The Guild of Mace-Bearers

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Feb 8, 2013 ... Mace-Bearers of the City and the Ward Beadles 1. 14 .... I was appointed Deputy Town Crier and Sword bearer to the late Fred “Boots” Deacon.

The Mace-Bearer 2012

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IN THIS EDITION The Objects, Ideal & Motto of the Guild of Mace-Bearers The Guild Council Patrons Officer Reports Officer’s Antics A Diamond Year Annual Conference 2012 A Mayors Musing It Is Not Always Easy Being a Mayor Mace-Bearers of the City and the Ward Beadles 1 Social Scene Becoming the Youngest Town Sergeant/Macebearer Around the South East Region From the Editor’s Wife Maces, Maces and More Maces Mace-Bearers of the City and the Ward Beadles 2 A Little Relief from the Tax Man Taking Stock! The Art of the Chauffeur Glass Sword A Visit to Buckingham Palace Civic Insignia The Invisible Men (and Women) The City of Ripon Bellman The Exeter Experience 2012 Royal Wootton Bassett The Ceremony of the White Gloves A Mayor’s Best Friend Coat of Arms Breaking the Ceremonial Mould The Guild On-Line The Royal Hospital Chelsea T-Shirts There Shall Be a Scottish Parliament An Olympic Year Preston Guild A Royal Visit A Little Light reading Conference 2013 Guild Areas Recipe Corner Puzzle Pages Merchandise Answers A Plea from the Editor Patrons and Past Prime Wardens

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Front Cover: Nick Clarke (QRIH), Cas Butler (WG), Ted Roberts (RAOC), Bert Willis (RNF), Malcolm Smart MBE (RSigs), Combined Age of 357, Army Service 109 years. Royal Hospital Chelsea (See Page 36)

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THE OBJECTS, IDEAL & MOTTO OF THE GUILD OF MACE-BEARERS Objects To uphold and preserve the customs of the civic and corporate life of the Country and Commonwealth and to advise thereon. To collect and disseminate information that will assist members in the performance of their duties. To uphold the position and dignity of the office of Mace Bearer within the civic and corporate domain. To promote the spirit of comradeship and co-operation amongst its members. To encourage a degree of uniformity in civic and corporate ceremonial without infringing the peculiar and characteristics customs of individual Towns and Corporations To assemble its members periodically to discuss matters of professional interest.

Ideal The Guild shall be strictly non-sectarian and non-political and shall not seek the status of a Trade Union.

Motto Semper Fidelis (Ever Faithful)

THE GUILD COUNCIL Prime Warden

Joe Caruana

[email protected]

Renter Prime Warden

Owen Collier

[email protected]

Guild Clerk

Peter Townsend

[email protected]

Guild Bursar

Owen Collier

[email protected]

Guild Training Officer

Keith Simpson

[email protected]

Guild Editor

Alan Spencer

[email protected]

AREA REPRESENTATIVES North and North Wales

Stephen Smith

[email protected]

Scotland

Willy Paterson

[email protected]

South East

Chris Hobbs-East

[email protected]

South West and South Wales

Michael Coy

[email protected]

WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF Guild Welfare Officer

Ron Crabbe

[email protected]

Guild Web Master

Peter E Legg

[email protected]

For general enquires e-mail [email protected]

