South East Asia

32 downloads 6 Views 2MB Size Report
Agathis borneensis Warb. ................................................................................................... ............... 17. 5. Agathis dammara (Lamb.) ... Agathis endertii Meijer Drees .

Strategies for the sustainable use and  management of timber tree species subject  to international trade:  South East Asia 

2007  Compiled by UNEP­WCMC

Prepared and produced by: UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre, Cambridge,  UK  About UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre  www.unep­wcmc.org  The  UNEP  World  Conservation  Monitoring  Centre  is  the  biodiversity  assessment  and  policy implementation arm of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the  world’s foremost intergovernmental environmental organisation. UNEP­WCMC aims to  help decision­makers recognize the  value of  biodiversity to people  everywhere,  and to  apply this knowledge to all that they do. The Centre’s challenge is to transform complex  data  into  policy­relevant  information,  to  build  tools  and  systems  for  analysis  and  integration, and to support the needs of nations and the international community as they  engage in joint programmes of action.  UNEP­WCMC provides objective, scientifically  rigorous products and services that  include  ecosystem  assessments,  support  for  implementation  of  environmental  agreements,  regional  and  global  biodiversity  information,  research  on  threats  and  impacts, and development of future scenarios for the living world. 

© Copyright: UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre, 2007 

The  designations  of  geographical  entities  in  this  report  and  the  presentation  of  the  material, do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of UNEP­  WCMC  concerning  the  legal  status  of  any  country,  territory,  or  area,  or  of  its  authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.  Cover photo: Ulu Sg. Palutan, Sarawak ©Saw Leng Guan

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

Table of contents  ACKNOWLEDGEMENT.................................................................................................................... 4  SUMMARY ............................................................................................................................................ 4  INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................. 5  METHODOLOGY................................................................................................................................ 5  SUMMARY OF SELECTED SOUTH EAST ASIA TIMBER TREE SPECIES..................... 6  SPECIES PROFILES .................................................................................................................................... 13  1. Acer laurinum Hassk. ........................................................................................................................ 14  2. Afzelia rhomboidea (Blanco) S. Vidal................................................................................................ 15  3. Afzelia xylocarpa (Kurz) Craib .......................................................................................................... 16  4. Agathis borneensis Warb. .................................................................................................................. 17  5. Agathis dammara (Lamb.) Rich. & A. Rich........................................................................................ 19  6. Agathis endertii Meijer Drees ............................................................................................................ 20  7. Aglaia perviridis Hiern. ..................................................................................................................... 21  8. Aglaia silvestris (M. Roemer) Merr.................................................................................................... 22  9. Ailanthus integrifolia Lamk ............................................................................................................... 23  10. Albizia splendens Miq. .................................................................................................................... 25  11. Alloxylon brachycarpum ( Sleumer ) P.H.Weston & Crisp ............................................................... 25  12. Alstonia pneumatophora Backer ex L.G. Den Berger........................................................................ 26  13. Anisoptera costata Korth.................................................................................................................. 27  14. Araucaria cunninghamii Aiton ex D. Don......................................................................................... 29  15. Calophyllum canum Hook. f. ........................................................................................................... 31  16. Calophyllum carrii P.F. Stevens var. longigemmatum P.F. Stevens................................................... 32  17. Calophyllum euryphyllum Lauterb................................................................................................... 33  18. Calophyllum inophyllum L. ............................................................................................................. 34  19. Calophyllum insularum P.F. Stevens................................................................................................ 36  20. Calophyllum papuanum Lauterb. ..................................................................................................... 37  21. Canarium luzonicum Miq................................................................................................................. 38  22. Canarium pseudosumatranum Leenh................................................................................................ 39  23. Cantleya corniculata (Becc.) R.A. Howard ....................................................................................... 40  24. Cephalotaxus oliveri Masters ........................................................................................................... 41  25. Cinnamomum porrectum (Roxb.) Kosterm....................................................................................... 42  26. Cynometra elmeri Merr.................................................................................................................... 43  27. Cynometra inaequifolia A. Gray....................................................................................................... 44  28. Cynometra malaccensis Knaap v. Meeuwen ..................................................................................... 45  29. Dactylocladus stenostachys Oliv. ..................................................................................................... 46  30. Dalbergia annamensis A. Chev......................................................................................................... 47  31. Dalbergia bariensis Pierre ................................................................................................................ 48  32. Dalbergia cambodiana Pierre ........................................................................................................... 49  33. Dalbergia cochinchinensis Pierre...................................................................................................... 50  34. Dalbergia mammosa Pierre .............................................................................................................. 51  35. Dalbergia oliveri Gamble ex Prain ................................................................................................... 52  36. Dalbergia tonkinensis Prain.............................................................................................................. 53  37. Dehaasia caesia Blume .................................................................................................................... 54  38. Dehaasia cuneata Blume .................................................................................................................. 55

Page 1 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

39. Dialium cochinchinense Pierre......................................................................................................... 56  40. Diospyros blancoi A.DC. ................................................................................................................. 57  41. Diospyros ferrea .............................................................................................................................. 58  42. Diospyros mun A.Chev.................................................................................................................... 59  43. Diospyros philippinensis A.DC. ....................................................................................................... 60  44. Diospyros pilosanthera Blanco......................................................................................................... 60  45. Diospyros rumphii Bakh. ................................................................................................................. 62  46. Durio dulcis Becc. ........................................................................................................................... 62  47. Durio kutejensis Becc. ..................................................................................................................... 64  48. Dyera costulata Hook.f. ................................................................................................................... 65  49. Dyera polyphylla (Miq.) Steenis....................................................................................................... 67  50. Erythrophleum fordii Oliver............................................................................................................. 68  51. Eusideroxylon zwageri Teijsm. & Binn. ........................................................................................... 69  52. Fagus longipetiolata Seemen............................................................................................................ 71  53. Gmelina arborea Roxb. .................................................................................................................... 72  54. Homalium foetidum (Roxb.) Benth. ................................................................................................. 74  55. Hydnocarpus sumatrana (Miq.) Koord.............................................................................................. 75  56. Intsia bijuga (Colebr.) Kuntze .......................................................................................................... 76  57. Jackiopsis ornata (Wall.) Ridsdale.................................................................................................... 79  58. Kalappia celebica Kosterm............................................................................................................... 80  59. Kjellbergiodendron celebicum (Koord.) Merr................................................................................... 81  60. Kokoona leucoclada Kochummen .................................................................................................... 81  61. Koompassia excelsa (Becc.) Taub. ................................................................................................... 82  62. Koompassia grandiflora Kosterm. .................................................................................................... 83  63. Koompassia malaccensis Benth........................................................................................................ 84  64. Lophopetalum javanicum (Zoll.) Turcz. ........................................................................................... 86  65. Lophopetalum multinervium Ridley................................................................................................. 87  66. Lophopetalum pachyphyllum King .................................................................................................. 88  67. Lophopetalum rigidum Ridley.......................................................................................................... 89  68. Madhuca betis (Blanco) J.F. Macbr. ................................................................................................. 90  69. Madhuca boerlageana (Burck) Baehni.............................................................................................. 90  70. Madhuca pasquieri H.J.Lam............................................................................................................. 91  71. Mangifera decandra Ding Hou ......................................................................................................... 92  72. Mangifera macrocarpa Blume .......................................................................................................... 93  73. Manilkara kanosiensis H.J.Lam & Meeuse ....................................................................................... 94  74. Merrillia caloxylon Swingle............................................................................................................. 95  75. Neesia altissima Blume.................................................................................................................... 96  76. Neesia malayana Bakh..................................................................................................................... 97  77. Neobalanocarpus heimii Ashton....................................................................................................... 98  78. Ochanostachys amentacea Mast. ...................................................................................................... 99  79. Octomeles sumatrana Miq.............................................................................................................. 101  80. Palaquium bataanense Merr. .......................................................................................................... 102  81. Palaquium impressinervium Ng ..................................................................................................... 102  82. Palaquium maingayi (C.B. Clarke) King & Gamble........................................................................ 103  83. Parinari costata (Korth.) Blume...................................................................................................... 104  84. Parinari oblongifolia Hook.f........................................................................................................... 105  85. Pericopsis mooniana Twaites ......................................................................................................... 107  86. Phoebe elliptica Blume .................................................................................................................. 108  87. Pinus merkusii Jungh & de Vriese.................................................................................................. 109  88. Planchonia valida Blume................................................................................................................ 110  89. Podocarpus neriifolius D.Don ........................................................................................................ 111  90. Pterocarpus macrocarpus Kurz....................................................................................................... 113  91. Pterocarpus santalinus.................................................................................................................... 114  92. Pterocymbium beccarii K. Schumann............................................................................................. 115  93. Pterocymbium tinctorium (Blanco) Merr........................................................................................ 116

Page 2 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

94. Pterocymbium tubulatum (Masters) Pierre...................................................................................... 118  95. Santiria laevigata Blume ................................................................................................................ 118  96. Scaphium longiflorum Ridley ........................................................................................................ 119  97. Shorea albida Sym. ........................................................................................................................ 120  98. Shorea curtisii Dyer ex King .......................................................................................................... 121  99. Shorea negrosensis Foxw. .............................................................................................................. 123  100. Shorea rugosa Heim..................................................................................................................... 124  101. Sindora beccariana de Wit............................................................................................................ 125  102. Sindora inermis Merr. .................................................................................................................. 126  103. Sindora supa Merr........................................................................................................................ 127  104. Strombosia javanica Blume.......................................................................................................... 128  105. Syzygium flosculiferum (M.R. Hend.) Sreek ................................................................................ 129  106. Syzygium koordersianum (King) I.M. Turner............................................................................... 130  107. Syzygium ridleyi (King) Chantar & J. Parn. ................................................................................. 130  108. Tectona grandis L. ....................................................................................................................... 131  109. Tectona hamiltoniana Wall........................................................................................................... 136  110. Tectona philippinensis Benth. & Hook.f. ...................................................................................... 137  111. Toona calantas Merr. & Rolfe ...................................................................................................... 137  112. Triomma malaccensis Hook. F. .................................................................................................... 138  113. Vavaea amicorum Benth. ............................................................................................................. 139  114. Vitex parviflora A.L. Juss. ........................................................................................................... 141  115. Wallaceodendron celebicum Koord.............................................................................................. 142  116. Xylia xylocarpa (Roxb.) Taubert .................................................................................................. 142  APPENDIX ............................................................................................................................................... 145  Appendix 1: Species excluded from the list.......................................................................................... 145  Appendix 2: Trade of teak (Tectonia grandis) from 1996­2003............................................................. 146

Page 3 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

Acknowledgement  This  document  is  based  on  a  previous  desk  study  Contribution  to  an  evaluation  of  tree  species  using  the  new  CITES  listing  criteria,  compiled  by  UNEP­WCMC  in  1998  with  funding from the government of the Netherlands. This study reviewed the conservation and  trade status of tree species in the Americas, Afria and Asia.  A history of subsequent activites implemented in relation to this study are provided on the  CITES website in PC16 Doc. 19.2 http://www.cites.org/eng/com/PC/16/E­PC16­19­02.pdf.  These activities were funded by the governments of the Netherlands and the UK.  The work presented here, updating and enhancing information on trees of South East Asia,  was made possible during the time when the principle researcher, Soh Wuu Kuang, was a  UNEP­WCMC  Chevening  Scholar  in  Biodiversity  2005/2006.  Thanks  are  due  to  Harriet  Gillett, Sarah Ferriss and Gerardo Fragoso for their guidance, supervision and support that  lead to the production of this document.

Summary  Species profiles of 116 timber tree species in South East Asia have been prepared as material  for  a  workshop,  to  be  held  in  South  East  Asia  in  September  2007,  on  strategies  for  the  sustainable use of tree species in international trade.  The  document  Tree  species  evalution  using  the  new  CITES  listing  criteria  prepared  by  UNEP­WCMC in 1998 was used as guidance for the species selection. Eight species were  excluded from the current list and an additional seven species are included.  Of the current 116 species: ·  72 are known to be traded internationally ·  10 species are suspected to be traded internationally ·  7 species are traded domestically, ·  1 species is thought not to be in trade and ·  26  species  are  without  sufficient  trade  information  to  be  assigned  to  one  of  the  categories above.  The selected species fall into various IUCN conservation categories: 3 critically endangered,  15  endangered,  33  vulnerable,  19  at  lower  risk  and  17  data  deficient.  Twenty­six  species  have  not  been  evaluated  for  conservation  status.  Other  conservation  categories  were  also  noted. None of the selected species are listed in the Appendices to CITES, however at least  24 species are thought to meet the CITES listing criteria.

Page 4 of 150

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

Introduction  Biodiversity  is  the  crux  to  the  survival  of  humanity.  Forest  resources  are  widely  used  throughout the world for a host of reasons and trees may be specifically exploited, due to the  particular properties of their timber, fruit or sap. An internationally important timber species  may also be important locally for its medicinal and cultural value. This can result in heavy  pressure  for  use  at  the  local  and  international  scale.  If  international  demand  leads  to  the  decline of a species in its natural habitat, the poorest of the poor may therefore suffer directly  from  the  loss,  in  addition  to  the  general  impoverishment  of  the  environment.  Efforts  to  ensure  the  sustainable  use  of  forests  have,  however,  generally  considered  the  impact  of  habitat destruction, rather than species targeted for specific exploitation.  In  response  to  the  call  for  integrated  international  action,  to  address  the  illegal  and  unsustainable international trade in timber trees, a series of regional stakeholder workshops  are being implemented. to identify species threatened by international trade and the areas in  which  they  grow  and  to  agree  management  actions  to  ensure  the  sustainable  use  of  these  species. These actions may include CITES listing or identification of critical areas needing  protection.  The  first  workshop,  for  Mesoamerica  was  held  in  2005,  funded  by  the  governments  of  the  Netherlands  and  the  United  Kingdom.  Foresters  and  botanists  from  governmental  and  non­governmental  organisations  throughout  the  region  were  invited  to  participate.  The  same  concept  is  now  being  applied  in  South  East  Asia.  The  material  presented  here  will  be  used  for the  sakeholder  workshop to  be  held  in  Kuala  Lumpur  5­7  September 2007.

Methodology  A  list and species profiles of selected timber tree species  in South East Asian region were  extracted from CITES document on the Tree species evalution using the new CITES listing  criteria. Initially a total of 117 species from South East Asia were extracted. Eight of these  species (see Appendix 1) were excluded as they have recently been discussed during CITES  meetings. Seven new additional species were later added to the list:  1.  2.  3.  4. 

Afzelia xylocarpa  Anisoptera costata  Dactylocladus stenostachys  Shorea albida 

5.  Shorea negrosensis  6.  Shorea rugosa  7.  Xylia xylocarpa. 

The  decision  to  include  these  species  was  made  based  on  available  information  on  trade,  conservation status, distribution and ecology of the species.  The existing species profiles were updated based on recently available information, mainly  from  published  literature,  internet  resource,  and  on­line  species  (e.g.  GBIF,  ILDIS,  IUCN  Red  List  and  Kew  databases)  and  trade  databases  (e.g.  ITTO).  Due  to  constraints  in  availability  of  resources,  we  recognise  that  the  information  presented  here  is  by  no  mean  exhaustive. Though the information is preliminary, it is a crucial document for a stakeholder  consultation workshop to be held in South East Asia. It is hoped that during the stakeholder  workshop, expert opinion on the species will be made available to fill in the gaps.

Page 5 of 150

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

Summary of selected South East Asia timber tree species Meet  criteria  1  Conservation status  for  CITES 

Species 

Family 



Acer laurinum 

Aceraceae 



Afzelia rhomboidea 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 



Afzelia xylocarpa 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 



Agathis borneensis 

Araucariaceae 



Agathis dammara 

Araucariaceae 

VU A1cd 

√ 



Agathis endertii 

Araucariaceae 

LR/nt 

√ 



Aglaia perviridis 

Meliaceae 

VU A1c 



Aglaia silvestris 

Meliaceae 

LR/nt 



Ailanthus integrifolia 

Simaroubaceae 

LR/lc 

10 

Albizia splendens 

Leguminosae  (Mimosaceae) 

NE 

11 

Alloxylon brachycarpum 

Proteaceae 

12 

Alstonia pneumatophora 

Apocynaceae 

LR/lc 

13 

Anisoptera costata 

Dipterocarpaceae 

EN A1cd+2cd 

14 

Araucaria cunninghamii 

Araucariaceae 

Not threatened 

15 

Calophyllum canum 

Guttiferae 

NE 

16 

Calophyllum carrii  var. longigemmatum 

Guttiferae 

VU B1+2abcde 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

17 

Calophyllum euryphyllum 

Guttiferae 

LR/lc 

√ 

Traded, probably  internationally. 

1  ‡ 

II Bi 

Brunei 

II Bi 

Indonesia 

Laos 

Malaysia 

Myanmar 

Philippines 

√ 

√ 

DD 

√ 

√ 

VU A1cd 

√ 

√ 

EN A1cd 

II Bi 

Cambodia 

√ 

VU A1cd 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Singapore 

√ 

EN A2cd 

Vietnam 

Notes 

√ 

√ 

Unlikely to be in trade. 

√ 

Traded domestically. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Traded, probably  internationally. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Insuffiicient information on  trade. 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

‡ 

√ 

√ 

New additional species.  Traded internationally.  Traded internationally.  Current assigned  conservation status applied  to de Laubenfels (1988)  species concept, where A.  dammara and A. borneensis  are treated as same species. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Thailand 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

New additional species.  Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

Unless stated all conservation status shown are IUCN conservation categories (ver. 2.3, 1994)  Farjon, A. 1998. World Checklist and Bibliography of Conifers. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. 298 pp.

Page 6 of 150

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

Species 

Family 

18 

Calophyllum inophyllum 

Guttiferae 

19 

Calophyllum insularum 

Guttiferae 

20 

Calophyllum papuanum 

21 

Canarium luzonicum 

Meet  criteria  1  Conservation status  for  CITES  LR/lc 

Brunei 

Cambodia 

Indonesia 

Laos 

Malaysia 

Myanmar 

Philippines 

Singapore 

Thailand 

Vietnam 

Notes 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ (R ­ Rare)* 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

EN B1+2c 

√ 

Traded, probably  internationally. 

Guttiferae 

LR/lc 

√ 

Traded, probably  internationally. 

Burseraceae 

VU A1cd 

22  Canarium pseudosumatranum 

Burseraceae 

LRcd 

√ 

√ 

23 

Cantleya corniculatum 

Icacinaceae 

VU A1c,d 

√ 

√ 

24 

Cephalotaxus oliveri 

Cephalotaxaceae 

VU A1d 

25 

Cinnamomum porrectum 

Lauraceae 

DD 

√ 

26 

Cynometra elmeri 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 

VU A1d 

√ 

27 

Cynometra inaequifolia 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 

VU A1d 

28 

Cynometra malaccensis 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 

VU A1d 

29 

Dactylocladus stenostachys 

Crypteroniaceae 

NE 

30 

Dalbergia annamensis 

Leguminosae  (Papilionaceae) 

II Bi 

EN A1cd 

31 

Dalbergia bariensis 

Leguminosae  (Papilionaceae) 

II Bi 

EN A1cd 

√ 

32 

Dalbergia cambodiana 

Leguminosae  (Papilionaceae) 

II Bi 

EN A1cd 

√ 

33 

Dalbergia cochinchinensis 

Leguminosae  (Papilionaceae) 

II Bi 

VU A1cd 

√ 

34 

Dalbergia mammosa 

Leguminosae  (Papilionaceae) 

II Bi 

EN A1cd 

*  # 

II Bi 

II Bi 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ (Endangered) 

Traded, probably  internationally. 

√ 

√  (K ­  insufficiently  #  known) 

Traded internationally. 



Traded internationally. This  assessement refers to three  Cynometra species (currently  recognised as C. elmeri  Merr., C. inaequifolia A. Gray  and C. malaccensis Knaap v.  Meeuwen). 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

New additional species.  Traded internationally. 

√  # 

√ (Endangered) 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ (V ­  #  Vulnerable) 

Traded, probably  internationally. 

√ 

Insufficient information trade  and biology. 

√ (V ­  #  Vulnerable) 

Traded, probably  internationally. More  information needed. 

√ (V ­ Vulnerable) 

Traded, probably  internationally.



Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society. 343 pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.

Page 7 of 150 

Traded internationally.  Species with taxonomic  uncertainties. 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

Meet  criteria  1  Conservation status  for  CITES 

Species 

Family 

35 

Dalbergia oliveri 

Leguminosae  (Papilionaceae) 

II Bi 

EN A1cd 

36 

Dalbergia tonkinensis 

Leguminosae  (Papilionaceae) 

II Bi 

VU A1cd 

37 

Dehaasia caesia 

Lauraceae 

LR/nt 

38 

Dehaasia cuneata 

Lauraceae 

NE 

39 

Dialium cochinchinense 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 

LR/nt 

40 

Diospyros blancoi 

Ebenaceae 

VU A1cd 

41 

Diospyros ferrea 

Ebenaceae 

­ 

NE 

42 

Diospyros mun 

Ebenaceae 

II Bi 

CR A1cd 

43 

Diospyros philippinensis 

Ebenaceae 

?II 

EN A1c, B1 + 2abc 

44 

Diospyros pilosanthera 

Ebenaceae 

NE 

45 

Diospyros rumphii 

Ebenaceae 

DD 

√ 

46 

Durio dulcis 

Bombacaceae 

VU A1c 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

47 

Durio kutejensis 

Bombacaceae 

NE 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

48 

Dyera costulata 

Apocynaceae 

LR­lc 

√ 

√ 

√ 

49 

Dyera polyphylla 

Apocynaceae 

II Bi 

EN A1cd 

√ 

√ 

√ 

50 

Erythrophleum fordii 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 

?II Bi 

EN A1cd 

51 

Eusideroxylon zwageri 

Lauraceae 

II Bi 

VU A1cd & 2cd 



Brunei 

Cambodia 

√ 

√ 

Indonesia 

Laos 

Malaysia 

Myanmar 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Philippines 

Singapore 

Thailand 

Vietnam 

Notes 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ (V ­  #  Vulnerable) 

Traded, probablly  internationally. More  information needed.  Insufficient information on  trade and biology.  Insufficient information on  trade and biology. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√  (K ­  insufficiently  #  known) 

Insufficient information on  trade. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Excluded: very  widespread  and taxonomic problem,  difficult to assign  conservation categories 

√  √ (V ­  #  Vulnerable) 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

Traded internationally. 

Traded internationally.  * 

√ (R ­ Rare) 

√ 

√ 

Insufficient information on  trade.  Traded internationally. 



√ (R ­ Rare) 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society. 343 pp.

Page 8 of 150 

√ 

Insufficient information trade. 

Traded internationally. 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

Meet  criteria  1  Conservation status  for  CITES 

Species 

Family 

52 

Fagus longipetiolata 

Fagaceae 

VU A1cd 

53 

Gmelina arborea 

Verbenaceae 

NE 

54 

Homalium foetidum 

Flacourtiaceae 

LR/lc 

55 

Hydnocarpus sumatrana 

Flacourtiaceae 

DD 

56 

Intsia bijuga 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 

VU A1cd 

57 

Jackiopsis ornata 

Rubiaceae 

58 

Kalappia celebica 

59  Kjellbergiodendron celebicum 

Brunei 

Cambodia 

Indonesia 

Laos 

Malaysia 

Myanmar 

Philippines 

Singapore 

Thailand 

Vietnam 

Notes 



Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

NE 

√ 

√ 

VU D1+2c 

√ 

Traded domestically. 

Myrtaceae 

NE 

√ 

Insufficient information on  trade and biology. 

60 

Kokoona leucoclada 

Celastraceae 

VU D2 

61 

Koompassia excelsa 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 

LR/cd 

62 

Koompassia grandiflora 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 

63 

Koompassia malaccensis 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 

LR/cd 

64 

Lophopetalum javanicum 

Celastraceae 

65 

Lophopetalum multinervium 

66 

II Bi 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Insufficient information trade. 

√ 

Leguminosae  ?I B/ II Bi  (Caesalpiniaceae) 

√ 

√ (R ­ Rare) 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√  * 

√ (R – Rare) 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 



Traded domestically. 

√ (R ­ Rare) 

Traded domestically,  not of  commercial importance. 

√ 

√ 

VU A1cd+2cd 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

Traded internationally.  √ (V ­  *  Vulnerable) 

√ 

√ 

NE 

√ 

√ 

Celastraceae 

NE 

√ 

√ 

Lophopetalum pachyphyllum 

Celastraceae 

NE 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

67 

Lophopetalum rigidum 

Celastraceae 

NE 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

68 

Madhuca betis 

Sapotaceae 

VU A1cd 

√ 

69 

Madhuca boerlageana 

Sapotaceae 

NE 

√ 

70 

Madhuca pasquieri 

Sapotaceae 

#  * 

?II Bi 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ (V ­  *  Vulnerable) 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

Traded domestically.  Insufficient information on  trade.  √ (K ­  insufficiently  #  known) 

VU A1cd 

Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society. 343 pp.

Page 9 of 150 

Insufficient information on  trade. 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

Meet  criteria  1  Conservation status  for  CITES 

Species 

Family 

71 

Mangifera decandra 

Anacardiaceae 

LR 

72 

Mangifera macrocarpa 

Anacardiaceae 

VU A1c 

73 

Manilkara kanosiensis 

Sapotaceae 

74 

Merrillia caloxylon 

75 

Brunei 

Cambodia 

√ 

√ 

Indonesia 

Laos 

Malaysia 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Myanmar 

Philippines 

Singapore 

Thailand 

Vietnam 

Notes 

Traded internationally.  √ (V ­  *  Vulnerable) 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

EN A1cd+2cd, C2a 

√ 

Rutaceae 

VU B1+2c 

√ 

√ 

Neesia altissima 

Bombacaceae 

NE 

√ 

√ 

√ (V ­  *  Vulnerable) 

Traded internationally. 

76 

Neesia malayana 

Bombacaceae 

NE 

√ 

√ 

√ (En ­  *  Endangered) 

Traded internationally. 

77 

Neobalanocarpus heimii 

Dipterocarpaceae 

78 

Ochanostachys amentacea 

Olacaceae 

DD 

√ 

√ 

79 

Octomeles sumatrana 

Datiscaceae 

NE 

√ 

√ 

80 

Palaquium bataanense 

Sapotaceae 

VU A1d 

81 

Palaquium impressinervium 

Sapotaceae 

NE 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

82 

Palaquium maingayi 

Sapotaceae 

VU B1+2a 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

83 

Parinari costata 

Chrysobalanaceae 

DD 

√ 

√ 

√ 

84 

Parinari oblongifolia 

Chrysobalanaceae 

DD 

√ 

√ 

√ 

85 

Pericopsis mooniana 

Leguminosae  (Papilionaceae) 

VU A1cd 

√ 

√ 

86 

Phoebe elliptica 

Lauraceae 

NE 

√ 

√ 

87 

Pinus merkusii 

Pinaceae 

VU B1+2ce 

88 

Planchonia valida 

Lecythidaceae 

NE 

#  * 

II Bi 

?II Bi 

II Bi + ii 

Traded internationally. 

VU A1cd 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society. 343 pp.

Page 10 of 150 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 



Traded internationally. 



Traded internationally. 

√ (R ­ Rare) 

√ (R ­ Rare)  √ 

Traded internationally.  Insufficient information on  trade and biology. 

√ 

√ 

Traded domestically. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

Insufficient information trade. 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

Meet  criteria  1  Conservation status  for  CITES 

Species 

Family 

89 

Podocarpus neriifolius 

Podocarpaceae 

90 

Pterocarpus macrocarpus 

Leguminosae  (Papilionaceae) 

91 

Pterocarpus indicus 

Leguminosae  (Papilionaceae) 

92 

Pterocymbium beccarii 

Sterculiaceae 

DD 

93 

Pterocymbium tinctorium 

Sterculiaceae 

DD 

94 

Pterocymbium tubulatum 

Sterculiaceae 

NE 

√ 

√ 

95 

Santiria laevigata 

Burseraceae 

LR/lc 

√ 

√ 

96 

Scaphium longiflorum 

Sterculiaceae 

VU B1+2c 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

97 

Shorea albida 

Dipterocarpaceae 

EN A1cd+2cd/  †  Critically endangered 

√ 

√ 

√ 

New additional species.  Traded internationally. 

98 

Shorea curtisii 

Dipterocarpaceae 

LR/lc 

√ 

√ 

√ 

99 

Shorea negrosensis 

Dipterocarpaceae 

CR A1cd 

100 

Shorea rugosa 

Dipterocarpaceae 

CR A1cd, C2a/  †  Endangered 

√ 

√ 

√ 

New additional species.  Traded internationally. 

101 

Sindora beccariana 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 

DD 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Insufficient information on  trade. 

102 

Sindora inermis 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 

VU A1d 

103 

Sindora supa 

Leguminosae  (Caesalpiniaceae) 

VU A1d 

*  † 

­ 

Brunei 

Cambodia 

Indonesia 

Laos 

Malaysia 

Myanmar 

Philippines 

DD 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

DD 

√ 

VU A1d 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Singapore 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Thailand 

Vietnam 

Notes 

√ 

√ 

Insufficient information trade. 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

Excluded:  irrelevant,  widespread and planted. 

√ 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society. 343 pp.  Soepadmo, E., L.G. Saw and R.C.K. Chung (eds.). 2004. Tree flora of Sabah and Sarawak, vol. 5: 542 pp.

Page 11 of 150 

Traded domestically and  internationally. 

√ (V ­  *  Vulnerable) 

Traded internationally. 

√ (V ­  *  Vulnerable) 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Traded internationally.  New additional species.  Traded internationally. 

√ 

Insufficient information on  trade. 

√ 

Insufficient information on  trade. 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

Meet  criteria  1  Conservation status  for  CITES 

Species 

Family 

104 

Strombosia javanica 

Olacaceae 

DD 

105 

Syzygium flosculifera 

Myrtaceae 

NE 

√ 

106 

Syzygium koordersiana 

Myrtaceae 

LR/lc 

√ 

107 

Syzygium ridleyi 

Myrtaceae 

LR/lc 

√ 

108 

Tectona grandis 

Verbenaceae 

NE 

109 

Tectona hamiltoniana 

Verbenaceae 

NE 

110 

Tectona philippinensis 

Verbenaceae 

111 

Toona calantas 

Meliaceae 

DD 

√ 

√ 

112 

Triomma malaccensis 

Burseraceae 

NE 

√ 

√ 

113 

Vavaea amicorum 

Meliaceae 

DD 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Insufficient information on  trade. 

114 

Vitex parviflora 

Verbenaceae 

DD 

√ 

√ 

√ 

Traded, probably  internatinally. 

115 

Wallaceodendron celebicum 

Leguminosae  (Mimosaceae) 

DD 

√ 

√ 

Insufficient information trade  and biology 

116 

Xylia xylocarpa 

Leguminosae  (Papilionaceae) 

NE 

*  †  + 

IB 

Brunei 

Cambodia 

√ 

Indonesia 

Laos 

Malaysia 

Myanmar 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

√ 

† 

√ 

√+ 

Philippines 

Singapore 

Thailand 

√ (V ­  *  Vulnerable) 

√ 

Vietnam 

Insufficient information on  trade. 

√ (Ex ­  *  Extinct) 

Insufficient information on  trade.  Insufficient information on  trade. 

√ (V ­  *  Vulnerable)  √ 

Insufficient information on  trade. 

√ 

√ 

√ 

EN B1 & 2abc 

√ 

Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society. 343 pp.  Soepadmo, E., L.G. Saw and R.C.K. Chung (eds.). 2004. Tree flora of Sabah and Sarawak, vol. 5: 542 pp. Introduced species

Page 12 of 150 

√ 

Insufficient information on  trade. 

√ 

Insufficient information on  trade.  √ (V ­  Vulnerable)* 

√ 

Traded internationally.  Insufficient information on  trade. 

√ 

√ 

Notes 

† 

√ 

√ 

† 

Traded internationally. 

√ 

√ 

New additional species.  Traded internationally. 

DRAFT April 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

Species Profiles

Page 13 of 150

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

1. Acer laurinum Hassk.  Aceraceae  Common names  Walik elar, wuru dapang, wuru putih (van Gelderen et al., 1994).  Trade name: maple (English); Indonesia: huru kapas (Sudanese), madang alu (Minangkabau), walik sana,  wuru  kembang  (Javanese);  Malaysia:  perdu  (Sarawak);  Philippine:  maple  (English),  baliag,  laing  (Tagalog); Myanmar: Himalayan maple (English); kuam (Thailand) (Sosef et al., 1988). Vietnam: thích  muoi nhi (Vũn, 1996).  Synonyms  Acer  cassiaefolium,  Acer  chionophyllum,  Acer  curani,  Acer  decandrum,    Acer  javanicum,    Acer  laurinum ssp. decandrum,  Acer niveum, Acer philippinum, Acer pinnatinervium (van Gelderen et al.,  1994).  Habitat  A. laurinum occurs scattered in primary or occasionally secondary, hill or montane forest up to 2550m. It  grows  in seasonal to non­seasonal  climates  (Sosef et al., 1988). In  Sabah and  Sarawak  populations are  apparently confined to soils of relatively high nutrient status, on igneous rocks between 200 and 1500m in  the upper limits of mixed dipterocarp forest and on granodiorite rocks in lower montane oak­laurel forest  between 1200 and 1600m (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995).  Population status and trends  Widespread and relatively uncommon (Sosef et al., 1998).  China: Occurrence reported in Hainan (Vũn, 1996).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Java, Kalimantan, Lesser Sunda Islands, Sulawesi, Sumatra and Timor  (Sosef et al., 1998).  Malaysia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Peninsular  Malaysia,  Sabah  and  Sarawak.  In  Sabah  only  two  collections  have  been  made  and  the  species  is  frequent  within  a  very  local  distribution  in  Sarawak  (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995).  Myanmar: Occurrence reported in Kayin, Mon and Taninthayi (Kress et al., 2003).  Philippines: Occurrence reported in Mindanao (Sosef et al., 1998).  Thailand: Occurrence reported (Sosef et al., 1998).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported in Lao Cai, Cao Bang, Vinh Phu, Ha Nam, Ninh Binh, Nghe An, Ha Tinh,  Quang Binh, Quant Tri, Thua Thien­Hue, Gia Lai, Kong Tum and Lam Dong provinces (Vũn, 1996).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  A.  laurinum  though  uncommon  is  fairly  widespread  and  seldom  harvested  and  does  not  seem  to  be  threatened (Sosef et al., 1998).  Utilisation  The white undersides to the leaves provide an attractive ornamental attribute to the species. Utilisation of  the  timber  is  very  limited  due  to  its  scarcity  and  absence  of  heartwood,  it  is  used  domestically.  Ocassionally the species is used for furniture and musical instruments (Sosef et al.,1998).  Trade  No information.  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): DD (WCMC, 1997).  Conservation measures  It was planted in the Botanical Garden of the University of Groningen, The Netherlands (van Gelderen et  al., 1994). Cultivated in Cibodas Botanical Garden, Java, Indonesia [1].  Forest management and silviculture  The species is of low  forestry interest (WCMC, 1997). A. laurinum can be propagated by seed: per kg  there are about 4900 dry, winged fruits. It may be planted at 1000­1500 m altitude, but planting on open  sites is not recommended. Conversion of the wood should be done rapidly after harvest to avoid serious  discolouration from mould and sap­stain fungi (Sosef et al., 1988).

Page 14 of 150

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  References  Kress, W. J., R. A. DeFilipps, E. Farr, and Daw Yin Yin Kyi. 2003. A Checklist of the Trees, Shrubs,  Herbs  and  Climbers  of  Myanmar  (Revised  from  the  original  works  by  J.  H.  Lace  and  H.  G.  Hundley). Contrib. U. S. Nat. Herbarium 45: 590 pp.  Soepadmo, E. & K.M. Wong, (eds.). 1995. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak, volume 1: 513 pp.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3).  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 859 pp.  van Gelderen, D.M., P.C. de Jong & H.J. Oterdoom. 1994. Maples of the world. Timber Press, Portland.  458 pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.  WCMC 1997. Report of the Third Regional Workshop, held at Hanoi, Vietnam, 18­21 August 1997.  Conservation and sustainable management of trees project. Unpublished..  Additional web references  [1] The maple. http://homepage2.nifty.com/chigyoraku/EIndones.html. Downloaded 4 May 2006.

2. Afzelia rhomboidea (Blanco) S. Vidal  Leguminosae – Caesalpinoideae  Common names  Trade  name:  Afzelia;  Indonesia:  kupang,  tanduk  tarum  (Sumatra);  Philippines:  tindalo  (Tagalog),  balayong (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonyms  Afzelia  acuminata,  Afzelia  borneensis,  Eperua  rhomboidea,  Instia  acuminata,  Instia  rhomboidea,  Pahudia acuminata, Pahudia borneensis, Pahudia rhomboidea (Ding Hou et al., 1996).  Habitat  The  species  is  scattered  on  low  hills  and  ridges  or  in  areas  which  are  temporarily  inundated  with  freshwater in primary rain forests at low and medium altitudes up to 350m (Soerianegara & Lemmens,  1994)  (Ding  Hou  et  al.,  1996).  In  the  Philippines  it  is  found  near  the  coast  and  along  the  edges  of  dipterocarp forests (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Population status and trends  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Java, Kalimantan and Sumatra, native (East coast and Palembang)  (Ding Hou et al., 1996) (ILDIS, 2006).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Sabah, native(Ding Hou et al., 1996) (ILDIS, 2006).  Philippines:  Occurrence  reported  in  Cebu,  Leyte,  Northern  Luzon,  Marindoque,  Masbate  and  Mindanao, native (Ding Hou et al., 1996) (ILDIS, 2006). Populations in the Philippines have become  depleted through logging and kaingin making (de Guzman et al, 1986).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Habitat  Habitat destruction and degradation through agriculture and logging activities (Asia Regional Workshop,  1998)  Utilisation  A valuable timber tree (Ding Hou et al., 1996). The wood is widely used in local crafts and in high grade  construction, cabinet and furniture work (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  Probably still in trade in the Philippines and highly valued (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd (Asian Regional Workshop, 1998).  Conservation measures  The Philippines environmental laws Act  No. 3572 prohibits the cutting of tindalo forest or molave trees  less than 60cm in diameter measured at breast height [1].  Forest management and silviculture  Slow­growing  (Asian  Regional  Workshop,  1997).  Afzelia  wood  is  often  obtained  from  natural  forests  which are managed under selective cutting systems (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). Page 15 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  References  Asian  Regional  Workshop  (Conservation  &  Sustainable  Management  of  Trees,  Viet  Nam).  1998.  Afzelia  rhomboidea.  In:  IUCN  2004.  2004  IUCN  Red  List  of  Threatened  Species.  . Downloaded on 03 January 2006.  de Guzman, E.D., Umali, R.M, Sotalba, E.D. 1986. Guide to Philippine flora and fauna vol. III.  Ding Hou, K. Larsen & S.S. Larsen. 1996. Leguminosae­Caesalpinioideae. Flora Malesiana Ser. I, vol.  12: 409­730.  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on  15 March 2006.  Soerianegara,  I.  &  R.H.M.J.  Lemmens  (eds.).  1994  Plant  Resources  of  South­East  Asia  5(1).  Timber  trees: major commercial timbers. Pudoc Scientific Publishers, Wagenigen. 610 pp.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.chanrobles.com/actno3572.htm. Chan Robles Virtual Law library. Downloaded 4 May 2006.

