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In the Naruto Shippuden Deck-building Game, you take on the role of Naruto,. Sakura, or one of their brave and heroic allies in the struggle against the forces.

TURN SEQUENCE • Play cards from your hand. Cards you play that match the Chakra Points of your Character may be played into those points. For each card you play into an empty Chakra Point, +1 Chakra.

• Total up your Chakra. You may pay for Chakra abilities on your Character or on cards you play. Chakra abilities may only be paid for once per turn, unless a card says otherwise. • Total

up your Power and purchase cards with combined cost less than or equal to that total. You may play additional cards even after making purchases.

• As

soon as you buy or gain a card, place it into your discard pile, unless instructed otherwise. END OF TURN

• Resolve

any “at the end of your turn” effects. Return any Hand Signs you played to the Hand Signs stack.

• Place

all the cards you played and any remaining cards from your hand into your discard pile, and draw a new hand of five cards.

• Fill

each empty slot in the Line-Up with a card from the top of the main deck.

• If

the top card of the Archenemy stack is face down, flip it face up and read aloud the next Archenemy’s Group Attack. Do not reshuffle your discard pile just because you have no cards in your deck. Wait until you must draw, discard, or reveal a card from your deck. Then shuffle your discard pile, and it becomes your new deck. The game ends immediately when either of the following two conditions is met: • You are unable to flip up a new Archenemy on the stack. • You

are unable to refill all five slots of the Line-Up.

©2002 MASASHI KISHIMOTO / 2007 SHIPPUDEN All Rights Reserved. ©2014 Cryptozoic Entertainment. 25351 Commercentre Dr., 2nd Floor, Lake Forest, CA 92630 www.cryptozoic.com

Made in China.

OVERVIEW In the Naruto Shippuden Deck-building Game, you take on the role of Naruto, Sakura, or one of their brave and heroic allies in the struggle against the forces of evil! While you begin armed with only the ability to Punch your foes, as the game progresses, you will add new, more powerful cards to your deck, with the goal of defeating as many Archenemies as you can. In the end, the player who has accumulated the most Victory Points from the cards in his or her deck wins the game. CONTENTS 211 Game Cards • 36 Punch Starting Cards • 16 Vulnerability Starting Cards • 111 Main Deck Cards • 16 Kick Cards • 12 Hand Sign Cards • 12 Archenemy Cards • 20 Weakness Cards 7 Oversized Character Cards 1 Rulebook SETUP FOR YOUR FIRST GAME 1. Your Character and Starting Decks Each player is dealt a random oversized Character. Alternately, each player may choose to play as their favorite Character. Each Character begins with a starting deck of seven Punch cards and three Vulnerability cards. You will use your Punch cards to buy more powerful cards to add to your deck, improving it as the game goes on. Vulnerability cards represent the things that occasionally cause a Character to falter. They don’t do anything for you when drawn or played, so it’s best to get rid of them as soon as possible (more on how to do that later).

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TYPES OF CARDS

Card Type Victory Points

CHARACTER

STARTER CARDS

ENEMY

Abilities

Special Rules Text

Card Type

Archenemy Level

ARCHENEMY

WEAKNESS

HAND SIGN

LOCATION

Card Name Abilities

Victory Points

ALLY

Cost

TECHNIQUE

EQUIPMENT

TECHNIQUE DEFENSE

WITH

The different card types that you can play are: Starter, Enemy, Location, Ally, Technique, and Equipment. Weakness, and Hand Sign cards have no card type.

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2. The Main Deck Most of the cards that you will add to your deck as the game progresses come from the main deck. Shuffle the main deck and place it in the middle of the table. None of the following cards should ever be placed into the main deck: Archenemies, Punch, Vulnerability, Kick, Hand Signs, Weakness, or the oversized Characters. The main deck is made up of every other card in the game (111 cards total).