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PATRONS

As Patron of the Guild of Mace-Bearers I am delighted to contribute to this edition of The Mace-Bearer, especially given how vital our mace is to the House of Commons, and indeed to Parliament. As Speaker of the House of Commons my main role is to chair parliamentary debates and proceedings in the Chamber. However, it is important to note that without the ceremonial mace in place on the Table of the House, the House of Commons would not be constituted and business could not take place. The Mace originally represented the emblem of the Royal Serjeant at Arms who, on request of the Commons by the sovereign in the 15th century, enabled the House to go about its business both within the Commons and outside it on occasions when the Serjeant carried out orders such as arrests on behalf of the House. In recent times, the mace has become the symbol of the authority delegated to the Commons by the Sovereign, and to this day it is returned to the St James’ Palace when the House is prorogued or during dissolution. The Speaker’s procession which takes place each day before the Commons’ sits is led by the Serjeant at Arms carrying the mace across his right shoulder. The procession is another marked indication of the importance of the mace and the traditions and values that it and its bearers symbolise. For visitors of Parliament, the Speaker’s Procession is one of the most highly anticipated events of the Parliamentary day. There are always schoolchildren, tourists, and often international delegations that take the opportunity to watch the procession before visiting the Public Gallery to watch proceedings. The importance with which the Mace is regarded can be seen throughout history. For example, in an attempt to suspend Parliamentary proceedings, King Charles I, famed for his conflicts with Parliament, called for the Mace to be returned to him. In defiance, the Commons refused. In more recent times, Members of Parliament have on occasion attempted to remove the Mace in protest, an act which has been deemed as an act of grossly disorderly conduct in parliamentary procedure and can result in suspension from the House. Each day when groups of schoolchildren arrive to watch Speaker’s procession, I am reminded by the importance of this tradition and am pleased that the mace will continue to be an iconic symbol for future generations. Rt Hon John Bercow MP, Speaker of the House of Commons

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FROM THE EDITOR Dear All, I am pleased that you have once again given me the opportunity to produce this magazine. The first colour edition last year was my first attempt at producing a magazine and to say I was apprehensive about how it would be received by Guild Members is somewhat of an understatement. However, you must have enjoyed it as I received many positive comments and suggestions. Thank you to everyone who got in touch. In 2012 there are many events that are hard to ignore. First and foremost is the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The Guild have paid their own tribute to Her Majesty and you can find out more on this in ‘A Diamond Year’. The Annual Conference was held in February. If you did not attend the AGM in 2012, maybe the report and pictures will encourage you to join us in Royal Wootton Bassett in February 2013. One suggestion I received was for a puzzle page. I have taken this idea on board and have produced a couple for your amusement there will even be a small prize (details on the puzzle page). I would like to thank all contributors of the previous and this edition. Without these there would be no magazine. Alan Spencer, Editor

FROM THE PRIME WARDEN First, thank you for trusting me to this Office. In April 1996 I was invited by our then Town Clerk, Mrs. Christine Knapman, to become Mace Bearer to the Mayor of Hertford, and was installed by the outgoing Mayor Councillor Henry Sergeant. In 2002 I became a Member of the Guild, and have enjoyed the companionship and camaraderie of Fellow Members at many Conferences. It was both my privilege and pleasure to Host the Conference in Hertford in February of this year. The Conference was deemed to be successful and the Dinner enjoyed by all who attended. It really goes without saying that we were royally entertained by Richard Strudwick with his amusing anecdotal response. I would like to publicly thank the Hertford Team at The Castle and my colleagues for all their support. Special thanks must go to our Guild Clerk, Peter Townsend, for his patience and invaluable guidance leading up to The February Conference and ongoing. I am finding it strange that the whole year of preparation was more active than my first four months in office, (I am not complaining about this). In this Our Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Year, and with London presiding over the Olympic Games, many Festivities will be taking place across our Nation. Here in our County Town we are looking forward to Celebrating the Jubilee with a huge picnic in our Castle Grounds Hosted by our new Mayor, Councillor Jane Sartin, in the company of Lord Charles Cecil who will light the Beacon on top of The Castle. Also on 24th June we hope our streets will be filled with happy people taking part in our first Town Carnival for 12 years; and on 7th July the Olympic Torch will be carried through our Town. Much is happening, much more to come. It is my great privilege to be Prime Warden in such a special year in our Countries Calendar. I trust I will serve you well. Greetings and Best wishes to you all. Joe Caruana, Prime Warden 6

