Terza Universita degli Studi di Roma

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parallel implementation for solving linear systems over the rationals. .... application of Gaussian elimination algorithm using p-adic arithmetic will be outlined.
Terza Universita degli Studi di Roma

p-adic Arithmetic and Parallel Symbolic Computation: An Implementation for Solving Linear Systems

Carla Limongelli, Roberto Pirastu Technical Report n. RT{INF{1{1995 Dipartimento di discipline Scientifiche: Sezione Informatica

Carla Limongelli 1 Terza Universita degli Studi di Roma Dipartimento di Discipline Scientiche: Sezione Informatica Via Segre, 2 - 00146 Roma - Italy [email protected]

Roberto Pirastu 2 Research Institute for Symbolic Computation J. Kepler University, 4040 Linz, Austria [email protected]

Partially supported by Progetto Finalizzato \Sistemi Informatici e Calcolo Parallelo" of CNR under grant n. 93.01625.69. Supported by the Commission of the European Communities in the framework of the program \Human Capital and Mobility", contract Nr. ERBCHBICT930501 1 2

Abstract

In this work we describe the use of truncated p-adic expansion for handling rational numbers by parallel algorithms for symbolic computation. As a case study we propose a parallel implementation for solving linear systems over the rationals. The parallelization is based on a multiple homomorphic image technique and the result is recovered by a parallel version of the Chinese remainder algorithm. Using a MIMD machine, we compare the proposed implementation with the classical modular arithmetic, showing that truncated p-adic arithmetic is a feasible tool for solving systems of linear equations working directly over rational numbers. A safe algorithm for computing the p-adic division operation is proposed. The implementation leads to a speedup up to seven by ten processors with respect to the sequential implementation. Keywords: Parallel algorithms, p-adic arithmetic, scientic computing, computer algebra,

shared memory machines.

1 Introduction In this paper we describe an application of the truncated p-adic representation for rational numbers in parallel symbolic computation. Although many problems over rational numbers can be reduced to the case of integers, our goal is to show that the p-adic representation is a suitable tool for parallelizing algorithms using homomorphic image techniques working directly over rational numbers. In particular, we compare our implementation with equivalent ones based on modular representation of integers. p-adic arithmetic has been chosen for two main reasons. 1. p-adic arithmetic representation provides a unied form to treat numbers and functions by means of truncated power series and it constitutes the mathematical background for the denition of basic abstract data structures for a homogeneous computing environment. A unied representation can be obtained when numbers and functions are represented by power series and p-adic analysis o ers an appropriate mathematical settlement to handle with power series 12]. In 18] is shown how it is possible to treat numbers by truncated power series, as like as the most general p-adic construction methods in an integrated computing environment. 2. p-adic arithmetic is an exact arithmetic and the algebraic bases on which it is founded overcome the problem of the oating point arithmetic, which is essentially due to a lack of algebraic setting. This last characteristic belongs to modular arithmetic too 10, 8], but the di erence is that while modular arithmetic works over the integers, p-adic arithmetic operates on rational numbers. In 15] are shown the advantages due to the possibility of working directly over the rationals. Moreover in 19, 14] is shown that also algebraic numbers are representable in this arithmetic. Despite to its characteristic of modularity and its powerful algebraic properties (completeness of the p-adic metric space 11]), this arithmetic has not received much attentions because of some computational problems, due to the possible lack of the signicant digit of the code. For the case study we choose the classical linear algebra problem of solving linear systems. For a positive integer n we want to solve a system of n linear equations for the n unknowns x1  : : : xn 8 a x + a x + :::+a x = b > < a2111x11 + a2122x22 + : : : + a21nnxnn = b21 (1) > : an1x1 + an2x:2: +: : : : + annxn = :b:n: where aij and bi (i = 1 : : : n and j = 1 : : : n) are rational numbers. We will denote the system (1) by A~x = ~b. Gaussian elimination is often used in numerical analysis to nd approximations to the solutions of such systems. It is well known that for the so-called ill-conditioned systems, small errors in the approximation of the coecients may lead to large errors in the approximation of the solution. For instance, when a system based on oating point numbers attempts a division of a large dividend by a small divisor, the oating point result could be far from the exact result. The use of exact arithmetic overcomes this problem. We will apply p-adic arithmetic to perform exact computations and we will compare this approach with the one based on modular arithmetic. There exist mainly two possibilities to compute exact solutions for (1): either one rst transforms the problem to the solution of a system over the integers, or one computes with rational numbers. One can compute a matrix A and a vector ~b with integer entries, such that the system A ~x = ~b has the same solutions as (1). For instance one can apply Cramer's rule to A ~x = ~b and obtain a solution avoiding rational arithmetic. This approach has the disadvantage that the entries in A are in general considerably larger than the entries in A. On the other hand, working directly with system (1) needs an error-free representation of rational numbers and algorithms for error-free computations with them. In this work we present a parallel implementation for solving linear systems, based on Gaussian elimination algorithm and the p-adic representation of rational numbers via truncated power series w.r.t. a prime basis p. Our parallelization consists of applying the well known Gaussian elimination method (see for 0