3. Afzelia xylocarpa (Kurz) Craib  Leguminosae – Caesalpinoideae  Common names  Trade name: Afzelia; Cambodia: beng (general); Laos: tê 2  kha 1 , kha 1  (general); Thailand: makhamong,  makha­luang (general), makha­hua­kham (northern); Vietnam: c[af] te, g[ox] d[or], g[ox] t[of] te  (southern) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonyms  Pahudia xylocarpa, Pahudia cochinchinensis,  Afzelia siamica (Soerianegara & Lemmens) 1994).  Habitat  Found  in  mixed  deciduous  or  dry  evergreen  forest  on  clayey  or  laterite  soil  at  100­600  m  altitude  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Population status and trends  Cambodia: Occurrence reported, native (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (ILDIS, 2006).  China: Occurrence reported in Guandong, Guangxi, Hainan and Yunnan, introduced (ILDIS, 2006).  Laos: Occurrence reported, native (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (ILDIS, 2006).  Myanmar: Occurrence reported, native (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (ILDIS, 2006).  Thailand: Occurrence reported, native (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (ILDIS, 2006).  Vietnam:  Occurrence  reported  in  Gia  Lai,  Kon  Tum,  Dac  Lac,  Lam  Dong,  Song  Be  and  Dong  Nai  provinces, native (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (Vũn, 1996) (ILDIS, 2006). The species is considered  endangered due to habitat loss and wood extraction (Vũn, 1996).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Habitat  loss  and  wood  extraction  (Ngia,  1998).  The  tree  is  highly  valued  in  Thailand  making  it  susceptible to genetic erosion (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Utilisation  A valuable general purpose timber used for furniture, flooring, craft and interior finish. The bark is used  for tanning hides and skin. The seeds are edible (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  The wood production in Thailand was 25 000 m 3  in 1985, 28 000 m 3  in 1986, 40 000 m 3  in 1987, and 34  000 m 3  in 1988. The average  price  of  sawn  Afzelia  timber in Thailand  was  US$  430/ m 3  in 1985 and  1986,  increasing  to  US$  715/  m 3  in  1988.  The  wood,  though,  is  used  mostly  domestically  and  is  not  important in  Trade  in  Southeast  Asia  except Thailand  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994). The average  price of Afzelia log was US$ 390/ m 3  in 2003 in which Thailand exported 21 000 m 3  worth US$ 561 000  (ITTO,  2004).  The  wood  is  much  sought  in  Vietnam  for  domestic  use  and  is  sold  by  kilograms  (Vũn, 1996).

Page 16 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Import log from Thailand (ITTO, 2003­2004)  Year  2002  2003 

Volume (m 3 )  21 000  21 000 

Average Price $/m 3  27  390 

Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): EN A1cd (Ngia, 1998).  Conservation measures  In  Vietnam,  the  species  protected  in  Cat  Tien  National  Park  (Don  Nai  province)  and  Nam  Ca  Nature  reserve (Dac Lac province). The tree has been planted in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh city (Vũn, 1996).  Forest management and silviculture  In Thailand, trees were formerly cut selectively in a 13­30­year­rotation. At present the minimum girth  of  the  bole  permitted  for  cutting is  200cm  at  breast height.  The  tree  is  planted  in  mixed  plantations,  together with Dalbergia spp. and teak (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org. Downloaded on  15 March 2006.  ITTO.  2003­2004.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  timber  situation.  st  http://www.itto.or.jp/live/PageDisplayHandler?pageId=199. Downloaded on 1  January 2006.  Ngia,  N.H.  Afzelia  xylocarpa.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World  List  of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650 pp.  Soerianegara,  I.  &  R.H.M.J.  Lemmens  (eds.).  1994.  Plant  Resources  of  South­East  Asia  5(1).  Timber  trees: major commercial timbers. Pudoc Scientific Publishers, Wagenigen. 610 pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.

4. Agathis borneensis Warb.  Araucariaceae  (Taxonomic  note:  In  de  Laubenfels  (1988),  A.  borneensis  and  A.  dammara  were  treated  as  the  same  species. Later, the Committee for Spermatophyte Nomenclature rejected this combination and hence both  species should be treated as different (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). Farjon (1988) accidently placed  A.  borneensis  in  A.  dammara  (Gymnosperm  Database,  2006)  (World  Checklist  of  Selected  Plant  Families, 2006) [1])).  Common names  Trade  name:  kauri;  Brunei:  bindang;  Indonesia:  bembueng  (south­eastern  Kalimantan),  damar  pilau  (Dayak, Kalimantan), hedje (Sumatra); Malaysia: damar minyak (general), bindang (Sarawak), tambunan  (Sabah) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonyms  Agathis  beccarii,  Agathis  alba,  Agathis  beckingii,  Agathis  latifolia,  Agathis  macrostachys,  Agathis  rhomboidalis (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, 2006).  Habitat  Found  scattered in  upland rainforest  up to  1200 m altitude in  Peninsular  Malaysia and  Sumatra,  but is  often found in pure stands on sandy peat soil at low elevation in Borneo. In Kalimantan, the species is  associated with ramin population in swamp forest (Laubenfels, 1988) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Population status and trends  Occurring in west Malaysia (World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, 2006).  Brunei: Occurrence reported (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Kalimantan and Northern Sumatra. Huge stands of A. borneensis in  South  Kalimantan  have  been  exploited  heavily  (Laubenfels,  1988)  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, 2006).  Malaysia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Peninsular  Malaysia,Sabah  and  Sarawak  (Laubenfels,  1988)  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.

Page 17 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Threats  Wood extraction is a threat. In the past the tree has been destructively exploited for copal (Soerianegara &  Lemmens, 1994) (SSC Conifer Specialist Group, 1998).  Utilisation  Kauri wood is used as general­purpose softwood, it is used for joinery, boat building, construction under  cover,  household  utensil,  music  instrument,  tools,  panelling,  turnery,  paper,  charcoal,  moulding  and  packaging. Resin is tapped for producing varnish and linoleum (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  Export of kauri round logs from Indonesia:  Year  Volumes  Value  1970  425 000 m 3  ­  1973  760 000 m 3  ­  1987  67 000 m 3  US$ 20.1  1988  83 000 m 3  US$ 22.2  Export of kauri from Peninsular Malaysia:  Year  1967 (Peninsular Malaysia – round logs)  1973 (Peninsular Malaysia – round logs)  1981 (Peninsular Malaysia – sawn wood)  1986 (Peninsular Malaysia – sawn wood)  1989 (Peninsular Malaysia – sawn wood)  1990 (Peninsular Malaysia – sawn wood)  1992 (Peninsular Malaysia – sawn wood) 

Volumes  8300 m 3  3250 m 3  800 m 3  3300 m 3  6000 m 3  5500 m 3  3500 m 3 

Export of kauri from Sabah and Sarawak:  1987 (Sarawak – round logs)  22 000 m 3  1987 (Sabah – round logs)  130 000 m 3  1992 (Sabah – sawn wood)  37 000 m 3  1992 (Sabah – round logs)  9000 m 3 

Value  ­  ­  US$ 230 000  US$ 740 000  US$ 2.5 m  US$ 3.0 m  US$ 1.9 m 

Value  US$ 17.3 m  US$ 18 m 

The area planted with kauri in Java is estimated to be about 85000 ha. Elsewhere, kauri is planted on a  small scale (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation measures  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd (SSC Conifer Specialist Group, 1998). This  assigned conservation status applied to the Laubenfels (1988) species concept, where A. dammara and A.  borneensis are treated as same species.  Conservation measures  In 1979, a worldwide provenance trial was coordinated by the Oxford Forestry Institute whereby the seed  from the entire range distribution of Agathis was sent to 19 countries. Breeding of Agathis trees has been  included in the national forest tree improvement programme in Indonesia. Some protected areas contain  very  important  gene  pools  of  Agathis  species,  e.g.  Badas  Forest  Reserve  in  Brunei,  Gunung  Palung  Nature  reserve  in  Kalimantan,  Bukit  Barisan  Selatan  National  Park  in  Sumatra  and  Taman  Negara  National  Park  in  Peninsular  Malaysia  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994).  Recommendation  on  the  conservation of A. borneensis population genetics in Brunei was made by Kitamura and Rahman (1992).  Forest management and silviculture  Much  information  is  available  on  propagatation  and  silviculture  of  kauri  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994).  References  de Laubenfels, D.J. 1988. Coniferales. Flora Malesiana series I ­ spermatophyta, flowering plants 10(3).  Farjon, A. 1998. World Checklist and Bibliography of Conifers. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. 298  pp.  Conifer Specialist Group 1998. Agathis dammara. In: IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened  Species. . Downloaded on 03 January 2006.  Kitamura,  K.  &  M.Y.B.A.  Rahman.  1992.  Genetic  diversity  among  natural  populations  of  Agathis  borneensis  (Araucariaceae),  a  tropical  rain  forest  conifer  from  Brunei  Darussalam,  Borneo,  Southeast Page 18 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Asia. Canadian Jounal of Botany 70:1945­1949.  Soerianegara,  I.  &  R.H.M.J.  Lemmens  (eds.).  1994.  Plant  Resources  of  South­East  Asia  5(1).  Timber  trees: major commercial timbers. Pudoc Scientific Publishers, Wagenigen. 610 pp.  Gymnosperm Database. http://www.conifers.org/ar/ag/dammara.htm. Downloaded 5 May 06.  World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. 2006. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens,  Kew. Published on the Internet; http://www.kew.org/wcsp/ accessed 6 June 2006.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.agathis.info/taxonomy.php. Systematics of Agathis. Downloaded 5 May 06.

5. Agathis dammara (Lamb.) Rich. & A. Rich.  Araucariaceae  (Taxonomic  note:  In  de  Laubenfels  (1988),  A.  borneensis  and  A.  dammara  were  treated  as  same  species.  Later,  the  Committee  for  Spermatophyte  Nomenclature  rejected  this  combination  and  hence  both species should be treated as different (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). Farjon (1988) accidently  placed A. borneensis in A. dammara (Gymnosperm Database, 2006) (World Checklist of Selected Plant  Families, 2006) [1])).  Common names  Trade  name:  kauri;  Indonesia:  dammar  raja  (general),  kisi  (Buru),  salo  (Ternate);  Philippines:  dayungon (Samar) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonyms  Agathis loranthifolia, Agathis celebica and Agathis hamii. It is sometimes regarded as conspecific with  A.  philippinensis  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (World  Checklist  of  Selected  Plant  Families,  2006).  Habitat  Agathis dammara is scattered but locally common in lowland rain forest up to 1200m (Soerianegara &  Lemmens, 1994).  Population status and trends  Occurs in central Malesia (World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, 2006).  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Sulawesi  and  Maluku.  Population  of  A.  dammara  in  Maluku  has  been depleted. Planted in Java. (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (World Checklist of Selected Plant  Families, 2006).  Philippines:  Occurrence  reported  in  Palawan  and  Samar  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (World  Checklist of Selected Plant Families, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Wood extraction is a threat. In the past the tree has been destructively exploited for copal (Soerianegara  & Lemmens, 1994) (SSC Conifer Specialist Group, 1998).  Utilisation  A.  dammara  wood  is  used  as  kauri  and  also  an  important  source  of  copal  resin  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  Traded  as  kauri.  In  1926  the  world  production  of  copal  was  18  000  t.,  88%  of  which  came  from  Indonesia, 7% from the Philippines and 5% from Sabah. In 1977 the Philippines exported a total of 778  t.  of  Manila  copal  worth  US$  325  000.  In  1987  the  export  of  copal  from  Indonesia  was  still  2650  t  (US$ 1.7 m), but decreased to 1230 t. (US$ 650 000) in 1989 (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).

Page 19 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Trade of Agathis spp. (ITTO, 1997­2003)  Volume m 3 

Year 

Countries 

Trade 

1996 

Malaysia 

1997  1998  1999  2000  2001  2002 

Indonesia 

Import log  Import sawnwood  Export veneer 

Philippines 

Export sawnwood 

Average Price US$/m 3 

18783.0000  883.0000  1000  17000  4000  15000  2000  10000 

138  146  0  122  196  136  131  56 

Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd (SSC Conifer Specialist Group, 1998). This  assigned conservation status applied to the Laubenfels (1988) species concept, where A. dammara and  A. borneensis are treated as the same species.  Conservation measures  There is a total ban on cutting and exporting Agathis tree in the Philippines and Papua New Guinea.  Large plantation of A. dammara exist in Java (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Forest management and silviculture  In plantation in Java, A. dammara starts to produce cones at the age of 15 years, but viable seeds are  usually  not  produced  before  25  years.  Data  from  A.  dammara  plantations  indicate  that  the  usual  rotation for pulpwood production in plantations is 20 years. More time is needed for timber production.  Annual wood production is 23­32m³/ha in 30 years and 22­28m³ in 50 years. A total yield of 570m³/ha  may be obtained after 40 years (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Conifer Specialist Group 1998. Agathis dammara. In: IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened  Species. . Downloaded on 03 January 2006.  de  Laubenfels,  D.J.  1988.  Coniferales.  Flora  Malesiana  series  I  ­  spermatophyta,  flowering  plants  10(3).  Farjon, A. 1998. World Checklist and Bibliography of Conifers. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. 298  pp.  ITTO.  1997­2003.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  timber  situation.  http://www.itto.or.jp/live/PageDisplayHandler?pageId=199. Downloaded on 1 st  January 2006.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Gymnosperm Database. http://www.conifers.org/ar/ag/dammara.htm. Downloaded 5 May 06.  World  Checklist  of  Selected  Plant  Families.  2006.  The  Board  of  Trustees  of  the  Royal  Botanic  Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet; http://www.kew.org/wcsp/ accessed 6 June 2006.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.agathis.info/taxonomy.php. Systematics of Agathis. Downloaded 5 May 06.

6. Agathis endertii Meijer Drees  Araucariaceae  Common names  Trade name: kauri; Bulok (Iban) (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Habitat  Isolated  stands  are  confined  to  moist  lowland  forest  or  heath  forest,  often  associated  with  sandstone  kerangas up to 1440 m (de Laubenfels, 1988).

Page 20 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Population status and trends  Endemic  to  Borneo.  Although  the  species  is  widespread,  it occurs  in  isolated  populations  in  Borneo  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (de Laubenfels, 1988) (Farjon, 1998) (Gymnosperm Database, 2006)  (World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, 2006) [1].  Brunei: Occurrence reported (Gymnosperm Database, 2006).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Kalimantan (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Sabah and Sarawak (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Timber is heavily exploited. Habitat loss due to clear­felling or logging (Conifer Specialist Group,  1998).  Utilisation  The wood is used as kauri (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  Although present in much smaller quantities in trade, the species is included in the export figures  outlined for Agathis in Borneo (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): LR/nt (Conifer Specialist Group, 1998).  Conservation measures  In 1979, a worldwide provenance trial was coordinated by  the Oxford Forestry Institute whereby the  seed  from the entire range distribution of Agathis was sent to 19 countries. Breeding of Agathis trees  has  been  included  in  the  national  forest  tree  improvement  programme  in  Indonesia.  Some  protected  areas  contain  very  important  gene  pools  of  Agathis  species,  e.g.  Badas  Forest  Reserve  in  Brunei,  Gunung  Palung  Nature  reserve  in  Kalimantan,  Bukit  Barisan  Selatan  National  Park  in  Sumatra  and  Taman Negara National Park in Peninsular Malaysia (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Forest Management and Silviculure  No information.  References  Conifer Specialist Group 1998. Agathis endertii. In: IUCN  2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened  Species. . Downloaded on 22/11/05.  de Laubenfels, D.J. 1988. Coniferales. Flora Malesiana Ser. I, vol. 10: 337­453.  Farjon,  A.  1998.  World  Checklist  and  Bibliography  of  Conifers.  The  Royal  Botanic  Gardens,  Kew.  298 pp.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Pudoc Scientific Publishers, Wagenigen. 610 pp.  Gymnosperm Database. http://www.conifers.org/ar/ag/dammara.htm. Downloaded 5 May 06.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.agathis.info/taxonomy.php. Systematics of Agathis. Downloaded 5 May 06.

7. Aglaia perviridis Hiern.  Meliaceae  Common names  Trade name: aglaia; Malaysia:  tengkorak  lang, tenkohalang  ;  Vietnam:  g[ooj]  xanh (Lemmens  et  al.,  1995).  Synonyms  Aglaia kingiana (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Habitat  Occurring  between  100  ­  1330  m  altitude,  the  species  is  commonly  found  in  tropical  or  subtropical  primary evergreen forest, monsoon and secondary forest on limestone or deep ferralitic wet and well­  drained soils (Mabberley et al., 1995). In Vietnam, occurs from 400 ­ 1500 m altitude on hill slopes or  flat ground on deep ferralitic, light to medium textured, wet and well­drained soil (Vũn, 1996). Page 21 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Population status and trends  Although a common species much of the habitat is threatened with destruction (Pannell, 1997).  Bangladesh: Occurrence reported (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Bhutan: Occurrence reported (Mabberley et al., 1995).  China: Occurrence reported in the south (Mabberley et al., 1995).  India: Occurrence reported in south­western India, Andaman and Nicobar Is. (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Malaysia: Occurrence recorded in Peninsular Malaysia (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Thailand: Occurrence recorded (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported in the north (Mabberley et al., 1995). Found sporadically in Que Phong  and Qui Chau districts (Vũn, 1996).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Habitat loss (Pannell, 1998).  Utilisation  The  fruit  is  eaten  locally.  The  timber  is  used  in  construction,  ship  and  boat­building,  for  household  utensils  and  agricultural  tools.  It  is  often  planted  as  an  ornamental  tree  (Lemmens  et  al.,  1995).  In  Vietnam, often cultivated as a shade or ornamental tree due to its beautiful crown (Vũn, 1996). Suitable  for agroforestry [1].  Trade  No information.  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1c (Pannell, 1997).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  Regeneration is said to be poor in Vietnam and saplings are rarely found under the canopy of mother  trees (Vũn, 1996).  References  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp.  Mabberley, D.J., C.M. Pannell and A.M. Sing. 1995. Meliaceae. Flora Malesiana. Series I, vol. 12(1)1:  1─407.  Pannel,  C.M. Aglaia  perviridis. In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World  List of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.  Additional web references  [1]  http://www.worldagroforestry.org/sea/Products/AFDbases/af/index.asp.  AgroForestryTree  Database.  Downloaded 8 June 2006.

8. Aglaia silvestris (M. Roemer) Merr.  Meliaceae  Common names  Trade  name:  aglaia;  Indonesia:  ganggo  (general),  pacar  kidang  (Sumatra),  kayu  wole  (Sulawesi);  Malaysia:  bekak  (Peninsular  Malaysia),  segera  (Sarawak),  lantupak  (Dusun,  Sabah);  Philippines:  salamingai  (Tagalog),  panuhan  (Negrito);  Thailand:  chanchamot  (Chanthaburi)  (Pannell,  1992)  (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Synonyms  Aglaia  acuminata,  Aglaia  cedreloides,  Aglaia  forstenii,  Aglaia  ganggo,  Aglaia  microcarpa,  Aglaia  obliqua, Aglaia pyrrholepis (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Habitat  Primary forest, swamps, savanna, kerangas, monsoon forest, mossy forest, along roads, along rivers on  clayey  loam,  sandstone,  sand,  limestone,  sea­level  to  2100m.  Few  and  scattered  to  common  (Mabberley et al., 1995). Page 22 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Population status and trends  A widespread, variable species found throughout Malesia and Indochina (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Cambodia: Occurrence reported (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Irian  Jaya,  Java,  Kalimantan,  Moluccas,  Sulawesi  and  Sumatra  (Mabberley, 1995)  India: Occurrence reported in Andaman and Nicobar Is. (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak (Mabberley et al., 1995)  Papua New Guinea: Occurrence reported (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Philippines: Occurrence reported (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Solomon Islands: Occurrence reported (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Thailand: Occurrence reported (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported (Mabberley et al., 1995).  Solomon  Islands:  Occurrence  reported  in  the  South  in  Kon Tum,  Gia  Lai and  Lam  Dong provinces  (Mabberley et al., 1995) (Vũn, 1996).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Habitat destruction is a continuous and potentially very serious threat (Pannell, 1998).  Utilisation  An  important  source  of  timber,  the  wood  is  light  and  used  in  house­building  and  for  making  agricultural tools (Lemmens et al., 1995). The fruits are edible. (Pannell, 1992)  Trade  Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands are a main source of Japan’s Aglaia timber. Most Aglaia  timber  are  sold  domestically.  In  1992,  Papua  New  Guinea  sawn  logs  of  Aglaia  fetched  a  minimum  price of US$ 50/m 3 .  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): LR/nt according to Pannell (1998).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp.  Mabberley, D.J., C.M. Pannell & A.M. Sing. 1995. Meliaceae. Flora Malesiana Ser. I, vol. 12: 1─407.  Pannell, C.M. 1992. A taxonomic monograph of the genus Aglaia Lour. (Meliaceae). London: HMSO.  1­379.  Pannel,  C.M.  Aglaia  silvestris.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World  List  of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.

9. Ailanthus integrifolia Lamk  Simaroubiaceae  Common names  Trade name: White siris (English); Indonesia: ai lanit (Moluccas), kayu ruris (Minahassa), pohon langit  (Ambon); Philippines: malasapsap (general), balokas, makaisa (Tagalog) (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Indonesia: aylanto, kaju langit (Ambon), raden, tawa (Java); Papua New Guinea: kokop, kun­kun (New  Britain), aisasa, broes, limoetiti, won; Philippines: balokas, makaisa, malaaduás, malasapsáp (Nooteboom,  1962).  Trade  name:  gokul;  India:  gokul;  Assam:  borpat,  saragphula,  borkeseru,  koronga,  ring  (Forest  Compendium, 2006)  Synonyms  Ailanthus blancoi, Ailanthus peekelii, Ailanthus grandis, Pongelion grandis (Nooteboom, 1962). Page 23 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Habitat  The subspp. integrifolia is found in non­seasonal primary and secondary rain forest, the subspp. calycina  is found in mixed primary forest under seasonal conditions (Nooteboom, 1962). The subspp. integrifolia  is locally  common  in  North New  Guinea  and in New  Ireland  it  occurs  from  the lowland up to  900 m  (Nooteboom, 1962). In Borneo, subspp. integrifolia is found scattered on low hills or level ground below  150 m, on yellow, sandy loam soil containing lime and in both primary and secondary forest (Argent et  al., 1997).  Population status and trends  There are two subspecies viz. subspp. integrifolia and subspp. calycina. The subspp. integrifolia is found  in New  Guinea, Solomon  Islands and all island  in  Malesia except  Java and  Lesser Sunda Islands. The  subspp.  calycina  is  found  only  in India  (Assam  and  Sikkim),  Vietnam,  Java  and  Lesser  Sunda Islands  (Nooteboom, 1962). Although the species has a large distribution it is rare in most regions. It is locally  common in Borneo and New Guinea (Nooteboom, 1962) (Argent et al., 1997).  India: Occurrence reported in Assam and Sikkim of subspp. calycina (Nooteboom, 1962).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Sumatra, Java, Kalimatan, Sulawesi, Maluku Islands and Irian Jaya.  The  subspp.  integrifolia  occurs  on  all  islands  except  for  Java,  in  which  subspp.  calycina  is  found  (Nooteboom, 1962).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Sabah and Sarawak (Argent et al., 1997).  Papua New Guinea: Occurrence reported of subspp. integrifolia (Nooteboom, 1962).  Philippines:Occurrence reported of subspp. integrifolia (Nooteboom, 1962).  Singapore: Occurrence reported from Seletar reservoir (Whitmore, 1973).  Solomon islands: Occurrence reported (Nooteboom, 1962).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported (Nooteboom, 1962).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  The wood is used for house building, furniture manufacture, paper pulp, fuel and charcoal amongst other  things. The leaves, bark, roots and resin have medicinal properties. The leaves also provide a black dye  and the resin is burnt for its fragrance (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Trade  The timber is sometimes traded together with similar timber as ‘mixed light­coloured hardwood’. Japan  imports small amounts of white siris mainly from Papua New Guinea. In Papua New Guinea logs fetched  a minimum price of US$43/m³ in 1992.  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994):  LR/lc (WCMC, 1997).  Conservation measures  In India this species had been taken up in a germplasm bank (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Forest management and silviculture  The species is propagated by seed. Plantations have been developed in certain areas, for example in Java  and  India,  but  the  timber  is  sourced  from  the  wild  in  Papua  New  Guinea.  It  is  believed  that  the  establishment of plantations may benefit from a taungya system in which a low annual crop such as chilli  or eggplant is planted in the first year. The species is fast­growing. Planted trees in Java showed an annual  increment of 15m³/ha in the first ten years. In India increments of 20m³/ha have been attained. On suitable  sites the timber may be harvested at 35­40 years. Natural regeneration of planted trees has been observed  to occur after four years but seed production is variable. In the wild, regeneration is poor in the shade but  more successful in open weed­free situations. In summary the species has great plantation development,  especially if seed production can be better controlled (Lemmens et al., 1995).  References  Argent,  G.,  A.  Saridan,  E.J.F.  Campbell  and  P.  Wilkie.  1997.  Manual  for  the  larger  and  more  important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  2.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda, Indonesia. 364 pp.  Forest  Compendium.  http://www.cabicompendium.org/NamesLists/FC/Full/AIL_IN.htm.  Downloaded  on  8  May 06.

Page 24 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp.Nooteboom,  H.P. 1962. Simaroubiaceae. Flora Malesiana Ser. I, vol. 6: 193­226.  WCMC 1997. Report of the Third Regional Workshop, held at Hanoi, Vietnam, 18­21 August 1997.  Conservation and sustainable management of trees project. Unpublished..  Whitmore, T.C. (ed.). 1973. Tree flora of Malaya, volume 2. Longman: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.`

10. Albizia splendens Miq.  Leguminosae ­ Mimosaceae  Common names  Indonesia: benatan (Sumatra). Malaysia: kungkur (general) (Sosef  et al., 1998).  Synonyms  Pithecellobium splendens, Pithecellobium confertum (Nielsen, 1992)  Habitat  Found in primary lowland rain forest, old secondary forest on ridges and steep hillsides, altitude to 800 m  (Nielsen, 1992).  Population status and trends  Brunei: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Sumatra and Kalimantan, native (Nielsen, 1992) (ILDIS, 2006).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia and Sabah, native (Nielsen, 1992) (ILDIS, 2006).  Singapore: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Thailand: Peninsular Thailand, native (Nielsen, 1992) (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  Suitable for furniture (Nielsen, 1992). The outer bark is used for lighting fires in humid condition (Sosef  et  al., 1998).  Trade  Albizia splendens timber  was exported from Sabah together with Parkia spp. as a total volume of 2100 m 3  of sawn timber and a total value of about US$ 480 000 (Sosef  et al., 1998).  Conservation status  The species has been recorded as threatened in Indonesia (WCMC, 1991).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  Albizia is easy to propagate from seed (Sosef et al., 1998).  References  WCMC  1991.  Provision  of  data  on  rare  and  threatened  tropical  timber  species.  Unpublished  report,  prepared under contract to the EC.  ILDIS ­ International Legume  Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org. Downloaded  on 15  March 2006.  Nielsen, I.C. 1992. Mimosaceae (Leguminosae­Mimosoideae). Flora Malesiana Series 1, vol. 11(1): 1­  226.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3).  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 859 pp.

11. Alloxylon brachycarpum ( Sleumer ) P.H.Weston & Crisp  Proteaceae  Common names  Trade name: Pink silky oak (English); Indonesia: kawoli (Je, Merauke, Irian Jaya) (Sosef et al., 1998). Page 25 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  A. brachycarpum occurs scattered but is locally common in well­drained, primary, mixed rain forest on  hills, ridges  and high river  banks, up to  800 m altitude.  It seems  to  prefer  gallery  forest  but has also  been found in bamboo­eucalypt forest. It is often found growing together with Acacia, Flindersia and  Grevillea spp. (Sosef et al., 1998).  Population status and trends  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Irian  Jaya  and  Moluccas  (Sosef  et  al.,  1998).  In  Irian  Jaya  the  species is confined to Western Province in the south, Digul district and extending into the Aru Islands  (Eddowes, 1997).  Papua New Guinea: Occurrence reported, the population in Papua New Guinea is restricted in range  and confined to a fragile ecosystem in the Oriomo River area in Western Province, where logging and  habitat destruction are serious threats (Eddowes, 1997).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Habitat destruction from logging activities (Eddowes, 1997).  Utilisation  This  nicely  figured  and  attractive  wood  of  this  species  is  used  for  boat­building,  interior  trim,  fine  finish,  furniture  and  cabinet  work,  mouldings,  decorative  wall  panelling  and  marquetry,  turning  and  fancy veneer. It is also a potential ornamental plant (Sosef et al., 1998).  Trade  The timber is found in international trade in small quantities. In 1996 Papua New Guinea exported 121  m 3  of ‘pink silky oak’ logs at an average free­on­board (FOB) price of US$ 99/cu m (Sosef et al.,  1998).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): EN A2cd according to Eddowes (1997). This  evaluation refers to the situation in Papua New Guinea only, however the species is undoubtedly  endangered in Indonesia as well (Eddowes, 1997).  Conservation measures  There are no known conservation measures and it is not thought to be in cultivation (Eddowes, 1997).  References  Eddowes, P.J. 1997. Alloxylon brachycarpum. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The  World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3).  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 859 pp.

12. Alstonia pneumatophora Backer ex L.G. Den Berger  Apocynaceae  Common names  Trade name: pulai; Malaysia: pulai lilin (Sabah). pulai paya (Sarawak) (Soepdamo et al., 2004); Indonesia:  pulai rawang, Basung (Sumatra), pulai akar napas (Kalimantan) (Argent et al., 1997); Brunei: pulai puteh;  Malaysia: pulai basong (peninsular); Indonesia: basung (Sumatra) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonym  No Synonyms.  Habitat  The  species  occurs in mixed  peat­swamp  forest  on  shallow  peat,  often  where it  overlies  sand near the  coastal fringe. It becomes abundant near the mouth of large rivers (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).

Page 26 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Swampy areas, on periodically inundated habitats along stream, on sandy loam or heavy loam soils, at  altitudes to 50m (Soepadmo et al., 2004).  Population status and trends  Most  Alstonia  species  are  common  and  widespread.  They  do  not  seem  vulnerable  to  genetic  erosion  because they often easily invade severely disturbed places. However stands are heavily depleted in places  as a result of deforestation caused by logging and shifting cultivation (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Brunei: Occurrence reported (Soepadmo et al., 2004).  Indonesia: Found in Sumatra, Sulawesi and Kalimantan (Soepadmo et al., 2004).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak (Soepadmo et al., 2004).  Singapore: Occurrence reported (Soepadmo et al., 2004).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Logging and shifting cultivation (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Utilisation  Pulai  is  a  lightweight  hardwood  used  to  make  boxes  and  crates,  veneers  and  plywood,  interior  trim,  furniture components and carvings. The wood of the aerial roots is used as a substitute for cork. The latex  is used medicinally and when mixed with oil make glue sticks (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  Present in trade with other members of the genus. Pulai, as applied to the genus as a whole, is one of the  six most important export timbers of Indonesia. Export of sawnwood increased from 50,000m³ in 1987 to  70,000m³ in 1989, raising a price of US$18.5 million. Sarawak and Sabah also export smaller amounts;  Sabah exported 20,000m³ of round logs and 9500m³ of sawnwood in 1992 (Soerianegara & Lemmens,  1994). Peninsular Malaysia reported in 1995 the presence of 2000 m³ of sawnwood in exports valued at  an average price of US$312/m³ (ITTO, 1997). [note: trade not traceable in ITTO 2004 Annual Report]  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): LR/lc (WCMC, 1997).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  Alstonia spp. in general are fast­growing but often show scarce natural regeneration. Seedlings are found  scattered  or  in  groups  particularly  at  forest  edges  and  in  secondary  forest.  In  most  countries  pulai  is  harvested  selectively  from  natural  forest  and  there  is  little  experience  of  silviculture  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994).  References  Argent, G., A. Saridan, E.J.F. Campbell and P. Wilkie. 1997. Manual for the larger and more important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda,  Indonesia. 341 pp.  ITTO.  1997.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  tropical  timber  situation.  1996.  International  Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO).  Soepadmo,  E.,  L.G.  Saw  and  R.C.K.  Chung  (eds.).  2004.  Tree  flora  of  Sabah  and  Sarawak,  vol.  5:  542pp.  Soerianegara, I. & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (Eds.) 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia (PROSEA) 5(1)  Timber trees: major commercial timbers. Pudoc Scientific Publishers, Wageningen.  WCMC 1997. Report of the Third Regional Workshop, held at Hanoi, Vietnam, 18­21 August 1997.

13. Anisoptera costata Korth.  Dipterocarpaceae  Common name  Trade  name:  mersawa;  Brunei  mersawa  kesat.  Indonesia:  masegar  (Sumatra),  meraswa  daun  lebar  (Java), ketimpun (Kalimantan); Malaysia: mersawa kesat, mersawa terbak (Peninsular), pengiran kesat  (Sabah);  Philippines:  Mindanao  palosapis  (general),  balingan  (Sulu).  Myanmar:  kabanthangyin;  Cambodia: phdiek, phdiek krâham, phdiek sâ; Laos: bak, maiz bak; Thailand: krabak (central), krabak Page 27 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  khok  (north­eastern),  krabak  daeng  (peninsular);  Vietnam:  v[ee]n  v[ee]n,  v[ee]n  v[ee]n  tr[aws]ng,  v[ee]n v[ee]n xanh (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonym  Anisoptera  cochinchinensis,  Anisoptera  marginatoides,  Anisoptera  mindanensis  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994).  Habitat  Occurs  in  ever­green  and  seasonal  mixed  dipterocarp  forest  at  up  to  700  m  altitude  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994).  Population status and trends  Cambodia: Occurrence reported (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994)  Indonesia:  Occurrence reported in Sumatra, western Java and Kalimantan (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  Laos: Occurrence reported (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994)  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular, Sabah and Sarawak (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994)  Myanmar: Occurrence reported (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994)  Philippines:  Occurrence  reported  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994).  Only  a  single  collection  of  specimen exist for Philippines (Ashton, 1998).  Thailand: Occurrence reported (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994)  Vietnam: Occurrence reported in Southern Vietnam (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994)  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  Timber  is  used  as  mersawa  for  ship,  planking,  interior  finish,  construction,  veneer  and  plywood  Occurrence reported (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  Import of Anisoptera costata from Thailand (ITTO, 1997­1998):  Year  1996  1997 

Import 

Volume m 3 

Average Price  US$/m 3 

Log  Sawnwood  Log  Sawnwood 

25000  32000  17000  6000 

165  335  128  217 

Import of Anisoptera spp. from Thailand (ITTO, 1997­2004):  Average Price  Import  Year  Volume m 3  US$/m 3  Log  1997  52000  127  Sawnwood  1997  18000  279  Log  1998  24000  117  Log  1998  29000  106  Sawnwood  1998  12000  214  Sawnwood  1998  12000  214  Log  1999  29000  106  Sawnwood  1999  12000  204  Log  2000  39000  107  Log  2000  35000  114  Sawnwood  2000  24  693  Sawnwood  2000  28000  172  Sawnwood  2000  24000  194  Log  2001  28000  123  Log  2001  27660  116 Page 28 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Import 

Year 

Sawnwood  Sawnwood  Log  Log  Sawnwood  Log 

2001  2001  2002  2002  2002  2003 

Average Price  US$/m 3  40000  168  40000  156  53010  161  106000  181  53400  175  56000  164 

Volume m 3 

Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category: EN A1cd+2cd (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Ashton,  P.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World  List  of  Threatened  Trees.  World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650 pp.  ITTO.  1997­2004.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  timber  situation.  http://www.itto.or.jp/live/PageDisplayHandler?pageId=199. Downloaded on 1 st  January 2006.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.