FROM THE RENTER PRIME WARDEN From Her Majesty’s Royal Town of Wootton Bassett in The County of Wiltshire I feel deeply honoured to have been elected Renter Warden of The Guild of Mace-bearers in This the Queens Diamond Jubilee year and an Olympic year as well Plans are already under way for next year’s Annual Training, Conference and Dinner. Which will be held 6 - 8th February 2013 in Royal Wootton Bassett and I hope as many of the Guild members both old and new are able to attend. A warm welcome awaits you all Most of you will know me as The Guild Bursar Don’t forget to read my Bursar report included in this issue For those of you who do not know me. I have been Guild Bursar for some four years. Here in Royal Wootton Bassett I hold the dual position of Town Crier and Sword-Bearer. I was appointed Deputy Town Crier and Sword bearer to the late Fred “Boots” Deacon. On 21 April 2001 and took over Fred’s mantle at his retirement in 2005. My predecessor held the office for 31 years and was an early member of this Guild. When Don Trafford (Banbury) was Prime Warden in 1985-86 My role here in Royal Wootton Bassett is a voluntary position and I’m appointed on a yearly basis at The Annual General Meeting of The Town Council and Mayor making Ceremony It was customary here for the Mayor and Officers of The Crown to be appointed on behalf of The Lord of The Manor by The Court Leet on his behalf and by his approval being the undisputed Lord of this Town. He owned The Town Hall and placed a covenant in place forbidding it to be used for political and religious meetings that still applies to this day. In order that no one steps out of line and challenged his authority My best wishes are sent to you all in this Diamond Jubilee Year God Bless Her Majesty, Long May You Reign Over Us, and GOD SAVE THE QUEEN. Owen Collier, Renter Warden

FROM THE AREA REPRESENTATIVES NORTH AND NORTH WALES Hello everybody for those that do not know me my name is Stephen Smith and I work for the City of Salford. I have had a busy time at work so far this year as we now have two Mayors, a City Mayor whom was elected on the 4th of May by the people of the City for a four year term of office and Ceremonial Mayor who still does one year. I look forward to seeing members from the North Area at the Guild Conference in February 2013 which will be held at Royal Wootton Bassett. If anyone wishes to [email protected]

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I am still trying to arrange some sort of get together for the North of England anybody with any ideas please contact me on the above e-mail address. Stephen Smith, Salford

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SCOTLAND I am 54 years old, married to Elizabeth for 30 years with one daughter Ashleigh, who is about to give birth, so I will soon be known as Papa Paterson. I have worked for East Dunbartonshire Council for 34 years, 16 years as a janitor and 18 years as Council Officer which I have really enjoyed. It has been a busy last few months as it has been our local election plus we have a new Provost, most of the Scottish authorities have a new administration and the Scottish Government is trying to cut the Councils from 32 to 19. We are closing our Council Headquarters and moving offices to the Marina. I have been told I am getting a water taxi. Ha Ha! I would like to finish off and thank Joe Caruana for the Guild Conference. It was a great success. Good luck to the Guild. Slangevar. Willy Paterson, East Dunbartonshire

SOUTH EAST To report on everything that all our members have been doing over the last year would be impossible so I have called on just one of the 66 members of the South East area to report on what his town has been doing. Every year I will be asking a different member to report on their town and this year is the turn of the Town Sergeant of Hythe, Terry Reene. His report can be found later in the magazine. As possibly the youngest member of the Guild, I was asked by the editor to provide an article for the magazine on how I became a mace-bearer. I hope you find this interesting. Maybe for future magazines some of you can let us know how you too became a mace-bearer. I look forward to seeing many of you in Royal Wootton Bassett in February 2013. Many Thanks Christopher Hobbs-East, Dover

SOUTH WEST AND SOUTH WALES We are pleased to report that Ron Crabb, Guild member from Exeter was awarded the British Empire Medal in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list.

OBITUARIES It is with regret that we have to inform members of the following death Alan Hughes, Freeman of the Guild Our deepest sympathies go out to his family. 8