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instance 1]) for several homomorphic images of the problem w.r.t. di erent prime bases, and recovering the result by the Chinese Remainder Algorithm (CRA). The order of truncation r, as well as the prime bases, is chosen in accordance with an a priori estimation of the magnitude of the solution of the problem. This allows us to do error-free computations directly with rational numbers. For a detailed treatment of p-adic arithmetic in the context of symbolic computation, we refer to 8, 12, 14]. Krishnamurthy in 13] proposes a similar method based on CRA, EEA (Extended Euclidean Algorithm) and HLA (Hensel Lifting Algorithm), for inverting matrices with rational entries. Dixon's approach 7] for solving systems of linear equations has been studied in 27, 26]. In this work we particularly want to stress the usefulness of p-adic representation of rational numbers via Hensel codes, therefore we compare our implementation with an equivalent parallel one which uses modular arithmetic. In order to show that p-adic arithmetic provides an ecient tool for solving linear systems over the rational numbers, we compared our implementation with one using modular arithmetic and with a sequential implementation in the computer algebra system Maple 3]. Aspects of our parallel implementation are also presented in 17]. The implementation was done in Paclib, a C-language library for parallel symbolic computation 9], on a Sequent parallel machine with a MIMD architecture. Next section describes the algebraic bases of the proposed arithmetic. Section 3 shows the algebra of Hensel code set and the treatment of the pseudo-Hensel codes which occurs when a signicant digit of the code is missed. The computation of a bound for the solutions is discussed in Section 4. In Section 5 the application of Gaussian elimination algorithm using p-adic arithmetic will be outlined. Section 6 is devoted to the features of the parallel implementation and concluding remarks. The authors wish to thank the anonymous referees for bringing their attention to some relevant literature and for suggesting a reformulation of Section 5.

2 Basic notions on p-adic arithmetic A non zero rational number  = a=b can always be uniquely expressed as  = dc pe where e is an integer, p is a xed prime number, and c d, and p are pairwise relatively prime integers. This representation is called the normalized form of . Moreover Q^ will indicate the set of rational numbers c=d such that GCD(d p) = 1. The function p : Q IR from the rational numbers Q to the real numbers IR, dened as n e  p = p if  = 0 0 if  = 0 is then a norm on Q (see 11]), called the p-adic norm. On the basis of this p-adic norm, it is possible to dene a p-adic metric on Q, such that, given two rational numbers  and , their distance d( ) is expressed as: 

kk

!

;

k

6

k

d( ) =   p : Then (Q d) is a metric space. Let Qp be the set of equivalence classes of Cauchy sequences in (Q d), then the system (Qp  + ) forms a eld called the eld of p-adic numbers, and (Qp  d) is a complete metric space. The main characteristics of the eld of p-adic numbers are: 1. the series Xi p k



1

converges to 1/(1-p) in (Qp  d)

i=0

2

;

k

2. every non zero rational number  can be uniquely expressed in the form: =

X 1

i=e

ai pi ai ZZp  e ZZ 2

 p = p e  ae = 0

2

k

;

k

6

(2)

where ZZ represents the set of integer numbers. The p-adic representation of a rational number  is then an innite sequence of digits (the p-adic digits) which are the coecients of the series given in (2):  = (ae ae 1 : : :a 1 : a0 a1 a2 : : :): Let us recall that the p-adic expansion of a rational number is periodic. Therefore the p-adic representation can also assume the following form: ;