14. Araucaria cunninghamii Aiton ex D. Don  Araucariaceae  Common names  Pien  (Pidgin),  ungwa  (Kapauku),  sumgwa  (Manikiong),  alloa  (Marconi  R.),  kiriwi  (Wandammen),  ningwik (Tambuni Valley), makut (Pikpik), domooimer, tororomooi (Dajo), jarujosuwa (Tanahmerah),  flabbito (Wapi), d’li (Telefomin), escera (Foie), sari (Bembi), bontuan (Kaigorin), wariri (Gurumbu),  nimola (Esa’ala) (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Trade  name:  Araucaria;  hoop  pine,  colonial  pine,  Richmond  river  pine  (English);  Indonesia:  alloa,  ningwik, pien (Irian Jaya) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Hoop pine, Moreton Bay pine, colonial pine, arakaria, Dorrigo pine (Gymnosperm Database, 2006).  Kolonialkiefer (German); yau (Portuguese); son naam (Thailand) [1].  Synonyms  Synonyms of Araucaria cunninghamii var. cunninghamii: Eutacta cunninghamii, Araucaria  glauca, Araucaria cunninghamii var. glauca, Araucaria cunninghamii var. longfolia (Farjon,  1998).  Synonym of Araucaria cunninghamii var. papuana, Araucaria beccarii (Farjon, 1998).  Habitat  Emergent in rain­forest from 60­2745 m, more common above 1000 m altitude on a variety of soils and  in areas with high rainfall and temperature range from 9­26 o C. Found in a variety  of rain­forest soils  along ridges, in swampy conditions and submontane oak forest. A. cunninghamii is a pioneer tree and a  nurse  for  the  invasion  of  rain­forest  after  disturbance  and  burning.  In  Papua  New  Guinea  it  is  commonly  associated  with  Castnopsis  acuminatissima,  Cinnamomum  sp.,  Podocarpus  neriifolius,  Prumnopitys amara and Schizomeria sp. (de Laubenfels, 1988) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Population status and trends  Distributed from the coastal regions of New South Wales and south­eastern Queensland to Papua New  Guinea  and  Irian  Jaya  (de  Laubenfels,  1988)  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (World  Checklist  of  Selected  Plant  Families,  2006).  There are  two  varieties  each  exclusively  found  in  Australia  and  New  Guinea (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Australia: Occurrence reported of the var. cunninghamii from northern Queensland to Coffs Harbour  in NSW (de Laubenfels, 1988). Large amounts of timber are being produced from plantation sources in  Australia (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). Native [1]. Page 29 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Eritrea: Occurrence reported, exotic [1].  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Irian Jaya of the var. papuana (de Laubenfels, 1988). Native [1].  Kenya: Occurrence reported, exotic [1].  Nigeria: Occurrence reported, exotic [1].  Papua New Guinea: Occurrence reported of the var. papuana found scattered in isolated to extensive  stands  from  one  end  of  the  island  to  the  other,  both  in  the  central  range  and  along  the  north  coast,  including Japen and Ferguson Island (de Laubenfels, 1988). In New Guinea, stands have been heavily  exploited,  especially  for  the  plywood  industry.  Areas  such  as  Bulolo  in  Papua  New  Guinea  are  exhausted. Numerous small patches, however, still remain in a range of habitats and large scale logging  is  no  longer  viable.  Large  scale  plantation  of  the  species  has  been  established  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994). Native [1].  Solomon Islands: Occurrence reported, exotic [1].  Uganda: Occurrence reported, exotic [1].  Zimbabwe: Occurrence reported, exotic [1].  Role of species in the ecosystem  A dominant species. Regeneration in the wild takes place in disturbed habitats (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Threats  Commercial overexploitation of natural population (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Utilisation  The  timber  is  useful  as  a  light  structural  timber,  for  ships and  buildings,  furniture,  veneer,  plywood,  pulpwood, joinery and turnery. The seeds are edible and trees are planted as ornamentals (Soerianegara  & Lemmens, 1994). Suitable for agroforestry [1].  Trade  Araucaria timber is commercially important but mainly traded domestically. Araucaria plywood was a  major export item from Papua New Guinea until 1980 when the supplies of logs from natural sources  became low. The export of Araucaria logs from Papua New Guinea has been banned to obtained added  value from processed product (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). The species is reported in plywood  exports in 1995 from Papua New Guinea (ITTO, 1997). In Australia, A. cunninghamii is important in  plywood industry (Gymnosperm Database, 2006). [note: species trade not traceable in ITTO 2004  Annual Report, but trade reported for the genus]  Export of Araucaria spp. plywood from Papua New Guinea (ITTO, 1997­2002).  Year 

Volume m 3 

Average Price US$/m 3 

1996  2000  2001  2001 

372  450  1000  1000 

497  600  372  372 

Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): not evaluated.  Not threathened based on Farjon (1998).  Conservation measures  Extensive plantation has already been established in South Africa, Papua New Guinea and Australia,  and have produced large amounts of timber. In New Guinea natural stands are no longer being logged  on a large scale (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). In Australia the tree is found in National Parks and  plantations (Gymnosperm Database, 2006).  Forest management and silviculture  In Australia 44,500 ha have been planted and provided an annual timber production of 211,000 m³ in  1988­1989 and 248,000 m³ in 1989­1990. Plantations mixed with A. hunsteinii cover 8000 ha in Papua  New Guinea, where trees have reached heights of 30m after 38 years growth. Trees in Queensland are  reported to reach 33 m in 34 years and in Peninsular Malaysia the same height is reached in 30 years.  Plantation material produces a premium quality pulp. Trees usually start to bear cones at 15 to 25 years  age. Propagation can be achieved from seed, which can be stored for up to six years. A. cunninghamii  has  shown  good  regeneration  under  the  parent  canopy  and  within  gaps,  and  is  regarded  as  a  shade­  tolerant species (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). Page 30 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  References  de Laubenfels, D.J. 1988. Coniferales. Flora Malesiana Ser.1, vol. 10: 337­453.  Farjon, A. 1998. World Checklist and Bibliography of Conifers. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. 298  pp.  ITTO. 1997. Annual review and assessment of the world tropical timber situation. 1996. International  Tropical Timber Organization.  ITTO.  1997­2002.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  timber  situation.  http://www.itto.or.jp/live/PageDisplayHandler?pageId=199. Downloaded on 1 st  January 2006.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Gymnosperm Database. http://www.conifers.org/ar/ag/dammara.htm. Downloaded 5 May 06.  World  Checklist  of  Selected  Plant  Families.  2006.  The  Board  of  Trustees  of  the  Royal  Botanic  Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet; http://www.kew.org/wcsp/ accessed 6 June 2006.  Additional web references  [1]  http://www.worldagroforestry.org/sea/Products/AFDbases/af/index.asp.  AgroForestryTree  Database.  Downloaded 8 June 2006.

15. Calophyllum canum Hook. f.  Guttiferae  Common names  Trade name: bintangor; Malaysia: bintangor merah (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonym  Calophyllum borneense (Stevens, 1980).  Habitat  Occurs  in  well­drained  mixed  dipterocarp  forest  and  peat  swamps  up  to  1200m  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994).  Population status and trends  It is expected that Calophyllum species will be more heavily harvested when other timber supplies have  become exhausted (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Brunei:Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Sumatra (main island and Riau) and East and Central Kalimantan  (Stevens, 1980) (Argent et al., 1997).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak (Stevens, 1980).  Role of species in the ecosystem  Calophyllum is pollinated by insects such as bees. It often bears fruits throughout the year. The fruits  are eaten and dispersed by mammals (bats, squirrels, monkeys) and birds (Soerianegara & Lemmens,  1994).  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  A source of bintangor, it is a good general purpose timber. It is suitable for light construction, flooring,  moulding, decking, panelling, joinery,  furniture, making tools,   veneer and plywood,  wooden pallets,  boat  construction  and  diving  boards.  Heavier  wood  is  sometimes  used  for  beams  and  columns,  for  railway carriages and crane shafts. The poisonous latex from the bark is used to stupefy fish and poison  rats (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).

Page 31 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Trade  Bintangor is the trade name to timber derived from all members of the genus. In Sarawak, this species  represents one of the most important sources of bintangor. Bintangor is exported in large quantities to  Japan, especially from Borneo. Round logs exported from Sabah in 1987 amounted to 42,000m³ with a  value of US$2.8 million. In 1992 17,500m³ of logs and 41,500m³ of sawnwood was exported at a value  of US$10.3 million (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). Peninsular Malaysia reported the presence of  16,000m³ of Calophyllum sawnwood in exports in 1995, valued at an average price of US$167/m³  (ITTO, 1997) [note: trade not traceable in ITTO 2004 Annual Report].  Conservation Status  No information.  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  Preliminary data from Peninsular Malaysia indicate that members of the genus may be slow­growing,  taking 70 years to attain a diameter of 50 cm (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Argent, G., A. Saridan, E.J.F. Campbell and P. Wilkie. 1997. Manual for the larger and more important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda,  Indonesia. 341 pp.  ITTO.  1997.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  tropical  timber  situation.  1996.  International  Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO).  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Stevens,  P.F.  1980.  A  revision  of  the  Old  World  species  of  Calophyllum  (Guttiferae).  Journal  of  the  Arnold Arboretum 61: 117—699.

16. Calophyllum carrii P.F. Stevens var. longigemmatum P.F. Stevens  Guttiferae  Synonym  No Synonym.  Common names  Trade name: calophyllum (Eddowes, 1997).  Habitat  Scattered  in  primary,  lowland,  moist,  non­seasonal,  broadleaved,  closed  forest  between  15  ­  300m  (Stevens, 1980).  Population status and trends  There are two varieties of Calophyllum carii, viz var. carii and var. longigemmatum. The var. carii is  found  in  Central  and  Northern  provinces  in  Papua  New  Guinea.  The  var.  longigemmatum  is  only  known from small area long the northern coast of New Guinea in an area near Jayapura, Irian Jaya, and  West  Sepik  Province  in  Papua  New  Guinea.  It  occurs  in  areas  that  are  subject  to  intensive  logging  activities (Stevens, 1980) (Eddowes, 1997).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Irian Jaya (Stevens, 1980) (Eddowes, 1997).  Papua New Guinea: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980) (Eddowes, 1997).  Role of species in the ecosystem  Bats, feral pigs, birds and water act as dispersal agents. Pollinated by insects and wild bees (Eddowes,  1997).  Threats  Logging and habitat loss is the major threat (Eddowes, 1997).  Utilisation  The wood is used for plywood, furniture and as a veneer (Eddowes, 1997).

Page 32 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Trade  The timber is found in major international trade (Eddowes, 1997). In 1995 Papua New Guinea recorded  the export of 231,000m³ of Calophyllum logs, valued at an average price of US$156/m³ (ITTO, 1997).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU B1+2abcde (Eddowes, 1997).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  ITTO.  1997.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  tropical  timber  situation.  1996.  International  Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO).  Eddowes,  P.J.  1997.  Calophyllum  carrii  var.  longigemmatum.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven. 1998. The World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK.  650pp.  Stevens,  P.F.  1980.  A  revision  of  the  Old  World  species  of  Calophyllum  (Guttiferae).  Journal  of  the  Arnold Arboretum 61: 117—699.

17. Calophyllum euryphyllum Lauterb.  Guttiferae  Common names  Trade name: Calophyllum (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  This tree is scattered in primary rainforest up to 610 m, sometimes on coral (Stevens, 1980).  Population status and trends  Distributed in Northern New Guinea (Stevens, 1980). It is expected that Calophyllum species will be  more heavily harvested when other timber supplies have become exhausted (Soerianegara & Lemmens,  1994).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Irian Jaya in Aru, Wakatoebi, Vogelkop and Geevink Bay (Stevens,  1980).  Papua  New  Guinea:  Occurrence  reported  in  Morobe  and Bismark  Archipelago,  except  New  Ireland  (Stevens, 1980).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  A source of bintangor, it is a good general purpose timber. It is suitable for light construction, flooring,  moulding,  decking,  panelling,  joinery,  furniture,  making  tools,  veneer  and  plywood,  wooden  pallets,  boat  construction  and  diving  boards.  Heavier  wood  is  sometimes  used  for  beams  and  columns,  for  railway carriages and crane shafts. The poisonous latex from the bark is used to stupefy fish and poison  rats (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).

Page 33 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Trade  The species is probably traded as calophyllum in Papua New Guinea. In 1995 Papua New Guinea  recorded the export of 231,000m³ of calophyllum logs, valued at an average price of US$156/m³  (ITTO, 1997).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): LR/lc according to Stevens (1997).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Eddowes,  P.J.  1997.  Calophyllum  carrii  var.  longigemmatum.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven. 1998. The World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK.  650pp.  ITTO.  1997. Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  tropical  timber  situation.  1996.  International  Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO).  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Stevens,  P.F.  1997.  Annotations  to  a  listing  of  draft  species  summaries  for  New  Guinea  for  the  Conservation and sustainable management of trees project. (Unpublished)

18. Calophyllum inophyllum L.  Guttiferae  Common names  Alexandrian  laurel,  Borneo  mahogany  (English);  Indonesia:  njamplung  (Java),  dingkaran  (Sulawesi);  Malaysia:  bintangor  laut,  penaga  laut  (Peninsular  Malaysia),  penaga  (Sabah);  Papua  New  Guinea:  beach  calophyllum;  Phillipinnes:  palo  maria  (Sp),  bitaog  (general);  Myanmar:  ponnyet,  ph’ong.  Thailand:  krathing  (general),  saraphee  naen  (northern),  naowakan  (Nan);  Vietnam:  c[aa]y  m[uf]  u  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonym  Balsamaria  inophyllum,  Calophyllum  bintagor,  Calophyllum  blumei,  Calophyllum  tacamahaca  (Stevens, 1980).  Population status and trends  At  local  levels  populations  are  heavily  harvested.  Widely  distributed ranging  from  Eastern  Africa  to  South Asia, Malesia, Australia and the pacific islands in the tropics (Stevens, 1980).  Australia : Occurrence reported in Queensland and Northern Territory (Stevens, 1980).  British Indian Ocean Territory: Occurrence reported in Diego Garcia Atolls  Cambodia: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Cameroon: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  China: Occurrence reported in Hainan island (Stevens, 1980)  Comoros: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Djibouti: Occurrence reported, exotic [1].  Ethiopia: Occurrence reported, exotic [1].  Eritrea: Occurrence reported, exotic [1].  French  Polynesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Marquesas,  Tuaomotu  archipelago,  Society  Islands  and  Mangareva Island and Tubuai Islands (Stevens, 1980)  Ghana: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Guinea: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  India: Occurrence reported in Maharashtra, Mysore, Tamilnadu, West Bengal, Andaman and Nicobar  Islands (Stevens, 1980).  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Sumatra,  Kalimantan,  Java,  Sulawesi,  Maluku  and  Irian  Jaya  (Stevens, 1980). In Borneo recorded throughout the island (Argent et al., 1997)

Page 34 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Ivory Coast: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Japan: Occurrence reported in Okinawa and Bonin Islands (Stevens, 1980). Native [1].  Kenya: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Exotic [1].  Kiribati:  Occurrence  reported  in  Phoenix  Islands,  Line  Islands  and   Tarawa  (Stevens,  1980).  Native  [1].  Laos: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Native [1].  Madagascar: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Native [1].  Malaysia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Peninsular  Malaysia,  Sabah  and  Sarawak  (Stevens,  1980).  Native  [1].  Maldives: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Marshall Islands: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Native [1].  Mauritius: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Mozambique: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Myanmar: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Native [1].  New  Caledonia:  Occurrence  reported  (Stevens,  1980).  Native  [1].  New Zealand: Occurrence reported in Cook islands (Stevens, 1980)  Nigeria: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Exotic [1].  Northern Mariana Islands: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Palau: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Papua New Guinea: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Native [1].  Philippines: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Native [1].  Reunion: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Native [1].  Rodrigues: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Samoa: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Native [1].  Seychelles: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980)  Singapore: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Solomon Islands: Occurrence reported, native [1].  Somalia: Occurrence reported, exotic [1].  Sri Lanka: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Native [1].  Taiwan: Occurrence reported, native [1].  Tanzania: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Exotic [1].  Thailand: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Native [1].  Tonga: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Native [1].  Tuvalu: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Uganda: Occurrence reported, exotic [1].  United Kingdom: Occurrence reported in Pitcairn Island (Stevens, 1980)  United States: Occurrence reported in Hawaii (Stevens, 1980). Exotic [1].  Vanuatu: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980). Native [1].  Wallis and Futuna: Occurrence reported (Stevens, 1980).  Habitat  A widespread tree of sandy beaches near the coast and occasionally inland on sandy soils up to 200 m  (Stevens, 1980).  Ecology  Fruits are dispersed by the sea and animals, eaten by fruit bats and squirrels (Stevens, 1980).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  Compared to other Calophyllum the timber is more durable and stronger, with a finer grain. It is used  for construction work, furniture, cartwheel hubs, musical instruments, canoes and boats. The oil from  the  seed  is  used  for  illumination,  soap  making  and  medicinal  purposes.  The  latex  and  pounded  bark  also have medicinal uses. Fruit are edible. Trees are planted for shade and ornament (Soerianegara &  Lemmens, 1994). Suitable for agroforestry [1].  Trade  The timber is often traded separately as beach calophyllum. Fiji is recorded as exporting Calophyllum  spp. as plywood, veneer and sawnwood in 1995 (ITTO, 1997). In the same year Papua New Guinea  recorded the export of 231,000m³ of calophyllum logs, valued at an average price of US$156/m³ and Page 35 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Peninsular Malaysia reported the presence of 16,000m³ of Calophyllum sawnwood in exports, valued at  an average price of US$167/m³ (ITTO, 1997).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): LR/lc according to Stevens (1997).  The Singapore Red Data Book: Rare [R] (Ng & Wee, 1994)  Conservation measures  Trees  are  widely  planted  both  within  and  outside  the  natural  range,  e.g.  in  West  Africa  and  tropical  America, as a source of oil (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Forest management and silviculture  Preliminary data from Peninsular Malaysia indicate that members of the genus may be slow growing,  taking 70 years to attain a diameter of 50cm (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Argent, G., A. Saridan, E.J.F. Campbell and P. Wilkie. 1997. Manual for the larger and more important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda,  Indonesia. 341 pp.  ITTO.  1997.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  tropical  timber  situation.  1996.  International  Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO).  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society.  343pp.  Phengklai,  Chamlong  &  Sanan  Khamsai.  1985.  Some  non­timber  species  of  Thailand.  Thai  Forest  Bulletin (Botany) 1(15): 108­148.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Stevens,  P.F.  1980.  A  revision  of  the  Old  World  species  of  Calophyllum  (Guttiferae).  Journal  of  the  Arnold Arboretum 61: 117—699.  Stevens,  P.F.  1997.  Annotations  to  a  listing  of  draft  species  summaries  for  New  Guinea  for  the  Conservation and sustainable management of trees project.  Additional web references  [1]  http://www.worldagroforestry.org/sea/Products/AFDbases/af/index.asp.  AgroForestryTree  Database.  Downloaded 8 June 2006.

19. Calophyllum insularum P.F. Stevens  Guttiferae  Common names  Bintangor (Stevens, 1980).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  A tree scattered in primary colline rainforest up to 200 m (Stevens, 1980).  Population status and trends  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Irian  Jaya,  the  entire  population  is  restricted  to  an  island  in  Geelvink Bay (Stevens, 1980) (Eddowes, 1997).  Role of species in the ecosystem  The flowers are pollinated by birds and the seeds are dispersed by birds (Eddowes, 1997).  Threats  Expansion of human settlements, extensive agriculture and wood extraction.  Utilisation  The wood is used for plywood, furniture and as a veneer (Eddowes, 1997).  Trade  The timber is possibly traded internationally (Eddowes, 1997).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation categories (ver 2.3, 1994): EN B1+2c according to Eddowes (1997). Page 36 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Conservation measures  None exist.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Eddowes,  P.J.  1997.  Calophyllum  insularum.  In:  IUCN  2004.  2004  IUCN  Red  List  of  Threatened  Species. . Downloaded on 09 January 2006.  Stevens,  P.F.  1980.  A  revision  of  the  Old  World  species  of  Calophyllum  (Guttiferae).  Journal  of  the  Arnold Arboretum 61: 117—699.

20. Calophyllum papuanum Lauterb.  Guttiferae  Synonym  No Synonym.  Common names  Trade name: calophyllum (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Habitat  Usually canopy tree of hilly or montane forest often dominated by Fagaceae,  more rarely in swampy  forest or depleted Agathis forest over limestone with thick clay cover; 120­1830m (Stevens, 1980).  Population status and trends  It is expected that Calophyllum species will be more heavily harvested when other timber supplies have  become exhausted (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Maluku Island. (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Papua New Guinea: Occurrence reported (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  The timber is used in building and is considered a decorative substitute for dark­coloured mahogany, if  suitably  stained,  and  for  all  kinds  of  mahogany  if  transparently  coated.  It  is  also  substituted  for  red  meranti (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  The timber is traded in Papua New Guinea as calophyllum. In 1995 Papua New Guinea recorded the  export of 231,000m³ of calophyllum logs, valued at an average price of US$156/m³ (ITTO, 1997).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): LR/lc according to Stevens (1997).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  ITTO.  1997.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  tropical  timber  situation.  1996.  International  Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO).  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Stevens,  P.F.  1980.  A  revision  of  the  Old  World  species  of  Calophyllum  (Guttiferae).  Journal  of  the  Arnold Arboretum 61: 117—699.  Stevens,  P.F.  1997.  Annotations  to  a  listing  of  draft  species  summaries  for  New  Guinea  for  the  Conservation and sustainable management of trees project

Page 37 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

21. Canarium luzonicum Miq.  Burseraceae  Common names  Philippines: piling­liitan (Filipino), belis (Tagalog), malapili (Bikol) (Lemmens et al.,1995).  Philippines: alangi  (Ilk.),  alanki  (Ilk.), antang  (Ibn.), anteng  (Ilk.),  bakan  (Ting.),  bakoog  (Ilk.),  belis  (Tag.),  bulau  (Pang.),  malapili  (Bik.),  pilauai  (Tag.),  pili  (Tag.,  Bik.,  S.  L.  Bis.,  P.  Bis.,  Ibn.),  pisa  (Tag.), sahing (Tag.), tugtugin (Tag.) [4].  Synonyms  Canarium carapifolium, Canarium polyanthum, Canarium oliganthum (Lemmens et al.,1995).  Pimela  luzonica,  Canarium  album,Canarium  commune,  Canarium  carapifolium,  Canarium  polyanthum, Canarium triandrum [4].  Habitat  This species occurs in primary forest at low to medium altitudes (Lemmens et al.,1995).  Population status and trends  Philippines:  Occurrence  reported,  endemic  to  the  island  found  in  Northern  Luzon  (Cagayan)  to  Mindoro, Ticao, and Masbate (Merrill, 1923) (Lemmens et al.,1995) [4].  Role of species in the ecosystem  Flowers are probably insect pollinated. Fruit eating pigeons, monkeys and occasionally bats act as seed  dispersers (Lemmens et al.,1995).  Threats  Habitat loss is likely to be the greatest threat to remaining populations. The timber has not been of great  commercial importance to date (Lemmens et al.,1995).  Utilisation  The kedondong timber is used for light construction. Manila elemi is derived from C. luzonicum and  C. ovatum [4]. Manila elemi is distilled from the resin and used locally for caulking ships, in torches,  varnishes  and  glues  (Lemmens  et  al.,1995)  [2].  Elemi  is  used  for  aromatheraphy  [1][3]  and  as  a  medicinal ointment to treat bronchitis, catarrh, cough, mature skin, scar, stress and wounds [2].  The  average  yield  of  resin  from  a  single  mature  tree  of  C.  luzonicum  is  about  45  kg.  It  is  also  commercially exported for the manufacture of varnish and medicinal ointments. Some are exported to  Europe  for  preparing  medicinal  ointment  while  much  is  exported  to  China  for  manufacturing  transparent paper  used got  window  panes  (Lemmens  et  al.,1995)  [4]. The greater  part  of  the  world’s  supply of elemi (Burseraceae oleo­resin) is derived from the Philippines [4]. The seeds are edible and  the bark yields a tannin of reasonable quality (Lemmens et al.,1995).  Trade  Canarium  timber  is  usually  mixed  with  the  timber  of  other  members  of  Burseraceae  and  sold  as  kedondong.  The  production  of  fruits  appears  to  be  more  commercially  important  than  of  timber  (Lemmens et al. 1995).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd (World Conservation Monitoring Centre,  1998).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  Canarium spp. can be propagated by seed. Natural regeneration is believed to be scarce because of the  scattered  distribution  of  trees  and  possibly  also  because  of  levels  of  fruit  harvesting  (Lemmens  et  al.,1995).  References  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara, & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  No 5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Leiden: Backhuys Publishers. 655 pp.  Merrill,  E.D.  1923.  An  Enumeration  of  Philippine  Flowering  Plants  vol.  2.  Publication  no.  18,  the  government  of  the  Philippines  islands  department  of  agriculture  and  natural  resources  bureau  of  science manila: 530 pp. Page 38 of 150

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  World  Conservation  Monitoring  Centre  1998.  Canarium  luzonicum.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven. 1998. The World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK.  650pp.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.buyaromatherapy.com/store/elemi_oil.html. Pure Elemi Oil. Downloaded 8 June 2006.  [2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elemi. Elemi. Downloaded 8 June 2006.  [3] http://www.fromnaturewithlove.com/product.asp?product_id=eoelemi. Essential oil: Elemi. Downloaded 8  June 2006.  [4]  http://www.bpi.da.gov.ph/Publications/mp/pdf/p/pili.pdf.  Canarium  luzonicum.  Downloaded  on  8  June  2006.

22. Canarium pseudosumatranum Leenh.  Burseraceae  Common names  Malaysia: kala, kedondong senggeh, lamshu senggi (Lemmens et al.,1995).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  This  species  is  scattered  as  very  large  trees  in  lowland  forest  and hill  forest  between  300  and  920m  (Lemmens et al.,1995).  Population status and trends  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia and Sabah. In Peninsular Malaysia, population  recorded in the state of Perlis, Kedah Perak, Selangor, Negeri Sembilan and Pahang (Whitmore, 1983).  Indonesia: Occurrence recorded in Sumatra and Kalimantan. In Kalimantan reported in the East, West  and Central provinces (Argent et al., 1997).  Role of species in the ecosystem  Flowers are probably insect pollinated. Fruit eating pigeons, monkeys and occasionally bats act as seed  dispersers (Lemmens et al.,1995).  Threats  Habitat loss due to clear­felling/logging, infrastructure development and expansion of human  settlement  (Chua, 1997).  Utilisation  The  wood  is  used  as  kedondong  timber  for  house  buidling,  light  construction,  floorings,  interiors,  furniture, joinery, canoes, veneer and plywood (Lemmens et al.,1995).  Trade  Canarium  timber  is  usually  mixed  with  the  timber  of  other  members  of  Burseraceae  and  sold  as  kedondong.  The  production  of  fruits  appears  to  be  more  commercially  important  than  of  timber  (Lemmens et al. 1995). The export of kedondong  as sawnwood, valued at US$638/m³, is recorded in  1995  (ITTO,  1997).  In  1983  16,350m³  of  kedondong  sawnwood  at  a  value  of  US$675,000  was  exported to Singapore (69%), South Korea (19%) and Hong Kong (12%). The following year 9500m³  at a value of US$395,000 was exported to Singapore (99%) and Japan (1%) (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): LRcd (Chua, 1997).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  Canarium spp. can be propagated by seed. Natural regeneration is believed to be scarce because of the  scattered  distribution  of  trees  and  possibly  also  because  of  levels  of  fruit  harvesting  (Lemmens  et  al.,1995).  References  Argent, G., A. Saridan, E.J.F. Campbell and P. Wilkie. 1997. Manual for the larger and more important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda,  Indonesia. 341 pp. Page 39 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Chua, L.S.L. 1997. Canarium pseudosumatranum. In: IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened  Species. . Downloaded on 10 January 2006.  ITTO.  1997.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  tropical  timber  situation.  1996.  International  Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO).  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara, & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  No 5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Leiden: Backhuys Publishers. 655 pp.  Whitmore,  T.C.  (ed.).  1983.  Tree  flora  of  Malaya.  Volume  1.  Longman,  Forest  Department,  Kuala  Lumpur. 473 pp.

23. Cantleya corniculata (Becc.) R.A. Howard  Icacinaceae  Common names  Trade name: dedaru; Brunei: cendana, samala, seranai; Indonesia: bedaru (general), garu buaya  (Sumatra), mendaru (Bangka); Malaysia: bedaru (Sarawak), daru­daru (Peninsular Malaysia), dedadu  (Sabah) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Indonesia: bedaru, Kalimantan: kajo, kakal (Argent et al., 1997).  Bedaru, daru, dedaru, endaru, garu, pedar, tempilai (Sleumer, 1971).  Synonyms  Cantleya johorica, Stemnourus corniculatus and Urandra corniculata (Sosef et al., 1998).  A genus with only one species (Sleumer, 1971).  Habitat  The species is comparatively rare and scattered, and occurs as canopy trees in primary forest, from sea­  level up to about 300 m altitude. It is  found in the  drier parts  of  freshwater and  peat­swamp  forest, in  kerangas as well as in drier hill forest, on marshy or sandy soils. It has been found together with Shorea  uliginosa, Tetramerista glabra and Koompassia malaccensis (Sosef et al., 1998).  Population status and trends  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Sumatra,  Riau  and  Lingga  Islands,  Banka  and  Central  Kalimantan  (Sleumer, 1971).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia  and Sabah (Sleumer, 1971).  Singapore: Occurrence reported (Sleumer, 1971).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  The population is scattered and the timber is in high demand, this makes the species easily become  endangered because of its habitat destruction or overcutting (Sosef et al., 1998).  Utilisation  The  timber  is  highly  valued  and  much  sought  after.  It  is  heavy  and  hard  with  a  fragrance  similar  to  sandalwood  for  which it is  used  as a  substitute.  It  is also  used  for house and  ship  building and heavy  construction. In Borneo it has been regarded as the second most valuable wood for house building. The  fruit can be eaten but is said to be rather poor in quality (Sosef et al., 1998).  Trade  At the beginning of the 20 th  Century the timber was reported to have been found in the Singapore market,  supplies coming from Sumatra and Borneo. It is still exported from the latter areas but it is also used  locally. As supplies are very limited, dedaru seldom comes on the market, and when it does it is generally  sold in mixed consignments. Some of it may be marketed as ‘balau’ (Shorea spp.). The fragrant wood is  reputed to have been exported to China (Sosef et al., 1998).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1c,d (Asia Regional Workshop, 1997).  Conservation measures  There are no records of the species in seed or germplasm banks (Sosef et al., 1998).  Forest management and silviculture  Natural  regeneration  is  generally  sparse  and  silvicultural  research  is  urgently  needed  (Sosef  et  al.,  1998). Page 40 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  References  Argent, G., A. Saridan, E.J.F. Campbell and P. Wilkie. 1997. Manual for the larger and more important  non­dipterocarp trees of central Kalimantan, vol. 1. Forest Research Institute, Samarinda, Indonesia.  341 pp.  Asia Regional Workshop. 1997. Cantleya corniculata. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998.  The World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3).  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 859 pp.  Sleumer, H. 1971. Icacinaceae. Flora Malesiana Ser. I, vol. 7: 1─87.

24. Cephalotaxus oliveri Masters  Cephalotaxaceae  Common name  Vietnam: Phi luoc bí (Vũn, 1996).  China: bi zi san jian shan (Gymnosperm Database, 2006).  Synonym  No Synonyms.  Habitat  This species is mainly  found in evergreen broad­leaved  forests  or in evergreen and deciduous  broad­  leaves mixed forests in valleys and by streams (Fu & Jin, 1992) (Vũn, 1996), or at low altitude of 300­  1000 (­1500) m in subtropical closed forests.  Population status and trends  Distributed  in  China,  Indochina  and  eastern  India.  However  specimens  from  Indochina  and  eastern  India may be considered conspecific with C. mannii (Gymnosperm Database, 2006). It is not recorded  as being grown in the U.S.or U.K. (Tripp, 1995).  China: Occurrence reported in eastern and nortwestern Jiangxi, northern Guangdong, northeastern and  southeastern  Guangxi,  Hunan,  southwestern  Hubei,  northern  and  southeastern  Guizhou,  southeastern  and  central  Sichuan,  western  and  southeastern  Yunnan  (Fu  &  Jin,  1992).  In  China,  the  population  is  scattered in low to middle altitude forests in subtropical regions of China. The C. oliveri population has  reduced rapidly due to over­exploitation of forest, and land conversion (Fu & Jin, 1992).  Laos: Occurrence reported (Vũn, 1996).  Thailand: Occurrence reported (Vũn, 1996).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported in Lam Dong province (Vũn, 1996).  India: Occurrence reported in eastern India (Gymnosperm Database, 2006).  Regeneration  Shade tolerant species with moderately slow growth. Seeds germinate after ripening for one year in the  broad­leaf litter; once the seeds have germinated the seedlings require shade (Fu & Jin, 1992).  Role of Species in its Ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Threatened by over­exploitation and habitat loss (Fu & Jin, 1992) (Vũn, 1996). The dioecious nature of  C. oliveri means that this species is further threatened by frequent regeneration (Fu & Jin, 1992).  Utilisation  Timber  used  for  furniture,  stationary,  tool  handles  and  the  fine  arts.  The  oil  in  the  seeds  is  used  in  painting (Vũn, 1996). C. oliveri contains alkaloids, extracted from leaves, shoots and seeds which hold  medicinal value for treating leukaemia and lymphoma (Fu & Jin, 1992).  Trade  No information.  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1d (Conifer Specialist Group, 1998).  China  Plant  Red  Data  Book:  Vulnerable  (Fu  &  Jin,  1992).  Considered  an  endangered  species  in  Vietnam (Vũn, 1996). Considered endangered thoroughout its range (Tripp, 1995).

Page 41 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Conservation measures  This species is found in several nature reserves (Emei Mountain in Sichuan, Shuanghuang Mountains  and Zhangjiajie in Hunan (Fu & Jin, 1992). In Vietnam, the species requires protection in the Bidoup  and Langbian Nature Reserves (Vũn, 1996).  References  Conifer  Specialist  Group.  1998.  Cephalotaxus  oliveri.  In:  IUCN  2004.  2004  IUCN  Red  List  of  Threatened Species. . Downloaded on 03 January 2006.  Fu,  Li­kuo  &  Jian­ming,  Jin  (eds.).  1992.  China  Plant Red  Data  Book.  Beijing:  Science  Press. xviii­  741.  Gymnosperm Database. http://www.conifers.org/ce/ce/oliveri.htm. Downloaded 8 June 06.  Tripp, Kim E. 1995. Cephalotaxus: the plum yews. Arnoldia 55(1): 24­39.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.

25. Cinnamomum porrectum (Roxb.) Kosterm.  Lauraceae  Common name  Safrol  laurel  (English).  Indonesia:  medang  leash  (general),  ki  sereh  (Sudanese,  Java),  selasihan  (Java),  rawali (Kalimantan). Malaysia: medang kemangi (Peninsular), keplah wangi (Sarawak), bunsod (Sabah).  Myanmar: karawa. Thailand: thep­tharo. Vietnam: re huong (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Karawe (Myanmar), sinkosi (Myanmar), thit­lai­nyin (Myanmar) (Kress et al., 2003).  Synonym  Cinamomum glanduliferum, Cinnamomum parthenoxylon, Cinnamomum sumatranum (Lemmens et  al.,  1995).  Habitat  Found in lowland to montane forest, sometimes in regions with dry season on fertile and poor soils up to  2000(­3000) m altitude (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Population status and trends  Widely  distributed  and  locally  common  from  Tibet  through  India,  China  (Yunnan),  Indo­China  and  Thailand, Peninsular Malaysia, Jawa and Borneo.  China: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al., 1995).  India: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Sumatra, Jawa and Kalimantan (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Myanmar: Occurrence reported in Mon and Taninthyai (Kress et al., 2003)  Singapore: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Thailand: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  The wood of this species is used in furniture making, construction, flooring, utensils and wood­carving.  The wood contains essential oil (safrol) which is used in perfumery and medicine. The roots are used as  medicine for fever, childbirth or as spices (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Trade  Cinnamomum  timber  is  traded  as  medang  together  with  other  Lauraceae  genera.  The  total  export  of  medang in 1984  from  Peninsular  Malaysia to  Singapore  was  1500 m 3  with a  value  of  US$  62000, the  export from Sabah in 1992 was 52000 m 3  with a total value of US$ 4.3 million (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): DD (Asia Regional Workshop, 1997).  Red  Data  Book  of  Vietnam:  K  ­  Insufficiently  known  (Ministry  of  Science,  Technology  and  Environment, 1996).

Page 42 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Forest management and silviculture  Cinnamomum can be propagated by seed. However the seed of C. porrectum has a short viability period  (Lemmens et  al.,  1995). Light demanding. Natural and coppice regeneration good in secondary forests  (Vũn, 1996).  Conservation measures  No information.  References  Asia  Regional  Workshop.  1997.  Discussions  held  during  the  Third  Regional  Workshop  for  the  WCMC/SSC  Conservation  and  sustainable  management  of  trees  project,  Hanoi,  Vietnam,  18­21  August 1997.  Asian Regional Workshop. Cinnamomum porrectum. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998.  The World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650 pp.  Kress, W. J., R. A. DeFilipps, E. Farr, and Daw Yin Yin Kyi. 2003. A Checklist of the Trees, Shrubs,  Herbs  and  Climbers  of  Myanmar  (Revised  from  the  original  works  by  J.  H.  Lace  and  H.  G.  Hundley). Contrib. U. S. Nat. Herbarium 45: 590 pp.  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C.Wong (Eds). 1995. Plant Resources of South East Asia. No.  5(2). Timber Trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp.  Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment. 1996. Red Data Book. Vol. 2: Plants (Sach Do Viet  Nam Phan Thuc Vat). Science and Technical Publishing House, Hanoi. 484pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.

26. Cynometra elmeri Merr.  Leguminosae­Caesalpinoideae  (Taxonomic  note:  the  name  Cynometra  inaequifolia  has  been  commonly  used  and  confused  with  C.  malaccensis in Peninsular Malaysia and C. elmeri in Borneo (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994)).  Common name  Trade name: kekatong (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonym  Cynometera inaequifolia auct. non A. Gray (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Cynometera inaequifolia sensu Ridl. (ILDIS, 2006).  Habitat  Forest back mangrove and swamps, 50­300 m altitude (Ding Hou et al., 1996).  Population status and trends  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Sabah (Ding Hou et al., 1996). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Philippines: Occurrence reported in Luzon, Rial Prov (Ding Hou et al., 1996).Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Kalimantan, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  Wood  is  used  as  kekatong:  wood  used  for  interior  construction,  door  and  window  frames,  heavy­duty  flooring and interior trim. When treated it is suitable for heavy outdoor construction, poles, posts, beams,  railway sleepers, fenders and for boat and ship building. The wood is also suitable for tool handles, toys  and novelties. The wood yields good quality charcoal (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  This is not an important export timber, and only very small amounts are exported. Export of round logs  from  Sabah  in  1987,  which  amounted  to  only  200 m 3  with  a  value  of  US$16  000  (price:  US$  80/m 3 )  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).

Page 43 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1d (WCMC, 1998). This assessement refers to  three Cynometra species (currently recognised as C. elmeri Merr., C. inaequifolia A. Gray and C.  malaccensis Knaap v. Meeuwen).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  All timber extraction for kekatong is from natural forest, and there has been no replanting or enrichment  planting (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Ding Hou, K. Larsen & S.S. Larsen. 1996. Leguminosae­Caesalpinioideae. Flora Malesiana Ser. 1, vol.  12: 409­730.  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org. Downloaded on 8  June 2006.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  WCMC­World Conservation Monitoring Centre. 1998. Cynometra inaequifolia. In: IUCN 2006. 2006  IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. . Downloaded on 8 June 2006.

27. Cynometra inaequifolia A. Gray  Leguminosae­Caesalpinoideae  (Taxonomic  note:  the  name  Cynometra  inaequifolia  has  been  commonly  used  and  confused  for  C.  malaccensis in Peninsular Malaysia and C. elmeri in Borneo (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994)).  Common name  Trade name: kekatong (Malay); Philippines: dila­dila (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonym  Habitat  Forest at low and medium altitudes (Ding Hou et al., 1996).  Population status and trends  Philippines: Occurrence recorded in Luzon, Panay and Negros, native (Ding Hou et al., 1996) (ILDIS,  2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Habitat loss through clear cutting and agriculture (WCMC, 1998).  Utilisation  Wood  is  used  as  kekatong:  wood  used  for  interior  construction,  door  and  window  frames,  heavy­duty  flooring and interior trim. When treated it is suitable for heavy outdoor construction, poles, posts, beams,  railway sleepers, fenders and for boat and ship building. The wood is also suitable for tool handles, toys  and novelties. The wood yields good quality charcoal (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  This is not an important export timber, and only very small amounts are exported. Export of round logs  from  Sabah  in  1987,  which  amounted  to  only  200  m 3  with  a  value  of  US$16  000  (price:  US$  80/m 3 )  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1d (WCMC, 1998). This assessement refers to  three Cynometra species (currently recognised as C. elmeri Merr., C. inaequifolia A. Gray and C.  malaccensis Knaap v. Meeuwen) and therefore do not truly reflect the threat status of C. inaequifolia.  Conservation measures  No information.