3. The Archenemy Stack There are twelve different Archenemies available to use each game. Typically, eight Archenemies are used for a standard game. For a longer game, use more than eight. No matter how many you use, you will always use Orochimaru and Tobi. If you use eight Archenemies, you will use six selected at random, plus Orochimaru and Tobi. The Archenemies are broken up into four Levels: · There is a single Level 1 Archenemy (Orochimaru) · There are five Level 2 and five Level 3 Archenemies · There is a single Level 4 Archenemy (Tobi) Tobi is the lone Level 4 Archenemy, and he will be the last Archenemy you face each game. Place his card face down. Next, shuffle the five Level 3 Archenemies. Randomly select three cards. Place them face down on top of the Tobi card. Set the rest of the Level 3 Archenemies aside, still face down. Then, shuffle the five Level 2 Archenemy cards. Randomly select 3 cards and place them face down on top of the Archenemy stack. Gather the unused Level 2 and Level 3 cards and set them aside face down (in the game box is recommended). Finally, place Orochimaru face up on top of the Archenemy stack. In a typical eight-Archenemy game, the stack will now appear as: Level 1, followed by three Level 2 cards and three Level 3 cards, and ending with the Level 4 Tobi.

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THE LINE-UP

Once you have arranged the main deck, the Line-Up, and the other stacks, it will look something like the above. Your opening five cards in the Line-Up will vary. At the start of the game, there should be 16 Kicks, 12 Hand Signs, 8 Archenemies, and 20 Weaknesses in their respective stacks.

MAIN DECK

these stacks perpendicular to the board so that everyone can reach them. You will always use all 16 Kicks, 12 Hand Signs, and all 20 Weaknesses each game. The number of Archenemies you use will vary. Kicks and Archenemies are always available to be bought or defeated during your turn (while cards remain in their stacks). Weaknesses are never bought; they are gained only through unfriendly card effects. The main deck and the four stacks of cards on the end are not part of the Line-Up.

Next, place the Hand Sign, Kick, Archenemy, and Weakness stacks at the end of the Line-Up. You may want to turn

After shuffling the main deck, place the top five cards from the main deck into the Line-Up. There is no board necessary to play this game; just reserve space for each card.

4. The Line-Up

THE STACKS

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GAMEPLAY Randomly determine a player to go first. Each player begins by shuffling his or her deck and drawing five cards. Players take turns in clockwise order. Each turn, you may buy cards from the Line-Up, Kick cards, Hand Signs, and/or the top card of the Archenemy stack to improve your deck. Cards you buy or gain are always immediately placed into your discard pile unless you are instructed otherwise. Discard piles are always face up. Soon they’ll be shuffled into your deck, and then you’ll be drawing these newer, more powerful cards into your hand so you can play them. Buying powerful cards builds up the effectiveness of your deck. That’s why it’s called a “deck-building game.” You can buy any number of available cards with combined cost less than or equal to the amount of Power you have for the turn. For example, your Punch cards each give you +1 Power. If you draw four of them and no other cards with any Power bonuses, your total Power for the turn is 4. You can buy a single card with cost 2, 3, or 4, or even two cards each with cost 2, assuming these options are available. Kick and Hand Sign cards are (usually) available if the cards in the Line-Up are too expensive, and you may buy more than one during your turn if you wish. You may pass if you cannot buy or do not wish to buy any cards. Vulnerability and Weakness cards provide no Power. Since they weaken your draws and deck, you should try to destroy them as soon as possible. You may play them if you wish, but they have no effect when played. They are not discarded until the end of your turn when you discard all cards you have played and any cards that you have kept in your hand. Chakra Points Your Character has four Chakra Points. When you play a card that matches a Chakra Point on your Character, you may play that card into that point. For each card you play into an empty Chakra Point, you generate 1 Chakra. This is written on cards as +1 Chakra, just like how +Power is written. If you choose to not play a card into a Chakra Point, you cannot later move it into a Chakra Point. When you play a card into a Chakra Point, you gain that Chakra immediately... even before the game text of the card resolves. This allows you to use the Chakra a card generates on its own Chakra ability (if any). Cards you wish to play into Chakra Points may only be played into empty Chakra Points. A Chakra Point is “empty” if no cards have been played into it. A Chakra Point is “filled” if a card has already been played into that Chakra Point and it has not left play. For example, if you have a Technique Chakra Point and have four Techniques in your hand, you may only play one of them into that Chakra Point. If you play a card into a Chakra Point and it leaves the playing field during your turn, the Chakra it generated remains. You may play another card into that Chakra Point and it will generate new Chakra. Cards you play from places other than your hand may still be played into your Character’s Chakra Points. Cards played into Chakra Points are discarded at the end of your turn just like any other card you played.