;

 = (ae ae 1 : : :a 1 : a0 : : :ak m 1 ak m : : :ak 1ak ) where the m rightmost digits are the period. Let us now describe the procedure which computes the p-adic representation of a given rational number : p-adic Representation of a Rational Number ;

;

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Input: p: prime number  Q  = 0, represented by its normalized form,  = c=d pe  Output: the coecients ae  ae+1 ae+2 : : : of the p-adic expansion of  Begin 2

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c1=d1 := c=d i := 0

repeat

ae+i := ci+1=di+1 p  ci+2 =di+2 := 1p (ci+1 =di+1 ae+i )  i := i + 1 until the period is detected j

j

;

End

Here ci =di p = ci di 1 p p is the least non-negative remainder of ci =di mod p. We note that the hypothesis of primality for p is necessary in order to ensure the existence and the uniqueness of di 1 p . From now on we will consider p a prime number. Example 2.1 We compute the p-adic expansion of the rational number 3=4, with p = 5 (in this case e = 0):  = 34 50 dc1 = 34  1 a0 = dc1 p = 34 5 = 3 4 1 5 5 = 12 5 = 2 j

j

j

j

;

j

;

j

j

j



j

1

j

j



j

j

 j



;

j

j

j

 

j

c2 = 1 3 2 = 1 5 = 1  d2 5 4 5 4 4 c 1 a1 = d2 p = 4 5 = 1 5 4 1 5 5 = 1 2 ;

j

j

j ;

j

;

j j ;

3

j

;

 j

;

j

j

c3 = 1  1 1 = 1  5  = 1  d3 5 4 5 4 4 a2 = dc3 p = 14 5 = 1: 3 In general this process will not terminate, but, since we are assuming that  is a rational number, the p-adic expansion will be periodic and we have to continue the detection of the p-adic coecients until the period is detected. In this case the p-adic expansion of the number 3/4 is .211: : : = .2 1. 2 ;

;

j

;

j

j ;

;

j

0

Arithmetic operations on p-adic numbers are carried out, digit by digit, starting from the left-most digit ae , as in usual base p arithmetic operations. The division operation on p-adic numbers is performed in a di erent way with respect to usual integer arithmetic. Starting from the left-most digit of both the dividend and the divisor, we obtain the left-most digit of the quotient, and so on, in a way similar to the other three basic p-adic arithmetic operations. In order to make automatic the p-adic arithmetic computations, the usual and obvious problem is related to the length of p-adic digit sequence. A natural solution is reached by introducing a nite length p-adic arithmetic on the so-called Hensel codes as we will show below.

Denition 1

(Hensel Codes) Let p be a prime number. Then the Hensel code of length r of any number

 = (c=d) pe Q is the pair 

2

(mant  exp) = (: a0 a1 ar 1 e) where the left-most r digits and the value e of the related p-adic expansion are called the mantissa and the 

exponent, respectively. Moreover

r 1 X ;

i=0

;

ai pi ZZp : 

2

r

2 Let IHpr indicate the set of Hensel codes with respect to the prime p and the approximation r and let Hpr () indicate the Hensel code representation of the rational number  = (a=b) pe with respect to the prime p and the approximation r. The forward mapping is essentially the application of EEA to d and pr in order to nd d 1 p . We solve the Diophantine equation pr x + d y = 1, since pr and d are relatively prime. Then y = d 1 p because pr x + d y p = 1 (mod pr ) = d y p : 

j



j

Theorem 2.1







;

j r

j

j r

j



;

j r

j r

(Forward Mapping) Given a prime p, an integer r and a rational number  = (c=d)  pn,

such that GCD(c p) = GCD(d p) = 1, the mantissa mant of the code related to the rational number , is computed by the Extended Euclidean Algorithm (EEA) applied to pr and d as:

(mod pr )

mant c y 



where y is the second output of the EEA applied to d and pr .

Proof. See 23].