FROM THE GUILD BURSAR Once again thank you to all the members that paid their membership on time. This not only makes my job as Bursar a lot easier. But also saves the Guild a considerable amount of money in postage and photo copying which is nearly £100.00 a year that could be diverted to other uses without the need for membership to be raised Again this year, late payments or no payment with the excuse “My Council normally pays” is no excuse for members not submitting their subscriptions. Send me your payment first A receipt will always be issued, if you require one, in order to claim the money back from your City or Town Council. At one of the regional gatherings kindly hosted by the former South West Rep Ernie Davis at Exeter City Council, out of The 33 Mace-Bearers present only three members were employed full-time, five received honorariums, 25 mace-bearers (including me) receive no expenses at all and carry out mace-bearing duties voluntarily. Looking at the current membership statistics, the South West Region has the largest number of Mace-bearers making up 39% of the Guilds membership. With most Guild members paying their own subscriptions. This is nearly half the membership! Unfortunately North and North Wales has the lowest number of Guild Members (21%) whilst it has some of the biggest Cities and Towns in the country and population figures. Birmingham, Manchester, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne members. Are you not proud to be members of The Guild of Mace-Bearers and carry your Maces, in honour of your Sovereign in North & North Wales? In this Her Majesty the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Year. Guild Items for purchase (Guild Members only) all items in stock at present. Postage prices will have to rise to over the recent increased in charges beyond the Guild control The Guild Council will meet here in Royal Wootton Bassett in August May you carry your Mace or Sword with Pride Owen Collier Guild Bursar

FROM THE GUILD CLERK It is with disappointment that I have to say that the membership has fallen this year. The reason for this is because of cutbacks in local government which has meant redundancies within our field of expertise and on top of this some have been told that their council has stopped paying for their annual subscription and this has resulted in members not renewing their membership. In 2013, the Guild Conference and AGM will take place in Royal Wootton Bassett on the 6th – 8th February. Could I encourage as many members as possible to attend as this is the one time that we as a Guild all come together to learn and to teach fellow Mace Bearers old and new the art of carrying the Mace and the protocols that surrounds the Mayoralty. We continue to keep the costs of the Guild and therefore for you the members to a minimum. You can help us by emailing me with confirmation of your email address so that the Guild Officers can keep in contact without incurring the expense of postage. Can I also encourage you to use the Guild’s website and message board as this is another way we can all keeping contact with each other. Finally, if there is anything that the Guild Council or I can do to help please do get in contact with us. You will find all our contact details in this magazine. Peter Townsend, Guild Clerk 9

FROM THE TRAINING OFFICER In February 2012, I attended the Annual Conference & training in Hertford, which was very well attended and hugely successful, with the newly appointed Joe Caruana, Prime Warden and Owen Collier, Renter Prime Warden. The members came from all over the country and were not disappointed with the level of training incorporated in the programme, with Hertford County Crime Prevention Officer, Colin Clare, providing valuable information regarding our personal property and being aware of our surroundings when on Mayoral duties. Regarding the Mayoral chains, Mr Clare, informed us that the price of gold has risen considerably over last few years, which may draw jewellery thieves to go for GOLD. Mr Clare, did advise us to visit and register on this website: - www.imobilse.com. Mr Ray Charlton, who now owns the civic robes company Michael's of Bristol, presented a great understanding of how to care for all your Mayoral attire. There were so many questions on this subject that, unfortunately, we ran out of time! Mr William Hunt, College of Arms, provided us with a great understanding of his work and how the Windsor Herald has helped for thousands of years. I am hoping to organise a tour of the College of Arms as I am sure many members would be keen to visit. Details will be available on the Guild website. Tony Sharp, President of the City of London Ward Beadles, gave a presentation Ward Beadles and their involvement in the City with the Lord Mayor. More details of this can be found later in this magazine. Finally, I would stress that it would be great if we could increase the London's Guild member’s attendance at our conferences. Keith Simpson, Hammersmith & Fulham

OFFICER’S ANTICS The editor received a number of pictures of the Guild Officer’s that he could not resist sharing with readers.

Willy Paterson (yes, really!) in his prize winning ‘Cruella deVille’ persona.

Yours truly waiting for the Mayor at a function (it’s not all hard work!) (Photo courtesy of [email protected])

Steve Smith, proudly receiving his Queen’s Jubilee Medal.

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A DIAMOND YEAR As Mace-Bearers we could not let 2012 pass without mentioning the Diamond Jubilee of HM Queen Elizabeth II.

The Guild of Mace-Bearers sent a scroll congratulating the Queen on her 60th year as our Sovereign.

©John Swannell/Camera Press

Her Majesty graciously sent a message of thanks in return.