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Chakra & Chakra Abilities Chakra is a resource similar to Power, but you don’t use it to buy cards. You generate Chakra by playing cards into your Chakra Points or by playing certain cards like Hand Signs. Total up your Chakra and then spend it on your Chakra abilities. Any unspent Chakra at the end of your turn is lost. Your Character and some cards have Chakra abilities. They are written as Chakra (#):. You need that much Chakra to use that ability. For example, each Character has a “Chakra (3):” ability that you must pay 3 Chakra to use. Once you spend Chakra on that ability, it is lost just like spent Power. The effect written after the Chakra payment is what you get. You may only use a card’s Chakra ability once per turn, unless the card says otherwise. Order of Playing Your Cards On your turn, you get to play the cards in your hand in the order of your choice. When you play a card, it generates 1 Chakra if you played it into a Chakra Point, and then its game text resolves immediately. Chakra ability payments on cards may be made later during your turn, unless the Chakra ability replaces the card’s nonChakra ability. (See Suigetsu on page 13 for an example of a replacement effect.) When you have played all the cards you wish to play at that time, total up the Power and Chakra you have accumulated and buy what you wish to buy from the Line-Up or the face-up stacks. You may pay for Chakra abilities on your Character and on cards you play. Chakra abilities may only be paid for once per turn, unless a card says otherwise. You do not have to play all of the cards in your hand before you start making purchases or spending Chakra if you don’t wish to. You may play additional cards even after making purchases. Ending Your Turn 1. Resolve any “at the end of your turn” effects. Return any Hand Signs you played to the Hand Sign stack. 2. Place all the cards you played and any cards remaining in your hand into your discard pile. Return any Hand Signs you played to the Hand Sign stack. Any unspent Power and Chakra is lost. Draw a new hand of five cards and pass the turn to the player on your left. 3. If any of the slots in the Line-Up are empty, draw cards off the main deck and add them to the Line-Up. Do not replace empty slots as soon as you buy or gain a card from the Line-Up. 4. If the top card of the Archenemy stack is face down, flip it face up. This will reveal the next Archenemy out to terrorize the Characters.

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END OF GAME The game ends immediately when either of the following two conditions is met: • You are unable to flip up a new Archenemy on the stack. • You are unable to refill all five slots of the Line-Up. Return all Locations you have in play, all cards in your hand, and all cards in your discard pile to your deck. Then, players total up the Victory Points 1 on cards in their deck. Weakness cards in your deck at the end of the game will subtract Victory Points (VP) from your total. The player with the highest VP total is crowned the winner! In case of a tie, the player with more Archenemy cards wins. After a winner has been determined, all players will need to take apart their decks, placing all of the cards back into their proper stacks. Be sure to return any Archenemies that were not used during the game to the Archenemy stack, so they can be used in the next game.

ADDITIONAL RULES

Characters Your Character gives you an ability that you may choose to use during your turn if you have generated at least 3 Chakra. It helps to turn the cards in your Character’s Chakra Points sideways to remember how much Chakra you have remaining. At the start of games after your first, each player may choose a Character to play with, or if you have enough, deal two Characters to each player, and then each player chooses one.

Hand Signs

Naruto has two Enemy, one Ally, and one Starter Chakra Point.