2

^ + ) and (IHpr  + ) is not Let us note that the correspondence between the commutative rings (Q P r 1 i bijective, since each Hensel code mantissa : a0 a1 ar 1 (= i=0 ai p ZZp ) in IHpr , is the image of an innite subset of the rational numbers. For this reason we need to dene a suitable subset of Q^ , such that the correspondence between this subset and IHpr is injective. 



;

;

4



2

r



Denition 2

^ such that: (Farey Fraction Set) The Farey fraction set IFpr is the subset of Q a=b Q^ : GCD(a b) = 1 2

r pr 1  0 a N 0 < b N N = 2 

and





;



2

where IN indicates the set of natural numbers.

IFpr will also be called the Farey fraction set of order N, as N = N(p r). Denition 3 The generalized residue class Qk is the subset of Q^ dened as follows: 

Qk = a=b Q^ such that 

f

2

a=b p = k :

j

j r

g

2 From the last denition it follows that

Q^ =

r p ;1

k=0

Qk : 

Theorem 2.2 Let N be the largest integer satisfying the inequality 2N 2 + 1 pr and let Qk contain the order-N Farey fraction x = a=b. Then x is the only order-N Farey fraction in Qk . Proof. See 8]. 2 



Also the backward mapping is carried out by EEA. In this case we have to solve the following Diophantine equation: m x + pr y = 1 for x and y. This means that m+y = 1 < 1 pr x x pr x2 being by hypothesis x < pr , so that we compute an approximation of pm . In the sequence of pairs (xi yi ) produced by the EEA the result is then found looking for yi IFp . Theorem 2.3 (Backward Mapping) Given a prime p, an integer r, a positive integer m pr and a rational number c=d IFpr Q^ , let m be the value in ZZ p of the Hensel code mantissa related to c=d, then the EEA, applied to pr and m, computes a nite sequence of pairs (xi  yi ) such that there exists a subscript j for which xj =yj = c=d. Proof. See 23]. 2 





r

2

r



2

r



From these considerations we can nally state the following theorem. Theorem 2.4 Given a prime p, an approximation r, an arithmetic operator  in Q and the related arithmetic operator  over IHpr , then for any 1  2 Q, if 12 = 3 3 IFpr  then there exists precisely one  IHpr such that Hpr (1 ) Hpr (2) =  and furthermore  = Hpr (3). 0

2

2

2

0

5

On these bases, every computation over IHpr gives a code which is exactly the image of the rational number given by the corresponding computation over Q^ . A general schema of computation may consist in mapping on IHpr the rational numbers given as input to the computation and then performing the computation over IHpr . However, by Theorem 2.3, the inverse mapping can be performed only when the expected result belongs to IFpr . We note that the choice of order of truncation, as well as the choice of the base p, are made in accordance with an a priori estimation of the magnitude of the solution of the problem. In fact we must identify a suitable set of Farey fractions that contains the rational solution the choices of p and r are a consequence of this identication. Such an estimate depends in general on the given algorithm/problem one is interested in. The computation of the estimate may turn out to be a dicult problem. Let us mention some examples. 1. arithmetic over the rationals: Let us consider the computation of ab, where a Q and b ZZ. The number of bits which are necessary to represent the rational result is: b log2a. 2. algebra of polynomials: For example, it is easy to compute in advance the maximum P coecient P which can be obtained by a polynomial multiplication. In fact: given the polynomials ni=0 ai xi e mj=0 bj xj , if a = max ai 1 i n, b = max bj 1 j m and c = max a b , then the greatest coecient of the polynomial result is smaller than max n m c2 . 3. linear algebra: For example, it is well known that the determinant D(A) of an n-dimensional square matrix A, is bounded by n! an, where a = max aij  1 i j n. 2

2





fj

jg  

fj

jg  

f

f



g

g



fj

jg





There is also a class of mathematical problems which are particularly well-suited for being solved by p-adic arithmetic: these are problems which are a ected either by overow during the computations or by ill-condition as we will see with the case study that we are going to analize and implement. In Section 4 we will discuss in more detail a bound for the solutions of linear equation systems over rational numbers.