Page 44 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Forest management and silviculture  All timber extraction for kekatong is from natural forest, and there has been no replanting or enrichment  planting (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Ding Hou, K. Larsen & S.S. Larsen. 1996. Leguminosae­Caesalpinioideae. Flora Malesiana Ser. 1, vol.  12: 409­730.  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org. Downloaded on 8  June 2006.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  WCMC­World Conservation Monitoring Centre. 1998. Cynometra inaequifolia. In: IUCN 2006. 2006  IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. . Downloaded on 8 June 2006.

28. Cynometra malaccensis Knaap v. Meeuwen  Leguminosae­Caesalpinoideae  (Taxonomic  note:  the  name  Cynometra  inaequifolia  has  been  commonly  used  and  confused  for  C.  malaccensis in Peninsular Malaysia and C. elmeri in Borneo (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994)).  Common name  Trade name: kekatong (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonym  Cynometera inaequifolia auct. non A. Gray (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Cynometra inaequalifolia Baker (ILDIS, 2006).  Habitat  Common  in  the  lowlands  and  hills  to  600  m;  sometimes  locally  abundant  (e.g.  Genting  Sempah,  Peninsular Malaysia); in suitable sites up to c. 900 m altitude (Ding Hou et al., 1996).  Population status and trends  India: Occurrence reported in Assam, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Malaysia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Sabah  (Ding  Hou  et  al.,  1996)  and  Peninsular  Malaysia,  native  (ILDIS, 2006).  Philippines: Occurrence reported in Luzon, Rial Prov (Ding Hou et al., 1996).  Thailand: Occurrence reported in Thailand, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  Wood  is  used  as  kekatong:  wood  used  for  interior  construction,  door  and  window  frames,  heavy­duty  flooring and interior trim. When treated it is suitable for heavy outdoor construction, poles, posts, beams,  railway sleepers, fenders and for boat and ship building. The wood is also suitable for tool handles, toys  and novelties. The wood yields good quality charcoal (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  This is not an important export timber, and only very small amounts are exported. Export of round logs  from  Sabah  in  1987,  which  amounted  to  only  200  m 3  with  a  value  of  US$16  000  (price:  US$  80/m 3 )  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1d (WCMC, 1998). This assessement refers to  three Cynometra species (currently recognised as C. elmeri Merr., C. inaequifolia A. Gray and C.  malaccensis Knaap v. Meeuwen).  Conservation measures  No information. Page 45 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Forest management and silviculture  All timber extraction for kekatong is from natural forest, and there has been no replanting or enrichment  planting (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Ding Hou, K. Larsen & S.S. Larsen. 1996. Leguminosae­Caesalpinioideae. Flora Malesiana Ser. 1, vol.  12: 409­730.  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org. Downloaded on 8  June 2006.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  WCMC­World Conservation Monitoring Centre. 1998. Cynometra inaequifolia. In: IUCN 2006. 2006  IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. . Downloaded on 8 June 2006.

29. Dactylocladus stenostachys Oliv.  Crypteroniaceae  Common name  Trade  name:  jongkong  ;  Brunei:  medang  tabak,  tabak;  Indonesia:  mentibu  (Indonesian),  merubung,  sampinur  (Kalimantan);  Malaysia:  medang  miag  (Kedayan  Sabah),  medang  tabak,  tabak  (Sabah,  Sarawak), merebong (Iban, Sarawak) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  Dominant  tree  in  peat­swamp  forest  in  Sarawak  and  Brunei,  forming  the  Gonystylus­Dactylocladus­  Neoscortechinia  association  in  mixed  peat  swamp  forest  and  the  Combretocarpus­Dactylocladus  association. Found also in kerangas vegetation and in East Kalimantan it is forming an important element  in the Cratoxylum glaucum­ Dactylocladus stenostachys community. Usually found at low attitudes rarely  going up to 800 m (Sosef et al., 1998).  Population status and trends  Monotypic genus endemic to Borneo (Sosef et al., 1998).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Sarawak and Sabah (Sosef et al., 1998).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Kalimantan (Sosef et al., 1998).  Brunei: Occurrence reported (Sosef et al., 1998).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  The tree has been heavily exploited but is thought to be abundant. In Sarawak, its natural regeneration is  encouraging and thus is not at risk of genetic erosion (Sosef et al., 1998).  Utilisation  Exported  wood  of  jongkong  is  used  for  furniture  and  interior  construction.  Domestically  it  is  used  for  concrete  shuttering,  weatherboard,  paticle  boare,  flooring,  interior  construction,  partitioning,  and  sometimes veneer and plywood (Sosef et al., 1998).  Trade  The species is the third most important swamp timber exported from Sarawak after ramin and meranti  (Sosef et al., 1998).  Sarawak export  Year  Export  1987  log  1988  sawnlog  1993  sawnlog  Sabah export  Year  Export 

Volume  (m 3 )  41500  254650  186750 

Value (US$) 

Volume  (m 3 ) 

Value (US$)

10.2 m  15.5 m 

Page 46 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  1987  1992  Sawn timber  1992  log  (Source : Sosef et al., 1998) 

183  598  898 

11000  141500  61000 

Malaysia  export  187100  m3  (average  price  US$  77.28/m 3 ) of  jongkong  log  in  1996.  Japan  imported  74000 m3 of jongkong log in 1998 (average price US$ 113/m 3 ) in 1998. Most of jongkong timber is  exported to Japan (ITTO, 1997­2004)  Conservation status  No information.  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  Little  is  known  on  the  silvicultural  management  of  peat­swamp  forest  for  the  production  of  D.  stenostachys (Sosef et al., 1998).  References  ITTO.  1997­2004.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  timber  situation.  st  http://www.itto.or.jp/live/PageDisplayHandler?pageId=199. Downloaded on 1  January 2006.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3).  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 859 pp.

30. Dalbergia annamensis A. Chev.  Leguminosae ­ Papilionoideae  (Taxonomic  note:  not  found  in  ILDIS  and  IPNI  database.  Possibly  invalidly  published  name  and  related to D. velutina var. annamensis to check with the following articles:  C.  NIYOMDHAM  &  PHAM  HOANG  HÔ.  Nouveautés  taxonomiques  concernant  le  genre  Dalbergia  (Fabaceae)  dans  la  péninsule Indochinoise (Thaïlande, Cambodge, Laos  et  Viêtnam). Bulletin  du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle , Paris, 4e  sér., 18, 1996 Section B, n° 1­2 : 137­149  Abstract: The revision of the genus Dalbergia for the Flore du Cambodge, du Laos et du Viêtnam and for Flora of Thailand has  led  to  establish  the  following  taxonomic  novelties:  3  new  species  (D.  darlacensis  Pham  Hoang  Hô  &  C.  Niyomdham,  D.  suthepensis  C.  Niyomdham,  D.  vietnamensis  Pham  Hoang  Hô  &  C.  Niyomdham),  1  new  variety  (D.  velutina  Benth.  var.  annamensis C. Niyomdham) and 8 new combinations.  Chawalit  NIYOMDHAM,  The  Forest  Herbarium,  Royal  Forest  Department,  Bangkok  10900,  Thailand.  Laboratoire  de  Phanérogamie, Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, 16 rue Buffon, 75005 Paris, France.  PHAM  HOANG  HÔ  ,  7005  St  Dominique,  #  3,  Montréal,  P.Q.,  H2  S3  B6,  Canada.  Laboratoire  de  Phanérogamie,  Muséum  national d'Histoire naturelle, 16 rue Buffon, 75005 Paris, France.) 

Habitat  Lowland dry open forest, at altitudes up to 500m (?).  Population status and trends  The species is scattered in lowland dry open forest (Nghia, 1997).  Vietnam: Endemic to Vietnam, occurring in Phú Yên and Khánh Hòa provinces (Nghia, 1997).  Role of species in the ecosystem  Threats  This species is endangered by over­exploitation for its valuable wood and clear­felling (Nghia, 1997).  Utilisation  No information.  Trade  Minor international trade.  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category: EN A1cd according to Nghia (1997).  Red  Data  Book  of  Vietnam:  E  –  Endangered  (Ministry  of  Science,  Technology  and  Environment,  1996).  Conservation measures  No information. Page 47 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Forest management and silviculture  The species is not in cultivation (?).  References  Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment. 1996. Red Data Book. Vol. 2: Plants (Sach Do Viet  Nam Phan Thuc Vat). Science and Technical Publishing House, Hanoi. 484pp.  Nghia,  N.H.  1997.  Dalbergia  annamensis.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Note: Check this reference ­ Lock, J.M. & J. Heald. 1994. Legumes of Indo­China. The Royal Botanic  Gardens, Kew. 164pp.

31. Dalbergia bariensis Pierre  Leguminosae ­ Papilonoideae  Common name  Vietnam: Cam lai (Vũn, 1996).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  Lowland and submontane broadleaved, dense evergreen tropical forests or semi­deciduous forest up to  1000 m altitude (Nghia, 1997) (Vũn, 1996).  Population status and trends  The species is widely distributed and scattered in Indo­China. A rapid decline in number of large trees  has occurred because of overexploitation of the timber (Nghia, 1997).  Cambodia: Occurrence reported (Nghia, 1997).  Laos: Occurrence reported (Nghia, 1997).  Thailand: Occurrence reported (Nghia, 1997). Native (ILDIS, 2006)  Vietnam: Occurrence reported in southern provinces such as Ba Ria, Gia Lai, Kon Tum, Dac Lac, Lam  Dong, Ninh Thuan, Binh Thuan, Dong Nai, Song Be and Tay Ninh (Vũn, 1996). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Timber exploitation and general clear­felling/logging of the habitat. There has been rapid decline in the  number of large trees because of over­exploitation of the precious timber (Nghia, 1997).  Utilisation  A precious tree species, timber used for furniture, fine art and in wood turnery (Vũn, 1996).  Trade  No information.  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): EN A1cd according to Nghia (1997).  Red  Data  Book  of  Vietnam:  V  ­  Vulnerable  (Ministry  of  Science,  Technology  and  Environment,  1996).  Conservation measures  It is legally protected from cutting in Vietnam and occurs in protected areas in Cat Tien national park,  Nam Ca and Krong Trai nature reserves. The species is not in cultivation (Nghia, 1997).  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on  8 June 2006.  Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment. 1996. Red Data Book. Vol. 2: Plants (Sach Do Viet  Nam Phan Thuc Vat). Science and Technical Publishing House, Hanoi. 484pp. Page 48 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Nghia, N.H. 1997. Dalbergia bariensis. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World  List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.  Note: Check this reference ­ Lock, J.M. & J. Heald. 1994. Legumes of Indo­China. The Royal Botanic  Gardens, Kew. 164pp.

32. Dalbergia cambodiana Pierre  Leguminosae ­ Papilionoideae  Common name  No information.  Synonym  No information.  Distribution  Cambodia, Vietnam (Nghia, 1997).  Habitat  This species occurs in moist lowland forest up to an altitude of 500m (Nghia, 1997).  Population status and trends  Widely distributed but scattered (Nghia, 1997).  Cambodia: Occurrence recorded, native (Nghia, 1997) (ILDIS, 2006).  Vietnam: Occurrence recorded, native (Nghia, 1997) (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Illegal exploitation and habitat loss through clear­felling/logging (Nghia, 1997).  Utilisation  The wood is valuable (Nghia, 1997).  Trade  Minor international trade (?).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): EN A1cd (Nghia, 1997).  Conservation measures  This species is not in cultivation.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on  8 June 2006.  Nghia,  N.H.  1997.  Dalbergia  cambodiana.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Note: Check this reference ­ Lock, J.M. & J. Heald. 1994. Legumes of Indo­China. The Royal Botanic  Gardens, Kew. 164pp.

Page 49 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

33. Dalbergia cochinchinensis Pierre  Leguminosae ­ Papilionoideae  Common name  Vietnam: Trac (Vũn, 1996).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  In  Vietnam  the  tree  grows  sparsely  in  open  and  semi­deciduous  forests,  occasionally  in  pure  stands.  Mainly concentrated at altitudes of 400­500 m preferring deep sandy clay soil and calcareous soil (Vũn,  1996).  Population status and trends  Cambodia: Occurrence reported (Vũn, 1996) (Asia Regional Workshop, 1997). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Thailand: Occurrence reported (Asia Regional Workshop, 1997). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Laos:Occurrence reported (Vũn, 1996) (Asia Regional Workshop, 1997).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported, found south of Quang Nam­Da Nang, mainly in Gia Lai and Kon Tum, in  other  provinces  it  is  sparsely  distributed  in  a  few  localities  (Vũn,  1996)  (Asia  Regional  Workshop,  1997). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Deforestation and exploitation are threats to this species (Asia Regional Workshop, 1997).  Utilisation  D.  cochinchinensis  is  considered  a  `first  class  prime  timber',  as  it  is  hard,  durable,  easy  to  work  and  resistant to insects. The distinctive heartwood makes beautiful patterns when cut and the wood is used to  make furniture, carvings, musical instruments and sewing machines (Vũn, 1996).  Trade  No specific information on trade in this species is available.  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd (Asia Regional Workshop, 1997).  Red Data Book of Vietnam: V – vulnerable (Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment, 1996)  (Vũn, 1996).  It is also of conservation concern in Thailand (Phengklai, pers. comm. 1989).  Conservation measures  A  current  IPGRI  project  is  looking  at  the  distribution  of  genetic  resources  of  this  species  in  its  range  countries. It is found in some nature reserves (WCMC, 1997).  Forest management and silviculture  This species is shade tolerant as a sapling and becomes light demanding. D. cochinchinensis has quite a  slow growth rate. It regenerates well by coppicing (Vũn, 1996).  References  Asia  Regional  Workshop,  1997.  Dalbergia  cochinchinensis.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven. 1998. The World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK.  650pp  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on  8 June 2006.  Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment. 1996. Red Data Book. Vol. 2: Plants (Sach Do Viet  Nam  Phan  Thuc  Vat).  Science  and  Technical  Publishing  House,  Hanoi.  484pp.Vũn,  V.D.  (ed.).  1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.  WCMC  1997.  Report  of  the  Third  Regional  Workshop,  held  at  Hanoi,  Vietnam,  18­21  August  1997.  Conservation and sustainable management of trees project. Unpublished.

Page 50 of 150

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Correspondence and personal communications  Phengklai, pers. comm. 1989.  Additional web references  http://www.gilmerwood.com/species­page2.htm 

Note: Check this reference ­ Lock, J.M. & J. Heald. 1994. Legumes of Indo­China. The Royal Botanic  Gardens, Kew. 164pp.

34. Dalbergia mammosa Pierre  Leguminosae ­ Papilionoideae  Common name  Vietnam: cam lai vu (Vũn, 1996).  Synomym  No Synonym.  Habitat  Dense semi­deciduous forest or transitional forest between evergreen and dry dipterocarp forest, up to  800  m. altitude,  sometimes  along  streams.  Found  on  deep and  well­drained  old  basalt  or  old  alluvial  soils  (Vũn,  1996)  (Nghia,  1997).  Grows  in  association  with  Terminalia  chebula,  Terminalia  nigrovenulosa,  Stereospermum  cylindricum,  Hymenodyction  exselsum,  Allospondias  lakoensis  and  Hopea odorata (Vũn, 1996).  Population status and trends  Vietnam:  Occurrence  reported  in Central  and  Southern  Vietnam (Nghia, 1997).  Found  in  Kon Tum,  Gia Lai, Dac Lac, Dong Nai and Song Be provinces (Vũn, 1996). Scattered in broadleaved forest, the  entire population has declined through over­exploitation of the valuable timber (Nghia, 1997). Native  (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Over­exploitation of the valuable timber through illegal felling; clear­felling/logging of the habitat  (Nghia, 1997).  Utilisation  Timber used for furniture and house­building. Leaves provide black dye (Vũn, 1996).  Trade  No information.  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): EN A1cd (Nghia, 1997).  Red  Data  Book  of  Vietnam:  V  ­  Vulnerable  (Ministry  of  Science,  Technology  and  Environment,  1996).  Conservation measures  The  species  is  legally  protected  as  it  is  included  in  the  Council  of  Ministers  Decision  18/HDBT  (17  January 1992) as a species with high economical value which is subject to  over­exploitation (?). It is  not in cultivation (?).  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on  8 June 2006.  Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment. 1996. Red Data Book. Vol. 2: Plants (Sach Do Viet  Nam Phan Thuc Vat). Science and Technical Publishing House, Hanoi. 484pp.  Nghia, 1997. Dalbergia mammosa. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World List of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp Page 51 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.

35. Dalbergia oliveri Gamble ex Prain  Leguminosae­Papilionoideae  Common names  Vietnam: cam lai bong (Vũn, 1996).  Myanmar: Burmese rosewood, mai­ho­gwan, tabauk, tamalan (Kress et al., 2003).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  Dense  evergreen  or  semi­deciduous  forest  up  to  1200  m  (Nghia,  1997).  Grows  in  association  with  Dalbergia  cochinchinensis,  Albizzia  chinensis,  Sindora  siamensis  and  Dipterocarpus  alatus  (Vũn,  1996).  Population status and trends  Scattered in dense evergreen or semi­deciduous forest within a relatively restricted area of distribution  (Nghia, 1997).  India: Occurrence reported in Arunachal Prades, possibly introduced (ILDIS, 2006).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported (ILDIS, 2006).  Myanmar:  Occurrence  reported  in  Bago  and  Mandalay  (Nghia,  1997)  (Kress  et  al.,  2003).  Native  (ILDIS, 2006).  Thailand: Occurrence reported (Vũn, 1996) (Nghia, 1997). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Vietnam:  Occurrence  reported  ,  found in  Ninh  Thuan,  Binh Thuan,  Lam  Dong and  Dong  Nai  (Bien  Hoa) provinces (Vũn, 1996) (Nghia, 1997). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Over­exploitation and habitat loss through clear­felling/logging (Nghia, 1997).  Utilisation  Produces a beautiful hard red wood, suitable for furniture and handles of agricultural tools (Vũn, 1996).  Trade  Occurs in international trade.  Export of Dalbergia oliveri from Myanmar (ITTO, 1997­2003):  Average Price  Year  Trade  Volume m 3  US$/m 3  1996  30  1999  368  302  Log  2001  98  136  2002  43  233  2003  53  151  1999  17  122  1999  630  94  Sawnwood  2000  689  90  2001  3575  90  2002  2618  285  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): EN A1cd (Nghia, 1997).  Conservation measures  In Vietnam the species is included in the Council of Ministers Decision 18/HDBT (17 January 1992) as  a species with high economical value which is subject to over­exploitation (?). A protected population  occurs in Nam Cát Tiên National Park (Nghia, 1997). Page 52 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on  8 June 2006.  ITTO.  1997­2003.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  timber  situation.  http://www.itto.or.jp/live/PageDisplayHandler?pageId=199. Downloaded on 1 st  January 2006.  Nghia, 1997. Dalbergia oliveri. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World List of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.  Additional web references  http://www.gilmerwood.com/species­page2.htm

36. Dalbergia tonkinensis Prain  Leguminosae ­ Papilionoideae  Common names  No information.  Synonym  No information.  Habitat  Primary and secondary lowland forest up to 500m. Associated species are Aglaia gigantea, Canarium  album and Ailanthus altissima (Vũn, 1996).  Population status and trends  The  tree  is  known  from  scattered  populations in  forest  areas  in  Vietnam and  Hainan  Ialand  in  China  (Ban, 1997).  China: Occurrence reported in Hainan island (Ban, 1997). Native (ILDIS, 2006). Habitat loss on  Hainan Island through logging has also been significant (Ban, 1997).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported  in Lang Son, Ha Bac, Quang Ninh and Ninh Binh provinces. Planted in  Hanoi city and some other towns in northern Vietnam as shade trees (Vũn, 1996). In Vietnam heavy  exploitation  of  the  timber  has  led  to  considerable  population  declines  (Ban,  1997).  Native  (ILDIS,  2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Logging of the species; clear­felling/logging of the habitat; forest clearance for agriculture (Ban, 1997).  Utilasation  The timber is utilised in construction, tools, furnitures, carving and art. The species is also grown as an  shade tree (Vũn, 1996).  Trade  Minor international trade (?).  Conservatin status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd (Ban, 1997).  Red  Data  Book  of  Vietnam:  V  ­  Vulnerable  (Ministry  of  Science,  Technology  and  Environment,  1996).  Conservation measures  Require protection in nature reserves in Lang Son province (Vũn, 1996).  Forest management and silviculture  No information.

Page 53 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  References  Ban, N.T. 1997. Dalbergia tonkinensis. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World  List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on  8 June 2006.  Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment. 1996. Red Data Book. Vol. 2: Plants (Sach Do Viet  Nam Phan Thuc Vat). Science and Technical Publishing House, Hanoi. 484pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.

37. Dehaasia caesia Blume  Lauraceae  Common names  Trade name: medang; Indonesia: huru kacang (Sudanese), madang intalo (Kalimantan), medang batu  (Sumatra) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Indonesia: medang batu, Dayak: panguan tulang (Argent et al., 1997).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  Lowland forest (Argent et al., 1997).  Population status and trends  The risk of genetic erosion for Dehaasia spp. is generally considered to be small because this species is not  restricted in distribution (Sosef et al., 1998).  Brunei: OccuranceOccurrence reported (Argent et al., 1997).  Indonesia: OccuranceOccurrence reported in Sumatra, Java and Kalimantan (Sosef et al., 1998).  Malaysia: OccuranceOccurrence reported in Sabah and Sarawak (Argent et al., 1997).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  The wood of Deehasia is used for light construction under cover, house posts, house piling, interior finish,  panelling, partitioning and ceilings, furniture and cabinet work, turnery, carvings, picture framing, musical  instruments, tools,  oars, boat  building and knife sheaths. Veneer and ply  wood  of  varying quality  can be  manufractured from the wood  (Sosef et al., 1998).  Trade  This is one of the main species traded as medang and constitutes a small portion of the trade. In 1992, the  export of medang from Sabah amount to 52 000 m 3  with a total value of US$ 4.3 million (Sosef  et al.,  1998).  Conservation category  The species has been recorded as Rare in Indonesia (WCMC, 1991).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Argent, G., A. Saridan, E.J.F. Campbell and P. Wilkie. 1997. Manual for the larger and more important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda,  Indonesia. 341 pp.

Page 54 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3).  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 859 pp.  WCMC 1991. Provision of data on rare and threatened tropical timber species. Unpublished report,  prepared under contract to the EC.

38. Dehaasia cuneata Blume  Lauraceae  Common names  Trade name: medang; Indonesia: medang kelaban, medang telur (Sumatra), medang penguan  (Kalimantan); Malaysia: medang paying (Peninsular Malaysia) (Sosef  et al., 1998).  Habitat  Scattered in lowland dipterocarp forest (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994).  Population status and trends  The species is naturally scattered. It has been recorded as Rare in Indonesia (WCMC, 1991). The risk of  genetic  erosion  for  Dehaasia  spp.  is  generally  considered  to  be  small  because  they  are  not  restricted  in  distribution (Sosef et al., 1998).  Indonesia:  Occurence  reported  in  Sumatra  and  Kalimantan,  possibly  extinct in  Java  (WCMC,  1991)  (Argent et al., 1997) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Malaysia: Occurence reported in Peninsular Malaysia (WCMC, 1991) (Sosef et al., 1998), Sabah and  Sarawak (Argent et al., 1997).  Thailand: Occurence reported (WCMC, 1991).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  This species is not used as timber in Malaysia or Indonesia (WCMC, 1997).  Trade  No information.  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category: DD (WCMC, 1997).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Argent, G., A. Saridan, E.J.F. Campbell and P. Wilkie. 1997. Manual for the larger and more important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda,  Indonesia. 341 pp.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3).  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 859 pp.  WCMC  1991.  Provision  of  data  on  rare  and  threatened  tropical  timber  species.  Unpublished  report,  prepared under contract to the EC.  WCMC  1997.  Report  of  the  Third  Regional  Workshop,  held  at  Hanoi,  Vietnam,  18­21  August  1997.  Conservation and sustainable management of trees project. Unpublished.

Page 55 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

39. Dialium cochinchinense Pierre  Leguminosae ­ Caesalpinoideae  Common name  Trade name: keranji. Velvet tamarind (English); Malaysia: keranji kertas kecil (Peninsular Malaysia);  Cambodia : krâlanh lomië; Laos: kheng. Thailand: khleng (general), i­dang (northern), kayi  (peninsular); Vietnam: xoay, x[aa]y, nh[ooj] (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994.  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  Dense  evergreen  and  semi­deciduous  forest  and  in  transistional  forest  between  evergreen  and  open  dipterocarp forest, the species is recorded up to 800 m altitude (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (Vũn,  1996).  Population status and trends  Trees of the genus Dialium are naturally scattered and large­scale logging may endanger species  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). Occurring in various forest types throughout Indo­China south into  Peninsular Thailand and Malaysia, this species is becoming rare in many places because of  overexploitation (WCMC, 1998).  Brunei: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Cambodia: Occurrence reported (Ding Hou et al., 1996). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Laos: Occurrence reported (Ding Hou et al., 1996). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia (Ding Hou et al., 1996) and Sarawak (ILDIS,  2006). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Myanmar: Occurrence reported (Ding Hou et al., 1996).  Thailand: Occurrence reported (Ding Hou et al., 1996). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported from Nghe An, Ha Tinh, Kon Tum, Dong Nai and Song Be provinces,  listed as threatened (Vũn, 1996). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  The fruits are eaten by animals and are carried in water currents (Vũn, 1996).  Threats  Exploitation of the species and clear­felling/logging of the habitat (WCMC, 1998).  Utilisation  The timber is used as keranji which is highly­valued locally. Keranji is a good general­purpose timber.  It is used for ship and boat building, constructing vehicle bodies, furniture, panelling, tood handles,  gymnasium equipment, toys and novelty items. The wood is mainly used for construction, however it is  not suitable for purposes in contact with the ground due to its moderate natural durability. The sweet  pulp of the fruits is edible and the tree is used locally as a shade tree (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  Tree of minor international trade. Trees are difficult to cut because of the dense wood and as they are  also scattered, commercial extraction is not favoured. During the late 19 th  Century and the beginning of  the 20 th  Century, logs were exported from Peninsular Malaysia to China, but when the number of the  large trees diminished, keranji timber lost its importance. However when timber is becoming more  valuable, there is a tendency to view any timber left in the forest as worth harvesting (Soerianegara &  Lemmens, 1994).  Conservatin status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): LR/nt (WCMC, 1998).  Red  Data  Book  of  Vietnam:  K  –  Insufficiently  known  (Ministry  of  Science,  Technology  and  Environment, 1996).  Conservation measures  A  protected  population  occurs  in  Kon  Cha  Rang  Nature  Reserve,  Vietnam  (Vũn,  1996).  Planted  in  villages of northern Peninsular Malaysia for its fruits (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).

Page 56 of 150

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Forest management and silviculture  Research is required on silvicultural and management aspects (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Ding Hou, K. Larsen & S.S. Larsen. 1996. Leguminosae­Caesalpinioideae. Flora Malesiana Ser. 1, vol.  12: 409­730.  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on 14  June 2006.  Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment. 1996. Red Data Book. Vol. 2: Plants (Sach Do Viet  Nam Phan Thuc Vat). Science and Technical Publishing House, Hanoi. 484pp.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.  WCMC. Dialium cochinchinense. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World List of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650 pp.

40. Diospyros blancoi A.DC.  Ebenaceae  Common name  Trade name: streaky ebony; English: Mabolo, velvet apple, butter fruit. Indonesia: buah mentega (Malay,  Sumatra), bisbul, mabolo (Sudanese); Malaysia: buah lemah, buah sagalat, kayu mentega; Philippines:  mabolo, kamagong (general), talang (Tagalog) (Lemmens et al. 1995).  Synonym  Diospyros discolor (Lemmens et al. 1995).  Habitat  Found in primary and secondary forest up to 800 m altitude (Lemmens et al. 1995).  Population status and trends  Native  to  the  Philippines  and  Taiwan;  occasionally  planted  elsewhere  in  Peninsular  Malaysia,  Sumatra,  Java and other topical areas (Lemmens et al. 1995).  Philippines: Occurrence reported, very common and widespread (Lemmens et al. 1995).  Taiwan: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al. 1995).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Habitat loss through logging and shifting cultivation has led to considerable population declines (WCMC,  1998).  Utilisation  The  wood  is  used  for  carving  and  special  furniture.  This  species  is  occasionally  cultivated  for  its  fruits  (mabolo) and as a roadside tree (Lemmens et al. 1995).  Trade  No information.  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd (WCMC, 1998).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  WCMC  1991.  Provision  of  data  on  rare  and  threatened  tropical  timber  species.  Unpublished  report,  prepared under contract to the EC.  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp. Page 57 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  WCMC.  Diospyros  blancoi.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World  List  of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.

41. Diospyros ferrea  Ebenaceae  Distribution  Angola, Australia, Benin, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Fiji, Ghana,  Guinea,  Guinea­Bissau,  India,  Indonesia,  Japan,  Laos,  Madagascar,  Malaysia  (Peninsular  Malaysia),  Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Sri Lanka,  Taiwan, Thailand, Zimbabwe.  Habitat  In Papua New Guinea the species is found in tropical, lowland, moist, broadleaved, closed forest, open  forest; mainly in primary rainforest and on limestone (Eddowes, 1997). It is associated with Syzygium,  Palaquium, Aglaia spp and Eucalypopsis papuana (Eddowes, 1997).  Altitude: 0 – 50(?)m (Eddowes, 1997)  Population status and trends  This family is in dire need of an orderly revision, especially the Papua New Guinea species; the major  species that produce the famed commercial striped and black ebony from Papua New Guinea are still  broadly  lumped  under  the  very  doubtful  Diospyros  ferrea  group  (Eddowes,  1997b).  Therefore  the  major  species  of  Papua  New  Guinea,  which are  clearly  highly  endangered  through  over­exploitation,  cannot be correctly classified due to the insatisfactory taxonomy of the group (Eddowes, 1997b).  Role of species in the ecosystem  Threats  In  Papua  New  Guinea  the  species  is  threatened  mainly  by  clear­felling  or  logging  of  the  habitat  (Eddowes,  1997).  Secondary  threats  include  the  expanding  human  settlements  and  increased  subsistence farming (Eddowes, 1997).  Utilisation  Trade  The timber is found in major international trade (Eddowes, 1997).  The export of Diospyros spp. is banned in round log form from Papua New Guinea (Eddowes, 1997).  IUCN Conservation category  EN A1cd+2cd, B1+2abcde according to Eddowes, P.J. (1997).  Conservation notes: A valuable ebony timber tree. Due to the doubtful status of the Diospyros ferrea  species  group,  as  applied,  it  is  difficult  to  assign  a  specific  IUCN  threat  category.  In  Papua  New  Guinea, it occurs in primary rainforest and is all but restricted to Woodlark Island and possibly some  other small islands in the D'Entrecasteaux group. Although the export of Diospyros spp. is banned in  round  log  form  from  Papua  New  Guinea,  this  tree  has  been  vigorously  exploited  in  this  and  other  regions  and  is  highly  endangered.  This  species  is  in  dire  need  of  immediate  and  strict  conservation  measures if this species is to survive in perpetuity. The above category applies to Papua New Guinea  but could well be applied to other countries in its range.  Conservation measures  Forest management and silviculture  Status in cultivation: small scale  References  Ake Assi, L. 1990. Annotated WCMC list of timber species for the Ivory Coast. (Côte d'Ivoire).  Balakrishna, P. & T. Ravishankar. 1993. Letter with list of corrections to TPU printout for India. 3pp.  Dassanayake,  M.D.  &  F.R.  Fosberg  (eds.).  1980.  A  revised  handbook  to  the  flora  of  Ceylon.  New  Delhi: Amerind Publ. Co.  Eddowes, P.J. 1997a. Completed data collection forms for New Guinea.  Eddowes, P.J. 1997b. Letter from Peter Eddowes to Sara Oldfield dated 13 October, 1997.  Hawthorne, W.D. 1995. Ecological profiles of Ghanaian forest trees. Oxford Forestry Institute. 345pp.  Hutchinson,  J.,  J.M.  Dalziel,  &  F.N.  Hepper.  1927.  Flora of  West  Tropical  Africa.  Published  by  the  English Ministry of State for the Colonies.  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society.  343pp. Page 58 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Papua  New  Guinea  Department  of  Forests.  1989.  Facts  and  figures  1989.  Boroko  NCD:  Papua  New  Guinea Department of Forests. 46pp.  Phengklai, C. 1978. Ebenaceae of Thailand. Thai Forest Bulletin 11: 1­103.  Said, I.M. & Z. Rozainah. 1992. An updated list of wetland plant species of Peninsular Malaysia, with  particular reference to those having socio­economic value. Asian Wetland Bureau. 109pp.  Timberlake,  J.R.  1995.  Annotations  to  WCMC  printout  entitled  "Conservation  status  listing  for  Zimbabwe". 79pp.  White, F. 1978. The taxonomy, ecology and chorology of African Ebenaceae, I. The Guineo­Congolian  species. Bull. Jard. Bot. Nat. Belg. 48: 245­358.  Wild, H. & T. Müller. 1979. Rhodesia. Part of appendix to: Possibilities and needs for conservation of  plant  species  and  vegetation  in  Africa.  pp.  99­100.  In  Hedberg,  I.  (ed.).  Systematic  botany,  plant  utilization and biosphere conservation. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell International.

42. Diospyros mun A.Chev  Ebenaceae  Common names  Vietnam: Mun (Vũn, 1996).  Trade name: Mun ebony [1]  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habit  The species grows on limestone mountains in the Northern provinces, up to elevations of 800 m. Further  south it occurs on yellow ferallitic soils developed from schists (Vũn, 1996).  Population status and trends  Populations of this slow­growing species have declined in the wild because of the demand for timber for  the export market.  Vietnam: Endemic to Vietnam. In the northern provinces it is found at Ha Tuyen, Lang Son, Hoa Binh,  Ha Tinh, Quang Binh; in the south it occurs at the communes of Cam Thinh Dong and Cam Thinh Tay,  district Cam Ranh, province Khanh Hoa (Vũn, 1996).  Laos: Occurrence reported [1].  Threat  No information.  Utilisation  Diospyros  mun  yields  back heartwood  which is  valued  for craft  objects and  especially  for  chopsticks.  Fresh seeds give black dye for dyeing fabric (Vũn, 1996).  Trade  In trade [1][2].  Conservatin status  IUCN Conservation Category: CR A1cd (Nghia, 1998).  Red  Data  Book  of  Vietnam:  V  –  Vulnerable  (Ministry  of  Science,  Technology  and  Environment,  1996).  Conservation measures  No information.  Additional protection needs  Protection of the species is needed, especially at the Nature Reserve of Cam Thinh Dong, district Cam  Ranh and at another reserve in Quang Binh province. Ex situ Conservation measures are also urgently  needed (Vũn, 1996).  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment. 1996. Red Data Book. Vol. 2: Plants (Sach Do Viet  Nam Phan Thuc Vat). Science and Technical Publishing House, Hanoi. 484pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp. Page 59 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Nghia,  N.H.  Diosyros  mun.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World  List  of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp  Additional web references  [1] http://www.exoticwoodgroup.com/order_mun_ebony.htm. Exotic Wood Group. Downloaded 3 May 06  [2]  http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/ebony,%20mun.htm.  Exotic  Wood.  Downloaded  3  May  2006.

43. Diospyros philippinensis A.DC.  Ebenaceae  Common name  Trade name: black ebony; Indonesia: boniok (Sulawesi); Philippines: kamagong, ooi (general), bato  bantilan (Mindoro) (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Synonyms  Diospyros cunalon, Diospyros cumingii, Diospyros flavicans (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Habitat  Found in primary forest at altitudes up to 200 m (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Population status and trends  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Northern Sulawesi (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Philippines:  Occurrence  reported  in  Philippines  (Lemmens  et  al.,  1995).  In  the  Philippines  the  exploitation  of  ebony  has  caused  the  species  to  become  rare,  very  little  lowland  forest  remains  and  records of Philippines ebony are often from forest fragments smaller than 50 km 2 . Despite a ban on log  exports  which  came  into  force  in  1989,  there  have  been  reports  of  illegal  trade  (Asian  Regional  Workshop, 1998).  Role of Species in its Ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Logging has depleted black ebony resource in the wild (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Utilisation  The  timber  is  used  as  black  ebony,  for  furniture,  carving,  tool,  toy,  decorative  veneer  and  musical  instrument (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Trade  Illegal trade in D. philippinensis is widespread, even though there has been a ban on log exports since  1989 (CITES Proposal, 1992).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation Category: EN A1c, B1 + 2abc (Asian Regional Workshop, 1998).  Conservation measures  Philippine ebony is protected in the Philippines (Lemmens et al., 1995). D. philippinensis is found in  many  of  the  Philippine  protected  areas  such  as  Mount  Arayat  National  Park,  Mounts  Palay  Palay  Mataas NA Gulod National Park and Initai National Park (CITES Proposal, 1992).  References  Asian Regional Workshop. Diosyros philippinensis. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998.  The World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  CITES Proposal, 1992. Proposal to include Diospyros philippinensis in Appendix II of CITES.  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp.