The Queen is not unfamiliar with the Mace-Bearer as the Editor sent a copy to Buckingham Palace in 2011. 11

ANNUAL CONFERENCE

2012

On Thursday 02 February 2012 Mace-Bearers from around the country converged on Hertford for the Mace-Bearers annual conference. The weather was extremely cold but the welcome we all received could not be warmer. The weekend officially started with a get together at Hertford Castle where members had the chance to catch up with old friends over a glass of wine and a sumptuous buffet provided by Hertford Town Council. Joe Caruana still in his position as Renter Prime Warden gave a tour of the castle including the dungeons

A number of training sessions had been organised for Friday. In the morning, delegates were given a talk on crime prevention by Colin Clare followed by a presentation by Ray Charlton of Michaels’s of Bristol on the care of robes.

After lunch, was the turn of Windsor Herald William Hunt to give a very entertaining insight into the College of Arms. Last training session of the day was a talk on Beadles and Sergeants at Mace by Tony Sharpe. Guests were not forgotten with a trip to the Hertford Museum in the morning followed, after lunch, with a trip to Hatfield House opened especially for a private tour courtesy of Lord Salisbury.

Friday evening was a chance for members, The Mayor of Hertford and Invited guests to enjoy an excellent ‘black tie’ dinner at ‘The Whistling Duck’ Restaurant.

If you have not attended the Annual Conference before then do try to attend in 2013 in Royal Wootton Bassett. Not only is the conference an excellent training opportunity, it is a great chance to meet with fellow mace-bearers from across the country to compare notes and possibly get advice from more experienced colleagues. Alan Spencer, Editor 12

A MAYORS MUSING I have the privilege of being elected by the city councillors of Southampton to the position of Mayor. I am the 790 th Mayor in the history of our city. I am very proud of all our ceremonial offices and procedures, from the wearing of the robes to chairing the council meetings. One of the most important parts of our city heritage and history are the Town Sergeants and sitting right alongside this are the Mace-Bearers. The Mace-Bearers perform a vital part of this city’s functions. They lend a great deal of gravitas to all the varied functions that we attend. Wherever we go they perform sterling work. Everyone we meet is not only impressed with them but, when the role is fully explained, say how much they think it adds to our city. It is not only the ceremonial role but the message it sends when the Mayor and Mace-bearer attend. That both roles are linked together both convey the importance of the office. I believe that our city is better for having this important office. It sends a clear message that we value our traditions and our history as well as the people that carry out the duties. We can have all the ceremony and traditions we want but without the dedication and expertise of our Mace-bearers and Town Sergeants the whole edifice would not work and we would be the poorer for that. In my discussions with Mayors and Chairs, across not only Hampshire but nationally, they all agree that one of the most important elements of the job is the Mace and Mace-Bearers. I believe it is of vital importance that the things that make this such a great place to live and work are valued and retained, indeed re-introduced where they have been lost. Cllr Derek Burke, The Right Worshipful the Mayor of Southampton

IT IS NOT ALWAYS EASY BEING A MAYOR Many may feel that the Mayor has it easy compared to the Mace-Bearer. However, if we make a mistake few people would notice (we hope!) and it would certainly not make the pages of the local or national newspapers.

Two boys on crutches could kick the ball but Mayor couldn’t

The editor came across an article in the Sun newspaper (16 March 2012). Aislinn Lee, Mayor of St Albans in Hertfordshire was taking part in a world record bid by students at St Columbus College. As the Mayor came to take the 650th kick she ‘scuffed’ her kick and the ball failed to travel the necessary 11 metres. The poor Mayor was embarrassed and subject to on-line mockery by students. Fortunately, to the relief of the Mayor, the previous record of 579 passes had been beaten.

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MACE-BEARERS OF THE CITY AND THE WARD BEADLES Tony Sharp, President ‘The Ward Beadles of the City of London’ gave an illuminating talk at the 2012 Conference in Hertford. Tony has kindly submitted the following article for those who were unable to make the conference.