The 12 Hand Signs begin each game in the stacks at the end of the Line-Up. These cards are bought in the same way that Kick cards are bought. You may buy as many as you wish. Hand Signs give you a quick burst of Chakra when played, but the cards are lost after playing them. At the end of your turn, place any Hand Signs you played back on the stack. If the stack has no cards, you cannot buy a Hand Sign. You cannot buy a Hand Sign that you played that same turn, as they don’t return to the stack until the end of your turn. If you don’t wish to lose a Hand Sign, simply keep it in your hand and then discard it at the end of your turn. Each Hand Sign has unique art, but that has no game function.

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Attacks and Defenses Some cards allow you to make an Attack against the other players in the game. When you play a card with an Attack ability, each other player has an opportunity to avoid the Attack with a card that has a Defense ability. A player using a Defense card’s ability negates the Attack only for that defending player. A player may only play one Defense card per Attack. Any players who don’t avoid the Attack are then affected by the Attack card’s ability. Avoiding an Attack does not negate any other abilities (like +2 Power) of a card, unless an ability specifically counts the players successfully hit by the Attack.

Positive Attacks Positive Attacks are special cards that have very powerful effects. The awesome ability of the card happens for you, the person playing the card. However, an opponent can stop the effect from resolving by playing a Defense card. Starting with the player on your left and continuing clockwise, each player has the opportunity to use a Defense card to stop the Positive Attack card. Once a player has stopped the effect, no other players may use a Defense card to stop it again. If a Positive Attack is avoided by a foe, the card may not do anything else, but it still fills a Chakra Point (if it was played there). You cannot avoid your own Positive Attack. The Archenemies When you have accumulated enough Power in a turn, you can choose to defeat a Archenemy. If you do, take the topmost face-up card from the stack and place it into your discard pile, unless instructed otherwise. The next card in the Archenemy stack remains face down until your turn is over, so a player may defeat only one Archenemy per turn. Archenemies range in cost from 8 to 13, and their stack is randomized at the start of each game, so check the stack for the current Archenemy’s cost. While Orochimaru is content to gaze scornfully at the players from his lofty perch atop the Archenemy stack, the rest of the Archenemies take a more hands-on approach. On each Archenemy (other than Orochimaru), you will find that Archenemy’s Group Attack. When a new Archenemy is revealed, this is the only time it makes its Group Attack. When revealed on the Archenemy stack, this Attack resolves immediately against each player in the game. Each player with a Defense card may defend against the Attack. The Attack will resolve against any players who do not defend themselves. These Attacks do not happen during any player’s turn. Archenemies are Enemies. Archenemy is a title, not a card type, so playing an Archenemy does not count as playing two different card types.

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Archenemy Cards in Your Deck Like any other card you acquire, the experience gained defeating an Archenemy will aid you in your future turns. When you play an Archenemy from your hand, the text at the top of the text box is the relevant text. The “Group Attack” is no longer applicable, as the Archenemy already made that attack when he was first revealed from the Archenemy stack. Weakness Some cards force players to gain a Weakness. If this happens, the Weakness cards are usually placed in that player’s discard pile, effectively adding them to that player’s deck. They have no ability when drawn during the game and can be played or kept in your hand and discarded at the end of your turn. At the end of the game, each Weakness in your deck subtracts 1 Victory Point from your VP total, so you’ll need a plan for destroying them at some point! If the Weakness deck runs out, effects that would cause a player to gain a Weakness do not do so, but any other effects those cards have still resolve as usual. A player may still play a Defense to avoid an Attack, even when there are no Weaknesses available to be gained. Shuffling Your Deck You don’t reshuffle your discard pile into your deck as soon as you run out of cards. However, if at any point during the game if there are no cards in your deck and you need to draw, discard, or reveal a card from your deck, immediately reshuffle your discard pile, and it becomes your new deck. Locations Location cards go straight to your discard pile when bought or gained, just like any other card. However, when you later draw and play a Location, that card will remain face up and in play in front of you for the rest of the game. Each Location has a unique effect that you may use during each of your turns for the rest of the game. The word Ongoing is a reminder that this card keeps working for you turn after turn. This effect occurs only once during each of your turns. You can have any number of Locations in play at once.