44. Diospyros pilosanthera Blanco  Ebenaceae  Common name  Trade  name:  streaked  ebony.  Indonesia:  semetik  (Sumatra),  balun  injuk  (Java),  kayu  arang Page 60 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  (Kalimantan).  Malaysia:  buey,  kayu  arang  (Peninsular).  Philippines:  bolong­eta  (general).  Thailand:  nian (peninsular), damdong (south­eastern), kaling (north­eastern) (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Synonym  Diospyros hiernii (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Habitat  D. pilosanthera occurs in primary lowland and medium altitude forest (up to 900 m) and is frequently  found in peat swamp forest, swampy areas, and in river valley forests (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Population status and trends  This species is  widespread across Southeast Asia and apparently  very  variable, 8 varieties have  been  distinguished (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Cambodia: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Sumatra, Java, Kalimantan, Maluku and Sulawesi (Lemmens et al.,  1995). D. pilosanthera var. elmeri is endemic to Borneo and in Indonesia reported in East and Central  Kalimantan. D. pilosanthera var. oblonga is reported in Sumatra and Kalimantan. D. pilosanthera var.  polyalthioides is reported in Sumatra, Java, Kalimatan, Sulawesi and Maluku (Argent et al. 1997).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak (Lemmens et al., 1995). D.  pilosanthera  var.  elmeri  is  endemic  to  Borneo  and  in  Malaysia  reported  in  Sabah  and  Sarawak  (Soepadmo et al., 2002) . D. pilosanthera var. oblonga reported in Peninsular Malaysia and Sarawak.  D. pilosanthera var. polyalthioides is reported in Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak (Argent et  al. 1997).  Myanmar: Occurrence reported in Taninthayi (Lemmens et al., 1995) (Kress et al., 2003).  Philippines:  Occurrence  reported  (Lemmens  et  al.,  1995).  D.  pilosanthera  var.  oblonga  and  D.  pilosanthera var. polyalthioides were reported (Argent et al. 1997).  Singapore: Occurence reported Ng& Wee, 1994).  Thailand: Occurrence reported. D. pilosanthera var. oblonga and D. pilosanthera var. polyalthioides  were reported (Lemmens et al., 1995) (Argent et al. 1997).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Role of Species in its Ecosystem  No information.  Threats  According to Madulid (1996) this species is rarely exploited for timber.  Utilisation  The wood is used as streaked ebony  for fancy  woodwork, furniture, cabinet making and tool handles  (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Trade  No information.  Conservation Status  The Singapore Red Data Book: Rare [R] (Ng& Wee, 1994).  Conservation measures  D. pilosanthera occurs in the protected forests of Palawan and Mt. Makiling, Philippines (Madulid, in  litt., 1996); the rest of the range in the Philippines (i.e. any public land) are under the jurisdiction of the  Dep't  of  Environment  and  Natural  Resources  (DENR).  There  are  no  known  plantations  of  D.  pilosanthera in the Philippines (Madulid, in litt., 1996).  References  Argent, G., A. Saridan, E.J.F. Campbell and P. Wilkie. 1997. Manual for the larger and more important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda,  Indonesia. 341 pp.  Kress, W. J., R. A. DeFilipps, E. Farr, and Daw Yin Yin Kyi. 2003. A Checklist of the Trees, Shrubs,  Herbs  and  Climbers  of  Myanmar  (Revised  from  the  original  works  by  J.  H.  Lace  and  H.  G.  Hundley). Contrib. U. S. Nat. Herbarium 45: 590 pp.  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp.  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society.  343pp.  Soepadmo, E., L.G. Saw & Richard C.K. Chung, (eds.). 2002. Tree flora of Sabah and Sarawak, vol. 4:  388 pp. Page 61 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Correspondence and personal communications  Madulid, D. A., 1996. Letter to Amy MacKinven dated 11th July 1996 re: Diospyros pilosanthera and  D. philippinensis.

45. Diospyros rumphii Bakh.  Ebenaceae  Common name  Trade  name:  black  ebony,  Macassar  ebony,  streaked  ebony;  Indonesia:  maitem,  moyondi  (Sulawesi),  mologotu (Maluku) (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Synonym:  Diospyros utilis  Habitat  Lowland forest up to 400 m altitude (Lemmens, Soerianegara and Wong, 1995).  Population status and trends  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Sulawesia and Maluku (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  Used  as  black  and  streaked  ebony,  for  furniture,  carving,  tool,  toy,  decorative  veneer  and  musical  instrument (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Trade  The species is an important source of black and streaked ebony (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation Category: DD (Asia Regional Workshop, 1998).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Asian Regional Workshop. Diosyros rumphii. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The  World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.globalwoodsource.com/store.php?ctgid=9. Global Wood Source. Downloaded 2 August 06.

46. Durio dulcis Becc.  Bombacaceae  Common names  Trade name: durian; Kalimantan: durian (bala, tinggang), duyen, pesasang, lah(o)(u)ng, Lay(j)ung  (Argent et al., 1997)).  Indonesia & Malaysia (Borneo): lahong, layung, durian bala (Dayak), durian merah (Malay), durian isa  (Iban), pesasang (Tidung) (Lemmens et al., 1995).

Page 62 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Synonyms  Durio conicus (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Habitat  A large tree found scattered in lowland dipterocarp forest to 200 ­ 800 m (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994)  (Lemmens et al., 1995) (Argent et al., 1997).  Population status and trends  Endemic to Borneo (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Indonesia: Occurrence recorded in all provinces in Kalimantan (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994) (Lemmens  et al., 1995) (Argent et al., 1997).  Malaysia: Occurrence recoded in Sabah and Sarawak (Lemmens et al., 1995) (Argent et al., 1997).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Forest clearance and degradation because of agriculture and logging are major threats to the habitat  (WCMC, 1998). Genetic erosion has been reported for this species in Indonesia and protection is  required (Lemmens et al., 1995) (WCMC, 1998) [1].  Utilisation  The fruits and timber are utilised. The wood is probably one of the most important sources of durian  timber in Sarawak and Kalimantan (Lemmens et al., 1995) (Argent et al., 1997).  Trade  The fruits are sold in local and urban markets (WCMC, 1998). Timber of Durio is traded together with  timber of other Bombacaceae genera (Lemmens et al, 1995). Durian timber is exported primarily from  Sabah and Sarawak mainly to Japan (Lemmens et al, 1995). In 1987 Sabah exported a total of 5,300 m 3  round logs for US$67/m 3  and in 1992 they exported 8,500m 3  round logs and sawn wood with a total value  of US$655,000 (US$170/m 3  for sawn wood and US$68/m 3  for round logs) (Lemmens et al, 1995).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation Category: VU A1c (WCMC, 1998).  Conservation measures  No specific conservation measures known.  Forest management and silviculture  The  species  is  occasionally  planted  for  food,  but  this  is  rare  because  of  its  short  fruiting  period  (WCMC, 1998)[1].  References  Argent, G., A. Saridan, E.J.F. Campbell and P. Wilkie. 1997. Manual for the larger and more important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda,  Indonesia. 341 pp.  Kessler,  P.J.A  &  K.  Sidiyasa.  1994.  Trees  of  the  Balikpapan­Samarinda  area,  East  Kalimantan,  Indonesia:  a  manual  of  280  selected  species.  Tropenbos  Series  7.  The  Tropenbos  Foundation,  Wageningen. 446 pp.  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp.  WCMC. Durio dulcis. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World List of Threatened  Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Additional web references  [1]  http://www.worldagroforestry.org/SEA/Products/AFDbases/AF/asp/SpeciesInfo.asp?SpID=18193.  AgroForestryTree Database. Downloaded 2 August 06.

Page 63 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

47. Durio kutejensis Becc.  Bombacaceae  Synonyms  Lahia kutejensis (Lemmens et al, 1995).  Common names  Trade name: durian ; Borneo: durian kunin (Brunei); lai, sekawi (Dayak, Kalimantan); durian tinggang  (Malay, Kalimantan), durian merah (Sabah) and rain isu (Iban, Sarawak) (Lemmens et al, 1995).  Lai (Dayak, Kalimantan), lae (Dayak benuag) (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994)  Durian (kuning, tinggang), lai, layuk, lembunyu, pekawai, putuk, ruas, sekawi. (Argent et al., 1997)  Habitat  The  wild populations are  found in lowland mixed dipterocarp  forest  on  foothills  of  undulating land  on  fertile clay rich soils (Lemmens et al., 1995) (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994) (WCMC, 1998) [1].  Population status and trends  Found naturally in Borneo, very often cultivated in other areas such as Java (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994)  (Argent et al., 1997).  Brunei: Occurrence reported (Argent et al., 1997).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in East, West and Central Kalimantan. Cultivated in Java (Argent et al.,  1997).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Sarawak and Sabah (Argent et al., 1997).  Role of species in the ecosystem  The  fruits  of  Durio  sp.  are  eaten  by  animals,  especially  orang­utans,  which  act  as  seed  dispersers  (Lemmens et al, 1995).  Threats  The natural habitat of this species is threatened by forest degradation due to logging and shifting  agriculture. In Indonesia there is evidence of genetic erosion within populations (WCMC, 1998).  Utilisation  The tree is planted for fruit, it is an ornamental tree. The fruit is popular and is the durian relative that  comes closest to the 'real' durian (Durio zibethinus) (Coronel & Verheij, 1992) (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994)  (Argent  et  al.,  1997).  The  wild  populations  may  be  very  important  for  improving  cultivated  species  (Lemmens et al, 1995), Durio kutejensis having an aromatic but less pungent odour than the true durian,  and could be used in breeding a variety appealing to non­Asian markets (Soegeng­Reksohihardjo, 1961 in  Smith et al, 1992). The wood is thought to be utilised as durian timber (Lemmens et al, 1995). Durian  timber is not durable and is only suitable for construction indoors; it is also used for cheaper furniture,  cabinets, light­traffic flooring, fittings, panelling, partitioning, plywood, chests, boxes, wooden slippers,  low­quality coffins and ship building (Lemmens et al, 1995).  Trade  This species is traded on a large scale in E. Kalimantan and has the potential for more widespread trade  (van Valkenburg, 1997). Lai is traded in local markets at the height of the durian season, sometimes  between January and April and there is sometimes a second season in July/August (van Valkenburg,  1997). Prices vary between Rp.500 to RP.1000/fruit depending on size of the fruit and the supply (van  Valkenburg, 1997).  Timber of Durio is traded together with timber of other Bombacaceae genera (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Durian timber is exported primarily from Sabah and Sarawak mainly to Japan (Lemmens et al, 1995). In  1987 Sabah exported a total of 5,300 m 3  round logs for US$67/m 3  and in 1992 they exported 8,500m 3  round logs and sawn wood with a total value of US$655,000 (US$170/m 3  for sawn wood and US$68/m 3  for round logs) (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1c (WCMC, 1998).  Conservation measures  No information.

Page 64 of 150

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Forest management and silviculture  The seeds of Durio spp. tend to be recalcitrant as they cannot withstand descication or low temperatures  (Lemmens et al, 1995). Often management systems do not take into account the sporadic occurrence and  regeneration of Durian species (Lemmens et al, 1995).  References  Argent, G., A. Saridan, E.J.F. Campbell and P. Wilkie. 1997. Manual for the larger and more important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda,  Indonesia. 341 pp.  Coronel, R.E. & Verheij, E.W.M. (Eds.). 1992. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 2. Edible fruits and  nuts. Prosea Foundation, Bogor, Indonesia. 330 pp.  Kessler,  P.J.A  &  K.  Sidiyasa.  1994.  Trees  of  the  Balikpapan­Samarinda  area,  East  Kalimantan,  Indonesia:  a  manual  of  280  selected  species.  Tropenbos  Series  7.  The  Tropenbos  Foundation,  Wageningen. 446 pp.  Lemmens,  R.H.M.J.,  Soerianegara, I.  &  Wong,  W.C.  (Eds.)  1995.  Plant Resources of  South­East Asia  (PROSEA) 5(2) Timber Trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden 655pp.  Smith,  N.J.H.,  Williams  J.T.,  Plucknett,  D.L.  and  J.P.  Talbot.  1992.  Tropical  Forest  and  their  Crops.  Cornell University Press: Ithaca, U.S.A.  van Valkenburg, J.L.C.H. 1997. Non­timber forest products of East Kalimantan. Potentials for  sustainable forest use. Tropenbos Series 16. The Tropenbos  Foundation:Wageningen,  The  Netherlands. pp.61­95.  WCMC.  Durio  kutejensis.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World  List  of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Additional web references  [1]  http://www.worldagroforestry.org/SEA/Products/AFDbases/AF/asp/SpeciesInfo.asp?SpID=18193.  AgroForestryTree Database. Downloaded 2 August 06.

48. Dyera costulata Hook.f.  Apocynaceae  Synonym  Alstonia costulata, Dyera laxiflora (Lemmens et al. 1995) (Soepadmo et al., 2004).  Common names  Trade  name:  jelutong;  Indonesia:  jelutung  bukit  (general),  melabuai  (Sumatra),  pantung  gunung  (Kalimantan);  Malaysia:  jelutung  bukit  (general),  jelutong  pipit,  jelutung  daun  lebar  (Peninsula);  Thailand:  teen­pet  daeng  (Peninsula),  ye­luu­tong,  luu­tong  (Malay,  Peninsular)  (Lemmens  et  al.,  1995), jelutung gunung (Dayak, Malay), pantung (Dayak), pulu (Dayak) (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994).  Habitat  The species is scattered in open or primary evergreen lowland or hill forest, more often on undulating land  in well­drained locations up to 1220 m (Lemmens et al. 1995) (Soepadmo et al., 2004).  Population status and trends  Jelutong has a scattered natural distibution ranging from Peninsular Thailand to Indonesia (Lemmens et  al., 1995).  Brunei: Occurrence reported (Argent et al., 1997) (Soepadmo et al. 2004).  Indonesia: Sumatra, East and Central Kalimantan (Argent et al., 1997) (Soepadmo et al. 2004).  Malaysia: Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak (Soepadmo et al., 2004).  Singapore: Occurrence reported (Ng & Wee, 1994).  Thailand: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Thailand (Lemmens et al. 1995) (Soepadmo et al., 2004).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Jelutong has declined as a result of tapping for latex and felling for timber. In Peninsular Malaysia the  species has been reported to be threatened (Ng et al., 1984). Jelutong does, however, regenerate readily in  logged­over forest. It is also planted commercially for timber (Lemmens et al., 1995).

Page 65 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Utilisation  It  has  a  number  of  special  uses  such  as  pattern  making  in  foundry  work,  for  drawing  boards,  pencils,  picture frames, dowels, carving, blackboards, wooden toys, clogs, brush handles and battery separators,  and  it  is  also  used  for  furniture  parts,  door  knobs,  ceilings,  partitioning,  matchsticks,  matchboxes  and  packing cases. The roots are used as a substitute for cork and their wood for axe handles. The latex is used  in the manufacture of chewing gum, in paints, as priming for concrete, or for sizing paper. Follicles are  occasionally used as torches by the local population or burnt to repel mosquitos (Lemmens, et al., 1995).  Trade  Timber is traded [1][2]. In the period from 1980­1990 the export of jelutong sawn timber from Peninsular  Malaysia was 32000­44000m 3 /year with a value of US$ 5.1­10.8 million a year; in 1992 it was 19000 m 3  with  a  value  of  US$  8.3  million  (US$440/m 3 )  (Lemmens,  Soerianegara  and  Wong,  1995).  In  1995,  Malaysia (Peninsular) exported 5000 m 3  of sawnwood at an average price of 710$/m 3  (ITTO, 1996).  The export of jelutong from Sabah was 67000 m 3  in 1987 with a value of US$4.5 million and 23000 m 3  (55% as sawn timber, 45% as logs) in 1992 with a total value of US$ 3.5 million (US$ 215/m 3  for sawn  timber,  US$  82/m 3  for  logs).  Japan  imports  comparatively  large  amounts  of  jelutong,  mainly  from  Sarawak and Sabah (Lemmens, Soerianegara and Wong, 1995).  In  1987,  Indonesia  exported  2,183,462US$  worth  of  this  species  as  jelutong  (WWF  and  IUCN,  1994­  1995).  In Malaysia, the trade in latex has declined since the peak production period 1930­1940. The export of  jelutong latex from Indonesia was still around 3500 t in 1989 (Lemmens, Soerianegara and Wong, 1995).  Indonesia is the main source of jelutong gum. Most is exported to Singapore, mainly for re­export to the  US. Some is exported directly to Japan and Europe, where Italy is the main importer (Coppen, 1995).  Import of Dyera spp. (ITTO, 1997­2000):  Year 

Import  Log 

1996  Sawnwood  1999 

Veneer 

Country 

Volume m3 

Malaysia  Rep. of Korea  Malaysia  Malaysia  Malaysia  Japan 

551  11000  551  504  504  100 

Average Price  US$/m3  81  223  81  138  138  ­­ 

Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): LR­lc (Asia Regional Workshop, 1997).  The Singapore Red Data Book: Rare [R] (Ng & Wee, 1994)  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  In Peninsular Malaysia D. costulata is chosen for enrichment planting because it is easy to handle in the  nursery,  survives  well  when  planted  out,  has  a  good  rate  of  growth  and  has  good  market  potential.  Prolonged  contact  with  acid  water  in  peat  forest  harms  young  plants.  D.  costulata  is  a  very  light­  demanding species and once a young tree is well established in full light, it tends to spread its crown and  develop into a pronounced 'wolf tree'. Sudden opening of the canopy is favourable for its development  (Lemmens et al., 1995). D. costulata coppices readily and is extremely resistant to girdling (Lemmens et  al., 1995).  References  Argent,  G.,  A.  Saridan,  E.J.F.  Campbell  and  P.  Wilkie.  1997.  Manual  for  the  larger  and  more  important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda, Indonesia. 341 pp.  Coppen,  J.  J.  W.  1995.  Gums,  resins,  and  latexes  of  plant  origin.  Non­wood  forest  products  No.  6.  Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.  ITTO. 1996. Annual review and assessment of the world timber situation. Page 66 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  ITTO.  1997­2000.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  timber  situation.  http://www.itto.or.jp/live/PageDisplayHandler?pageId=199. Downloaded on 1 st  January 2006.  Kessler,  P.J.A  &  K.  Sidiyasa.  1994.  Trees  of  the  Balikpapan­Samarinda  area,  East  Kalimantan,  Indonesia:  a  manual  of  280  selected  species.  Tropenbos  Series  7.  The  Tropenbos  Foundation,  Wageningen. 446 pp.  Lemmens,  R.H.M.J.,  Soerianegara, I.  &  Wong,  W.C.  (Eds.)  1995.  Plant Resources of  South­East Asia  (PROSEA) 5(2) Timber Trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden 655pp.  Ng,  F.S.P.,  Wong,  K.M.,  Kochummen,  K.M.,  Yaf,  S.K.,  Bin  Mohamad,  A.  and  Chan,  H.T.  1984.  Malaysian case study. In: Roche, L. and Dourojeanni, M.J., A Guide to in situ conservation of genetic  resources of tropical woody species. FORGEN/MISC/84/2. FAO, Rome  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society.  343pp.  Soepadmo, E., L.G. Saw and R.C.K. Chung (eds.). 2004. Tree flora of Sabah and Sarawak, vol. 5: 542  pp.  WCMC  1997.  Report  of  the  Third  Regional  Workshop,  held  at  Hanoi,  Vietnam,  18­21  August  1997.  Conservation and sustainable management of trees project. Unpublished.  WWF and IUCN. 1994­1995. Centres of plant diversity. A guide and strategy for their conservation. Vol.  2. IUCN publications Unit, Cambridge, UK.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.gilmerwood.com/species.htm. Gilmer Wood Company. Downloaded 2 August 06.  [2] http://www.timbermerchant.co.za/jelutong.html. Imported Timber. Downloaded 2 August 06.

49. Dyera polyphylla (Miq.) Steenis  Apocynaceae  Common names  Trade name: jelutong, swamp jelutong (English); Indonesia: jelutung paya, gapuk (Sumatra), pantung  (Borneo); Malaysia: jelutong paya (Sabah and Sarawak).  Synonym  Alstonia polyphylla, Dyera lowii, Dyera borneensis (Lemmens et al. 1995) (Soepadmo et al., 2004).  Habitat  A  tree  restricted  to  and  scattered  in  swamp  forest,  peat­swamp  forest  and  kerangas  on  ground  water  podzols. Frequently associated with Alstonia pneumatophora (Lemmens et al. 1995) (Soepadmo et al.,  2004).  Population status and trends  Brunei: Occurrence reported (Soepadmo et al., 2004).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Kalimantan and Sumatra (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994) (Lemmens et  al., 1995) (Soepadmo et al., 2004).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Sabah and Sarawak (Lemmens et al., 1995) (Soepadmo et al., 2004).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  The  risk  of  extinction  due  to  over­exploitation  was  recognised  60  years  ago.  It  is  considered  endangered  in  Sarawak.  Relatively  little  is  known  about  this  species  compared  the  more  common  Dyera costulata,  but  considering its restricted  distribution and  threatened habitat it is  apparently  at  a  greater risk of extinction. Over exploitation and habitat loss; the current burning of peat swamp forests  is likely to seriously impact this species (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Utilisation  The wood is traded as 'jelutong' timber and trees are tapped for the valuable latex. Uses similar to  Dyera costulata (Lemmens et al., 1995). The tree is of less commercial importance than D. costulata  (Argent et al., 1997).  Trade  See information for D. costulata.

Page 67 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Conservation Status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): EN A1cd (WCMC, 1998).  Conservation measures  Forest management and silviculture  There  is  some  plantation  development  in  Sarawak  and  Kalimantan.  In  southern  Kalimatan,  line  plantation of D. polyphylla by the local population needed thinning two years after planting to provide  more  light  for  the  planted  stumps.  Tapping  of  plantation­grown  D.  polyphylla  may  start  30­35  years  after planting when trees reach a diameter of about 35 cm.  References  Argent,  G.,  A.  Saridan,  E.J.F.  Campbell  and  P.  Wilkie.  1997.  Manual  for  the  larger  and  more  important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda, Indonesia. 341 pp.  Kessler,  P.J.A  &  K.  Sidiyasa.  1994.  Trees  of  the  Balikpapan­Samarinda  area,  East  Kalimantan,  Indonesia:  a  manual  of  280  selected  species.  Tropenbos  Series  7.  The  Tropenbos  Foundation,  Wageningen. 446 pp.  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara, & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  No 5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Leiden: Backhuys Publishers. 655 pp.  Soepadmo, E., L.G. Saw and R.C.K. Chung (eds.). 2004. Tree flora of Sabah and Sarawak, vol. 5: 542  pp.  WCMC.  Dyera  polyphylla.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World  List  of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.

50. Erythrophleum fordii Oliver  Leguminosae ­ Caesalpinoideae  Common names  No information.  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  Monsoon or rainforest up to 800 m on deep loamy and clay soil (Nghia, 1998) (Vũn, 1996).  Population status and trends  The Chinese populations are largely reduced to trees left standing around populated areas. Scattered or  dominant in forest (Nghia, 1998).  China:  Occurrence  reported  in  Southern  China  in  Guangdong  and  Guangxi  provinces,  and  also  in  Taiwan (Ngia, 1998) (ILDIS, 2006) (Vũn, 1996). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Vietnam:  Occurrence  reported  (Ngia,  1998)  (ILDIS,  2006)(Vũn,  1996).  Mainly  found  in  Northern  Vietnam  in  Nam­Da  Nang  province,  sparsely  distributed  in  Vinh  Phu,  Lang  Son,  Bac  Thai,  Quang  Ninh and  Ha  Bac  provinces.  Common  in  Thanh  Hoa,  Nghe  An,  Ha  Tinh and  Quang  Binh  provinces  (Vũn, 1996). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  The species constitutes a dominant stand making up to 60­70% in some forests in Vietnam. They are  usually associated with other tree species such as Gironniera subaequalis, Madhuca pasquieri, Pygeum  arboreum,  Canarium  album,  Rhaphiolepis  indica  and  Pterospermum  heterophyllum  (Vũn,  1996).  In  China, it is the dominant tree stand in Guangxi province (Fu & Jin, 1992).  Threats  In China, overcutting is the main threat (Fu & Jin, 1992).  Utilisation  A  valuable  and  durable  timber  tree  used  for  construction,  ship  building,  plank,  sleeper  and  furniture.  Bark contain tannin used for dyeing fabric (Vũn, 1996).  Trade  No information.  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): EN A1cd (Nghia, 1998). Page 68 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Conservation measures  Plantation  has  been  established  in  China  since  1950s,  however  supply  of  timber  still  falls  short  of  demand (Fu & Jin, 1992).  Forest management and silviculture  In China, plantations were established in the 1950s to increase supplies of the hard wood but demands  are still in excess of what can be sustainably provided (Fu & Jin, 1992).  References  Fu,  Li­kuo  &  Jian­ming,  Jin  (eds.).  1992.  China  Plant Red  Data  Book.  Beijing:  Science  Press. xviii­  741.  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on  15 March 2006.  Nghia, N.H. Erythrophleum fordii. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World List of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.

51. Eusideroxylon zwageri Teijsm. & Binn.  Lauraceae  Common name  Trade name: ulin; Ironwood, Bilian, Borneo Ironwood (En.); bois de fer (Fr); Brunei: belian; Malaysia:  belian  (Sarawak,  Sabah),  tambulian  (Sabah),  im  muk  (Cantonese,  Sabah),  Ulin;  Indonesia:  belian  (general),  onglen,  tulian,  tebelian  (Kalimantan);  Philippines:  tambulian,  sakian,  biliran  (Sulu)  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Ulin (Dayak), teluyan (Dayak benuag) (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994)  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  In  lowland  primary  and  secondary  forest,  from  sea­level  up  to  500(­625)  m  altitude,  on  sandy  well­  drained soils. Often common along rivers and adjacent hills. Found in a climate with an average annual  rainfall of 2500­4000 mm. Ulin generally occurs on sandy soils of Tertiary origin, on clay­loam soils or  on sandy silt­loam soils, but large specimens have also been found on limestone. Ulin occurs scattered  or is gregarious and is often the dominant canopy species, sometimes forms pure stands e.g. in Sumatra  the  ‘ironwood  forest’  is  recognised  as  a  distinct  forest  type  characterized  by  an  exceptionally  low  species  diversity.  Ulin  occurs  also  in  mixed  dipterocarp  forest  and  has  been  found  associated  with  Koompassia, Shorea aand Intsia species (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994).  Population status and trends  A monotypic genus. Belian is one of the most renowned timbers of Borneo. It has been favoured both for  local use and the export trade (Partomihardjo, 1987). Population reduction caused by overexploitation and  shifting agriculture has been noted in the following regions: Kalimantan, Sumatra, Sabah, Sarawak and  the Philippines. (Asian regional Workshop, 1998).  Indonesia: Occurence reported in Southern Sumatra, Bangka, Belitung and Kalimantan (Soerianegara &  Lemmens, 1994) (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994). On the flat lowlands of southern Sumatra, great stands of  ironwood,  (E.  zwageri)  once  stood,  these have now  been  almost  entirely  destroyed  (WWF  and  IUCN,  1994­1995).  E.  zwageri  is  considered  to  be  Vulnerable  in  Indonesia  by  Tantra  (1983)  and  was  in  a  shortlist of Endangered species of the country (Anon., 1978). The increased availability  of forest roads  opened  by  concessionaires  is  leading  to  greater  problems  of  uncontrollable  exploitation  in  Kalimantan  (Partomihardjo, 1987).  Malaysia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Sabah  and  Sarawak  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (Kessler  &  Sidiyasa, 1994). Over 30 years ago, the scarcity of E. zwageri in Sarawak was noted by Browne (1955),  who pointed out that, "Our surviving supplies of Belian are by no means very large and are undoubtably  dwindling."  The  main  causes  given  for  this  are  shifting  cultivation  and  wasteful  use.  The  species  is  considered to be almost extinct in Sabah (Meijer, pers. comm. 1997).  Philippines:  Occurrence  reported  in  Sulu  Archipelago,  Palawan  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (Kessler  &  Sidiyasa,  1994).  It  is  included  in  a  list  of  vanishing  timber  species  of  the  Philippines  (de Guzman, 1975).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information. Page 69 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Threats  Over­exploitation and shifting cultivation (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (Asian regional Workshop,  1998). Ulin used to be a common species in primary forest, but over­exploitation for its valuable timebr  has caused a serious depletion of stands and many stands are in critical condition. Ulin often occurs near  rivers, places which are easily accessible, and stands are also endangered by shifting cultivation. Control  of  exploitation  and  trade  together  with  enrichment  planting  after  logging  is  desirable  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994).  Utilisation  Ulin is one of the most important timbers for local use. Ulin is used locally in house construction and for  water butts. Its commercial uses are for heavy construction, marine work, boat building, printing blocks,  industrial flooring, roofing and furniture. Ulin has been esteemed by the Chinese as a coffin wood. The  fruits have been used medicinally against swelling (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  Primarily used locally with limited exports recorded by Sabah. In southern Kalimantan this timber is  felled by the owners of concession rights and also by local people coordinated by Ulin Traders  (Partomihardjo, 1987). Kartawinata et al. (1981) note that transmigrant settlers in East Kalimantan cut  this species for sale to supplement their income from cultivation. In 1987 Sabah exported 3836070 m 3  of  Belian (source: Forestry Department), in 1992 the export was 7350 m 3  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  The wood is traded internationally [1].  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd &2cd (Asia Regional Workshop, 1997).  Conservation measures  There are attempts to conserve supplies of this species in Sarawak (Asia Regional Workshop, 1997).  Legislation:  Indonesia has banned the export of belian and Sarawak has placed restrictions on export; Sabah continues  to export it .  Indonesia ­ Thought to be totally protected by law (Anon., 1978). Indonesian law forbids its export (out of  the country) and restricts cutting to trees over 60 cm diameter at breast height (Peluso, 1992). The need  for control of exploitation and better cutting criteria are pointed out by Partomihardjo (1987).  Sarawak ­  Under the  Forest  Rules  of  Sarawak,  export  of E. zwageri in log,  sawn  or hewn  form  is not  allowed without special permission. Export controls have been in force since 1950.  Presence in protected areas:  Indonesia  Kutai  National  Park,  East  Kalimantan  ­  has  pure  stands  of  Eusideroxylon  zwageri,  Tanjung  Putting  National  Park,  Kalimantan,  Gunung  Penrisen/Gunung  Nyiut  Game  Reserve,  Kalimantan,  Lempakai Botanical Park, East Kalimantan  Sabah Tabin Wildlife Reserve  Forest management and silviculture  Browne (1955) noted that the patchy distribution, limited extent and inaccessibility of many Belian forests  in  Sarawak  made assessment  of remaining  stands and  sustained  yield  management  very  difficult.  Poor  seedling regeneration in logged forests has been noted (Kartawinata, 1978). Some plantation was carried  out  in  secondary  forest  in  Sumatra  (Browne,  1955)  and  plantation  continues  on  a  trial  basis  both  in  Sumatra and West Kalimantan. Inadequacies of seed and seedling supply limit more extensive plantation  and the need for tissue culture has been suggested by Suselo (1987). In natural forests ulin is usually cut  selectively with a diameter limit of 50 cm. Harvesting is usually done manually. Regeneration in logged­  over forests is often not sufficient, although ulin may coppice freely and be persistent (Soerianegara &  Lemmens,  1994).  So  far  the  species  is  only  planted  on  a  small  scale  because  the  supply  of  seeds  and  seedlings is inadequate (Asian regional Workshop, 1998)  Ulin can be propagated by seed, but nursery­raised wildings are also often used for planting.  In  natural  forest  ulin  is  cut  selectively  with  a  diameter  limit  of  50  m.  Regeneration  in  logged­over  forest is often not sufficient. In South Kalimantan seedlings of ulin often dominate the regeneration in  virgin forest, together with meranti, but in logged­over forest regeneration of ulin is often considerably  less prolific. More research on appropriate methods of propagation is needed. Ulin does not seem to be  suitable  for  large­scale  plantation  establishement  as  it  grows  too  slowly  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994).

Page 70 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  References  Anon. 1978. Endangered species of trees. Conservation Indonesia 2(4).  Asia Regional Workshop, 1997. Conservation and Sustainable Management of Trees project workshop  held in Hanoi, VietNam, August 1997  Asian Regional Workshop. Eusideroxylon zwageri. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998.  The World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650 pp.  Browne, F.G. 1955. Forest trees of Sarawak and Brunei and their products. Government Printing Office,  Kuching.  de  Guzman,  E.D.  1975.  Conservation  of  vanishing  timber  species  in  the  Philippines.  In:  Williams,  J.,  Lamourak,  C.H.  and  Wulijarni­Soetjipto,  N.  (Eds),  South­East  Asian  plant  genetic  resources.  Symposium Proceedings Bogor, Indonesia, March 1975. IBPGR, Bogor.  Kartawinata, K. 1978. Biological changes after logging in lowland dipterocarp forest. In: Suparto, R.S. et  al.  (Eds),  Proceedings  of  a  Symposium  on  the  long­term  effects  of  logging  in  Southeast  Asia.  BIOTROP Special Publication No. 3, pp. 43­56.  Kartawinata,  K.,  Adisoemarto,  S.,  Riswan,  S. and  Vayda, A.P. 1981. The impact  of  man  on a tropical  forest in Indonesia. Ambio 10(2­3): 115­119  Kessler,  P.J.A  &  K.  Sidiyasa.  1994.  Trees  of  the  Balikpapan­Samarinda  area,  East  Kalimantan,  Indonesia:  a  manual  of  280  selected  species.  Tropenbos  Series  7.  The  Tropenbos  Foundation,  Wageningen. 446 pp.  Partomihardjo, T. (1987). The ulin wood which is threatened to extinction. Duta Rimba 87­88(13): 10­15.  Peluso,  N.L.  1992.  The  Ironwood  Problem:  (Mis)Management  and  Development  of  an  Extractive  Rainforest Product. Conservation Biology Vol. 6, No. 2: 210­219  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Suselo, T.B. (1987). Autecology of E. zwageri T. & B. (Lauraceae) as applied to forest regeneration. In:  Proc. Symp. Forest Regeneration in South East Asia. Biotrop Special Publication No. 25 BIOTROP,  Bogor.  Tantra, G.M. (1983). Erosi plasma nutfah nabati. J. Penelitian & Penembangan Pertanian 2(1): 1­5.  WWF and IUCN. 1994­1995. Centres of plant diversity. A guide and strategy for their conservation. Vol  2. IUCN publications Unit, Cambridge, UK.  Additional web references  [1] http://czjieli.en.ecplaza.net/. Changzhou Jieli Wood Industry Co., Ltd. Downloaded on 8 July 2006.  Correspondence and personal communications  Meijer, W. 1997. Personal communication to Amy MacKinven

52. Fagus longipetiolata Seemen  Fagaceae  Common name  No information.  Synonym  No information.  Habitat  A  dominant  tree  in  subtropical  dense  broadleaved  forest.  Found  on  wet  mountain  yellow  soils  at  altitude 300 – 2600 m (Vũn, 1996) [1].  Population status and trends  China:  Occurrence  reported.  In  China  this  species  is  quite  widespread  but  nowhere  very  abundant  (FAO, 1986) (Vũn, 1996). Reported in Anhui, Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hubei, Hunan,  Jiangxi, Shaanxi, Sichuan, Yunnan and Zhejiang provinces [1].  Vietnam: Occurrence reported in from Sapa and Moc Chau (Vũn, 1996).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.

Page 71 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Utilisation  The wood is used in construction, to make furniture, implements and musical instruments. The tree also  provides a useful source of gum, resin and oil (Vũn, 1996).  Trade  No information.  Conservatin status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd (Nghia, 1998).  Red Data Book of Vietnam: R ­ rare (Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment, 1996).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  Can be propagated by seeds [2].  References  FAO  Forestry  Department.  1986.  Databook  on  endangered  tree  and  shrub  species  and  their  provenances. Rome: FAO. 524pp.  Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment. 1996. Red Data Book. Vol. 2: Plants (Sach Do Viet  Nam Phan Thuc Vat). Science and Technical Publishing House, Hanoi. 484pp.  Nghia, N.H. Fagus longipetiolata. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World List of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.  Additional web references  [1]  http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200006255  .  eFlora  –  Flora  of  China.  Downloaded 2 August 06.  [2]  http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Fagus+longipetiolata  .  Plants  For  A  Future.  Downloaded  2  August 06.

53. Gmelina arborea Roxb.  Verbenaceae  Common name  Trade name: yemane (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Mai­saw, thebla, thun­vong, yemane (Myanmar) (Kress et al., 2003).  Yunnan shizi (Fu & Jin, 1992).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat:  Occurs in rain and deciduous forest. Found at altitudes up to 1300 m (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Population status and trends  The  species  is  commonly­planted  in  South­East  Asia  and  naturally  occurring  in  Indo­China  and  the  Indian subcontinent (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Africa:Occurrence reported, introduced (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Bangladesh:  Occurrence  reported,  native  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (World  Checklist  of  Selected Plant Families, 2006).  Brazil: Occurrence reported, introduced for plantation in Jarilandia (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Cambodia:  Occurrence  reported,  native  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (World  Checklist  of  Selected Plant Families, 2006).  China: Occurrence reported, confined to southern and southwestern Yunnan (Fu & Jin, 1992) (World  Checklist of Selected Plant Families, 2006). The population in China have reached a low levels due to  logging and forest clearing for agriculture (Fu & Jin, 1992).  India: Occurrence reported, native (World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, 2006).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Kalimantan, introduced (Kessler et al., 1992).  Laos: Occurrence reported, native (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (World Checklist of Selected Plant  Families, 2006).  Malaysia:  Occurrence  reported,  introduced  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (World  Checklist  of  Selected Plant Families, 2006).  Myanmar:  Occurrence  reported  in  Bago,  Kachin,  Mandalay,  Shan  and  Yangdon,  native, Page 72 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (Kress  et  al.,  2003)  (World  Checklist  of  Selected  Plant  Families,  2006).  Nepal: Occurrence reported, native (World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, 2006).  Pakistan: Occurrence reported, native (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (World Checklist of Selected  Plant Families, 2006).  Philippines:  Occurrence  reported,  introduced  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (World  Checklist  of  Selected Plant Families, 2006).  Sri Lanka: Occurrence reported, native (World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, 2006). There is  evidence  in  many  parts  of  its  range  that  populations  are  declining  through  use;  during  the  extensive  surveys  carried  out  by  the  Sri  Lankan  National Conservation  Review,  only  3  individuals  were  found  (Green and Gunawardena, 1997).  Thailand: Occurrence reported, native (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (World Checklist of Selected  Plant Families, 2006).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported in Tuyen Quang, Lang Son, Lai Chau, Son La, Vinh Phu, Bac Thai and  Ha Bac province, native (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (Vũn, 1996)  (World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information  Utilisation:  The  entire  plant  is  utilised  for  medicine.  The  stem  is  used  for  timber  in  light  construction  and  as  pulpwood. Leaves are good cattle fodder (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade:  A popular source of medicine and timber. The majority of yemane timber is for domestic use in  Southeast Asia, not until 1990 it was not exported. In Sri Lanka all parts of the tree are used, especially  the roots, to obtain medicinal extracts (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). The medicinal products play a  major role in international trade.  Log export of Gmelina arborea (ITTO, 1997­2002):  Average Price  Year  Country  Volume m 3  US$/m 3  1996  Malaysia  13600  38  1999  1025  44  Myanmar  2000  285  72  2001  975  69  Conservation status  Not threatened with extinction (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  China Plant Red Data Book: Rare (Fu & Jin, 1992).  Conservation measures  The species is protected in nature reserves in Mengla and Menglun, Xishuangbanna, China. It has been  brought  into  cultivation  in  South  Guangxi  and  Hainan.  Yemane  has  been  introduced  into  plantation  forestry and in Southeast Asia (Malaysia and Indonesia) an extensive programme has been introduced.  An  international  breeding  trial  has  been  established  in  the  region  by  the  Danish  International  Development Agency (DANIDA) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Forest management and silviculture  Plantation grown throughout the tropics. In the wild this species regenerates naturally only in the open  or on the edge of forests. In cultivation, Yemane has a high light requirement and a high sensitivity to  competition.  Good  growth  and  establishment  is  ensured  by  good  site  preparation  e.g  weeding  or  clearance by fire. In order to produce long clear boles pruning is essential. A straight bole is ensured by  cutting all the leaves off saplings with exception of the upper 2­3 pairs. Rotations of 6 years are used  for  those  trees  destined  for  pulpwood  and  of  10  years  for  those  used  for  sawnwood.  The  second  rotation is produced by coppicing, Stump or seedling planting is employed for a third rotation. During  the first two years weeding is carried out 3­4 times. Stands of 10 year rotation are thinned to 50% after  5  and  7  years.  It  has  been  shown  that  in  order  to  maintain  sufficient  growth  of  Yemane  during  the  second cycle extensive adittion of fertiliser is required (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).