3 Operations with Hensel codes In this section we treat Hensel codes arithmetic and we face the problem of pseudo-Hensel codes manipulation, which essentially consists in a loss of signicant digits (i.e.: the left-most digits) in an Hensel code. This loss of signicant digits does not permit one to execute the division as well as literature has been stated in 8]. In this section we will briey describe the main arithmetic operations, to show that it is possible to overcome this problem, by presenting a new approach both for division computation and for the treatment of the pseudo-Hensel codes. These results, together with the parallelization of p-adic arithmetic, proposed by the author, extend its use in a wide class of computing problems. Let us consider now the arithmetic operations in IHpr .

- Addition

Given two Hensel codes Hpr () = (mant  exp) and Hpr () = (mant  exp )

we rst manipulate them to have exp = exp , then perform the addition taking into account that all the operations are carried out from left to right.

Example 3.1 We want to compute the following addition: 3 + 1  in ZZ 4 5 10 2 by choosing p = 5 and r = 4, we obtain IF54 = 17. The Hensel codes related to 3=10 and to 1=2 are respectively: H45(3=10) = (:4 2 2 2  1) and H45(1=2) = (:3 2 2 2  0) ;

6

Since the exponents are di erent, we must normalize the code which has the greater exponent: (:3 2 2 2  0)

;!

(:0 3 2 2  1) ;

Now we can carry out the addition between the mantissas: + . 4 2 2 2 , = . 0 3 2 2 , . 4 0 0 0 ,

1 1 1

; ; ;

2 Addition behaves as described in the following operational table in which SIHpr represents the complement of the set IPIHpr with respect to IHpr (i.e. IHpr = IPIHpr SIHpr ), being IPIHpr the set of the pseudo-Hensel codes, given by the following denition: The code result (.4 0 0 0, -1) represents the rational number 4=5.



Denition 4

(Pseudo-Hensel codes)

A pseudo-Hensel code (IPIHpr ) is a code such that a0 =    = ak = 0 6= ak+1 , with 0 < k < r-1. The order of a pseudo-Hensel code is then k.

+ SIHpr IPIHpr SIHpr IHpr SIHpr IPIHpr SIHpr IPIHpr

- Subtraction

In order to perform a subtraction it is sucient rst to compute the complement mod pr of the minuend and then to carry out the addition. If the minuend is a pseudo-Hensel code, then the subtraction can be carried out in the usual way, without using the complement of the minuend (except in the case when the subtrahend is the Hensel code which represents zero).

Example 3.2 We compute the following subtraction:

3 3 4 2  in ZZ54 By choosing p = 5 and r = 4, we have IF54 = 17. The Hensel codes related to 3=4 and to 3=2 are respectively: ;

H45(3=4) = (:2 1 1 1  0) and H45(3=2) = (:4 2 2 2  0) In order to carry out the subtraction we must get a p-adic unit from the right digit (instead of from the left digit, as usually happens in subtraction between two integer numbers). . 2 1 1 1 , 0 = . 4 2 2 2 , 0 . 3 3 3 3 , 0 ;

the code result (.3 3 3 3, 0) represents the rational number 3=4. ;

The following table shows the operational behaviour of subtraction. SIHpr IPIHpr SIHpr IHpr SIHpr IPIHpr SIHpr IPIHpr ;

7

2

- Multiplication

In order to perform multiplication we must operate by multiplying the respective mantissas of the codes, and then we must add their exponents. Also in this case the code result is truncated to r digits. Example 3.3 We carry out the following operation: 4 5  in ZZ 4 5 15 2 By choosing p = 5 and r = 4, we have IF54 = 17. The Hensel codes related to 4=15 and to 5=2 are respectively: H45(4=15) = (:3 3 1 3  1) and H45(5=2) = (:3 2 2 2  1): . 3 3 1 3 , 1 = . 3 2 2 2 , 1 4 0 0 0 1 2 3 1 2 1 = . 4 1 3 1 , 0 The code result (.4 1 3 1, 0) represents the rational number 2=3. 2 The following operational table shows the behaviour of the multiplication and indicates that the multiplication of the elements of IHpr is always possible.

