SAMPLE TEST

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SAMPLE TEST. GRADE 3. 2003-2005. Word Meaning. Locating Information ..... Benchmark 1 (Grade 3) Reading/Literature. SAMPLE TEST KEY 2003-2005.

READING/LITERATURE

SAMPLE TEST

2003-2005 GRADE

3

Word Meaning Locating Information Literal Comprehension Inferential Comprehension Evaluative Comprehension Literary Forms Literary Elements

It is the policy of the State Board of Education and a priority of the Oregon Department of Education that there will be no discrimination or harassment on the grounds of race, color, sex, marital status, religion, national origin, age or handicap in any educational programs, activities, or employment. Persons having questions about equal opportunity and nondiscrimination should contact the State Superintendent of Public Instruction at the Oregon Department of Education.

Office of Assessment and Evaluation Oregon Department of Education 255 Capitol Street NE Salem, Oregon 97310-0203 (503) 378-3600

A product of the Oregon Statewide Assessment Program, Oregon Department of Education Susan Castillo, State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Cathy Brown, Specialist, Assessment and Evaluation

Bill Auty, Associate Superintendent, Assessment and Evaluation

Ken Hermens, Specialist, Assessment and Evaluation

Phyllis Rock, Director, Assessment and Evaluation

Elaine Hultengren, Specialist, Assessment and Evaluation

Steve Slater, Coordinator, Assessment and Evaluation

Leslie Phillips, Specialist, Assessment and Evaluation

Pat Almond, Specialist, Assessment and Evaluation

Sheila Somerville, Graphic Illustrator, Assessment and Evaluation

INTRODUCTION

TO

READING

AND

LITERATURE

SAMPLE TESTS The Oregon Department of Education provides sample tests to demonstrate the types of reading selections and questions students at grades 3, 5, 8 and 10 might encounter on the Oregon Statewide Assessment administered each spring. Passages on the test represent literary, informative and practical reading selections students might see both in school and other daily reading activities. These sample questions were taken from previous years’ tests. They were designed to assess students’ abilities to:

A list of test-taking strategies and tips follows this introduction. Teachers may use the tips to: generate individual and class discussion; call attention to helpful strategies students can use to prepare for and take the test; and share ideas with parents of ways to help reduce test anxiety and promote good study habits at home. In addition to gaining practice in reading and answering test questions, some students also may benefit from practice in marking bubbles on a separate answer sheet, as required on the actual test. An answer sheet for students to mark is provided at the end of each student test booklet.

understand word meanings within the context of a selection; locate information in common resources; understand information that is directly stated (literal comprehension); understand ideas which are not directly stated but are implied (inferential comprehension); analyze reading selections and form conclusions about the information (evaluative comprehension); recognize common literary forms such as novels, short stories, poetry and folk tales; and analyze the use of literary elements and devices such as plot, setting, personification and metaphor.

An answer key for each test—grades 3, 5, 8 and 10—is provided at the end of this introduction. In addition to the correct answer, the key also identifies which reporting category each question is designed to assess (word meaning, locating information, literal comprehension, inferential comprehension, evaluative comprehension, literary forms or literary elements). A table below the answer key converts the number of items correct on the sample test to a score similar to the scores students will receive on the Oregon Statewide Assessment (called a RIT score). However, this test is only a practice test. Scores on this sample test may not be substituted for the actual Oregon Statewide Assessment.

WHY PROVIDE STUDENTS WITH A SAMPLE TEST?

In using the sample test, teachers may wish to have students take the entire sample test, or complete a passage and its questions and then discuss it in class before proceeding to the next selection. Students may benefit from re-reading the passages and analyzing both the correct and incorrect answers.

Most students feel some anxiety when they approach a test. The more confident students feel about their knowledge of the topic, the less anxious they will feel. It also may help students feel less anxious if they are familiar with the types of reading selections and questions they will encounter on the test. It is important that students feel comfortable with the test format and have some test-taking strategies to help them achieve the best possible score.

Sample tests also may be shared with parents to help them understand the types of questions their child will encounter on the test and to practice with their child. Sample questions may be reprinted in newsletters or shared at community meetings to help constituents better understand the state assessment system. Although the sample tests are not as comprehensive as the actual tests, they do provide examples of the subject area content and difficulty level students will encounter as part of Oregon’s high academic standards.