Page 73 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  References:  Fu,  Li­kuo  &  Jian­ming,  Jin  (eds.).  1992.  China  Plant Red  Data  Book.  Beijing:  Science  Press. xviii­  741.  Green,  M.J.B.  and  E.R.  N.  Gunawardena  (comps.).  1997.  Designing  an  optimum  protected  areas  system for Sri Lanka's natural forests. (unpublished). Prepared by IUCN­The World Conservation  Union and the World Conservation Monitoring Centre for the Food and Agriculture Organisation  (FAO) of the United Nations.  ITTO.  1997­2002.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  timber  situation.  http://www.itto.or.jp/live/PageDisplayHandler?pageId=199. Downloaded on 1 st  January 2006.  Kessler, P.J.A., K. Sidiyasa, Ambriansyah & A. Zainal. 1992. Checklist for the flora of the Balikpapan­  Samarinda  area,  East  Kalimantan,  Indonesia.  Tropenbos  Series  8.  The  Tropenbos  Foundation,  Wageningen. 79 pp.  Kress, W. J., R. A. DeFilipps, E. Farr, and Daw Yin Yin Kyi. 2003. A Checklist of the Trees, Shrubs,  Herbs and Climbers of Myanmar (Revised from the original works by J. H. Lace and H. G. Hundley).  Contrib. U. S. Nat. Herbarium 45: 590 pp.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.  World  Checklist  of  Selected  Plant  Families.  2006.  The  Board  of  Trustees  of  the  Royal  Botanic  Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet; http://www.kew.org/wcsp/ accessed 6 June 2006.

54. Homalium foetidum (Roxb.) Benth.  Flacourtiaceae  Common names  Trade name: malas; Ternate ironwood (English); Indonesia: gia (general), melmas (Kalimantan), momala  (Sulawesi);  Malaysia:  petaling  padang  (Peninsular),  keruing  renkas,  bansisian  (Sabah);  Papua  New  Guinea:  malas  (general);  Philippines:  aranga  (general),  kamagahai  (Bikol),  yagau  (Cebu  Bisaya).  Solomon Islands: malasatu (Kwara’ae) (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Synonym  Homalium luzoniense, Homalium platyphyllum, Homalium novoguineense (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Habitat  Occurs in scattered places in primary and secondary rain forest or in thickets, often along rivers on clayey  or  sandy  soil,  sometimes  on  periodically  inundated  land,  up  to  200(­530)  m altitude  (Lemmens  et  al.,  1995).  Population status and trends  The species has been recorded as threatened in Indonesia (WCMC, 1991).  Brunei: Occurrence reported (Argent et al., 1997).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Maluku and Irian Jaya (Lemmens et  al., 1995) (Argent et al., 1997).  Malaysia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Peninsular  Malaysia,  Sabah  and  Sarawak  (Lemmens  et  al.,  1995)  (Argent et al., 1997).  Philippines: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al., 1995) (Argent et al., 1997).  New Guinea: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al., 1995) (Argent et al., 1997).  Solomon: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Exploitation for timber and destruction of habitat through logging are the main threats to the species. It is  particularly vulnerable due to its occurrence in accessible, lowland, primary rainforest (WCMC, 1997).  Utilisation  It is a fairly important source of malas timber, it is used for houses, bridges and combs (Lemmens et al.,  1995)  Trade  The timber is not thought to occur in European Trade (WCMC, 1991). This species makes up  approximately 9% of the total log exports of Papua New Guinea (Eddowes, 1977). In 1995, Papua New Page 74 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Guinea exported 326,000 m 3  of logs at an average FOB price of 115$/m 3 . Japan is the major importer of  malas logs. Australia and New Zealand import sawn timber for decking (ITTO, 1996).  Export of Homalium foetidum from Papua New Guinea (ITTO, 1997­2002):  Average Price  Year  Trade  Volume m 3  US$/m 3  1996  340000  113  1997  324000  142  Log  1998  177000  131  2000  160000  ­  2001  140400  ­  2001  Sawnwood  461  336  Conservation status  IUCN  Conservation  category  (ver  2.3,  1994):  LR/lc,  however,  further  review  is  desirable  (WCMC,  1997).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Argent,  G.,  A.  Saridan,  E.J.F.  Campbell  and  P.  Wilkie.  1997.  Manual  for  the  larger  and  more  important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda, Indonesia. 341 pp.  Eddowes,  P.  J.,  1977.  Commercial  timbers  of  Papua  New  Guinea,  their  properties  and  uses.  Forest  Products Research Centre, Department of Primary Industry, Port Moresby. Xiv 195 pp.  ITTO. 1996. Annual Review and Assessment of the World Tropical Timber Situation.  ITTO.  1997­2002.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  timber  situation.  st  http://www.itto.or.jp/live/PageDisplayHandler?pageId=199. Downloaded on 1  January 2006.  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp.  WCMC  1991.  Provision  of  data  on  rare  and  threatened  tropical  timber  species.  Unpublished  report,  prepared under contract to the EC.  WCMC  1997.  Report  of  the  Third  Regional  Workshop,  held  at  Hanoi,  Vietnam,  18­21  August  1997.  Conservation and sustainable management of trees project. Unpublished.

55. Hydnocarpus sumatrana (Miq.) Koord.  Flacourtiaceae  Common name  Trade name: senumpul; Indonesia: buntut kayu (Sumatra), limus buntu (Javanese), wulosu (Sulawesi);  Philippines: bagarbas (Lanao), kamupang (Sulu), mangasaluka (Yakan) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Synonyms  Hydnocarpus hutchinsonii, Hydocarpus pentagyna, Ryparosa sumatrana (Sosef et al., 1998).  Population status and trends  Brunei: Occurrence reported (Argent et al., 1997).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Sumatra, Java, East Kalimantan and Sulawesi (Argent et al., 1997).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Sabah and Sarawak (Argent et al., 1997).  Philppines: Occurrence reported (Argent et al., 1997).  Habitat  In forest on hilly and steep ground, never in flood areas up to 800 m. (Argent et al., 1997).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.

Page 75 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  The  wood  of  Hydnocarpus  is  used  for  for  firewood,  construction,  interior  finishing,  panelling,  frames,  flooring, tool and furniture (Sosef et al., 1998).  Trade  There are no specific records of trade in timber of this genus although it may possibly occur in mixed  consignments of medium­weight hardwood (Sosef et al., 1998). Timber is traded as senumpul [1].  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): DD (Asia Regional Workshop, 1997), more information  is needed.  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Argent,  G.,  A.  Saridan,  E.J.F.  Campbell  and  P.  Wilkie.  1997.  Manual  for  the  larger  and  more  important non­dipterocarp trees of central Kalimantan, vol. 1. 341 pp.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3).  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 859 pp.  WCMC  1997.  Report  of  the  Third  Regional  Workshop,  held  at  Hanoi,  Vietnam,  18­21  August  1997.  Conservation and sustainable management of trees project. Unpublished.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/senumpul.asp. Greenergy Co. Downloaded on 4 th  August 2006.

56. Intsia bijuga (Colebr.) Kuntze  Leguminosae ­ Caesalpinoideae  Common names  Trade  name:  merbau;.  Myanmar:  Saga­lun,  Tat­talum  (Kress  et  al.,  2003);  Cambodia:  krakas  prek;  Indonesia:  merbau  (general),  ipil  (Sulawesi),  ipi  (Nusa  Tenggara);  Malaysia:  merbau  ipil  (Sarawak,  Sabah),  kayu  besi  (Peninsular);  Philippines:  Ipil,  Ipil  laut,  Moluccan  Ironwood,  Borneo  Teak  (UK),  Kwila; Papua New Guinea: bendora, kwila, pas; Thailand: lumpaw, lumpho­thale (Surat Thani), pradu­  thale (Central). Guam: Ifil. Samoa: Ifi­lele; Fiji: Vesi; Solomon Islands: U'ula; Vietnam: Go Nuoc, g[ox]  n[uw] [ows]s (general), b[aaf]n [ooj]i (southern) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonym  Afzelia bijuga, Intsia madagascariensis (Ding Hou et al., 1996)  Habitat  It is a tree of lowland, primary and secondary tropical rain forest which is often found in coastal areas  bordering mangrove swamps, rivers, or floodplains. It is also found inland up to 600m, in primary or old  secondary forests (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (Ding Hou et al., 1996).  Population status and trends  I. bijuga produces one of the most valuable timbers of South East Asia. The species has been exploited so  intensively  for  timber  that  in  most  countries  few  trees  are  left  in  natural  stands.  There  have  been  few  attempts to cultivate the species in plantations and the species was said to face imminent disappearance as  an economic plant (National Academy of Sciences, 1979).  Good stands still exist in parts of Indonesia, mainly Irian Jaya, and Papua New Guinea where it is found  mainly in the Sepik and Madang provinces. In Papua New Guinea, I. bijuga is the more dominant than I.  palembanica; however, this is reversed in Peninsular Malaysia. I. bijuga is never abundant in Peninsular  Malaysia and rarely achieves timber size (Ser, 1982).

Page 76 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Widely  distributed  from  Tanzania,  islands  in  Indian  Ocean,  tropical  Asia,  through  Malesia  to  N  Australia, Melanesia and Micronesia (Ding Hou et al., 1996).  Australia: Occurrence reported in Queensland, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Bangladesh: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Brunei: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Cambodia: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Federated States of Micronesia: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Fiji: Occurrence reported, origin uncertain (ILDIS, 2006).  India: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Java, Irian Jaya, Kalimantan, Maluku, Sumatra and Sulawesi, native  (ILDIS, 2006).  Japan: Occurrence reported in Ryuku Is, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Madagascar: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Marshall Is.: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Mauritius: Occurrence reported, introduced (ILDIS, 2006).  Myanmar: Occurrence reported in Taninthayi, native (Kress et al., 2003).  Northern Mariana Is.: Occurrence reported, origin uncertain (ILDIS, 2006).  Papua New Guinea: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Philippines: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Samoa: Occurrence reported, origin uncertain (ILDIS, 2006).  Seychelles: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Singapore: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Solomon: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Sri Lanka: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Tanzania: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Thailand: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Tonga: Occurrence reported, origin uncertain (ILDIS, 2006).  Vanuatu: Occurrence reported, origin uncertain (ILDIS, 2006).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Utilisation  This  very  attractive  wood  is  one  of  the  most  valued  timbers  throughout  South  East  Asia  (National  Academy of Sciences, 1979). Merbau is a very good general­purpose timber. It is used for construction  work in house building, windows, door, framing, making decorative veneer and flooring (it produces the  famous 'merbau floors'). It generally too hard for plywood manufacture. The seeds are eaten locally after  soaking  in  salt  water  for  3­4  days  and  then  boiled.  A  brown  and  yellow  dye  is  obtained  from  an  oily  substance  present  in  the  wood  and  bark.  Bark  and  leaves  are  used  medicinally  against  rheumatism,  dysentery, diarrhoea and urinary disease (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  In trade [1]. The main importing countries are the Netherlands, where the wood is used for windows and  doors,  and  Germany.  Production  of  merbau  has  recently  become  more  important  in  Indonesia,  with  production of about 137,000 m 3  in 1992. The main production area is Irian Jaya and production is also  significant in Aceh and the Moluccas. Japan imports kwila from Papua New Guinea, Sabah and Sarawak  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). Approximately 4% of logs exported from Papua New Guinea are I.  bijuga and I. palembanica (Eddowes, 1997). In 1995, Fiji exported 1000 m 3  of sawnwood at an average  FOB  price  of  413$/m 3  (ITTO,  1996).  Malaysia  (Peninsular)  exported  42000  m 3  of  sawnwood  a  an  average FOB price of 466$/m 3  in 1995 (ITTO, 1996). Japan was reported to import the timber (ITTO,  1997­2003).  Export of Instia spp. from Papua New Guinea (ITTO, 1997­2002):  Year  Trade  Volume m 3  Average Price US$/m 3  1996  125000  226  1997  173000  247  Log  1998  79000  261  2000  40000  2001  7800  Sawnwood  1997  6000  164 Page 77 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Year  1998  2000  2001 

Trade 

Volume m 3  6000  7157  7649 

Average Price US$/m 3  239  423  405 

Export of Intsia bijuga (ITTO, 1997­2003):  Year  Trade  Country  Volume m 3  1996  Malaysia (Penins.)  36000  Sawnwood  Malaysia (Penins.)  1998  36000  2002  Fiji  186 

Average Price US$/m 3  505  505  409 

Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd (WCMC, 1998).  The Singapore Red Data Book: Rare [R] (Ng& Wee, 1994).  Conservation measures  No information.  Legislation:  Philippines ­ Classified as a premium hardwood under the DENR Administrative Order No. 78 Series of  1987, Interim Guidelines on the cutting/gathering of Narra and other premium hardwood species. Under  this  Order  special  permission  from  the  Secretary  of  the  Department  of  Environment  and  Natural  Resources is required to fell Intsia bijuga, and various conditions are specified.  Presence in protected areas  Indonesia Ujung Kulon National Park, Java, Manusela Wai Nua/Wai Mual National Park, Moluccas  Philippines  St  Paul  Subterranean  River  National  Park,  Quezon  National  Park,  Calauit  Island  National  Park  Forest management and silviculture  Trials  in  the  Solomon  Islands  have  shown  that  it  is  easily  established  either  from  seed  or  as  forest  wildings potted in the nursery. The potential of the species in these trials was shown by the fact that the  quickest growing individuals added 2 m height each year, but little general information is available about  the full plantation potential of the species. Further research on silviculture is urgently needed (National  Academy of Sciences, 1979). Some planting in Madagascar (Departement des Eaux et Forets, 1993).  References  Departement des Eaux  et  Forets.  1993.  Choix des  essences pour la  sylviculture a Madagascar. Akon'ny  Ala 12­13.  Ding Hou, K. Larsen & S.S. Larsen. 1996. Leguminosae­Caesalpinioideae. Flora Malesiana Ser. 1, vol.  12: 409­730.  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on  15 March 2006.  ITTO. 1996. Annual review and assessment of the world timber situation .  ITTO.  1997­2003.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  timber  situation.  http://www.itto.or.jp/live/PageDisplayHandler?pageId=199. Downloaded on 1 st  January 2006.  Kress, W. J., R. A. DeFilipps, E. Farr, and Daw Yin Yin Kyi. 2003. A Checklist of the Trees, Shrubs,  Herbs  and  Climbers  of  Myanmar  (Revised  from  the  original  works  by  J.  H.  Lace  and  H.  G.  Hundley). Contrib. U. S. Nat. Herbarium 45: 590 pp.  National Academy of Sciences. 1979. Tropical Legumes: Resources for the future. National Academy of  Sciences, Washington D.C.  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society.  343pp.  Ser, C.S. 1982. Malaysian timbers ­ Merbau. Malaysian Forest Service Trade Leaflet No. 65. Malaysian  Timber Industry Board, Kuala Lumpur.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  WCMC. Instia bijuga. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World List of Threatened  Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp. Page 78 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Additional web references  [1] http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/merbau.asp. Greenergy Co. Downloaded on 4 th  August 2006.

57. Jackiopsis ornata (Wall.) Ridsdale  Rubiaceae  Common name  Malaysia: medang gambut, pokok segan paya, selumar (Peninsular) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Synonym  No information.  Habitat  Locally frequent although never abundant in lowland swamp forest and riverine Habitats. This species  occurs in peat­swamp forest in northern Borneo (Sosef et al., 1998).  Population status and trends  This species occurs scattered in the forest and is fairly common, it is not thought to be endangered (Sosef  et al., 1998).  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Sumatra,  Kalimantan  and  Riau  Archipelago  (Kessler  &  Sidiyasa,  1994) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994)  (Sosef et al., 1998).  Singapore: Occurrence reported (Sosef et al., 1998).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  The current burning of peat swamp forests in Borneo is likely to impact severely on this species.  Utilisation  The timber is hard, heavy, reddish brown and fine textured, it is used locally in house building and for  implement such as rice pounders and carrying poles (Sosef et al., 1998).  Trade  The wood is rarely and only locally used (Sosef et al., 1998).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): The species has been recorded as threatened in  Indonesia (WCMC, 1991). The new IUCN categories have not yet been applied.  The Singapore Red Data Book: Rare [R] (Ng& Wee, 1994).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  Little is known about the silviculture of this tree, although it is thought more promising as an ornamental  than timber species. Prospects for timber production are hard to judge (Sosef et al., 1998).  References  Kessler,  P.J.A  &  K.  Sidiyasa.  1994.  Trees  of  the  Balikpapan­Samarinda  area,  East  Kalimantan,  Indonesia:  a  manual  of  280  selected  species.  Tropenbos  Series  7.  The  Tropenbos  Foundation,  Wageningen. 446 pp.  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society.  343pp.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (Eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3):  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden.  WCMC  1991.  Provision  of  data  on  rare  and  threatened  tropical  timber  species.  Unpublished  report,  prepared under contract to the EC.

Page 79 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

58. Kalappia celebica Kosterm.  Leguminosae ­ Caesalpinoideae  Common name  Indonesia: kalapi, nanakulahi, palapi (South Sulawesi) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  This  species  usually  occurs  on  poor  rocky  soils  containing  iron  of  around  pH4,  scattered  in  lowland  rainforest near the coast to up to 500 m altitude but more common below 100 m. forest (Ding Hou et al.,  1996) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Population status and trends  Indonesia: A monotypic species endemic to South Sulawesi, found only around Malili, native (Ding Hou  et al., 1996) (Sosef et al., 1998) (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  Very locally it can be one of the dominant species (Sosef et al., 1998).  Threats  Populations were already seriously depleted by the 1950’s as a result of large­scale logging for it’s  valuable timber (Sosef et al., 1998). This species is highly threatened by a continued timber trade and lack  of proper management.  Utilisation  The most  common use is as a light  construction timber used  in  building  ships,  bridges and  for  various  housing construction purposes. A timber form with beautiful grain pattern was once highly sought after  for cabinet and other furniture making (Sosef et al., 1998).  Trade  Up until the beginning of the 1950’s considerable amounts of Kallapia timber was transported from the  surrounding areas of Malili and Wotu (South Sulawesi), where K. celebica was common, to be processed  in Ujung Pandang. Current supplies are probably very limited, and the wood has become rare and  expensive on the local markets, no trade statistics are known (Sosef et al., 1998).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU D1+2c (WCMC, 1998).  Conservation measures  Protection of large areas of forest where it grows is essential for it’s survival. This protection may also  protect  Diospyros  celebica,  another  superior  timber  speceis  associated  with  K.  celebica  (Sosef  et  al.  1998).  Forest management and silviculture  Regeneration in closed forest is poor and in some examples non­existent. A forest near Wotu containing  approximately 65 trees per Ha displayed no signs of natural regeneration, however natural regeneration  was  observed  in  logged  over  areas.  This  poor  germination  may  require  special  forest  management  techniques. Tests with enrichment planting in logged over areas may be worth considering, any current  activities  of  propogation  by  seed have not  been reported, although it is known to  be  possible. There is  currently no evidence of attempts at cultivation of this species. Very little research has been carried out on  wood  properties,  propagation,  silviculture  and  forest  management  of  such  a  valuable  timber  species  (Sosef et al., 1998).  References  Ding Hou, K. Larsen & S.S. Larsen. 1996. Leguminosae­Caesalpinioideae. Flora Malesiana Ser. 1, vol.  12: 409­730.  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on  8 August 2006.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (Eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3):  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden.  WCMC.  Kallapia  celebrica.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World  List  of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp. Page 80 of 150

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

59. Kjellbergiodendron celebicum (Koord.) Merr.  Myrtaceae  Common names  No information.  Synonym  No information.  Distribution  Indonesia (Sulawesi)  Habitat  This species occurs in mountainous areas.  Population status and trends  The species has been recorded as rare in Indonesia (WCMC, 1991).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  No information.  Trade  No information.  Conservation status  No information.  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  WCMC  1991.  Provision  of  data  on  rare  and  threatened  tropical  timber  species.  Unpublished  report,  prepared under contract to the EC.  Note: more information needed.

60. Kokoona leucoclada Kochummen  Celastraceae  Common name  Trade name: mata ulat (Malay) (Lemmens et al., 1995)  Synonym  No information.  Habitat  Tropical lowland forest (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995).  Population status and trends  Malaysia:  Endemic  to  Sabah,  the  species  has  only  been  collected  once  from  Ranau  and  once  from  Sandakan in lowland forest (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  The species is threatened by the large­scale clearance of the forest (WCMC, 1998).  Utilisation  Trees of the genus are cut for mata ulat timber which is used locally (WCMC, 1998). Page 81 of 150

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Trade  The  genus  is  of  minor  commercial  importance,  only  very  small  amounts  of  mata  ulat  timber  are  exported  if  at  all.  The  trees  of  the  genus  are  generally  too  scattered  and  slow­growing  to  be  of  commercial importance. (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU D2 (WCMC, 1998).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp.  Soepadmo, E. & K.M. Wong, (eds.). 1995. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak, volume 1: 513 pp.  WCMC.  Kokoons  leucoclada.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World  List  of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Note: Check Sandakania, 5: 51 (1994)

61. Koompassia excelsa (Becc.) Taub.  Leguminosae – Caesalpinoideae  Common name  Trade name: tualang; Brunei: mangaris; Indonesia: mangaris, (Kalimantan), sialang (Sumatra);. Malaysia:  sialang (Peninsular), kayu raja (Sabah, Sarawak, Peninsular), tapang, kussi (Sarawak), mengaris (Sabah);  Philippines: manggaris (Sulu, tagbanua), ginoo (Palawan);. Thailand: yuan, tolae (Yala, Pattani)  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Indonesia, Kalimantan: Kempas madu (Malay), menggeris (Malay), tanjid (Dayak), puti (Dayak benuag)  (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994).  Synonym  Koompassia parvifolia (Ding Hou et al.,1996).  Habitat  Primary forest, stream valleys and lower slopes of ridges, up to 400(­600) m altitude. The trees are  often remaining in areas of secondary growth because they are rarely felled (Ding Hou et al.,1996).  Population status and trends  A  common  but  usually  not  very  abundant  species.  Solitary  trees  standing  alone  in  the  open  are  encountered comparatively often because they are difficult to cut and because local people harvest honey  from the tree crowns (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Brunei: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Kalimantan and north­east Sumatra, native (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994)  (Ding Hou et al.,1996) (ILDIS, 2006).  Malaysia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Peninsular  Malaysia,  Sabah  and  Sarawak,  native  (Ding  Hou  et  al.,1996) (ILDIS, 2006).  Philippines:Occurrence reported in Palawan, native (Ding Hou et al.,1996) (ILDIS, 2006).  Singapore: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006) (ILDIS, 2006).  Thailand: Occurrence reported southern Thailand, native (Ding Hou et al.,1996) (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  An important species for bees (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  Koompassia  timber  is  currently  gaining  importance  in  the  trade  because  of  the  shortage  of  heavy  hardwood  timber.  Koompasia  wood  is  suitable  for  structural  usage.  Treated  tualang  is  suitable  for  all  heavy  construction  purposes  such  as  railway  sleepers,  telegraph  and  transmission  posts,  beams,  joists, Page 82 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  rafters,  piling,  heavy  duty  columns,  fender  supports,  pallets,  door  and  window  frames  and  sills,  tool  handles  and marine  constructions.  When not  treated it  can  be  used  for  structural purposes  under  cover  such as parquet and strip flooring, panelling, vehiche bodies and heavy duty furtniture. Tualang is used  for  firewood  and  medicine.  Villagers  value  tualang  trees  as  souces  of  honey,  which  account  for  their  objection to felling these trees (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  Timber traded [1]. The average annual production of tualang log for Peninsular Malaysia for the period  1982­1987 was 77000 m 3 . In that period the average price of logs was US$ 45/ m 3 . The average annual  export of sawn timber in Peninsular Malaysia over the same period was 34 000 m 3 . (average price US$  86/ m 3 ). The export of sawn timber of tualang in 1990 and 1992 was 71 000 m 3  (valued US$ 8 million)  and US$ 9.5 milion respectively. Major export destinations are eastern Asia, Europe, North America and  western Asia. For Sabah, export of round logs of tualang in 1987 was 4000 m 3  with a value of US$ 260  000; in 1992 the export of tualang was 70 000 m 3  of logs and 69 000 m 3  of sawn timber valued US$ 16.9  million (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): LR/cd (Asia Regional Workshop, 1998).  Conservation measures  In Borneo Koompassia species are locally protected, e.g. Koompassia excelsa is a protected species under  Sarawak's  Wildlife  Protection  Bill,  1990  where  it  is  known  to  occur  in  protected  areas.  In  Peninsular  Malaysia the species is conserved in few virgin jungle reserves and big tree plots. At the Forest Research  Institute of Malaysia (FRIM), there is a 1.6 ha of planted tualang (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Argent,  G.,  A.  Saridan,  E.J.F.  Campbell  and  P.  Wilkie.  1997.  Manual  for  the  larger  and  more  important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  2.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda, Indonesia. 364 pp.  Ding Hou, K. Larsen & S.S. Larsen. 1996. Leguminosae­Caesalpinioideae. Flora Malesiana Ser. 1, vol.  12: 409­730.  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on  15 March 2006.  ITTO. 1997. Annual Review and Assessment of the World Tropical Timber Situation, 1996.  Kessler,  P.J.A  &  K.  Sidiyasa.  1994.  Trees  of  the  Balikpapan­Samarinda  area,  East  Kalimantan,  Indonesia:  a  manual  of  280  selected  species.  Tropenbos  Series  7.  The  Tropenbos  Foundation,  Wageningen. 446 pp.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  WCMC.  Koompassia  excelsa.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World  List  of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/tualang.asp. Greenergy Co. Downloaded on 8 August 2006.

62. Koompassia grandiflora Kosterm.  Leguminosae ­ Caesalpinioideae  Common name  Kempas, Tualang (Trade name) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonym  No information.  Habitat  A  primary  rain  forest,  coastal  plain  foothills,  stony  low  hill,  loam­soil  or  sandy  loamsoil,  up  to  840  altitude (Ding Hou et al., 1996).  Population status and trends  Koompassia  grandiflora  is  highly  vulnerable  because  it  occurs  in  primary  rainforest,  mostly  at  low,  readily accessible altitudes (Eddowes, 1998).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Manokwari, Irian Jaya (Ding Hou et al.,1996). The species is fairly  common in the lowland in Manokwari (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). Native (ILDIS, 2006). Page 83 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Papua  New  Guinea:  Occurrence  reported  in  Morobe,  Gulf  and  Central  Provinces  (Ding  Hou  et  al.,1996). Native (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Observations of active exploitation for the timber of this species in Papua New Guinea were made in  the  1960s  ;  the  timber  continues  to  be  in  high  demand  and  is  heavily  exploited  in  areas  subject  to  logging (Eddowes, 1998).  Utilisation  The  wood  is  used  as  kempas  and  tualang  for  heavy  construction,  beams,  flooring,  decking  and  plywood. In addition it is used as veneer (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  This species is and will continue to be heavily exploited in Papua New Guinea for both log export and  for domestic processing due to its very good bole form, wood quality and market acceptance (Eddowes,  1998).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd+2cd (Eddowes, 1998).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References:  Ding Hou, K. Larsen & S.S. Larsen. 1996. Leguminosae­Caesalpinioideae. Flora Malesiana Ser. 1, vol.  12: 409­730.  Eddowes, P.J. Koompassia grandiflora. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World List  of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on  15 March 2006.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.

63. Koompassia malaccensis Benth.  Leguminosae – Caesalpinoideae  Common name  Trade name: kempas; Brunei: impas. Indonesia: (m)engris (Acheh, Bangka, Belitung, Kalimantan),  (h)ampas (Sumatra, Kalimantan), Keranji (Sumatra); Malaysia: impas (Sabah, Sarawak), mengris  (Peninsular, Sarawak), makupa (Peninsular); Thailand: thongbung (Phuket), makupa (Malay,  Narathiwat), sifai (Patthalung) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Indonesia,  Kalimantan:  Kempas  merah  (Malay,  Kalimantan),  berniung  (Malay,  Kalimantan),  meryang  (Dayak, Kalimantan) (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994).  Synonym  Koompassia beccariana (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Habitat  Found in lowland forest, up to 800 m, often favouring an altitude not exceeding 150 m, also found in peat  and fresh water swamps (Ding Hou et al., 1996).  Population status and trends  Brunei: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Indonesia:  Occurrence reported in  Sumatra,  Riau  Archipelago,  Bangka,  Biliton and  Kalimantan (Ding  Hou et al.,1996) (Argent et al., 1997). Native (ILDIS, 2006)  Malaysia:  Occurrence reported in  Peninsular  Malaysia,  Sabah and Sarawak (Ding  Hou  et  al.,1996). In  Peninsular Malaysia it is considered to be the third commonest big forest tree (Soerianegara & Lemmens,  1994). Native (ILDIS, 2006). Page 84 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Singapore: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Thailand: Occurrence reported in southern Thailand, native (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (ILDIS,  2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  Koompassia  timber  is  currently  gaining  importance  in  the  trade  because  of  the  shortage  of  heavy  hardwood  timber.  Koompasia  wood  is  suitable  for  structural  usage.  Treated  kempas  is  suitable  for  all  heavy  construction  purposes  such  as  railway  sleepers,  telegraph  and  transmission  posts,  beams,  joists,  rafters,  piling,  heavy  duty  columns,  fender  supports,  pallets,  door  and  window  frames  and  sills,  tool  handles  and marine  constructions.  When not  treated it  can  be  used  for  structural purposes  under  cover  such  as  parquet  and  strip  flooring,  panelling,  vehiche  bodies  and  heavy  duty  furtniture.  Kempas  is  produces charcoal of high quality (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  Wood is traded [1] [2]. Average annual log production of kempas for Peninsular Malaysia for the period  1982­1987 was 571 000. In that period the average price for logs was US$68/m 3  for kempas. The average  annual export of sawn timber in Peninsular Malaysia over the same period was 126 000 m 3  (average price  US$ 108/ m 3 ) for kempas. The export of sawn timber of kempas from Peninsular Malaysia in 1990 was  114 000 m 3  valued US$ 14.6 million. In 1992 the export amounted to 49 000 m 3  valued US$ 9.2 million.  In Sabah the export of kempas was 29 000 m 3  of logs and 23 000 m 3  of sawn timber with total value of  US$  6.3 million. Major  export  destinations are  eastern Asia,  Eurpoe, North America and  western  Asia  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994).  In  1996,  Malaysia  exported  2882  m 3  of  Kompassia  malaccensis  sawnwood  worth  US$144/m 3  and  Japan  was  reported  to  import  kempas  log  in  the  same  year  (ITTO,  1997).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): LR/cd (Asia Regional Workshop, 1998).  The Singapore Red Data Book: Vulnerable [V] (Ng& Wee, 1994).  Conservation measures  Koompassia  malaccensis  is  a  protected  species  under  Sarawak's  Wildlife  Protection  Bill,  1990.  In  Peninsular Malaysia the species is conserved in few virgin jungle reserves and big tree plots. At the Forest  Research  Institute  of  Malaysia  (FRIM), there is a 9 ha  of  planted  kempas (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994).  Forest management and silviculture  No specific information is available (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Argent,  G.,  A.  Saridan,  E.J.F.  Campbell  and  P.  Wilkie.  1997.  Manual  for  the  larger  and  more  important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  2.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda, Indonesia. 364 pp.  WCMC. Koompassia malaccensis. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World List of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  ITTO.  1997.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  timber  situation.  http://www.itto.or.jp/live/PageDisplayHandler?pageId=199. Downloaded on 1 st  January 2006.  Kessler,  P.J.A  &  K.  Sidiyasa.  1994.  Trees  of  the  Balikpapan­Samarinda  area,  East  Kalimantan,  Indonesia:  a  manual  of  280  selected  species.  Tropenbos  Series  7.  The  Tropenbos  Foundation,  Wageningen. 446 pp.  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society.  343pp.  Soerianegara, I. & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (Eds.) 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia (PROSEA) 5(1)  Timber trees: major commercial timbers. Pudoc Scientific Publishers, Wageningen.  Ding Hou, K. Larsen & S.S. Larsen. 1996. Leguminosae­Caesalpinioideae. Flora Malesiana Ser. 1, vol.  12: 409­730.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/kempas.asp. Greenergy Co. Downloaded 8 August 2006. Page 85 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  [2]  http://cn.tradekey.com/selloffer_view/id/152136.htm.  Zhejiang  Chanx  Wood  Co.  Ltd.  Downloaded  8  August 2006.

64. Lophopetalum javanicum (Zoll.) Turcz.  Celastraceae  Common names  Perupok  (Trade  name);  Indonesia:  madang­gambici  (Batak,  Sumatra),  mandalaksa  (Javanese,  Java),  tatokwa  (Irian  Jaya) ;  Malaysia:  perupok,  kachang  rimba  (Peninsular),  perupok  dual  (Sabah);  Philippines:  abuab  (general),  sampol  (Bisaya),  buyun  (Sulu);  Thailand:  phuamphrao  (Trang)  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Perupok  gunung  (Malay),  medang  bora  (Malay),  kay  sang  (Dayak),  takorang  (Malay)  (Kessler  &  Sidiyasa, 1994).  Synonyms  Lophopetalum  fuscescens,  Lophopetalum  oblongifolium,  Lophopetalum  toxicum  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994).  Habitat  Found  mainly  in  lowland  rainforest,  sometimes  in  hill  and  montane  forest  up  to  1500  m.  Often  in  periodically  inundated  areas  or  peat  swamps  and  on  riverbanks  (Ding  Hou,  1962)  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (Argent  et  al.,  1997).  In  Sabah  and  Sarawak,  mainly  in  mixed  dipterocarp  forest  (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995).  Population status and trends  A widespread species that is probably most common on Borneo (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Indonesia: Ocurrance reported in Irian Jaya, Java, Kalimantan, Moluccas, Sulawesi and Sumatra (Ding  Hou, 1962) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Malaysia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Peninsular  Malaysia,  Sabah  and  Sarawak  (Ding  Hou,  1962)  (Soepadmo & Wong 1995).  Thailand: Occurrence reported (Ding Hou, 1962) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Philippines:  Occurrence  reported  in  Luzon,  Mindoro,  Samar,  Sulu  Islands  and  Palawan  (Ding  Hou,  1962) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Papua  New  Guinea:  Occurrence  reported  (Ding  Hou,  1962)  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Role of species in the ecosystem  The flowers are insect pollinated and the winged seeds are probably wind dispersed (Ding Hou, 1962).  Threats  Increasing  demand  for  perupok  may  put  this  species  under  threat and  could result in  genetic  erosion  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Utilisation  The wood is utilised as perupok timber. The wood is used for light general construction, interior  finishing, panelling, furniture manufacture, match boxes, pencil and food container. The bark is used as  a poison and the tree also provides fuel wood (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (Soepadmo & Wong  1995).  Trade  In trade [1]. Perupok has been generally used on a local scale. It has gained importance particularly in  Kalimantanin the late 1980s.. Export figure from Peninsular Malaysia indicate that in 1983, 3200 m 3  of  sawlogs with a value of US$ 125 000 was exported to Singapore, and in 1984, 2500 m 3  with a value of  US$ 100 000. In 1987 logs with a volume of 13 500 m 3  and a value of US$ 940 000 (US$ 70/ m 3 )were  exported from Sabah and in 1992, 23 000 m 3 . of logs and 27 000 m 3  of sawn timber with a total value  of  US$  13  million.  Sarawak  exports  a  considerable  amount  of  perupok  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994).  Sarawak  exports  a  considerable  amount  of  perupok.  The  timber  is  very  popular  in  Japan.  Indonesia exports perupok to japan, in 1991, the price of sawn timber from Kalimantan was about US$  1000/ m 3  and US$ 1400/ m 3  for moulding (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation status  No information.

Page 86 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Conservation measures  In East Kalimantan, a project has selected out the "superior mother trees" (Soerianegara & Lemmens,  1994).  Forest management and silviculture  Exploitation of stands of perupok is seldom based on sustainable management. Research is needed to  determine management requirements (Soerianegara &Lemmens, 1994).  References  Argent, G., A. Saridan, E.J.F. Campbell and P. Wilkie. 1997. Manual for the larger and more  important non­dipterocarp trees of central Kalimantan, vol. 1. Forest Research Institute,  Samarinda, Indonesia. 341 pp.  Soepadmo, E. & K.M. Wong, (eds.). 1995. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak, volume 1: 513 pp.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Ding Hou. 1962. Celastraceae I. Flora Malesiana Ser. I, vol. 6: 227­291.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/perupok.asp. Downloaded 8 August 2006.