Now I am sure that you are all familiar with the City of London’s Lord Mayor’s Show which involves great pageantry and you have probably seen the three Esquires to the Lord Mayor who accompany him; The City Marshal who wears a plumed hat, the Sword Bearer who wears a fur or Muscovy Hat and the Common Crier who wears a forensic wig and who actually carries the Great Mace of the City. However, the Ward Beadles actually pre-date that office. The Common Crier only dates from the institution of the Lord Mayor in 1189 and the office developed out of the Mayor’s personal mace bearer or Beadle. Now firstly you may have heard of the title of Beadle applied to other officials. The Livery Companies or Guilds of the City also have Beadles and those that have Halls have Hall Beadles. Yet these officials are employees of those companies and indeed the Mace Bearer to the Lord Mayor is an employee of the City Corporation. I am sure that most of the Mace Bearers in the Guild are actually employees of their boroughs. However, the Ward Beadles of the City of London are elected officials and as such they do not receive remuneration, they get an honorarium to cover their expenses, which it actually hardly does. When I say that they are elected whom, you may ask, so Elects them? The answer is that they are elected by the ordinary Voters in the City who also elect the Councillors and the Aldermen of the Wards. Until 2004 they were elected every year but since then every five years. Note that they are Elected Officials of the Wards and not Elected Representatives on the City Council. Now the Alderman, the senior elected Councilman of a Ward, is also an ancient office and they are still to this day also the City’s Magistrates or Justices of the Peace. As such legal officers who sit in judgement on others they required an executive officer who could bring wrong-doers before them. That executing officer was and is The Ward Beadle who acts on the instruction of the Alderman. Today these duties are largely ceremonial but also electoral in that the Official who keeps Order at both the elections for Sheriffs and for the Lord Mayor, elections that take place every year in the great Guildhall of the City, are the Ward Beadles. The Ward Beadle also calls to order the election meetings held in the Wards for the voters to question their councillors and to elect them; these meetings are called the Ward Motes and are the most ancient assemblies in the City, predating the elections of Sheriffs and Lord Mayor. There are twenty five Wards of the City and each elect a suitable person to the ancient office of ‘Ward Beadle’ of which in fact there are twenty nine: the three largest Wards have two or three Ward Beadles.

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What were the Origins of the Beadles? Well they had a number of public order duties which before modern police forces developed would be known as the Watch, night or day watch. An offence was committed and the Beadle would go equipped with his mace to apprehend the offender and take him before the Alderman. Later he would approach the wrong-doer to take his fine. I know that you are all aware that at the opposite end of a Mace is the symbol of authority of the law officer, be it the Mayor’s or the Borough’s coat of arms,these often combined with a crown to denote that the ultimate authority was the King. These symbols grew until they became the most notable part of the Mace and the cudgel end became reduced to a small knob. So we effectively all carry our Maces up-side down! The earliest set of rules and responsibilities for the Ward Beadles of the City come from ‘The Customs of London in the Reign of King John’ “There are three chief folkmoots annually. One at Michaelmas, to know who is sheriff, and to hear his commands. The second at Noel for keeping the wards. The third at St John’s day to protect the city from fire, by reason of the great drought. If any Londoner neglect one of these three, he is in the king’s forfeiture for forty shillings. But by the law of London the sheriff ought to have enquiry made concerning any one of whom he would know, for certain, whether he is there or not. If the good man say that he was not summoned, that must be ascertained from the beadle of the ward. If the beadle says he was summoned, the man is convicted at the husting; for the beadle has no other witness, nor ought to have than the great bell which is rung at St Paul’s for the folk-moot.” (reproduced from Stubbs’ ‘Select Charters’ OUP). The ‘folkmoot’ at ‘Michaelmas’ is the ‘Common Hall’ at which the Lord Mayor is elected, but originally in that period it was when the citizens were informed by the king who he had appointed as the sheriff. That at ‘Noel’ was the Ward mote elections as held in December until 2003 when it moved to March under the revised electoral arrangements. That at ‘St John’s Day’ is the midsummer ‘Common Hall’ became that for when the citizens elected the Sheriffs. As can be seen, the Beadle was the sole judge and witness of a citizen’s compliance, who would be subjected for neglect to the swingeing fine of £2.00; this at a time when a workman may earn only a penny a week! Primarily, it must be understood that Ward Motes were originally meetings of the Freemen only (but is now for all the electors on the Register or the Ward List) so that the democratic and electoral element of the meetings whereby they elected Councilmen was a later development. Indeed for centuries only the Ward officers and the Ward Beadle were elected. This was because these Ward Motes were essentially the same as a Manorial Court with the Freemen making ‘presentments’ of civil issues and criminal matters with the Alderman punishing miscreants according to law, the Beadle ‘attaching’ such persons as the court’s officer. In the early period the Alderman was the main landowner in the Ward, so he was lord of the manor. Indeed, even today, ward electors can ask general questions at the Ward Motes which the Alderman, Ward Clerk and Common Councilmen attempt to address. According to the famous Liber Albus compiled by the City Secretary John Carpenter at the request of Sir Richard Whittington in 1419 (Part I, Chapters I to XVI; and most of which of its procedures are still maintained) the Beadle as an elected officer actually predates that of the Councilmen as elected representatives. The councillors date from as late as Richard II – Henry IV, but then they did not govern the City as today. The election of Alderman is much later still and was only (until the last Act of 2003) ‘once for life’, this deriving from the Aldermanry of a Ward as a personal property acquired as the land title of a City magnate. The Sheriffs were originally appointed officers, of and by the king, until the early twelfth century (Henry II) whence from they were elected by the Liverymen. The Lord Mayor first appears in 1189 (Richard I). …continued on page 22 15