HOW TO USE THE SAMPLE TEST

The Oregon Department of Education has provided sample tests periodically beginning in 1997. The latest—Sample Test 2003-2005—appears in the student test booklet here. Students my take this sample test as a practice activity to prepare for the actual test.

Office of Assessment and Evaluation Oregon Department of Education

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2003- 2005 Sample Test, Grade 3 September 2003

Test-Taking Tips

Students: Use these tips to help you prepare for the test. If you are not sure of an answer to a question try these tips:

Before the test Develop a positive attitude. Tell yourself, “I will do my best on this test.”

- Get rid of the answers that you know are not correct and choose among the rest.

Get a good night’s sleep the night before the test.

- Read through all the answers very carefully, and then go back to the question. Sometimes you can pick up clues just by thinking about the different answers you have been given to choose from.

Get up early enough to avoid hurrying to get ready for school. Eat a good breakfast (and lunch, if your test is in the afternoon).

During the test

- Go back and skim the story or article to see if you can find information to answer the question. (Sometimes a word or sentence will be underlined to help you.)

Stay calm. Listen carefully to the directions the teacher gives. Ask questions if you don’t understand what to do.

- If you get stuck on a question, skip it and come back later.

Before you read a selection on the test, preview the questions that follow it to help focus your reading.

- It is OK to guess on this test. Try to make your best guess, but make sure you answer all questions.

After reading a selection, read the entire question and all the answer choices. Stop and think of an answer. Look to see if your answer is similar to one of the choices given.

After the test Before you turn your test in, check it over. Change an answer only if you have a good reason. Generally it is better to stick with your first choice.

Read each test question carefully. Try to analyze what the question is really asking.

Make sure you have marked an answer for every question, even if you had to guess.

Slow down and check your answers. Pace yourself. If you come to a difficult passage or set of questions, it may be better to skip it and go on, then come back and really focus on the difficult section.

Make sure your answer sheet is clearly marked with dark pencil. Erase any stray marks. Don’t worry about the test once it is finished. Go on to do your best work on your other school assignments.

This is not a timed test. If you need more time to finish the test, notify your teacher.

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September 2003

Reading and Literature DIRECTIONS Read each of the passages. Then read the questions that follow and decide on the BEST answer. There are a lot of different kinds of questions, so read each question carefully before marking an answer on your answer sheet.

ALL ABOUT GLOWWORMS Read the beginning of ALL ABOUT GLOWWORMS by Gerry Sherman to find out where they live.

EVERYONE KNOWS THAT WORMS wiggle and squirm and live underground. But did you know that there are worms that glow? These are called glowworms. They are found only in the Waitomo Caves of New Zealand. Imagine yourself on a visitor’s tour of these caves. You have to ride in a boat because a river runs through the middle of the caves. Better put a sweater on because it’s chilly inside. And don’t forget to take off your sunglasses: it’s also dark. Now where would you look for the worms? In the dirt? But there isn’t anything but rock and water. On the walls? Close, keep guessing. Give up? Why, they are right over your head on the ceiling. That’s right—the glowworms make their home on the cave’s ceiling. There are so many of them that they sparkle like thousands of stars in the night sky. 1 The author holds your interest by A. B. C. D.

using rhyming words. telling jokes. involving you in the story. using a scary setting.

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2003- 2005 Sample Test, Grade 3 September 2003

Reading and Literature 2 Which words does the writer use to help you pretend you are there? A. B. C. D.

They are found only in the Waitomo Caves of New Zealand. Imagine yourself on a visitor’s tour of these caves. But there isn’t anything but rock and water. They sparkle like thousands of stars in the night sky.

3 How can you see the worms in the caves? A. B. C. D.

Visit the caves early in the morning. Use the guide’s flashlight. The worms give off light. The worms are everywhere.

4 Think of the title and what you have read. The rest of this article probably tells A. B. C. D.

an exciting adventure in the caves. more information about the glowworms. more information about stars in the night sky. how to paddle a boat.

5 Which of the following words from the story is a compound word? A. Ceiling

B. Dark

C. Underground

D. Caves

MORNING GIRL MORNING GIRL by Michael Dorris tells of a twelve-year-old Native American girl who welcomed Columbus and his crew when they first came to the New World in 1492.