;



;

SIHpr IPIHpr SIHpr SIHpr IPIHpr IPIHpr IPIHpr IPIHpr

- Division

In order to perform division we must operate by dividing the respective mantissas of the codes, and then we must subtract the respective exponents. Example 3.4 We want to carry out the following division: 3 = 6  in ZZ 4 5 4 5 By choosing p = 5 and r = 4, we have IF54 = 17. The Hensel codes related to 3=4 and to 6=5 are respectively: H45(3=4) = (:2 1 1 1  0) and H45(6=5) = (:1 1 0 0  1): In order to carry out the division we must compute the inverse mod p(= 5) of the least signicant digit of the divisor and then we must multiply it by the most left hand digit of the dividend (or of the partial dividend). In this way we will obtain all the digits of the quotient. In this case we must compute 1 1 5 = 1. ;

j

2 1 1 3 2 4 4 0 1 0 1 4

;

j

1 1 0 0 0 4 2 4 1 3 0 4 4 3 3

The code result (.2 4 1 3, 1) represents the rational number 5=8. 8

2

We must pay particular attention when we operate with elements of IPIHpr . In fact if the rst digit of the divisor is zero, we cannot compute the modular inverse as stated in the classical algorithm described in

8]. The following operational table indicates when a division results in a pseudo-Hensel code. = SIHpr IPIHpr SIHpr SIHpr IPIHpr IPIHpr IPIHpr IPIHpr Looking at the examples presented above, we note that an addition or subtraction, may give a result in which some left-most digits are equal to zero. In this case we will say that the addition (or subtraction) has generated a pseudo-Hensel code (see Definition 4). We dene an algorithm which allows us to overcome the problem of pseudo-Hensel code manipulation and also to decrease the frequency with which they occur during computations, in particular at the end of the computation, when the rational result must be detected. In the following we see when a pseudo-Hensel code can occur.

Example 3.5 We want to compute the following addition:

13 13 4 15 + 10  in ZZ5 By choosing: p = 5, r = 4, we obtain IF54 = 17. The Hensel codes related to 13=15 and to 13=10 are respectively: H45(13=15) = (:1 4 1 3  1) and H45(13=10) = (:4 3 2 2  1) The addition follows: + . 1 4 1 3 , 1 = . 4 3 2 2 , 1 . 0 3 4 0 , 1 ;

;

; ; ;

In this case one signicant digit has been lost. Now, if we apply backward mapping to detect the rational result, we have an error, because the Farey fraction set is decreased: IF53 = 7. In fact the rational result of this computation is 13=10, which does not belong to IF53. 2 Nevertheless we can carry on with the computation, because the code approximation has not been decreased, but if we want to compute a division in which the dividend belongs to IHpr and the divisor is a pseudo-Hensel code of order k (with k < r), as we have previously observed, we can appropriately manipulate these codes, in order to apply the division algorithm. In the following we will show two algorithms proposed in literature for the manipulation of the pseudo-Hensel codes. The rst one was proposed by Dittemberger in 1987 (see 6]) and can be summarized by the following steps: Algorithm Dit87

Input: q1 IPIHpr : a pseudo-Hensel code of order k (1 k r 1) Output: q1 SIHpr k  2



2



;

;

1. eliminate the k left-most zeros of the mantissa of q1 2. increase the exponent of q1 by k.

2

We note that if we want to carry on with the computations, all the codes involved in the computation must be modied, that is their approximation must be decreased by a factor of k. In this way we will eliminate the pseudo-Hensel code, but the approximation of all the codes will be decreased. The algorithm proposed in 4] tries to rebuild the approximation lost by the pseudo-Hensel code occurrence: 9

Algorithm CM87

Input:

a b SIHpr  q1 IPIHpr , pseudo-Hensel code of order k (1 k r 1), such that q1 = a + b Output: q1 SIHpr  1. apply the inverse mapping to a and to b, by obtaining the rational numbers related to the codes which has produced the pseudo-Hensel code 2. apply the direct mapping to these rational numbers, with an approximation equal to r + k 3. carry out the addition: a pseudo-Hensel code of order k is obtained in IPIHpr+k  2 4. eliminate the rst k zeros and update the exponent now the code will belong to SIHpr 2

2





;