SOCIAL SCENE

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Prime Warden Joe Caruana chatting with The Worshipful the Mayor of Hertford Councillor Mrs Sally Newton, Guild Council Members, Members and guests

BECOMING THE YOUNGEST TOWN SERGEANT/MACEBEARER 2010 was an important year for me as this was the year I got my dream job. It all started when my friend was made redundant but unfortunately the jobcentre in Deal where we lived had closed so I was tasked with taking him and his wife to the next nearest which was in Dover. Well as he waited to be called forward we thought we would have a quick look on the computers to see what was about. There it was Dover Town Council are looking for a new Town Sergeant/General Assistant. Now most people especially of my age (at the time 24 years young) would have no clue what a Town Sergeant was but I was the lucky one as for many years before I had been lucky enough to help the Town Mayor of Ramsgate out with a few jobs. One of these jobs was when I was 19 in 2005 and Ramsgate Council had just appointed a new Town Sergeant (still in post today) and the first week he joined was Battle of Britain week. In Ramsgate they have a big parade through the town. I had been attending these parades for a number of years as my father was and still is the Officer Commanding of Ramsgate Air Cadet Unit and I was a Civilian Instructor, so this was the parade (apart from Remembrance Day) that the Air Cadets had to be at. Well the council felt it would be unfair to ask the new Town Sergeant to do such a high profile event so they asked me to step in as I knew the layout of the day. As you can see by the picture I was a natural! Ha I wish as inside I was panicking! Yes I knew the layout of the day but I had no idea how to macebear! Well it all went smoothly and apparently I did a good job and the Mayor was happy. So this all flashed through my mind when I saw the words Town Sergeant on the job role.

Now I would have taken the job back in 2005 in Ramsgate but I couldn't as by then I did not know how to drive so I thought that was my last chance to become a Town Sergeant. So fast forward a few months I had attended my 2 interviews at Dover Town Council and as part of one of these I had to attend that years Mayor Making. As I said before this was not my first encounter with Mayors but Dover definitely did Mayor Making on a grander scale to others I had attended. Well after much deliberation the council decided to go with me instead of the other applicant. I was made up! I couldn't believe my luck. But then came the hard part, actually doing the job for 20 hours a week instead of just stepping in. My background within the RAF as my father is a Flt Lt and also my brother is serving at RAF Marham has helped a lot with the two years I have been in post. But the people who have helped me the most are my first two Mayors. I have been very lucky that Cllr Sue Jones and Cllr Ronnie Philpott have been there for me all the way. Now this could be trying to explain how to get to certain places then realising we are completely lost or by telling me quietly how I was going wrong. We have had many a laugh and a tear over the two years. I think the funniest has probably been when we went to Belgium for the first time last year and people thought Ronnie was my Nan and Sue was my Mum! Well, theoretically, the age group we could be but it did make us laugh. Also I’m glad to say I have stopped being asked if I am the Mayors husband! It was fine for the Cllrs as they looked like they had a toy boy! Anyway, so my first two years has been an eye opener but I wouldn’t change it for the world! I love the history of the job and the history I have become part of and I hope one day when I retire in 60 years’ time my family can look back and be proud I was part of this historical job which we all do. Chris Hobbs-East, Dover Town Council