I SWAM CLOSER to get a better look and had to stop myself from laughing. The strangers had wrapped every part of their bodies with colorful leaves and cotton. Some had decorated their faces with fur and wore shiny rocks on their heads. Compared to us, they were very round. Their canoe was short and square, and, in spite of all their dipping and pulling, it moved so slowly. What a backward, distant island they must have come from. But really, to laugh at guests, no Office of Assessment and Evaluation Oregon Department of Education

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2003- 2005 Sample Test, Grade 3 September 2003

Reading and Literature matter how odd, would be impolite, especially since I was the first to meet them. If I was foolish, they would think they had arrived at a foolish place. “I won’t make a mistake,” I told She Listens. “I won’t be too good, and I won’t say too much because I might choose the wrong words.” I kicked toward the canoe and called out the simplest thing. “Hello!” One of the people heard me, and he was so startled that he stood up, made his eyes small, as fearful as I had been a moment earlier. Then he spotted me, and I waved like I’ve seen adults do when visitors arrive, my fingers spread to show that my hand was empty. The man stared at me as though he’d never seen a girl before, then shouted something to his relatives. They all stopped paddling and looked in my direction. “Hello,” I tried again. “Welcome to home. My name is Morning Girl. My mother is She Wins the Race. My father is Speaks to Birds. My brother is Star Boy. We will feed you and introduce you to everyone.” All the fat people in the canoe began pointing at me and talking at once. In their excitement they almost turned themselves over, and I allowed my body to sink beneath the waves for a moment in order to hide my smile. One must always treat guests with respect, I reminded She Listens, even when they are as brainless as gulls. When I came up they were still watching, the way babies do: wide eyed and with their mouths uncovered. They had much to learn about how to behave. “Bring your canoe to the beach,” I shouted, saying each word slowly so that they might understand and calm Office of Assessment and Evaluation Oregon Department of Education

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2003- 2005 Sample Test, Grade 3 September 2003

Reading and Literature themselves. “I will go to the village and bring back Mother and Father for you to talk to.” Finally one of them spoke to me, but I couldn’t understand anything he said. Maybe he was talking Carib or some other impossible language. But I was sure that we would find ways to get along together. It never took much time, and acting out your thoughts with your hands could be funny. You had to guess at everything and you made mistakes, but by midday, I was certain we would all be seated in a circle, eating steamed fish and giving each other presents. It would be a special day, a memorable day, a day full and new. I was close enough to shore now for my feet to touch bottom, and quickly I made my way to dry land. The air was warm against my shoulders, and there was a slight breeze that disturbed the palm fronds strewn on the ground. I squeezed my hair, ran my hands over my arms and legs to push off the water, and then stamped on the sand. “Leave your canoe right here,” I suggested in my most pleasant voice. “It will not wash away, because the tide is going out. I’ll be back soon with the right people.” 6 Morning Girl describes the strangers with the canoe as “dipping and pulling.” This means that the strangers were A. B. C. D.

fighting with the Native Americans. swimming beside the canoe. paddling toward shore. using ropes to get off the rocks.

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2003- 2005 Sample Test, Grade 3 September 2003

Reading and Literature 7 Which of the following statements is an opinion, not a fact? A. B. C. D.

They wore cotton. What a backward, distant island they must have come from. “My brother is Star Boy.” I allowed my body to sink.

8 The story tells you that the breeze “disturbed the palm fronds strewn on the ground.” This means that the palm branches were A. B. C. D.

stacked neatly in piles. burning slightly. woven into mats. scattered around.

9 According to the passage, while the strangers are landing their canoe, Morning Girl wants to A. B. C. D.

show them a Native American dance. borrow their strange-looking canoe. go back to the village to get her parents. sit in a circle and eat fish with them.

10 Why does the author describe the way the strangers are dressed? A. B. C. D.

To make the reader think that they are more civilized than Morning Girl To show how odd they look to Morning Girl To make the reader admire their colorful clothing To show the reader how wealthy they are compared to Morning Girl

11 What is the most likely reason that the strangers were pointing at Morning Girl and all talking at once? A. B. C. D.

They were surprised to see Morning Girl. They were an impolite group of people. They wanted to get Morning Girl’s attention. They were laughing at Morning Girl.