2

The latter algorithm presents some inconveniences. While in the rst algorithm the approximation of all the codes involved in the computation decreases and could also become zero (in this latter case it is necessary to begin the computation again by doubling at least the code approximations), in the latter algorithm the computation with the code stops in order to obtain the rational numbers which have generated the pseudo code. But, in this case, we do not know anything about the order of this intermediate result, hence we can not be certain that backward mapping will give the exact result. Furthermore this last algorithm is time consuming. Moreover let us note that the recovery of the code approximation is necessary only when a division operation with a pseudo code as divisor occurs. Hence the new proposal consists in proceeding without manipulating the pseudo-Hensel codes, but to manipulate the division algorithm, only when a pseudo-Hensel code occurs as a divisor. In this case the following algorithm is proposed: Algorithm Lim92

Input:

p r q1 SIHpr = (a0 a1 : : :ar 1  0): dividend q2 IPIHpr = (0 : : :0 bk : : :br 1  0): divisor (pseudo-Hensel code of order k) Output: q3 = q1=q2 IPIHpr = (0 : : :0 c0 : : :cr 1 k  2k) 2

;

2

;

2

; ;

;

1. represent the dividend in IHpr k : (a0 a1 : : :ar k 1 0) 2. represent the divisor in IHpr k : (bk : : :br 1  k) 3. carry out the division 8] in IHpr k : (a0 a1 : : :ar k 1 0)=(bk : : :br 1 k) 4. represent the code result (c0 : : : cr 1 k  2k) in IPIHpr : (0 : : : 0 c0 : : :cr 1 k  2k): The result will be a pseudo-Hensel code of order k: ;

; ;

;

;

;

; ;

;

; ;

; ;

;

;

Example 3.6 We want to carry out the following computation: 1 1 1 1 4 =( 2 + 3 ) + 25

We choose, as usual, p = 5 and r = 4. H54(1=4) = (:4 3 3 3 0) H54(1=2) = (:3 2 2 2 0) H54(1=3) = (:2 3 1 3 0) H54(1=25) = (:1 0 0 0 2) ;

10

2

1 + 1 = (:3 2 2 2 0) + (:2 3 1 3 0) = (:0 1 4 0 0) 2 3 1 =( 1 + 1 ) = (:4 3 3 3 0)=(:0 1 4 0 0) 4 2 3 By applying the above described algorithm we obtain: Input: q1 = (:4 3 3 3 0) q2 = (:0 1 4 0 0) (pseudo code of order 1) Output: q3 = (:4 3 3 3 0)=(:0 1 4 0 0) = (:0 4 2 2 2) we represent the dividend in IH53, by truncating the right-most digit of the mantissa: (:4 3 3 3 0) (:4 3 3 0) ;

;

;!

;

we represent the divisor in IH53, by truncating the left-most digit of the mantissa. In this case we must update the exponent because the position of the code digits is changed with respect to the power of p: (:0 1 4 0 0) (:1 4 0 1) ;!

;

now we carry out the division 8] in IH53: (:4 3 3 0)=(:1 4 0 1) = (:4 2 2 1) ;

;

we represent the code result in IPIH54: (:4 2 2 1) ;

;!

(:0 4 2 2 2) ;

