 28.

SPORTS EDITOR

Marks Must Come Up Big for Tiger Victory

Tomorrow’s game will come down to two storylines and who can win those battles. The first is the match-up between Wabash’s senior AllAmerican linebacker Adi Pynenberg against senior running back Jeremiah Marks. Both are record holders, team leaders and with it being their last Monon Bell will be going harder than ever. The DePauw offense stems from its ability to get going on the ground as it averages 160.3 yards a game and four yards per carry, with Marks averaging 128 yards a game. The only problem is that Pynenberg has recorded 18 tackles for loss on a Wabash defense that only gives up a mere 2.7 yards per carry. This battle will have extra importance early as DePauw tries to establish a running game it will need to win. When the Tigers can’t run effectively they have struggled to win. In both of the Tiger’s losses they only managed 58 and 68 yards on the ground, compared to their next lowest total being 117. If Marks can establish his presence early then Pynenberg and the rest of Wabash’s defense will have to respect DePauw’s run game, bring an eighth man up and open the field for sophomore quarterback Spud Dick. For DePauw to win Marks will have to pound out some important yards early and stop Pynenberg from being a terror in the backfield. The second storyline to watch will be how Wabash sophomore quarterback Matt Hudson responds to his first time playing in the Monon Bell game. Hudson has had a tremendous year for the Little Giants since becoming the full-time starter over Kyle Augustinovicz after senior Dustin Huff went down with an injury. Hudson has completed 73.1 percent of his

JONATHON BATUELLO

DEPAUW SPORTS EDITOR

passes and thrown for 17 touchdowns, but let’s be honest, the atmosphere he will be stepping into this weekend is different than any he’s dealt with before. With over 10,000 screaming fans and the pressure of an undefeated regular season on his shoulders, Hudson will have plenty of nerves and pressure to deal with. Wabash is known for its aerial attack, but they will likely hand the ball off a few times early to get Hudson settled in. After that, though, Hudson will be asked to throw the ball and throw it often and I know this because in both of DePauw’s losses they have given up 475 and 476 yards passing. The rest of the year

the Tiger defense only gaveup over 230 yards passing once. Wabash realizes this and will put the ball in Hudson and the receiving corps. If his nerves are settled then it could be a long day for the Tiger defense, because when Hudson is on he spreads the ball around (five players have four or more touchdowns), doesn’t miss (noted by his completion percentage) and doesn’t turn the ball over (only five interceptions so far). My guess, though, Hudson gets rattled enough to make a few mistakes, especially at the end. I think Marks and Pynenberg will both show why they are known for their abilities, but DePauw taking a lead late into the game. Then with the crowd noise and pressure really intense Hudson will make an ill-advised pass and senior Jevon Pruitt will come up with his sixth interception of the year to seal it. Prediction: DePauw 27, Wabash 24.

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Battle for the Bell

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sports

The Bachelor

november 8, 2007

Little Giants Look to Cap Undefeated Regular Season with Third Straight Bell Win

CHUCK SUMMERS

SPORTS EDITOR

When the Little Giants invade Greencastle for the 114th Monon Bell Classic on Saturday, there will be even more on the line than pride and the rights to the Bell for another year. This year, at 9-0, the Little Giants also have an opportunity to cap an undefeated regular season with a win against the archrivals from the south. “That’s something we definitely value in this program,” said sophomore quarterback Matt Hudson, referring to Wabash’s chance at an unblemished record. “That’s something that doesn’t happen often in any program.” Hudson will be getting his first Bell game start on Saturday, but didn’t show an ounce of nervousness in practice on Tuesday. “I’m so excited about the opportunity,” the smiling Hudson said. “It’s just an awesome atmosphere. There are so

many people there. I’m really excited, and I know the team is as well.” For Hudson and the Little Giants’ offensive attack, one of the key match-ups will be Wabash’s experienced receiving corps versus the experienced secondary of DePauw. “They have a very good secondary, very good corners,” Hudson said. “Like I’ve said all year, I think we have one of the best receiving corps in the country, so I think that’s going to be a very interesting matchup.” Leading the Tiger secondary is senior cornerback Jevon Pruitt, who leads the team in interceptions with five. His key opponent will be senior receiver Mike Russell, who has been back to All-American form down the stretch, posting three 100 yard receiving games in the past four games. The rest of Wabash’s deep and speedy receiving corps, including sen-

iors Gabe Guerrero, Bart Banach, and Ray Green will look to give the Tiger secondary fits all game. Despite the flashy match-up between the receivers and the secondary, Head Coach Chris Creighton believes the key to the game, on offense and defense, will be the play of the line. “If we’re unable to penetrate their offensive line, and viseversa, we’ll lose the game,” Creighton said. “That is the answer. The guys in the trenches.”

For the Little Giants defense, the emphasis will be stopping senior running back Jeremiah Marks, the focal point of a powerful DePauw offense. Marks has 768 yards on the season. “Marks is a guy who’s playing his last game ever,” Creighton said. “We’re going to get all he can give us. He’s the key. Everything stems off the running game. We’ll have to do our best to slow him down.” Schematically, nothing changes this week for the defense, which has had success against the top NCAC running

backs they’ve faced this year. “Our defense isn’t real sophisticated,” Creighton said. “It’s about executing.” Lining up across the line from Marks will be two senior linebackers, Andy Deig and Adi Pynenberg. Last week against Denison, Pynenberg became Wabash’s all-time tackles leader with 407, breaking Jim “Killer” Kilbane’s record of 400 set in 1984. The All-American has been lights-out in his senior campaign, racking up 123 tackles, six sacks and two interceptions. “I think it’s going to be a matter of will,” Creighton said. “Pynenberg and Deig are seniors, and Marks is a senior. Those guys are going to try to stop him by motivating the entire defense. In a battle of will, that’s going to be interesting to watch.” See, BELL, Page 14