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2003- 2005 Sample Test, Grade 3 September 2003

Reading and Literature SOUNDS AND MUSIC Sounds are all around us, and they are very important to us. Some sounds are pleasant and some can be harmful. Here is a glossary from a book called SOUNDS AND MUSIC. Use the glossary to answer these questions about words related to sound. GLOSSARY Absorb to soak up the sound. Some of the best absorbing materials are those with rough surfaces or those with holes Amplifier something which makes sounds louder Bagpipes a musical instrument that is pumped with air supplied from an animal bladder Beat a sound made regularly. The beat helps maintain the rhythm and keeps the musical time Bow an instrument used for making strings vibrate. Bows only work if they are coated with rosin and make rapid scraping movements Brass musical instruments played by the mouth using the lips as a reed Bugle a kind of simple horn designed for playing military tunes Chord the effect you get when you play three or more notes at the same time Decibel a unit that gives a measure of the loudness of a sound Drum a sound box with a skin stretched across it. It is hit with the hand or sticks Eardrum the flap of skin in the ear that acts as a sounding board for vibrations in the air Ear Muffs special “headphones” that have sound deadening material inside each ear cup

12 Which sentence below is true about the way that this glossary is organized? A. B. C. D.

It is organized by alphabetical order. It is organized by which page number is first. It is organized by how important the words are. It is organized in a way the author liked.

13 According to this glossary, what does the word beat mean? A. It means to whip eggs. B. It means to hit someone.

C. It means a sound made regularly. D. It means a group of people.

14 Which of these words is a unit that measures sound? A. An amplifier B. A chord C. A decibel Office of Assessment and Evaluation Oregon Department of Education

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D. An eardrum 2003- 2005 Sample Test, Grade 3 September 2003

Reading and Literature THE THINGS WINGS DO Did you think that insects only use their wings to fly? Read this article by Keith Waddington to find out some interesting facts about other ways wings can be useful.

INSECT WINGS have many different shapes and colors. They also have different uses. Most insects have two pairs of wings, with one pair behind the other. These wings are used for flying, of course. But wings can help an insect in other ways, too. FLYING

How fast can an insect fly? That depends on the size and speed of the wings. Houseflies can go fast because they have small wings that flap quickly. The same is true for honeybees. A honeybee can flap its small wings 225 times each second, and it can fly fourteen miles an hour. That’s fast for an insect. But butterflies drift from flower to flower. They flap their broad wings slowly. Sometimes they glide without flapping at all. These big wings could break if the butterfly flapped as hard as a bee does. HARD COVERINGS

Wings are not just for flying. In fact, a beetle’s front wings are not for flying at all. These two wings are hard. When the beetle rests or walks, they cover its soft body like two pieces of nutshell. These wings help protect the beetle from being eaten by birds. When the beetle flies, it holds its front wings out to the sides. With these hard wings out of the way, the beetle can fly with its small back wings.

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Reading and Literature COLORS FOR HIDING

Some wings have colors and patterns that make the insect hard to see. These wings look like the places where the insect rests. When the creature holds still, it doesn’t look like an insect. It looks like a leaf or stone or piece of bark. The colors help the insect hide from animals that might eat it. This kind of coloring is called camouflage. Grasshoppers have camouflage. When they sit on plants, their wings look like the leaves around them. Some moths have wings with camouflage that looks like tree bark. They can rest on trees without being found. BRIGHT COLORS

Some insects don’t hide at all. Instead, their wings have bright colors that can be seen from far away. Scientists say these wings have warning colors because the colors warn birds that the insects are not good to eat. The wings of the monarch butterfly have warning colors of bright orange with black. A bird might eat one of these butterflies. But after the bad taste of that meal, the colors warn the bird not to eat another one. Most people think wings are just for flying. I tell them about these amazing uses. 15 Where would you most likely find this article? A. B. C. D.

In a magazine about science In a book of short stories In a book of fairy tales In a book of poems about animals

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2003- 2005 Sample Test, Grade 3 September 2003

Reading and Literature 16 What is the main use for a beetle’s front wings? A. B. C. D.

They help the beetle to fly. They protect the beetle from birds. They make the beetle hard to see. Their color warns birds to stay away.

17 Which of the following sentences is an opinion, not a fact? A. B. C. D.

Most people think wings are just for flying. When the beetle flies, it holds its front wings out to the side. Insect wings have many different shapes and colors. The colors help the insect hide from animals that might eat it.

18 Based on what you have read, which of the following insects do you think would fly the fastest? A. B. C. D.

Grasshoppers Moths Butterflies Honeybees

19 Warning colors protect some insects by A. B. C. D.

showing birds the insects are not good to eat. showing birds the insects are beautiful. making the insects look like a stone or piece of bark. making the insects give off a bad smell.

