RECLAMATION OF SALINE SODIC SOILs UNDER SEMIARID ...

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purification process), and thinstillage (TS) (byproduct from alcohol distilleries). ..... compliance with these new and anticipated regulations. ...... Mining Corp., Valmy, NV 89438 , and 3corresponding author Thomas Wildeman, Dept. of Chemistry.

RECLAMATION OF SALINE SODIC SOILs UNDER SEMIARID CONDITION: COMPARATIVE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT CHEMICAL, ORGANIC AND INDUSTRIAL AMENDMENTS1 E.F. Aboukila2, P.D. Stahl, C.F. Strom, and S.J. Day Abstract: A leaching experiment was conducted with soil columns to investigate the comparative efficacy of different chemical, industrial, and organic soil amendments in calcareous saline sodic soil reclamation under semiarid condition. Soil amendments used included gypsum (G), sulfur (S), ferrous sulphate (FS), pyrite (P), and langbeinite (L) (soluble potassium-magnesium sulphate mineral). Industrial byproducts used were water treatment residuals (WTR) (by-products from the production of potable water), spent lime (SL) (byproduct from sugar purification process), and thinstillage (TS) (byproduct from alcohol distilleries). The amendments were added to calcareous saline sodic soil collected from Wamsutter, WY (CaCO3 = 4.38%, electrical conductivity (EC) = 6.6 dSm−1, exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) = 23.4%, and soil pH = 8.5). All amendments were applied alone or in a combination with compost (C). Gypsum, sulfur, ferrous sulphate, and pyrite were applied at equivalent rates of gypsum requirements for treating sodic soil. Whereas, application rates of water treatment residuals, spent lime, langbeinite and thinstillage were evaluated using a batch study experiment. Compost application rates were calculated to increase soil organic matter by 1%. In three replicates, treatments were applied to the soil, filled in soil columns, and then incubated in the field capacity moisture and a constant temperature at 25 Co for one month. After incubation period, water was continuously added to each column. Leachates were collected every 0.5 pore volume of water and up to 4 leaching events. The results demonstrated that EC, SAR, and soluble cations of leachate of the first leaching event were significantly higher than those of the subsequent leaching runs. Moreover, the concentration of removed soluble cations was lower than the control. TS, TS+C, L and L+C were the best treatments in leaching rates. Whereas the S, P, and WTR treatments were the lowest in leaching rates. Additional Key Words: Gypsum, sulfur, ferrous sulphate, pyrite, langbeinite, water treatment residuals, spent lime, thinstillage, compost. ___________________________ 1

Poster paper was presented at the 2013 National Meeting of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation, Laramie, WY Reclamation Across Industries, June 1-6, 2013. R.I. Barnhisel (Ed.) Published by ASMR, 3134 Montavesta Rd., Lexington, KY 40502. 2 E.F. Aboukila, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Natural Resources and Agricultural Engineering, College of Agriculture, Damanhour University, Damanhour, Egypt; Peter D. Stahl, Professor; Calvin F. Strom, Research Scientist; Samantha J. Day, Graduate Student; Ecosystem Science and Management Dept., University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071.

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COMPARISON OF BASAL AND AERIAL COVER FOR TOTAL VEGETATION COVER AND TOTAL GROUND COVER ON OIL AND GAS SITES IN WYOMING1 Cindy Adams2 Abstract: Oil and Gas (O&G) reclamation in the Western United States has expanded greatly with the onset of gas development in the last decade. Successful revegetation of well pads, road right-of-ways (ROWs), and pipeline ROWs is quantified based on various methodologies outlined by the specific Bureau of Land Management (BLM) office which regulates development of that site. Although specific methodology varies between BLM offices, measurement of total vegetation cover and total ground cover are two vegetation parameters generally collected as part of revegetation evaluations. Basal cover and aerial cover are two forms of cover measurement utilized in reporting total vegetation cover and total ground cover for evaluation of site stability. Basal and aerial cover data were collected using the point line intercept method at O&G sites throughout southwestern Wyoming. Three years of data were statistically analyzed to determine if there was a significant difference between aerial and basal cover for total vegetation cover and total ground cover within and between years. Results of this statistical comparison will be presented. Additional Key Words: vegetative cover, sampling, reclamation ___________________________ 1

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Oral paper was presented at the 2013 National Meeting of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation, Laramie, WY Reclamation Across Industries, June 1-6, 2013. R.I. Barnhisel (Ed.) Published by ASMR, 3134 Montavesta Rd., Lexington, KY 40502. Brenda K. Schladweiler, Owner BKS Environmental Associates, Inc., Gillette, Wyoming 82717.

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THIRD YEAR SURVIVAL AND HEIGHT GROWTH OF AMERICAN CHESTNUT ON POST-BOND RELEASE SURFACE MINES IN EASTERN KENTUCKY 1 Hannah Z. Angel2, Christopher D. Barton and Patrick N. Angel Abstract: The Forestry Reclamation Approach (FRA) has been utilized to reestablish native hardwood forests on sites impacted by surface mining in Appalachia. The American chestnut (Castanea dentata) was formerly an important hardwood species throughout the forests of eastern North America, but introduction of an exotic fungal blight (Cryphonectria parasitica) in the early 20th century decimated C. dentata populations. Surface mine spoils in the Appalachian coal region have been suggested as potential sites for the establishment of founder populations of blight-resistant chestnut hybrids which may then act as reservoirs for chestnut dispersal into surrounding forests. Three post-bond mine lands in eastern Kentucky that were reclaimed as hay land pastures were dozer ripped and planted with bareroot 15/16 backcross chestnuts. A study to examine the need for using weed mats and tree shelters on these sites was initiated due to concern of herbaceous competition and browsing from deer and elk. At each site, 25 chestnuts were planted in each of twelve plots that contained the following treatments (n=3): (1) control; (2) weed mats; (3) tree shelters; and (4) tree shelters plus weed mats. After three years, seedling survival has declined in all treatments but still significantly higher in the shelter (65%) and shelter + mat (60%) treatments than the mat (40%) and control (27%) treatments. Seedling height growth was limited between years 2 and 3 of the study (

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