65. Lophopetalum multinervium Ridley  Celastraceae  Common names  Indonesia: perupuk talang (Palembang), pupu (Bengkalis), bako (Dayak, Kalimantan). Malaysia: tinjau  tasek  (general),  perupok  (Sabah),  dual  (Sabah),  pasana  (Iban)  (Ding  Hou,  1962)  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994).  Synonym  Solenospermum aquatile (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Habitat  This tree is found in freshwater and peat swamp forest and very occasionally in submontane forest up  to 1500m (Ding Hou, 1962). It is widely distributed in Sabah and Sarawak (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995).  Population status and trends  A widespread species that is probably most common on Borneo (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Sumatra,  Bangka  and  Kalimatan  and  Sumatra  (Ding  Hou,  1962)  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995) (Argent et al., 1997).  Malaysia: Reported from Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995).  Singapore: Occurrence reported (Ng & Wee, 1994) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (Soepadmo &  Wong, 1995).  Role of species in the ecosystem  The flowers are insect pollinated and the winged seeds are probably wind dispersed (Ding Hou, 1962).  Threats  Increasing  demand  for  perupok  may  put  this  species  under  threat and  could result in  genetic  erosion  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Utilisation  The wood is utilised as perupok timber (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  In trade [1]. Perupok has been generally used on a local scale. It has gained importance particularly in  Kalimantanin the late 1980s. Export figures from Peninsular Malaysia indicate that in 1983, 3200 m 3  of sawlogs with a value of US$ 125 000 was exported to Singapore, and in 1984, 2500 m 3  with a value  of  US$  100  000.  In  1987  logs  with  a  volume  of  13  500  m 3  and  a  value  of  US$  940  000  (US$  70/  m 3 )were exported from Sabah and in 1992, 23 000 m 3  of logs and 27 000 m 3  of  sawn timber with a  total  value  of  US$  13  million.  Sarawak  exports  a  considerable  amount  of  perupok  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994).  Sarawak  exports  a  considerable  amount of  perupok.  The  timber  is  very  popular in  Japan.  Indonesia  exports  perupok  to  japan,  in  1991,  the  price  of  sawn  timber  from  Kalimantan  was  about US$ 1000/ m 3  and US$ 1400/ m 3  for moulding (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation status  The Singapore Red Data Book: Vulnerable [V] (Ng& Wee, 1994). Page 87 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Conservation measures  In East Kalimantan, a project has selected out the "superior mother trees" (Soerianegara & Lemmens,  1994).  Forest management and silviculture  Exploitation of stands of perupok is seldom based on sustainable management. Research is needed to  determine management requirements (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Argent,  G.,  A.  Saridan,  E.J.F.  Campbell  and  P.  Wilkie.  1997.  Manual  for  the  larger  and  more  important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda, Indonesia. 341 pp.  Ding Hou. 1962. Celastraceae I. Flora Malesiana Ser. I, vol. 6: 227­291.  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society.  343pp.  Soepadmo, E. & K.M. Wong, (eds.). 1995. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak, volume 1: 513 pp.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/perupok.asp. Greenergy Co. Downloaded 8 August 2006.

66. Lophopetalum pachyphyllum King  Celastraceae  Common names  Terupuk (Malay) perupuk (Peninsular) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Habitat  Dry  forest  on  slopes,  ridges  and  limestone  cliffs  up  to  an  elevation  of  450  m  (Ding  Hou,  1962).  In  Sarawak found in lowland forest near coastal area (Soepadmo & Wong 1995).  Population status and trends  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Sumatra  (Ding  Hou,  1962)  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (Soepadmo & Wong 1995).  Malaysia:  Occurrence  in  Peninsular  Malaysia  and  Sarawak.  In  Sarawak,  the  species  is  only  known  from two collections from Bako National Park (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (Soepadmo & Wong  1995).  Role of species in the ecosystem  The flowers are insect pollinated and seed winged­dispersed (Ding Hou, 1962).  Threats  Increasing  demand  for  perupok  may  put  this  species  under  threat and  could result in  genetic  erosion  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Utilisation  The wood is utilised as perupok timber (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  In trade [1]. Perupok has been generally used on a local scale. Export figure from Peninsular Malaysia  indicate that in 1983, 3200 m 3 of sawlogs with a value of US$ 125 000 was exported to Singapore, and  in 1984, 2500 m 3  with a value of US$ 100 000. In 1987 logs with a volume of 13 500 m 3  and a value of  US$ 940 000 (US$ 70/ m 3 ) were exported from Sabah and in 1992, 23 000 m 3 . of logs and 27 000 m 3  of  sawn  timber  with  a  total  value  of  US$  13  million.  Sarawak  exports  a  considerable  amount  of  perupok  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994).  Sarawak  exports  a  considerable  amount  of  perupok.  The  timber is very popular in Japan (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). 2000m 3  of species of Lophopetalum,  otherwise  known  as  Perupok,  was  exported  from  Peninsular  Malaysia  in  1995  at  $607  per  m 3  (ITTO,1997).  Conservation status  No information.  Conservation measures  No information. Page 88 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Forest management and silviculture  Exploitation of stands of perupok is seldom based on sustainable management. Research is needed to  determine management requirements (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Argent,  G.,  A.  Saridan,  E.J.F.  Campbell  and  P.  Wilkie.  1997.  Manual  for  the  larger  and  more  important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda, Indonesia. 341 pp.  Soepadmo, E. & K.M. Wong, (eds.). 1995. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak, volume 1: 513 pp.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Ding Hou. 1962. Celastraceae I. Flora Malesiana Ser. I, vol. 6: 227­291.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/perupok.asp. Greenergy Co. Downloaded 8 August 2006.

67. Lophopetalum rigidum Ridley  Celastraceae  Synonym  Lophopetalum subsessile (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Common names  Indonesia: galagah, parupuk, kerupok (Kalimantan) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Distribution  Brunei,  Malaysia  (Sabah,  Sarawak),  Kalimantan  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (Soepadmo  &  Wong, 1995) (Ding Hou, 1962).  Habitat  Understory  tree  that  occurs  in  freshwater and  peat  swamp forest  and kerangas  forest  in lowland and  montane forest up to 2400 m (Ding Hou, 1962) (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995).  Population status and trends  Endemic to northern half of Borneo (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Brunei: Occurrence reported (Ding Hou, 1962) (van Steenis,  1962)  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Kalimantan (Ding Hou, 1962).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Sarawak and Sabah. The species is locally frequent in Sarawak and  recorded from Lahad Datu, Keningau and Ranau district in Sabah (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995).  Role of species in the ecosystem  The flowers are insect pollinated and seed dispersed by wind (Ding Hou, 1962).  Threats  Increasing demand for perupok may be a threat to this relatively restricted species and current forest  burning is expected to impact negatively on the species (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Utilisation  The wood is utilised as perupok timber (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  In trade [1]. Trade in perupok, particularly from Kalimantan, has gained in importance over the past ten  years. The timber is very popular in Japan (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation status  No information.  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  Exploitation of stands of perupok is seldom based on sustainable management. Research is needed to  determine management requirements (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Ding Hou. 1962. Celastraceae I. Flora Malesiana Ser. I, vol. 6: 227­291.  Soepadmo, E. & K.M. Wong, (eds.). 1995. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak, volume 1: 513 pp. Page 89 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/perupok.asp. Greenergy Co. Downloaded 8 August 2006.

68. Madhuca betis (Blanco) J.F. Macbr.  Sapotaceae  Common names  Trade name: bitis; Indonesia: puntik (Kalimantan), lotoo tulu, sulewe (Sulawesi); Philippines: betis  (general), manilig (Magindanao), banitis (Bikol) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonyms  Madhuca philippinensis (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Habitat  Primary lowland forest species at altitudes up to 300 m altitude (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Population status and trends  In  the  Philippines  stands  have  been  depleted  by  logging  and  shifting  agriculture  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994).  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Kalimantan  and  Sulawesi  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (Argent et al., 1997).  Philippines: Occurrence reported in Luzon, Mindoro and Mindanao (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Logging and shifting agriculture posed a threat. Bitis and nyatoh are sometimes harvested as meranti  and not subject to enrichment planting, this might lead to genetic erosion or extinction (Soerianegara &  Lemmens, 1994).  Utilisation  Used  as  bitis  for  heavy  construction  work,  e.g.  for  wharf,  bridge  and  ship  building,  and  for  posts,  foundation  sills,  sleepers,  paving  blocks  and  tool  handles.  In  the  Philippines  it  is  considered  an  excellent  wood  for  purposes  requiring  great  strength  and  durability.  The  seeds  of  betis  yield  an  oil  which is used for illuminating and the bark and leaves are used in traditional medicine (Soerianegara &  Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  Bitis is only obtainable in small quantities and is used domestically (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd (WCMC, 1998).  Conservation measures  Forest management and silviculture  Very little attention is given to bitis in silvicultural practices (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Argent,  G.,  A.  Saridan,  E.J.F.  Campbell  and  P.  Wilkie.  1997.  Manual  for  the  larger  and  more  important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda, Indonesia. 341 pp.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  WCMC. Madhuca betis. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World List of Threatened  Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.

69. Madhuca boerlageana (Burck) Baehni  Sapotaceae Page 90 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Synonym  Ganua boerlageana (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Common name  Indonesia: arupa merah, arupa putih (Ambon), araka (Morotai) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Habitat  A tree of lowland rain forest at altitudes to 800 m (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Population status and trends  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Irian Jaya and Maluku. Plant from Irian Jaya has been distinguished  as var. latifolia (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Papua  New  Guinea:  Occurrence  reported.  This  species  is  extremely  rare  and  known  from  a  single  collection from Vanimo area, West Sepik Province. This part of Papua New Guinea is heavily logged  and there is grave doubt as to its continuing existence in this country (Eddowes, 1998).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  The main threat to this very rare species is logging of the habitat (Eddowes, 1998).  Utilisation  The wood is used for house building and for ship masts (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  No information.  Conservation status  IUCN  Threat  category  (ver  2.3,  1994):  CR  A1cd,  C2ab,  D1  ,the  threat  category  applies  to  the  situation in Papua New Guinea only (Eddowes, 1998).  Conservation measures  No information.  Silviculture and forest management  No information.  References  Eddowes, 1998. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World List of Threatened Trees.  World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources  of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.

70. Madhuca pasquieri H.J.Lam  Sapotaceae  Synonym  No Synonym.  Common name  No information.  Habitat  Mainly grow on low elevation mountains or hill at 100­600 m altitude, always below 1100 m altitude  (Fu & Jin, 1992). In Vietnam, Madhuca pasquieri grows sparsely in mixed stands with Vatica odorata,  Hopea molissima, Castanaopsis indica, Gironniera subaequalis, Paralbizzia turgida and Cinnamomum  obtusifolium,  sometimes  associated  with  Vatica  odorata  and  Erythropholoeum  fordii  on  mountain  slopes and crests (Vũn, 1996).  Population status and trends  This  large  light  demanding  timber  tree  species  has  a  scattered  distribution.  Populations  have  been  heavily exploited throughout the range and few large trees remain (WCMC, 1998).  China:  Occurrence  reported  in  southwest  Guangdong,  southern  Guangxi,  Malipo  and  Pingbian  in  Yunnan (Fu & Jin, 1992) (WCMC, 1998).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported in northern provinces in Lao Cai, Yen Bai, Vinh Phu, Ha Bac, Thanh  Hoa, Nghe An and Ha Tinh (Vũn, 1996) (WCMC, 1998). Page 91 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Role of species in the ecosystem  Seeds are produced in large amounts and eaten by bats and squirrels (Vũn, 1996).  Threats  The species is threathened by clear­felling/logging of the Habitat, expansion of human settlement and  extensive agriculture (WCMC, 1998).  Utilisation  The timber is used for furniture making. The seeds are eaten and provide a source of oil (Fu & Jin,  1992).  Trade  No information.  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd (WCMC).  Red  Data  Book  of  Vietnam:  K  ­  Insufficiently  known  (Ministry  of  Science,  Technology  and  Environment, 1996).  Conservation measures  The species range coincides  with protected areas in both countries (Fu & Jin, 1992). In Vietnam this  species is included in the Council of Ministers Decision 18/HDBT (17 January 1992) as a species with  high  economical  value  which  is  subject  to  over­exploitation.  It  is  also  categorised  as  a  priority  for  genetic conservation.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Fu,  Li­kuo  &  Jian­ming,  Jin  (eds.).  1992.  China  Plant Red  Data  Book.  Beijing:  Science  Press. xviii­  741.  Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment. 1996. Red Data Book. Vol. 2: Plants (Sach Do Viet  Nam Phan Thuc Vat). Science and Technical Publishing House, Hanoi. 484pp.  WCMC,  1998.  Madhuca  pasquieri.  In:  IUCN  2004.  2004  IUCN  Red  List  of  Threatened  Species.  . Downloaded on 03 January 2006  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.

71. Mangifera decandra Ding Hou  Anacardiaceae  Common name  Indonesia:  kemang  badak  (Sumatra),  konyot,  palong  besi  (East  Kalimantan).  Malaysia:  binjai  hutan  (Tidon), belunu hutan (Dusun, Sabah) (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  This  large  tree  grows  in  primary  lowland  evergreen  rainforest  up  to  900  (­1440)  m  (Kostermans  and  Bompard, 1993); it is sometimes found in freshwater swamp forest and secondary forests (Lemmens et al,  1995).  Population status and trends  This species is common but very scattered (Kostermans and Bompard, 1993). It is planted in Dayak home  gardens in E. Kalimantan (van Valkenburg, 1997).  Brunei: Occurrence reported (Soepadmo et al, 1996).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Sumatra and Kalimantan (Kostemans and Bompard, 1993).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Sabah and Sarawak (Soepadmo et al, 1996).  Role of species in the ecosystem  The fruits are likely to be eaten by animals i.e. monkeys, bats and hornbills (Lemmens et al, 1995).  Threats  No information. Page 92 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Utilisation  The fruits are edible and the wood is believed to be used as machang timber; machang is used for light  construction  or  heavy  construction  under  cover  and  the  beautiful  streaked  heartwood  is  used  for  fine  furniture  (Lemmens  et  al,  1995).  Being  a  wild  relative  of  the  mango,  this  species  could  be  useful  for  breeding purposes (Smith et al, 1992).  Trade  The fruits of this species are found in local markets is E. Kalimantan (van Valkenburg, 1997). Machang  timber is  exported  from  Borneo in  fairly large quantities.  In 1987,  Sabah  exported  40,000 m 3  of round  logs  worth  US$2.5  million  and  in  1992  38,000  m 3  were  exported  as  sawn  timber  and  round  logs  for  US$5.7 million (Lemmens et al, 1995).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): LR (WCMC, 1997). The given conservation status is not  finalised.  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  There  are  no  reports  of  machang  being  planted  for  timber.  Natural  regeneration  of  species  is  usually  abundant. Machang stones are recalcitrant (Lemmens et al., 1995).  References  Kostermans, A.J.H. and Bompard, J.M. 1993. The mangoes. Their botany, nomenclature, horticulture and  utilization. IBPGR and Linnean Society. Academic Press.  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp.  Soepadmo et al. (eds). 1996. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak volume 2.  Smith,  N.J.H.,  Williams  J.T.,  Plucknett,  D.L.  and  J.P.  Talbot.  1992.  Tropical  Forest  and  their  Crops.  Cornell University Press: Ithaca, U.S.A.  van Valkenburg, J.L.C.H. 1997. Non­timber forest products of East Kalimantan. Potentials for  sustainable forest use. Tropenbos Series 16. The Tropenbos  Foundation:Wageningen,  The  Netherlands. pp.61­95.  WCMC 1997. Report of the Third Regional Workshop, held at Hanoi, Vietnam, 18­21 August 1997.  Conservation and sustainable management of trees project. Unpublished.

72. Mangifera macrocarpa Blume  Anacardiaceae  Common names  Indonesia:  gompor  (Sudanese,  western  Java),  n’cham  busur  (East  Kalimantan),  asem  busur  (South  Kalimantan).  Malaysia:  machang  lawit  (Peninsular  ).  Thailand:  ma­muang­khikwang  (Peninsular)  (Lemmens et al, 1995).  Synonyms  Mangifera fragrans (Lemmens et al, 1995)  Habitat  Restricted  to  primary  wet  evergreen  lowland  forest,  at  altitudes  of  0  ­  800  m.  It  occurs  scattered  in  lowland rainforest (Lemmens et al.,1995).  Population status and trends  The species is very scattered. It flowers and fruits rarely but profusely (Kostermans and Bompard, 1993).  Cambodia: Occurrence reported (Ding Hou, 1978).  Indonesia:  Occur  in  Java,  Kalimantan  and  Sumatra  (Ding  Hou,  1978).  It  is  possibly  extinct  in  Java  (Kostermans and Bompard, 1993).  Malaysia: Occur in Peninsular Malaysia and Sabah (Soepadmo et al. 1996).  Thailand: Occurrence in Southern Thailand (Ding Hou, 1978).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information. Page 93 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Threats  General threats to the forests where this species occurs include conversion for agriculture and logging  (WCMC, 1998).  Utilisation  The wood is reputed to be used (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Trade  Machang timber is exported from Borneo in fairly large quantities. In 1987, Sabah exported 40,000 m 3  of  round logs worth US$2.5 million and in 1992 38,000 m 3  were exported as sawn timber and round logs for  US$5.7 million (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1c (WCMC, 1998).  The Singapore Red Data Book: Vulnerable [V] (Ng& Wee, 1994).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  There  are  no  reports  of  machang  being  planted  for  timber.  Natural  regeneration  of  species  is  usually  abundant. Machang stones are recalcitrant (Lemmens et al., 1995).  References  Ding Hou. 1978. Anacardiaceae. Flora Malesiana Ser. I, vol. 8: 395­548.  Kostermans, A.J.H. and Bompard, J.M. 1993. The mangoes. Their botany, nomenclature, horticulture and  utilization. IBPGR and Linnean Society. Academic Press.  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp.  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society.  343pp.  Soepadmo et al. (eds). 1996. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak volume 2.  WCMC.  Mangifera macrocarpa.  In  Oldfield,  S., C.  Lusty  and  A. MacKiven.  1998.  The  World  List of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.

73. Manilkara kanosiensis H.J.Lam & Meeuse  Sapotaceae  Common name  Manilkara (Trade name) (Papua New Guinea) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonym  No information.  Habitat  A medium to large sized tree scattered in primary lowland rainforest between 0 ­ 500m (Soerianegara  & Lemmens, 1994).  Population status and trends  A  relatively  widespread  but  uncommon  species  occurring  mainly  in  areas  where  intense  logging  is  being  carried  out,  such as  New  Britain and  New  Ireland in  the  Bismarck  Archipelago  and the north­  west of Papua New Guinea (Eddowes, 1998).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Maluku in Tanimbar Islands (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Papua New Guinea: Occurrence reported (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).

Page 94 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Role of species in the ecosystem  It regenerates in primary forest (Eddowes, 1998).  Threats  Felling is the main threat to Manilkara kanosiensis. As it only occurs in lowland primary forest,  exploitation of the species and habitat destruction render it vulnerable (Eddowes, 1998).  Utilisation  The  wood  is  used  to  build  bridge  and  wharf  superstructures;  also  it  is  used  for  flooring,  decking,  turnery and carving (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  The timber is found in international trade (Eddowes, 1998). It is reported to be exported to Japan  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation status  IUCN Threat category (ver 2.3, 1994): EN A1cd+2cd, C2a (Eddowes, 1998).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Eddowes, P.J. Manilkara kanosiensis. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World List of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.

74. Merrillia caloxylon Swingle  Rutaceae  Common name  Malay  lemon  (English).  Indonesia:  kemuning  hutan  (Sumatra).  Malaysia:  kemuning  gajah,  kemuning  limau, keteng(g)ah (Peninsular). Thailand: ka­ting­ka, kaeo khe khwai (peninsular) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Synonym  Murraya caloxylon (Sosef et al., 1998).  Habitat  Found along river banks in lowland primary or secondary rain forest to 400 m altitude. It is able to grow  on a variety of well drained soils (Sosef et al., 1998).  Population status and trends  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Sumatra (Sosef  et al., 1998).  Malaysia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Peninsular  Malaysia  and  Sabah  (Sosef  et  al.,  1998).  Collected  only  once from Sabah. This species is presumed extinct in Peninsular Malaysia (WCMC, 1998).  Myanmar: Occurrence reported in southern region (Sosef et al., 1998).  Thailand: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Thailand (Sosef et al., 1998).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Exploitaiton of the timber and general forest loss (WCMC, 1998).  Utilisation  In  Peninsular  Malaysia,  the  durable  handsome  wood  of  M.  caloxylon  has  been  used  to  make  walking  sticks, smoking pipes, parang handles and sheaths and other small objects (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995).  The species is also used for making furniture and boxes. Medicinal applications for M. caloxylon include  an infusion of the wood for stomachache, and as powder which is rubbed into the skin against aches and  pains. Often planted in villages in Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore for its wood (Sosef et al., 1998). Page 95 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Trade  The wood is rarely and only locally used. Prices are high and it is sold by the piece (Sosef et al., 1998).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU B1+2c (WCMC, 1998).  Conservation measures  With the exception of the few individuals in botanic gardens and those occurring in small villages there  are no reports of active ex­situ conservation (Sosef et al., 1998).  Forest management and silviculture  It is possible to propagate M. caloxylon by seed. An experiment in Peninsular Malaysia has shown that  approximately 75% of seeds germinate within 23­73 days. The growth rate of this species is probably to  low to make it a suitable plantation species (Sosef et al., 1998).  References  Soepadmo, E. & K.M. Wong, (eds.). 1995. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak, volume 1: 513 pp.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3).  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 859 pp.  WCMC.  Merrillia  caloxylon.  In  Oldfield,  S.,  C.  Lusty  and  A.  MacKiven.  1998.  The  World  List  of  Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.

75. Neesia altissima Blume  Bombacaceae  Common name  Durian (Trade name). Indonesia: durian hantu (Sumatra), bungan, ki bengang (Argent et al., 1997) (Sosef  et al., 1998).  Synonym  Neesia ambigua (Sosef et al., 1998).  Habitat  Neesia occurs in primary rainforest, often along streams or in freshwater swamp at altitudes of 100­1800m.  Population status and trends  The  species  has  been  recorded  as  threatened  in  Indonesia  although  the  genus  does  not  seem  to  be  in  immediate danger of genetic erosion or extinction (WCMC, 1991). Logging is seldom, even in concession  areas (Sosef et al., 1998).  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Sumatra,  Java  and  Kalimantan  (Argent et  al.,  1997) (Sosef  et  al.,  1998).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia (Sosef et al., 1998).  Singapore: Occurrence reported (Sosef et al., 1998).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  This  genus  produces  a  light  timber  and  is  suitable  for  light  construction,  cheap  furniture  and  fittings,  flooring,  planking,  wooden  shoes,  floats,  low­grade  coffins,  sliced  veneer  and  plywood.  Dried  fruits  are  hung  above  doors  in  Sumatra  to  ward  off  spirits.  The  wall  of  the  fruit,  of  this  species,  has  been  used  medicinally against gonorrhoea. There is no expected increase in the use of Neesi (Sosef et al., 1998).  Trade  This is  one  of the main Neesia species traded  with Durio and Coelostegia spp. as  Durian. Neesia wood  makes up only a small proportion of this trade group. Neesia may also be traded in mixed consignments as  “red meranti” (Sosef et al., 1998). Exports  of Durio spp.  from Peninsular Malaysia totalled 16,000m 3  in  1995 which was traded at an average 248$/m 3  (ITTO, 1997).  Conservation status  The species has been recorded as threatened in Indonesia (WCMC, 1991), although the genus does not  seem to be in immediate danger of genetic erosion or extinction. Logging is seldom, even in concession Page 96 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  areas (Sosef et al., 1998).  The Singapore Red Data Book: Vulnerable [V] (Ng& Wee, 1994).  Conservation measures  There are no records of ex situ conservation of Neesia, however there are some N. altissima in arboretum  and botanical gardens like Forest Research Institute Malaysia (Sosef et al., 1998).  Forest management and silviculture  It  is  possible  to  propagate  Neesia  from  seeds.  Other  fundamental  data  has  been  recorded,  for  e.g.  N.  altissima aged 23 years in the arboretum of the Forest Research Institute of Malaysia were to 12.5 m tall  and 17 cm diameter. In Java, the species flowers from February to July (Sosef et al., 1998).  References  Argent,  G.,  A.  Saridan,  E.J.F.  Campbell  and  P.  Wilkie.  1997.  Manual  for  the  larger  and  more  important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda, Indonesia. 341 pp.  Ng,  P.K.L.  &  Y.C.  Wee  (eds.).  1994.  The  Singapore  Red  Data  Book.  Singapore:  The  Nature  Society.  343pp.  WCMC. 1991. Provision of data on rare and threatened tropical timber species. Unpublished report,  prepared under contract to the EC.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (Eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3):  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden.  ITTO. 1997. Annual review and assessment of the world tropical timber situation, 1996.

76. Neesia malayana Bakh.  Bombacaceae  Common name  Trade name: durian (Sosef et al., 1998).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  Fresh water swamp forest (Whitmore, 1983).  Population status and trends  The  species  has  been  recorded  as  threatened  in  Indonesia  although  the  genus  does  not  seem  to  be  in  immediate danger of genetic erosion or extinction. Logging is seldom, even in concession areas (Sosef et  al., 1998).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported (Sosef et al., 1998).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported (Whitmore, 1983) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Singapore: Occurrence reported (Whitmore, 1983) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  This  genus  produces  a  light  timber  and  is  suitable  for  light  construction,  cheap  furniture  and  fittings,  flooring,  planking,  wooden  shoes,  floats,  low  grade  coffins,  sliced  veneer  and  plywood.  There  is  no  expected increase in the use of Neesia (Sosef et al., 1998).  Trade  This is one of the main Neesia species. Traded with Durio and Coelostegia spp. as Durian. Neesia wood  makes up only a small proportion of this Trade group. Neesia may also be traded in mixed consignments as  “red meranti” (Sosef et al., 1998). Exports of Durio spp. from Peninsular Malaysia totalled 16,000m 3  in  1995 which was Traded at an average 248$/m 3 (ITTO, 1997).  Conservation status  The Singapore Red Data Book: Endangered [En] (Ng& Wee, 1994).  Conservation measures  Neesia is not recorded to be conserved ex­situ (Sosef et al., 1998). Page 97 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Forest management and silviculture  It is possible to propagate Neesia from seeds (Sosef et al., 1998).  References  ITTO. 1997. Annual review and assessment of the world tropical timber situation, 1996.  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society.  343pp.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (Eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3):  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden  Whitmore,  T.C.  (ed.).  1983.  Tree  flora  of  Malaya.  Volume  1.  Longman,  Forest  Department,  Kuala  Lumpur. 473 pp.

77. Neobalanocarpus heimii Ashton  Dipterocarpaceae  Common name  Chengal  (Trade  name).  Malaysia:  chengai,  penak.  Thailand:  takhian­chan,  takhian  chantamaeo  (peninsular), chi­ngamat (Narathiwat) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  N. heimii grows under a wide range of ecological conditions but appears to grow best on undulating land  with  a  light  sandy  soil  (Thomas,  1953).  It  is  found  in  mixed  dipterocarp  forest  below  1000  m  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994). In Thailand it occurs in Hill Dipterocarp forest along slopes and in  valleys, often growing with Shorea curtisii (Smitinand et al., 1980).  Population status and trends  Chengal has been one of the most popular hardwoods of Peninsular Malaysia and has been heavily logged  throughout the state. The species is the best known and most highly valued timber in the country. By the  1950s chengal had been exterminated from some accessible areas, particularly in the western regions of  Malaya  (Thomas, 1953).  In  Malaysia the  species  is  common  but never  abundant (WCMC, 1997). The  species  is  listed  as  Vulnerable  in  Anon  (1985).  FAO  (1990)  notes  that  the  species  has  been  over­  exploited, has  poor regeneration and is need  of in  situ  conservation.  Inventory  data have  been used to  indicate the depletion  of  chengal in  Peninsular  Malaysia  in the  period  between  the  First (1971­72)  and  Second  (1981­82)  National  Forest  Inventories.  There  was  a  measured  decrease  in  volume/ha  and  number/ha for trees over 45 cm in diameter in both virgin and logged over forests (WCMC, 1997).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported throughout Peninsular Malaysia (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Singapore: Reported extinct (Chua, 1998).  Thailand: Occurrence reported in Southern Thailand, possibly extinct (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Threatened by timber extraction and habitat destruction (Chua, 1998).  Utilisation  Chengal is used for heavy construction, in bridge­making and for sleepers and telegraph poles. It is also  used for boat building, flooring, in sea defences and carving. Resin is used for varnish (Soerianegara &  Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  For  the  period  1986  ­  1990,  Peninsular  Malaysia  exported  an  average  of  28,500  m 3  of  sawn  wood  annually, and the domestic market consumed an average of 69,000 m 3  annually. In 1992, the export of  sawn  chengal  timber  was  8000  m 3  with  a  value  of  US$  2.1  m.  Thailand  is  the  main  importer  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd (Chua, 1998). Chengal stock has been depleted  and  it  might  be  endangered  in  near  future  because  of  its  limited  distribution  and  commercial  value  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).

Page 98 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Conservation measures  Peninsular Malaysia Occurs in a number of Virgin Jungle Reserves including those in Ulu Sedili Forest  Reserve,  Johore,  Panti  Forest  Reserve,  Johore,  Balah  Forest  Reserve,  Pahang,  Lesong  Forest  Reserve,  Pahang,  Gunung  Besut  Forest  Reserve,  Perak,  Sungai  Lalang  Forest  Reserve,  Selangor,  Angsi  Forest  Reserve,  Negeri  Sembilan  and  Pasoh  Forest  Reserve;  it  also  occurs  in  Taman  Negara  National  Park  (Chua, 1998). Most of areas populated with chengal in Malaysia’s virgin jungle reserve system have been  designated  as  research  plot  [1].  Under  the  Forest  Genetic  Resources  Information  System  (FORGRiS),  about 47 chengal mother tree have been selected for germplasm documentation [1]. Important information  like phenology, ecology, genecology and sivilculture has been collected and documented [1].  Thailand Neobalanocarpus heimii does not occur in any protected areas within Thailand (Phengklai pers.  comm.,  1989).  In  1987,  the  Forestry  Department  of  Peninsular  Malaysia  took  steps  to  ensure  some  protection of chnegal by increasing the cutting limit of 60 cm diameter at breast height (Soerianegara &  Lemmens, 1994).  Legislation  Peninsular Malaysia ­ The export of chengal in log form is banned in Peninsular Malaysia (Chua, 1998).  Thailand ­ Conserved as a valuable source of Dammar. Prior to the general logging ban, exploitation of  chengal timber could only be carried out by special permission granted by the Ministry of Agriculture (?).  Forest management and silviculture  Natural regeneration beneath parent trees is rarely abundant in primary rainforest except on ridges in hill  forest.  Seedlings  need  shade  for  development  and  some  success  has  been  achieved  with  planting  in  secondary  forests  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994).  In  Malaysia  there  has  been  some  success  in  enrichment planting trials in advancing secondary forest (WCMC, 1997). A great deal of experience in  cultivation  chengal  has  been  gained  around  1900­1913.  This  information  is  considered  adequate  for  current  planting  efforts.  The  limited  availability  of  seed  sources  is  still  a  constrain  to  conservation  programmes for this species [1].  References  Chua, L.S.L. Neobalanocarpus heimii. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The World List  of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Smithinand,  S.,  Santiasuk,  T.  and  Phengklai,  C.  1980.  The  manual  of  Dipterocarpaceae  of  mainland  South­East Asia. Royal Forest Department, Bangkok.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Thomas, A.V. 1953. Malayan timbers Chengai and Balau. Malayan Forest Service Trade Leaflet No. 20.  WCMC  1997.  Report  of  the  Third  Regional  Workshop,  held  at  Hanoi,  Vietnam,  18­21  August  1997.  Conservation and sustainable management of trees project. Unpublished.  Additional web references  [1]  http://www.fao.org/DOCREP/005/AC648E/ac648e0c.htm#bm12.  Ex­situ  conservation  efforts  for  Neobalanocarpus  heimii  in  Malaysia  –  in  FAO:  Proceedings  of  the  Southeast  Asian  Moving  Workshop on Conservation, Management and Utilization of Forest Genetic Resources. Downloaded  on 8 June 2006.  Correspondence and personal communications  Phengklai, C. Royal Forest Department, Bangkok, pers comm., November 1989.

78. Ochanostachys amentacea Mast.  Olacaceae  Common names  Indonesia, Malaysia: Petaling. Indonesia: petikal (Sumatra), ampalang, empilung (Kalimantan). Malaysia:  imah  (Sarawak­Bidayuh  Bau),  mentalai  (Peninsular  Malaysia),  petikal  (Sarawak,  sagad  berauth  (Sarawak­Murud),  santikal  (Sarawak­Iban)  and  tanggal  (Sabah­Dusun),  (Lemmens  et  al.,  1995).  Ampilung (Dayak, Kalimantan), petaling (Malay, Kalimantan), oos (Dayak benuag, Kalimantan) (Kessler  & Sidiyasa, 1994).  Synonyms  Petalinia bancana, Ochanostachys bancana (Lemmens et al., 1995).

Page 99 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Habitat  Primary and secondary lowland rain forest, often in mixed Dipterocarp forest in undulating country, on  hill sides and ridges up to 950 m. It is found on loamy or sandy and rarely periodically inundated ground.  It is scattered or locally frequent (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Population status and trends  A  fairly  common  monotypic  genus  found  scattered  in  the  understorey,  occasionally  reaching  the  canopy, of primary and secondary lowland rainforest, often mixed dipterocarp forest (Lemmens et al.,  1995).  India: Occurrence reported from Nicobar and Andaman Islands is probably erronaeous (Lemmens et al.,  1995).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Sumatra and Kalimantan (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994) (Lemmens et al.,  1995) (Soepadmo and Wong, 1995).  Malaysia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Peninsular  Malaysia,  Sabah  and  Sarawak.  In  Sabah  and  Sarawak  widespread and common (Lemmens et al., 1995) (Soepadmo and Wong, 1995).  Singapore: Occurrence reported (Ng & Wee, 1994).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  Petaling timber is used for house posts and other heavy construction purposes, such as bridge bearers  for logging roads and railways, for telephone poles foundation piles, fence posts, flooring and tool  handles. Utilisation for pallets, boxes and crates has also been reported. The bark and roots are used  medicinally. The seeds are edible (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Trade  Timber is traded [1]. Petaling is generally too scarce to be of economic importance as an export timber. It  is most frequently traded together with other medium­weight and heavy woods as mixed hardwood.  Petaling is generally too scarce to be of economic importance as an export timber. The amount exported  are insignificant. In 1983, about 3400 m3 of sawlogs were exported from Peninsular Malaysia, with a  value of US$ 120 000 (US$ 35/m3), and in 1984 it was 3500 m 3  with a value of US$ 140 000 (US$  40/m 3 ), the export was mainly to Singapore (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Conservatin status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): DD (Asia Regional Workshop, 1998).  Conservation measures  Forest management and silviculture  Petaling does not have potential as a timber plantation species due to its slow growth,however it is useful  for underplanting in forest plantations to reduce weed growth. Natural regeneration of this shade tolerant  species  is  sparse  and  scattered,  but  it  can  be  good  under  favourable  conditions.  The  tree  is  slow  growing; taking about 150 years to reach a diameter of 50 cm. (Lemmens et al., 1995).  eferences  Asian Regional Workshop. Ochanostachys amentacea. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998.  The World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp.  Soepadmo, E. & K.M. Wong, (eds.). 1995. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak, volume 1: 513 pp.  Kessler,  P.J.A  &  K.  Sidiyasa.  1994.  Trees  of  the  Balikpapan­Samarinda  area,  East  Kalimantan,  Indonesia:  a  manual  of  280  selected  species.  Tropenbos  Series  7.  The  Tropenbos  Foundation,  Wageningen. 446 pp.  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara, & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  No 5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Leiden: Backhuys Publishers. 655 pp.  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society.  343pp.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/petaling.asp. Greenergy Co. Downloaded on 8 August 2006.

Page 100 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

79. Octomeles sumatrana Miq.  Datiscaceae  Common names  Binuang (Trade name). Indonesia: benuang, winuang, binuang bini. Papua New Guinea: erima, irima,  ilimo. Philippine: bilus (Tagalog), barong (northern Luzon), barousan (southern Luzon) (Lemmens et  al., 1995).  Malaysia:  Binuang  (Sabah­Malay),  benuang  (Sarawak­Iban),  Binong  (Sarawak­Bidayuh),  lemeng  (Sarawak­Berawan, Punan, Tutoh) (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995).  Synonyms  Octomeles moluccana (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Habitat  Found in lowland forest to 1000 m altitude. Especially common in natural secondary and seral riverine  alluvial forest. Colonises bare alluvial soil (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Population status and trends  This monotypic genus is widespread in Malesia. A pioneer species, it regenerates quickly in disturbed  habitats such as logged­over forest and areas that were previously cultivated (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Irian  Jaya,  Sumatra,  Kalimantan  and  Maluku  (Lemmens  et  al.,  1995).  Papua New Guinea: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Philippines: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Solomon Islands: Occurrence reported (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Sabah and Sarawak (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Role of species in the ecosystem  Bees  prefer  to  nest  in  the  branches  of  this  species.  Flowers  are  wind  pollinated  and  the  seeds  are  probably wind dispersed. Binuang is a pioneer of bare alluvial soil, binding the soil with a network of  roots and improving site structure (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Threats  No immediate threats to the survival of this species.  Utilisation  The timber is not utilised for construction but for other purposes where strength is not important such  as furniture, interior finish, coffin board, canoes, rafts, crates, boxes, firewood and paper manufacture.  Bark used as medicine and dye, and young leves as vegetable. Binuang trees are valued by the locals as  wild bees often nest in them (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Trade  The export of binuang timber from Sabah in 1987 was 201 000 m3 of logs  with a value of US$ 12.7  million, and in 1992 it was 95 000 m3 (21% as sawn timber, 79% as log) with a total value of US$ 8.3  milion (US$ 141/m3 for sawn timber, US$ 73/m3 for logs). In Papua New Guinea, binuang is a fairly  important export timber. In 1992, sawn logs fetch a minimum price of  US$ 50/m3 and the import in  Japan is about 1.5% of the total timber import from Papua New Guinea (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Conservation status  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  Plantations  have  been  established  in  PNG  and  the  Philippines,  trial  plantation  has  been  established  outside Southeast Asia, e.g. in Brazil (Lemmens et al., 1995). It is one of the fast growing trees and  prefers strong light. It takes only 4 months from sowing to planting out in the field. This tree is suitable  for plantation because it can grow on low hilly sites and in temporarily flooded areas, possessed quick  crown  development,  and  self­pruning  abilities  (Soepadmo  &  Wong,  1995).  In  Sabah,  research  on  binuang monoculture plantations and intercropping with oil palm has been conducted (Lee et al., 2005)  References:  Soepadmo, E. & K.M. Wong, (eds.). 1995. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak, volume 1: 513 pp.  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara, & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  No 5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Leiden: Backhuys Publishers. 655 pp. Page 101 of 150

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Lee, Y.F., F.R. Chia, Anuar M., R.C. Ong & M. Ajik. 2005. The Use of Laran and Binuang for Forest  Plantations and Intercropping with Oil Palm in Sabah. Sepilok Bulletin Vol. 3.  Additional web references  [1] http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/binuang.asp. Greenergy Co. Downloaded on 8 August 2006.