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Destroying Cards Some cards have an ability that allows you to destroy a card from your hand, your deck, or even the Line-Up. When you destroy a card, place it into a face-up pile of destroyed cards anywhere away from the play area, removing it from your deck and the game. You will often get to choose which of your cards to destroy. Destroying Vulnerability and Weakness cards will improve your deck greatly! If Weaknesses, Hand Signs, and Kicks are destroyed, they do not go back to their respective stacks.

Gaining Cards When a card tells a player to gain a card, that card is taken and immediately placed in that player’s discard pile at no additional cost, unless otherwise directed by the card. If a card tells to you gain a card with a specific name, card type, or cost and there are none available, you simply don’t gain a card.

When You Buy or Gain This Card Several cards have bolded text at the top of their text boxes that read: “When you buy or gain this card, ...” The text that follows those words is what happens when you buy or gain this card from anywhere. Whether it’s from the Line-Up, the top of the main deck, or even a foe’s hand or discard pile, you will generate this effect. When you buy or gain a card from anywhere, you must reveal it to all players. Only the text in that paragraph happens when you buy or gain it. The text at the bottom of the card is the only thing that happens when you later play it from your hand. Resolving Card Abilities If a card’s ability affects multiple players, and the order matters (for example, an Attack that has each of three opponents gain a Weakness, with only two Weaknesses remaining on the board), resolve that ability for each affected player in clockwise order, starting from the player who played the ability.

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CARD CLARIFICATIONS Choji: The value of “X” is determined by the Level of the current Archenemy, which is found in the middle info bar of that card. You do not choose the value of X with this card. Dark Naruto: A “filled” Chakra Point is a side of your Character with the appropriate card type next to it. The maximum number of filled Chakra Points a Character can ever have is 4. When this card is used to avoid a Group Ambush, you cannot give a Punch to anyone. Deidara: This Ongoing ability cannot be avoided and is only active while on the Archenemy stack. You may still use Chakra abilities on your Character and cards you play, but your Chakra will have to come from cards you play. This card does nothing when later played, but it may be placed into a Chakra Point to generate Chakra. Gakido (Path of Pain): The Hand Sign you gain comes from the Hand Sign stack. If none are there, you gain nothing, but still generate +2 Power. Gedo Statue: Gaining a card from a foe’s hand might allow you to take advantage of a card with text reading, “When you buy or gain this card...” If you do trigger that text, you still get to play the card as well. No matter where the card you gained ends up after you play it, it always goes to that foe’s discard pile. Gentle Step Twin Lion Fists: A face-down Character has no Chakra Points and no Chakra ability, but you may still generate Chakra and use Chakra abilities with cards you play. Hidden Cloud Village and other Locations: The value of “X” is determined by the VP value of the card you wish to gain. All instances of X will then be the same on this card. Hinata, Kakashi: If you have an empty Ally Chakra Point, you may play this card into that point, or increase the effectiveness of these cards by not playing them into a Chakra Point. You cannot put them into an Ally Chakra Point after the ability resolves. Itachi: If a player loses their turn, they keep their current hand. If a player takes an additional turn, they draw a new hand as usual and resolve any Group Attacks between their turns as usual. Kakuzu: If you choose to reveal the top two cards of your deck, you must destroy one and draw the other. If you don’t wish to take any chances, do not reveal the top two cards of your deck. Karin: If you temporarily steal a card from another player and then destroy it, it will still return to that player. Kisame: This Ongoing ability cannot be avoided and is only active while on the Archenemy stack. You may still use your Character’s Chakra ability.