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2003- 2005 Sample Test, Grade 3 September 2003

Reading and Literature ELLA’S FRIENDS This is a story about Ella, an elephant who is always kind and helpful to the other animals. Read what happens when Ella becomes sick.

ELLA, AN ELEPHANT, walked through the grass while two egrets, which are white birds, sat on her back. As she walked through the grass, she stirred up bugs which the egrets ate. The egrets loved Ella, and so did all the other animals. Ella was good and kind and helpful. When danger was near, Ella would use her long trunk like a trumpet to warn the rest of the animals. And even though her own young elephants were grown, Ella still took her turn looking after a group of young elephants. One day, as Ella walked through the tall grass with the egrets on her back, the egrets noticed that Ella walked slower and breathed harder than usual. “What’s wrong, Ella?” they asked. “You act as if you do not feel well.” “I’m tired,” said Ella. “I’m just very, very tired.” “You worked too hard yesterday moving all those dead tree stumps with your long tusks,” the egrets said. “You should go home and rest.” “Maybe you are right,” Ella said. So the egrets flew off and Ella went to lie under a tree. When Ella awoke, she felt worse than before she lay down. She was so weak she could not get up. The egrets saw her. One flew to her while the other flew to get help. “Ella!” the first egret yelled. “Just lie down. My friend has gone to get help.” “Oh,” Ella said, “I hate to be such trouble.” The first egret flew down by Ella’s head and stroked it with his wing. “You are no trouble, Ella,” he said. “You are no trouble at all.”

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2003- 2005 Sample Test, Grade 3 September 2003

Reading and Literature Soon the second egret came with many of the other animals. “Oh, Ella!” the other animals said. “What can we do to help you?” Before Ella could say anything, one of the elephants took charge. She sent the young elephants to get water for Ella. She told the egrets to fetch a special plant to help Ella feel better. The rest of the elephants stood around Ella. Many of them wrapped trunks with Ella, which is the way elephants hug. Ella ate the plant the egrets brought and drank the water from the young elephants. She slept the rest of the afternoon and all that night while the animals watched over her. The next morning, when Ella awoke, she got to her feet. The elephants cleared the way. The egrets flew around Ella while she walked. “Ella! Ella! Are you okay?” the egrets asked. “Oh, I will be fine,” Ella said, “as long as I know I can always count on my friends.”

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2003- 2005 Sample Test, Grade 3 September 2003

Reading and Literature 20 What is an egret? A. B. C. D.

A bug A bird A plant An elephant

21 The special plant in the story is MOST like A. B. C. D.

a bed. a trumpet. some feathers. some medicine.

22 At the end of the story the animals are happy because A. B. C. D.

Ella feels better. Ella goes to sleep. Ella is moving trees. Ella is eating insects.

23 The setting for this story is in A. B. C. D.

a zoo. a river. a jungle. a house.

24 What kind of story is this most like? A. B. C. D.

A fable A poem A history story A mystery story

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2003- 2005 Sample Test, Grade 3 September 2003

Benchmark 1 (Grade 3) Reading/Literature SAMPLE TEST KEY 2003-2005 Item 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Key C B C B C C B D C B A A C C A B A D A B D A C A

Score Reporting Category Literary Elements Literary Elements Inferential Comprehension Inferential Comprehension Word Meaning Word Meaning Evaluative Comprehension Word Meaning Literal Comprehension Evaluative Comprehension Evaluative Comprehension Locating Information Locating Information Locating Information Literary Forms Literal Comprehension Evaluative Comprehension Inferential Comprehension Literal Comprehension Literal Comprehension Inferential Comprehension Evaluative Comprehension Literary Elements Literary Forms

CONVERTING TO A RIT SCORE Number correct

RIT Score

Number Correct

1 166.1 2 173.9 3 178.8 4 182.6 5 185.6 6 188.3 7 190.7 8 193.0 9 195.1 10 197.1 11 199.0 12 201.0* *Likely to meet Benchmark 1 standards

RIT Score

13 202.9 14 204.8 15 206.8 16 208.9 17 211.1 18 213.4 19 216.0** 20 219.0 21 222.7 22 227.5 23 235.1 24 242.4 **Likely to exceed Benchmark 1 standards

Students who get 7 or fewer items are likely to take Form A Students who get 19 or more items correct are likely to take Form C

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Oregon Department of Education 255 Capitol St NE, Salem, Oregon 97310 (503) 378-3600