80. Palaquium bataanense Merr.  Sapotaceae  Common names  Philippines: tagatoi, Bataan tagatoi (Tagalog), gasatan (Iloko) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  Synonyms  Palaquium whifordii (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  Habitat  Primary lowland forest, especially on dry hill forest (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  Population status and trends  Philippines: Occurrence reported (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Clear­felling/logging of the habitat and extensive agriculture (WCMC, 1998).  Utilisation  A  source  of  red  nato  timber  (WCMC,  1998).  Nyatoh  wood  is  used  for  house  construction,  canoes,  furniture, doors, veneer, panelling, flooring, tools and musical instruments (Soerianegara & Lemmens,  1995.  Trade  Timber from Palaquium is traded as nyatoh together with other Sapotaceae like Payena, Pouteria and  Madhuca. The timber is traded on an international scale (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1d (WCMC, 1998).  Conservation measures  Forest management and silviculture  There is an urgent need for silvicultural research into the genus (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  WCMC, 1998. Palaquium bataanense. In: IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. . Downloaded on 03 January 2006.

81. Palaquium impressinervium Ng  Sapotaceae  Common name  Malaysia: nyatoh surin (Peninsular Malaysia) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  Synonym  No Synonym.  Habitat  Common in forest on hill below 350 m altitude (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).

Page 102 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Population status and trends  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  Thailand: Occurrence reported in southern Thailand (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Clear­felling/logging of the habitat and expansion of human settlement (Chua, 1998)  Utilisation  The timber is used as bitis. Bitis is more durable than nyatoh and is used for heavy construction, heavy­  duty flooring, post, door, window frames and paving blocks (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  Trade  Timber from Palaquium is traded as nyatoh together with other Sapotaceae like Payena, Pouteria and  Madhuca. The timber is traded on an international scale (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995) [1].  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU B1+2a (Chua, 1998).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  This  species  is  not  in  cultivation.  There  is  an  urgent  need  for  silvicultural  research  into  the  genus  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  References  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Chua, L.S.L. 1998. Palaquium impressinervium. In: IUCN  2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened  Species. . Downloaded on 03 January 2006.  Additional web references  [1]. http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/nyatoh.asp. Greenergy Co. Downloaded on 8 August 2006.

82. Palaquium maingayi (C.B. Clarke) King & Gamble  Sapotaceae  Common name  Malaysia:  nyatoh  tembaga,  sundik,  getah  ketapang  (Peninsular).  Thailand:  chik­khao  (Chumphon,  Surat Thani), chik­nom­hin (Pattani), yak­keng (Malay, Pattani) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  Synonym  Croixia maingayi (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  Habitat  Found  in  lowland  and hill  forests  up  to  an  altitude  to  1100  m  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1995).  In  Sarawak found in riparian and kerangas forest (Soepadmo et al., 2002).  Population status and trends  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia and Sarawak (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995)  (Soepadmo et al., 2002).  Thailand: Occurrence reported in Thailand (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  The  timber  is  used  as  nyatoh.  Nyatoh  wood  is  used  for  house  construction,  canoes,  furniture,  doors,  veneer, panelling, flooring, tools and musical instruments (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995. The latex  makes gutta­percha of moderate quality (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). Page 103 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Trade  Timber from Palaquium is traded as nyatoh together with other Sapotaceae like Payena, Pouteria and  Madhuca (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995) [1]. The timber is traded on an international scale  (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1995).  Conservation status  No information.  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  The species is not in cultivation.  References  Soepadmo, E., L.G. Saw & Richard C.K. Chung, (eds.). 2002. Tree flora of Sabah and Sarawak, vol. 4:  388 pp.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1993. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Additional web references  [1]. http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/nyatoh.asp. Greenergy Co. Downloaded on 8 August 2006.

83. Parinari costata (Korth.) Blume  Chrysobalanaceae  Common names  Myanmar: Tauk­kade (Kress et al., 2003).  Indonesia: tenbel anak, tengko bayawak (Argent et al., 1997).  Merbatu (Trade name). Indonesia: mengkudur (East Kalimantan), sukupal, tayas (Sumatra). Malaysia:  bugan (Iban, Sabah), merbatu pipit, sekepal kemalau (Peninsular) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Synonyms  Parinari bicolour, Parinari polyneurum, Parinari rubiginosa (Prance, 1989).  Habitat  Mixed dipterocarp to submontane forests on well­drained soils at 300­1500 m altitude. Subspecies costata  is  found  in lowland  forest, hillsides, ridges at  altitude  up to  300 m.  Subspecies  rubiginosa is  found in  lower  montane  forest  at  750­1500  m  in  Peninsular  Malaysia  and  Borneo  and  lowland  forest  in  the  Philippines.  Subspecies  polyneura  is  found  in  lowland  forest  and  occasionally  in  hills  and  seasonal  swamps (Prance, 1989).  Population status and trends  Brunei: Occurrence reported of subspecies costata (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995).  Indonesia:  Three  subspecies  are  reported.  Subspecies  costata  is  reported  in  Sumatra  and  Kalimatan.  Subspecies rubiginosa is reported in Kalimantan (Prance, 1989) (Soepadmo & Wong, 1995) (Argent et  al., 1997). Subspecies polyneura is reported in Sumatra and possibly Kalimantan (Prance, 1989).  Malaysia:  Three  subspecies  are  reported.  Subspecies  costata  and  rubiginosa  is  reported  in  Peninsular  Malaysia,  Sabah  and  Sarawak,  both  are  considered  uncommon  (Prance,  1989)  (Soepadmo  &  Wong,  1995). Subspecies polyneura is reported in Peninsular Malaysia (Prance, 1989).  Myanmar:  Occurrence  reported  in  Taninthayi  of  subspecies  rubiginosa  (Prance,  1989)  (Soepadmo  &  Wong, 1995) (Kress et al., 2003).  Philippines:  Two  subspecies  are  reported.  Subspecies  costata  is  reported  in  Mindanao,  Culion  and  Samar, subspecies rubiginosa is reported in Mindanao only (Prance, 1989).  Singapore: Occurrence reported of subspecies polyneura (Prance, 1989).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  Parinari wood is likely to be used for medium to heavy construction undercover, for example packaging  for  heavy  articles,  posts,  beams,  panelling  and  parquet  flooring.  It  provides  a  good  fuel  and  charcoal. Page 104 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Treated  timber  can  be  used  for  outdoor  use  for  example  wharf  decking,  transmission  posts,  railway  sleepers, dunnage, salt­water piling and other marine constructions. The edible fruits of various species  are not often used and the seed oil is used to lacquer paper umbrellas. Parinari is difficult to saw, for this  reason it’s use is likely to be restricted to marine constructions and firewood (Sosef et al., 1998).  Trade  Species of the genus Parinari are likely to be traded in mixed consignments of medium­heavy hardwood,  or  along  with  species  of  Atuna  and  Maranthes  as  ‘merbatu’  (Sosef  et  al.,  1998)  [1].  Supplies  are  generally limited (Sosef et al., 1998).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): DD (WCMC, 1997).  The Singapore Red Data Book: Rare [R] (Ng& Wee, 1994).  Conservation measures  With  the  exception  of  those  specimens  incidently  cultivated  in  botanical  gardens  there  is  no  ex­situ  cultivation (Sosef et al., 1998).  Forest management and silviculture  Propagation  from  seed  is  possible.  Trees  are  shade­tolerant  and  under  natural  conditions  seedling  established in small numbers and grows up in primary forest (Sosef et al.,1998)  References  Argent,  G.,  A.  Saridan,  E.J.F.  Campbell  and  P.  Wilkie.  1997.  Manual  for  the  larger  and  more  important  non­dipterocarp  trees  of  central  Kalimantan,  vol.  1.  Forest  Research  Institute,  Samarinda, Indonesia. 341 pp.  Kress, W. J., R. A. DeFilipps, E. Farr, and Daw Yin Yin Kyi. 2003. A Checklist of the Trees, Shrubs,  Herbs  and  Climbers  of  Myanmar  (Revised  from  the  original  works  by  J.  H.  Lace  and  H.  G.  Hundley). Contrib. U. S. Nat. Herbarium 45: 590 pp.  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society.  343pp.  Prance, G.T. 1989. Chrysobalanaceae. Flora Malesiana Ser. I, vol. 10: 635­678.  Soepadmo, E. & K.M. Wong, (eds.). 1995. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak, volume 1: 513 pp.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3).  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 859 pp.  WCMC 1997. Report of the Third Regional Workshop, held at Hanoi, Vietnam, 18­21 August 1997.  Conservation  and  sustainable  management  of  trees  project.  Unpublished.Sosef,  Hong  and  Prawirohatmodjo, 1998  Additional web references  [1]. http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/merbatu.asp. Greenergy Co. Downloaded on 8 August 2006.

84. Parinari oblongifolia Hook.f.  Chrysobalanaceae  Common names  Indonesia: mankudar, mengkudu (Kalimantan). Malaysia; bedara hutan, mempelan babi, mentelur  kamalau (Peninsular) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Melalin (Dayak benuag, Kalimantan) (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994).  Synonyms  Ferolia oblongifolia, Parinari gigantea, Parinari borneese (Sosef et al., 1998).  Habitat  Lowland rain  forest and  beside rivers in  valleys  extending to  450 m  (Soepadmo and  Wong,  1995) and  occasionally in seasonal swamps (Kessler, Sidiyasa, 1994).  Population status and trends  This species has been recorded as threatened in Indonesia (WCMC, 1991).  Brunei: Occurrence reported (Soepadmo and Wong, 1995) (Prance, 1989).  Indonesia:  Sumatra  and  E,  W  and  Central  Kalimantan  (Prance,  1989)  (Kessler,  Sidiyasa,  1994)  (Soepadmo and Wong, 1995).  Malaysia: Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak (Prance, 1989) (Soepadmo and Wong, 1995).  Singapore: Occurrence reported (Ng & Wee, 1994). Page 105 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  Parinari wood is likely to be used for medium to heavy construction undercover, for example packaging  for  heavy  articles,  posts,  beams,  panelling  and  parquet  flooring.  It  provides  a  good  fuel  and  charcoal.  Treated  timber  can  be  used  for  outdoor  use  for  example  wharf  decking,  transmission  posts,  railway  sleepers, dunnage, salt­water piling and other marine constructions. The edible fruits of various species  are not often used and the seed oil is used to lacquer paper umbrellas. Parinari is difficult to saw, for this  reason it’s use is likely to be restricted to marine constructions and firewood (Sosef et al.,1998).  Trade  Species of the genus Parinari are likely to be traded in mixed consignments of medium­heavy hardwood,  or along with species of Atuna and Maranthes as ‘merbatu’. Supplies are generally limited (Sosef et  al.,1998).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): DD (WCMC, 1997).  The Singapore Red Data Book: Rare [R] (Ng & Wee, 1994).  Conservation measures  With  the  exception  of  those  specimens  incidently  cultivated  in  botanical  gardens  there  is  no  ex­situ  cultivation (Sosef et al.,1998).  Forest management and silviculture  Propagation  from  seed  is  possible.  The  stone  of    this  species  has  about  70%  chance  of  germination,  although this does not occur for 9 months after sowing. The last stones may germinate after more than 3  years. Treess are  shade­tolerant and  under natural  conditions  seedling are  established in  small numbers  and grow up in primary forest (Sosef et al., 1998).  References  Kessler, P.J.A & K. Sidiyasa. 1994. Trees of the Balikpapan­Samarinda area, East Kalimantan,  Indonesia: a manual of 280 selected species. Tropenbos Series 7. The Tropenbos Foundation,  Wageningen. 446 pp.  Ng, P.K.L. & Y.C. Wee (eds.). 1994. The Singapore Red Data Book. Singapore: The Nature Society.  343pp.  Prance, G.T. 1989. Chrysobalanaceae. Flora Malesiana Ser. I, vol. 10: 635­678.  Soepadmo, E. & K.M. Wong, (eds.). 1995. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak, volume 1: 513 pp.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3).  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 859 pp.  WCMC  1991.  Provision  of  data  on  rare  and  threatened  tropical  timber  species.  Unpublished  report,  prepared under contract to the EC.  WCMC 1997. Report of the Third Regional Workshop, held at Hanoi, Vietnam, 18­21 August 1997.  Conservation  and  sustainable  management  of  trees  project.  Unpublished.Sosef,  Hong  and  Prawirohatmodjo, 1998  Additional web references  [1]. http://www.greenergy.com.sg/woods/merbatu.asp. Greenergy Co. Downloaded on 8 August 2006.

Page 106 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org 

85. Pericopsis mooniana Twaites  Leguminosae ­ Papilionoideae  Common names  Pericopsis (Trade name). Nandu wood, nedun tree (English). Indonesia: kayau kuku (general), kayu besi  papus  (Sulawesi),  nani  laut  (Irian  Jaya).  Malaysia:  kayu  laut  (Peninsular,  Sabah),  merbau  laut  (Peninsular). Philippines: makapilit (Bisaya) (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Synonyms  Dalbergia  lanceolaria,  Dalbergia  mooniana,  Derris  ponapensis,  Ormosia  villamilii,  Pericopsis  ponapensis (ILDIS, 2006).  Habitat  This  species  grows  primarily  scattered  in  coastal  forests,  but  can  be  found  along river  banks,  and in  periodically  inundated  lowland  semi­deciduous  or  evergreen  forest  up  to  200(­350)  m  altitude.  It  occurs in evergreen or semi­decidous forest, primarily on sandy regosols which are relatively infertile.  The species requires an annual rainfall of 750­2000 mm and occurs in more seasonal condition with 3­  4  dry  months.  In  south­eastern  Sulawesi  P.  mooniana  is  found  in  association  with  Actinodaphne  glomerata,  Calophyllum  soulattri,  Dehasia  curtisii  and  Metrosideros  petiolata  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994). In Papua New Guinea it is associated with Flindersia, Syzygium and Myristica spp.  (Eddowes, 1997).  Population status and trends  This highly prized wood is disappearing fast owing to logging and land clearing for rubber and oil palm  plantations (National Academy of Sciences, 1979).  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Irian  Jaya,  Kalimantan,  Lesser  Sunda,  Maluku,  Sulawesi  and  Sumatra (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (ILDIS, 2006). P. mooniana is considered to be Vulnerable  in Indonesia according to Tantra (1983). It is included in a shortlist of Endangered species of the country  (Anon.,  1978)  and  this  reference  noted  that  it  had  become  exceedingly  rare  in  Kalimantan.  Over­  exploitation in Sulawesi has resulted in only a few stands of this species remaining there, for example in  Lamedae Reserve, south of Kolaka in south­east Sulawesi (Whitten et al., 1987).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak (ILDIS, 2006). The species  is considered to be almost extinct in Sabah (Asia Regional Workshop, 1998).  Micronesia Federated States: Occurrence reported (ILDIS, 2006).  Palau: Occurrence reported (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Papua  New  Guinea:  Occurrence  reported  (ILDIS,  2006).  The  Papua  New  Guinea  population  is  restricted to a small area in the Oriomo River region of the Western province, where it is possibly extinct  now (Asia Regional Workshop, 1998).  Philippines: Occurrence reported in Mindanao (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (ILDIS, 2006).  Sri  Lanka:  Occurrence  reported  (ILDIS,  2006).  In  Sri  Lanka,  demand  for  the  timber  has  led  to  Pericopsis mooniana becoming very rare (de S. Wijesinghe et al., 1990).  Utilisation  It is eagerly sought after for furniture, cabinet making, panelling, sliced veneer and turnery. The timber  also used for heavy construction for ship building and bridges (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (ILDIS,  2006).  Trade  Supplies of the timber are very limited and exports are negligible. However, it fetches high prices on the  world market and is ranked in Indonesia among other fancy woods. Sawn timber from Indonesia is traded  mainly to Japan (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU A1cd (Asia Regional Workshop, 1998).  Conservation measures  It  is  cultivated  in  the  LAE  National  Botanical  Gardens,  Papua  New  Guinea  (Eddowes,  1997).  In  Sri  Lanka included in a list of threatened plant species which will replace the schedule of protected plants in  the Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance 1937 (de S. Wijesinghe et al., 1990).

Page 107 of 150

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Forest management and silviculture  In Indonesia trees are harvested according to the Indonesian selective felling and planting system, with a  diameter limit of 50 cm. Natural regeneration is generally scarce. In cultivation seeds germinate well and  the species can also be propagated easily from stem cuttings (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  References  Anon. 1978. Endangered species of trees. Conservation Indonesia 2(4)  Eddowes, P. J., 1997. Completed data collection form for Pericopsis mooniana.  Asia Regional Workshop. Pericopsis mooniana. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The  World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp  National Academy of Sciences. 1979. Tropical legumes: resources for the future. National Academy of  Sciences, Washington, DC.  de S. Wijesinghe, L.C.A., Gunatilleke, I.A.U.N., Jayawardana, S.D.G., Kotagama, S.W. and Gunatilleke,  C.V.S.  1990.  Biological  conservation  in  Sri  Lanka  (A  national  status  report).  Natural  Resources,  Energy and Science Authority of Sri Lanka, Colombo.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Tantra, G.M. 1983. Erosi plasma nutfah nabati. J. Penelitian & Penembangan Pertanian 2(1): 1­5.  Whitten, A.J., Mustafa, M. and Henderson, G.S. 1987. The ecology of Sulawesi. Gadjah Mada University  Press.  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on  15 March 2006.

86. Phoebe elliptica Blume  Lauraceae  Common names  Medang (Trade name). Indonesia: huru dapung, huru huya, huru leksa (Sudanese) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Synonym  Phoebe macrophylla (Blume)Blume (Sosef et al., 1998).  Habitat  Most  timber  producing  Phoebe  species  are  found  in  evergreen  lowland  to  montante forest  up  to  1500(­  2000) m altitude (Sosef et al., 1998).  Population status and trends  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah? And Sarawak? (Sosef et al., 1998).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in western Java (Sosef et al., 1998).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  Phoebe wood is used for house building, plywood, veneer, furniture, musical instrument, sculpture, tools  and firewood (Sosef et al., 1998).  Trade  The timber is commonly grouped with that of other species of the family Lauraceae and traded as medang.  It probably constitutes only minor portion of the total traded medang (Sosef et al., 1998).  Conservation status  This species has been recorded as threatened in Indonesia (WCMC, 1991).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  Phoebe can be propagated by seed (Sosef et al., 1998).  References  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3).  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 859 pp. Page 108 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  WCMC 1991. Provision of data on rare and threatened tropical timber species ─ report prepared under  contract to the EC. Unpublished.

87. Pinus merkusii Jungh & de Vriese  Pinaceae  Common names  Tennaserim pine (English). Myanmar: pyek, shja, tinyu­tinshu. . Indonesia: dammar batu, dammar  bunga, hejam, hujam, ujam, ujem (Acheh), hiji (Kerintji), kaju tussam, tussam (Battok, Tapanuli).  Philippines: agoo, aguu, salilt, tapulao (Sambal) (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Merkus  pine,  Mindoro  pine,  Sumatran  pine  (English).  IndonesiaL:  damar  batu,  damar  bunga,  uyam  (Acheh,  Sumatra).  Philippines:  tapulau  (Sambali,  Tagalog).  Thailand:  son­song­bai,  son­haang­maa  (central),  kai­plueak­dam  (northern).  Vietnam:  th[oo]ng  nh[uwj]a,  th[oo]ng  hail[as]  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994).  Synonyms  Pinus sumatrana, Pinus finlaysoniana, Pinus latteri, Pinus merkusii var. tonkinensis, Pinus merkusiana  (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Population status and trends  Widely distributed and commonly planted in South­East Asia from eastern Myanmar to the South  China Sea. (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Cambodia: Occurrence reported (de Laubenfels, 1988) (Gymnosperm Database, 2006).  Indonesia: Occurrence reported in Sumatra in Acheh mountains and scattered further in Tapanuli with  an  isolated  outliner  near  Mt.  Kerinjtji  (de  Laubenfels,  1988)  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (Gymnosperm  Database,  2006).  In  Sumatra  the  timber  continues  to  be  extracted  (SSC  Conifer  Specialist Group, 1998).  Laos: Occurrence reported (de Laubenfels, 1988) (Gymnosperm Database, 2006).  Myanmar: Occurrence reported in Kayah, Mon, Shan and Taninthayi (Kress et al., 2003). Reported in  eastern Burma (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994) (Gymnosperm Database, 2006).  Philippine:Occurrence  reported  in  Mindoro  and  Luzon  in  Zambales  Province  (de  Laubenfels,  1988)  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  (Gymnosperm  Database,  2006).  High  levels  of  exploitation  have  resulted  in  populations  being  reduced  to  very  low  levels  in  the  Philippines  (SSC  Conifer  Specialist  Group, 1998).  Thailand: Occurrence reported (de Laubenfels, 1988) (Gymnosperm Database, 2006).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported (de Laubenfels, 1988). Found in large stands or in small groups at Lai  Chau,  Son  La,  Lang  Son,  Bac  Thai,  Ha  Bac,  Quang  Ninh,  Thanh  Hoa,  Nghe  An,  Ha  Thinh,  Quang  Binh and Thua Thien Hue, Kon Tum and Lam Dong provinces (Gymnosperm Database, 2006).  Habitat  From low elevation to 2000 m, generally  on poor quality acid podzolic  soils  over sandstone or fresh  volcanic ash, sometimes on deeply leached acid basalt, rarely successfully competing on richer forest  soil. Most stands show a clear relationship to fire or other disturbance and the pine can be seen to be  expanding in recently disturbed areas with grassland (de Laubenfels, 1988). The species occurs in areas  with  mean  annual  rainfall  of  1000­2800(­3500)  mm,  a  mean  annual  temperature  of  21­28 o C,  mean  maximum temperature of the hottest month of 24­32 o C, and mean minimum temperature of the coldest  month 18­24 o C (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  In Sumatra the habitat experiences heavy year­round precipitation, but the pine areas themselves  definitely favour the drier sites. The Tapanuli populations, which have thin bark, are more sensitive to  fire and do not descend below 1000 m. Elsewhere, including the Philippine islands, this pine grows in  strongly seasonal environments (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Habitat loss due to felling, agriculture, grazing and burning are threats. The effects on the population  here are yet to be confirmed but are not thought to be as severe (SSC Conifer Specialist Group, 1998).  Utilisation  An important timber tree. A general­purpose timber used for construction, flooring and boat building. It Page 109 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  is also a source of fuel for local use and resin. The tree is used to shade out weeds with fairly good  results (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Trade  Known to be traded, however insufficient information on the volume of the trade.  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): VU B1+2ce (SSC Conifer Specialist Group, 1998).  Conservation measures  The  seed  resource  of  P.  merkusii  are  Sumatra  and  Thailand.  International  provenance  trials  of  P.  merkusii has been established throughout South­East Asia and northern Australia, they are coordinated  by  the  Commonwealth  Forestry  Institure  of  Oxford,  UK.  P.  merkusii  seed  orchards  have  been  established in Indonesia (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994). In Vietnam, original stands are protected in  major  National  Parks  on  the  Langbian  Plateau  [1].  Due  to  the  economic  value  of  this  specis  seed  orchards and provenance trials have been established in Lam Dong and in Quang Binh since the 1980s  to conserve its genetic variation [1]. Due to its wide spread distribution it is not considered threatened  [1].  Forest management and silviculture  Pinus merkusii has been widely planted in South­East Asia in countries like Indonesia, Thailand and  Papua New Guinea. In plantation rotation cycles of 30 years are needed for optimal timber production  and  for  pulpwood  production,  a  cutting  cycle  of  15  years  is  usually  practised  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994). In North Vietnam, this species is  one tof the principal tree planted on bare hills to  protect against land erosion (Gymnosperm Database, 2006).  References  de Laubenfels, D.J. 1988. Coniferales. Flora Malesiana Ser.1, vol. 10: 337­453.  Gymnosperm Database. http://www.conifers.org/ar/ag/dammara.htm. Downloaded 5 May 06.  Kress, W. J., R. A. DeFilipps, E. Farr, and Daw Yin Yin Kyi. 2003. A Checklist of the Trees, Shrubs,  Herbs  and  Climbers  of  Myanmar  (Revised  from  the  original  works  by  J.  H.  Lace  and  H.  G.  Hundley). Contrib. U. S. Nat. Herbarium 45: 1­590  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Pudoc Scientific Publishers, Wagenigen. 610 pp.  SSC Conifer Specialist Group. Pinus merkusii. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven. 1998. The  World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp  Additional web references  [1].  http://www.ceh.ac.uk/sections/bm/conifer_manual.html.  Conifers  of  Vietnam.  Downloaded  8  August  2006.

88. Planchonia valida Blume  Lecythidaceae  Common names  Trade name: putat; Indonesia: putat (general), putat kebo (Javanese), telisai (dayak Tunjung, Kalimantan);  Malaysia: putat, putat paya (general), kasui (Murut, Sabah) (Sosef et al., 1998).  Malaysia: paya and selangan kangkong (Kadazan) (Soepadmo et al., 2002).  Indonesia: Putat (Malay) (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994).  Synonyms  Gustavia valida, Planchonia alata, Planchonia sundaica (Sosef  et al., 1998).  Habitat  Found in seasonally flooded forest, usually along rivers in lowland mixed seasonal forest or sometimes on  hillsides at altitude to 1000 m (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994) (Soepadmo et al., 2002).  Population status and trends  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia and Sabah (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994) (Sosef  et al.,  1998) (Soepadmo et al., 2002).  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Bali,  Java,  Kalimantan,  Sumatra,  Sulawesi,  the  Lesser  Sunda  Islands  and Timor (Kessler & Sidiyasa, 1994) (Sosef  et al., 1998) (Soepadmo et al., 2002). Page 110 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  The wood is easy to work, but not very durable. It provides a good source of firewood and the young leaves  are eaten as salad (Kessler & Sisiyasa, 1994).  Trade  The main species traded as putat.  Conservation status  No information.  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Kessler,  P.J.A  &  K.  Sidiyasa.  1994.  Trees  of  the  Balikpapan­Samarinda  area,  East  Kalimantan,  Indonesia:  a  manual  of  280  selected  species.  Tropenbos  Series  7.  The  Tropenbos  Foundation,  Wageningen. 446 pp.  Sosef, M.S.M, S. Prawirohatmodjo & L.T. Hong (eds). 1998. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(3).  Timber trees: Lesser­known timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 859 pp.  Soepadmo, E., L.G. Saw & Richard C.K. Chung, (eds.). 2002. Tree flora of Sabah and Sarawak, vol. 4:  388 pp.

89. Podocarpus neriifolius D.Don  Podocarpaceae  (Taxonomic notes: most taxonomists regard P. annamiensis as the same as P. neriifolius although it is  maintained as a distinct species in many Chinese floras [1].)  Common names  Podocarp (Trade name). Brown pine (English). Myanmar: Thitmin, Thitmin­po. Malaysia: Jati bukit  (Malay), belah­buloh (Sarawak), Ki beling (Sabah). Indonesia: Ambai ayam (Sumatra–Indragiri),  Hating (Sumatra–Tapanuli), Kayu tadji (Sumatra–Palembang), Minangkas (Bencoolen), Naru dotan  (Simalur Island), Sito bu botang (Karo Batak), Antoh (Java), Ki bima, Ki merak, Ki pantjar, ki putrid  (Java), Kurniah (Sulawesi–Nokilalaki), hadjo ketong, hadju pinis rona (Lesser Sunda Islands) (de  Laubenfels, 1988).  Indonesia:  antok  (Java),  beberas  (Sumatra),  kayu  cina  (Irian  Jaya).  Malaysia:  podo  bukit,  jati  bukit  (Peninsular), ki beling (Sabah). Philippines: mala adelfa (general). Myanmar: thitmin. Laos: ka dong.  Thailand: phayamai (general), phailamton (north­eastern), khunmai (eastern) (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Hainan luohansong (Fu & Jin, 1992).  Synonym  Nageia  neriifolia,  Podocarpus  neglecta,  Nageia  neglecta,  Podocarpus  discolor,  Nageia  discolor,  Podocarpus  leptostachya,  Nageia  leptostachya,  Podocarpus  junghuhniana,  Podocarpus  polyantha,  Podocarpus decipiens (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Podocarpus annamiensis (Hiep , N. T. & J. E. Vidal, 1996) [1].  Habitat  Occur scattered but may be locally common in primary forest, generally on rocky hilltops, on sand­  stone or latosols (Java or on ultrabasic soils, also near rivers, from sea­level up to 2100 m altitude  (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Population status and trends  Widespread from Nepal, Sikkim, Assam (Khasya) and Indochina through Malesia to the Solomon and  Fiji islands (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Bangladesh: Occurrence reported [1].  Cambodia: Occurrence reported (de Laubenfels, 1988). Page 111 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  China:  Occurrence  reported  in  Southern  Hainan,  subject  to  constant  exploitation  and  heavy  decline.  Status vulnerable in Hainan (Fu & Jin, 1992).  Fiji: Occurrence reported (de Laubenfels, 1988)  India: Occurrence reported (de Laubenfels, 1988)  Indonesia:  Occurrence  reported  in  Sumatra,  Java,  Lesser  Sunda  Islands,  Sulawesi,  Maluku,  Kalimantan and Irian Jaya (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Laos: Occurrence reported (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Malaysia: Occurrence reported in Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak (de Laubenfels, 1988  Myanmar: Occurrence reported in Kachin, Kayin and Taninthayi (de Laubenfels, 1988) (Kress et al.,  2003).  Nepal: Occurrence reported (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Papua New Guinea: Occurrence reported (de Laubenfels, 1988) [1].  Philippines: Occurrence reported [1].  Solomon: Occurrence reported (de Laubenfels, 1988)  Thailand: Occurrence reported (de Laubenfels, 1988).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported (de Laubenfels, 1988). Found in  Dien Bien, Lao Cai, Lang Son, Vinh  Phuc,  Tuyen  Quang,  Hoa  Binh,  Ha  Tay,  Nghe  An,  Quang  Tri,  Thua  Thien  Hue,  Quang  Nam,  Kon  Tum,  Dac  Lac,  Lam  Dong,  Ninh  Thuan,  Dong  Nai,  Kien  Giang,  scattered  in  all  montane  areas  throughout highlands [1].  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  Clear­felling/logging of the habitat (SSC Conifer Specialist Group, 1998).  Utilisation  P.  neriifolius  is  one  of  the  main  sources  of  podocarp  timber,  the  wood  is  often  used  for  furniture,  carving, musical instrument and cabinet work. The fruit is edible. A decoction of the leaves has been  used against rheumatism and arthritis. Juice from the leaves is used against sores in Papua New Guinea  (de Laubenfels, 1988) (Lemmens et al., 1995).  Trade  No information.  Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): DD (SSC Conifer Specialist Group, 1998).  Conservation measures  Podocarpus does not seem particularly endangered as it is widespread and is often common in forest  on ridges and mountain which are not easy to reach for logging (Lemmens et al., 1995). Populations  should be protected in the Jianfeng and Diaoluo Mts. A few individuals are present in the arboretum of  the Hainan Institute of Forestry (Fu & Jin, 1992).  Forest management and silviculture  The  growth  of  P.  neriifolius  is  slow.  Podocarpus  can  be  propagated  by  seed.  P.  neriifolius  seed  germinates  for  90%  in  20­67  days.  Seed  may  not  be  viable  after  more  than  3  months.  Natural  generation  of  P.  neriifolius  is  sparse  in heath  forest,  although  it  regularly  produces  seeds.  In  natural  forest  in  Central  Sulawesi,  2.4­6.0  P.  nerrifolius  trees/ha  were  found  in  the  diameter  class  35­49  cm  (producing  3.4­10.1  m3/ha)  and  about  2.4  trees/ha  with  diameter  of  50  cm  or  more  (producing  6.9  m3/ha). On Peleng Island, Central Sulawesi, 1.2 P.neriifolius trees/ha with a diameter of over 100 cm  and estimated timber volume of 8.2 m3/ha were found (Lemmens et al., 1995).  References  de Laubenfels, D.J. 1988. Coniferales. Flora Malesiana Ser.1, vol. 10: 337­453.  Fu,  Li­kuo  &  Jian­ming,  Jin  (eds.). 1992.  China  Plant Red  Data  Book.  Beijing:  Science  Press. xviii­  741.  Hiep, N. T. & J. E. Vidal. 1996. Fl. Cambodge, Laos et Vietnam 28: 105  Kress, W. J., R. A. DeFilipps, E. Farr, and Daw Yin Yin Kyi. 2003. A Checklist of the Trees, Shrubs,  Herbs  and  Climbers  of  Myanmar  (Revised  from  the  original  works  by  J.  H.  Lace  and  H.  G.  Hundley). Contrib. U. S. Nat. Herbarium 45: 1­590.  Lemmens, R.H.M.J., I. Soerianegara & W.C. Wong (eds.). 1995. Plant Resources of South­East Asia  5(2). Timber trees: Minor commercial timbers. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 655 pp.  SSC Conifer Specialist Group. Podocarpus annamiensis. In Oldfield, S., C. Lusty and A. MacKiven.  1998. The World List of Threatened Trees. World Conservation Press, Cambridge, UK. 650pp Page 112 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Additional web references  [1].  http://www.ceh.ac.uk/sections/bm/conifer_manual.html.  Conifers  of  Vietnam.  Downloaded  8  August  2006.

90. Pterocarpus macrocarpus Kurz  Leguminosae ­ Papilionoideae  Common names  Narra (Trade name). Thailand : pradu (general), pradu­ban (central), sano (Malay, peninsular). Vietnam:  gi[as]ng h[uw][ow]ng (Soerianegara & Lemmens, 1994).  Myanmar:  mai­chi­tawk,  mai­pi­tawk,  Myanmar  rosewood,  padauk,  padok,  thit­padauk.  (Kress  et  al.,  2003).  Synonym  Pterocarpus  cambodianus,  Pterocarpus  glaucinus,  Pterocarpus  gracilis,  Pterocarpus  parvifolius,  Pterocarpus pedatus (ILDIS, 2006)  Habitat  In Vietnam the species occurs in open semi­deciduous dipterocarp forest on well­drained soils.  Population status and trends  Cambodia: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  India: Occurrence reported in Tripura, West Bengal (ILDIS, 2006).  Laos: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Myanmar: Occurrence reported in Bago, Mandalay, Sagaing, Shan and Taninthayi (Kress et al., 2003).  Puerto Rico: Occurrence reported, introduced (ILDIS, 2006).  Thailand: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  USA: Occurrence reported, introduced (ILDIS, 2006).  Vietnam: Occurrence reported, native (ILDIS, 2006).  Role of species in the ecosystem  No information.  Threats  No information.  Utilisation  Classified  as  a  first  class  timber  in  Vietnam,  used  in  construction,  cabinet­work,  furniture  and  fine  art  articles. The resin is used as a red dye (Vũn, 1996).  Trade  Thailand exported 5.8 million kg of sawn Pterocarpus (P. indicus and P. macrocarpus) in 1990. Thailand  also imports this timber, 11000 m 3  in 1990, mainly from Myanmar but also in small amounts from Laos,  Cambodia and  Vietnam  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens, 1994). Myanmar  exported  37000 m 3  of  logs  at an  average price  of  429$/m 3  and 1000 m 3  of  sawnwood  at an average price  of  237$/m 3  in  1995. In 1995  Thailand  exported  5000 m 3  of  sawnwood  at an average  price  of  1761$/m 3  (Soerianegara  &  Lemmens,  1994)  Export of Pterocarpus macrocarpus (ITTO, 1997­2004)  Year 

Trade 

1996  1996  1997  1996  1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001  2002 

Log  Sawnwood  Log 

Country  Cambodia  Myanmar 

Volume m3  7359  2391  2000  30330  3000  52480  1548  1626  2568  29793  10295  Page 113 of 150 

Average Price  US$/m3  510  1012  1020  85  1561  53  47  47  111  90  139

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  2003  1996  1997  1999  2000  2001  2002  1996  1997  1996  1997  1997 

Sawnwood 

Log  Thailand  Sawnwood 

1214  990  2000  3004  2726  6441  3980  26000  42000  3000  2000  4000 

184  199  740  92  89  89  645  281  75  1776  1234  328 

Conservation status  IUCN Conservation category (ver 2.3, 1994): DD (WCMC, 1997).  Conservation measures  No information.  Forest management and silviculture  No information.  References  Asia  Regional  Workshop,  1997.  Conservation  and  sustainable  management  of  trees  project  workshop  held in Hanoi, VietNam, August, 1997.  ILDIS ­ International Legume Database & Information Service. http://www.ildis.org.. Downloaded on 15  March 2006.  ITTO.  2003­2004.  Annual  review  and  assessment  of  the  world  timber  situation.  http://www.itto.or.jp/live/PageDisplayHandler?pageId=199. Downloaded on 1 st  January 2006.  Kress, W. J., R. A. DeFilipps, E. Farr, and Daw Yin Yin Kyi. 2003. A Checklist of the Trees, Shrubs,  Herbs and Climbers of Myanmar (Revised from the original works by J. H. Lace and H. G. Hundley).  Contrib. U. S. Nat. Herbarium 45: 590 pp.  Soerianegara, I. & R.H.M.J. Lemmens (eds.). 1994. Plant Resources of South­East Asia 5(1). Timber  trees: Major commercial timbers. Wageningen: Pudoc Scientific Publishers. 610 pp.  Vũn, V.D. (ed.). 1996. Vietnam Forest Trees. Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi. 788 pp.  WCMC. 1997. Report of the Third Regional Workshop, held at Hanoi, Vietnam, 18­21 August 1997.  Conservation and sustainable management of trees project. Unpublished.

91. Pterocarpus santalinus  Leguminosae ­ Papilionoideae  Local names  lalchandan,  raktachand  (Beng.  &  Hindi);  ratanjali  (Guj.);  agaru,  honne  (Kan.);  patrangam,  tilaparnni  (Mal.); atti, sivappu chandanam (Tam.); agarugandhamu, raktagandhamu (Tel.). Redsanders, Red Sandal  Wood  Distribution  This  species  occurs  mainly  in  the  southern  eastern  Ghats  states  of  Peninsular  India  (Andhra  Pradesh,  Karnataka, Tamil Nadu) and sporadically in other states (Anon., 1997).  Habitat  Found  between  150  ­ 900 m altitude,  this  species is restricted  to dry, hilly,  often rocky,  ground in  dry  deciduous forest and is sometimes found on wetter hillsides.

Page 114 of 150 

DRAFT May 2007:For discussion at South East Asia workshop 2007  Please send comments and additional information to: [email protected]­wcmc.org  Population Status and Trends  The total range of this tree is 

Suggest Documents