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Killer Bee: If Killer Bee is in one of your Chakra Points, he does not return to your hand. The Power and Chakra the returned cards generated remain, and playing cards into your Character’s Chakra Points will generate additional Chakra. Medical Jutsu: The value of “X” is determined by you. If you generate 2 Chakra and choose to spend all 2 of it on this Technique, then X = 2. All instances of X will then be “2” on this card. You would then be able to destroy a total of 2 cards, not 2 cards from your hand and then 2 cards from your discard pile. Orochimaru: His Ongoing ability does not apply until he is bought or gained and put into play by a player. Rasengan: You may pay for this Chakra ability multiple times in the same turn. You must pay for it as many times as you wish before resolving the attack. A foe that avoids this attack will not discard any cards to this attack effect. Sign: You do not have to have bought or gained this card to generate its effect when destroyed. Sexy Jutsu: A “Defense” is a card that has the words “Defense:” followed by text referring to avoiding attacks. Shadow Stitching: A card is a Positive Attack if it has “Positive Attack:“ in its text box, followed by an attack effect. This card does not have a colon [:] after the words Positive Attack, nor does it have an attack effect after those words, so it does not qualify. Positive Attack is not the name of a card. Shark Skin: This doubles all Chakra you have generated and not yet spent, and any Chakra you will generate during the rest of your turn. It does not double any Chakra you already spent, as that Chakra was already used up and is lost. Suigetsu: If you play this card into a Chakra Point, or have an Ongoing ability that generates Chakra, you may use this Chakra ability immediately after playing this card. You may not pay the Chakra cost if it is not the first card you played. This card’s +2 Power is unaffected by the payment or nonpayment of the Chakra ability. Tendo (Path of Pain): This doubles all Power you have generated and not yet spent, and any Power you will generate during the rest of your turn. It does not double any Power you already spent, as that Power was already used up and is lost. Zetsu: A player has Chakra Points if the Character he is playing is face up and has colored Chakra Points.

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MERGING WITH OTHER CERBERUS ENGINE GAMES



While you could simply shuffle all 220+ main deck cards together from another set and this set, that would dilute a lot of the combos in both sets and be pretty darn tough to shuffle! Use this guide to understand the differences: Ally = Hero Enemy = Villain Technique = Super Power Character = Super Hero





Other Cerberus Engine games do not use Chakra. If you wish to play other Oversized Character cards with your Naruto set, you will need to grab a Naruto Character to act as your new Character’s Chakra Points. Whether you want to have your new Character also use that Character’s Chakra ability is your choice. It is recommended when mixing with other sets to use most or all of the main deck cards that have Chakra abilities.



FAQ



Q: What does the term “defeat” or “defeated” mean?



A: That term is only used referring to Archenemies. You “defeat” a Archenemy when you buy or gain it. That Archenemy has then been “defeated.”





Q: Does Zabuza only win the game if you played him during the very last turn of the game? A: No. If the game ends because the Line-Up can’t be refilled, the player with Zabuza in his deck wins the game.







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CREDITS Game Design Game Engine Design

Matt Hyra Matt Hyra & Erik Larsen

Cryptozoic Entertainment

President & CCO CEO Chief Operating Officer SVP Sales & Business Development

Game Design and Development Additional Thematic Development

Graphic Design Director of Operations Brand Management Business Coordinator Office Manager

Marketing and Community

Cory Jones John Nee Scott Gaeta John Sepenuk Matt Hyra (Lead), Phil Cape, Dan Clark, Matt Dunn, Kevin Jordan, Erik Larsen, Ben Stoll, Drew Walker, Chris Woods Nathaniel Yamaguchi Houman Baik (Lead), Larry Renac, Nancy Valdez, John Vineyard, Daniel Wong Leisha Cummins Adam Sblendorio Rumi Asai Venessa Jimenez Javier Casillas, Sara Erickson, Drew Korfe

Playtesters Richard Brady, Tom Driver, Ryan Dromgoole, Robert Gasio, Russ Greenwald, Herb Haneke, Kent Heidelman, Adam Hensch, Shannon Hunt, Cory Jones, Adam May, Marcos Payan, Tom Twedell, Nathaniel Yamaguchi and many, many others

Cryptozoic Special Thanks William Brinkman, Miranda Charsky, Kyle Heuer, Matt Hoffman, April Jones, Michael Kirchhoff, Lacy Lodes, George Nadeau, Matthias Nagy, Jon Nee, Lisa Villaire, MaryCarmen Wilber