Furthermore H54(1=25) = (:1 0 0 0 2) hence: (:0 4 2 2 2) + (:1 0 0 0 2) = (:1 4 2 2 2) We note that H54(17=50) = (:1 4 2 2 2). 2 Computing in this way we can avoid the loss of signicant digits (on the contrary, in the algorithm Dit87 the approximation order of all the codes involved in the computation decreases) and allows the manipulation of the pseudo-Hensel codes in the same way as the Hensel codes. We do not need to recover the rational numbers related to the Hensel codes which have generated the pseudo code (as like as the algorithm CM87 does). Moreover, the approximation lost can be recovered during the rest of the computation, because, with our algorithm, the code length is not decreased. The occurrences of the pseudo-Hensel codes can be sensibly reduced, by taking an appropriate base p and, especially, by parallelizing the arithmetic. In order to reduce the occurrences of pseudo-Hensel codes choosing an appropriate base p, we can note that the probability of nding a leading zero in a code is equal to 1/(p 1). The probability of obtaining a leading zero after an addition between two Hensel code is given by the probability of nding p k (with 1 k p) as leading digit of the rst code and k as the leading digit of the second code, that is 1=(p 1)2. The same occurs for subtraction. From a computational point of view, the best possible choice for p is hence made by taking p to be the greatest prime number less than the maximum integer representable in a memory word. The parallelization of p-adic arithmetic is not only suitable to reduce the occurrences of the pseudo-Hensel codes, but it speeds up rational number arithmetic especially when big number computations occur. The idea of the parallel p-adic approach 15] is to represent each rational number by a Hensel code for several values of p, each representing one homomorphic image. The computations are then performed independently in each image. The unique result has to be constructed out of the results in the images in a recovery step by using the Chinese Remainder Algorithm. Finally a backward mapping has to be performed that retrieves the rational number from the Hensel code. We saw in Section 2. that an a priori estimation of the result is necessary in order to x the base p and the approximation r. In the next section we are going to analyze the apriori estimation of the result related to the solution of a linear siystem over the rationals. ;

;

;

;

;

;

;





;

11

4 Bounds for the Solutions As we saw in the previous sections, the computation of a suitable bound for the size of the solutions is a fundamental step of any p-adic algorithm. In our case we consider systems of linear equations over rational numbers. This means that, for a given matrix A Qn n and ~b Qn , we need an integer m such that, if a solution vector ~x = (x1  : : : xn) Qn of A~x = ~b  exists, then the denominator deni and the numerator numi of each entry xi is bounded by m, viz. 

2

2

2

i

jden j 

m

i

jnum j 

m

(3)

For the case A ZZn n and ~b ZZn such a bound m can be easily computed, for instance, by Cramer's rule. We have in fact xi = AAi (4) 2



2

j

j

j

j

where A denotes the determinant of A, and Ai is the matrix obtained from A by substituting the ith column by ~b. Now let a be a maximal entry in a matrix M ZZn n, then by induction on n M n!an. From this and (4) we obtain that both numerator and denominator of any xi are bounded by m := n!an, where a is now a maximal entry in A and ~b. From this bound we determine a value for r, such that the result is in IFpr for a given prime p. From the denition it suces that j

j



2

n!an 

$r

pr 1 2 ;

j

j 

%

Considering the square of both sides of the inequality we obtain 2(n!an)2 + 1 logp (2(n!an)2 + 1) logp pr or, equivalently,

(5) 

pr . This implies



r logp (2(n!an)2 + 1)

(6)

Hadamard's inequality (see for instance 22] or 21]) gives another bound for the determinant A2

j

j



0 n 11=2 n X Y @ a2ij A i=1 j =1

(7)

From this bound the following condition is derived in 8] pr



0n 1 n n X X Y bi @ a2ij A i=1

j

j

i=1 j =1

(8)

In practice both bounds are still conservative, since a smaller choice of p and r is often sucient. In the general case A Qn n and ~b Qn the bound for the numerator and denominator of the xi 's becomes n!an(n+1). This follows again from Cramer's rule by considering the equivalent system obtained from A by multiplying each row by the common denominator of all entries in that row and of the ith entry in ~b, i.e., multiplying by a number of magnitude at most an+1. 2



2

5 The Parallel Algorithm The parallelization is based on the concurrent application of Gauss' algorithm on several homomorphic p-adic images of the problem. The multiple homomorphic images technique 12, 20] presents the following characteristics: 1. the image domains are simpler than the original domain so that the image problem can be solved more eciently 12

2. the forward mapping preserves the operations in every image domain as stated in Theorem 2.4 3. the transformation leads to several independent homomorphic image problems each of which can be solved exactly, independently and in parallel as Figure 1 shows. 4. the correctness of the recovery step is assured by the Chinese Remainder Algorithm that has been parallelized in 15, 16] on the basis of the following theorem taken from 12] (the computation of each summand in (9) is done in parallel).

Theorem 5.1 (Chinese Remainder Theorem) Let p1 : : : pk be k relatively prime integers > 1. Then for any s1  : : : sk (si < mi ) there is a unique integer s satisfying

s