Do you know of a younger Mace-Bearer? Let the Editor know. 17

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AROUND THE SOUTH EAST REGION Chris Hobbs East, Area Representative for the South East region has asked one of the members from the region to let us know what he has been up to in the past year. Hythe being an ancient town and Head Port within the confederation of Cinque Port town, retains a significant pride in supporting those events within the Confederation and neighbouring towns and limbs. In addition to these the Mayor of Hythe strives to support local businesses, charities, schools and the wider community. This has involved the attendance at local schools for school productions and prize giving's. Hythe Aqua is one of the largest swimming clubs in the South East and earlier this year a delegation of German swimmers were welcomed to the Town and provided with a tour of the Town Hall. The residential homes and retirement homes in the town have garden parties, Easter bonnet parades and Christmas shows which have been widely supported by the Mayor and his wife. During the year the Mayor supports a boot fair and quiz with the aim of raising funds in support of his chosen charity which is currently the Peoples Hospice. Hythe invites Mayors from the neighbourhood to attend our Mayor Making, Civic Sunday, Christmas Carol Service and the very popular day out in Hythe which takes in the crypt at St. Leonards church which contains over 2000 skulls, the Romney Hythe and Dymchurch light railway and a trip down the royal Military Canal on the new electric boat. Local fish and chips also figure during the day !

This year of course has seen the Jubilee celebrations which took the form of a party in the park culminating in the lighting of a Beacon.

Probably the biggest and best known event is the biannual Venetian Fete which takes place on the canal and the Mayors from all over the Confederation can be seen on their pontoons floating down the canal ably pulled by two sea cadets. Just as they set off the skies opened and it became rather wetter than people expected. Hythe is also one of those towns looking forward to the passing of the Olympic Torch and it is anticipated that a full Civic delegation will wave it through. Terry Reene, Hythe

Come on other regions. Let your Area Rep have your report. It could be featured in the next magazine.

FROM THE EDITOR’S WIFE After several days complaining of aching muscles in his arm and shoulder the Editor came home from work and announced that he had ‘Mace-bearer’s Shoulder’. Well, after picking myself up off the floor I asked whether this was an official diagnosis or was he making things up again? Apparently the pain had been subsiding but after carrying the City Mace the pain had come back. Therefore, ‘Mace-bearer Shoulder’ it must be! Coincidentally, a few days later I saw the following entry on Facebook from the South West rep “New shoes + 14 hr shift = OWWWWWW”. Obviously, one would question whether wearing new shoes for such a long shift was a particularly bright idea. However, it still goes to show that Mace-bearers can suffer for their art. Susan Spencer, Southampton

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MACES, MACES AND MORE MACES Continuing our look at different Maces

ROYAL HOSPITAL CHELSEA In size and shape the Sovereign’s Mace broadly follows the style and shape of the Royal Maces made for the Sergeants at Arms in the reign of our Founder, King Charles II. At 52” in length and weighing 24 pounds it was designed by Lt Col Charles Webb and Aubrey Bowden, crafted by master silversmith Norman Bassant and gifted to The Royal Hospital by Ronald Gerard OBE. The head (Bowl) has a distinctive theme of oak leaves and acorns, which are strongly associated with The Royal Hospital (Charles II escaped capture by Parliamentarian forces after the battle of Worcester in 1651 by hiding in an oak tree), and supports the large St. Edward’s Crown. Within the Crown is a disc bearing the Royal Coat of Arms. A scroll bearing a Latin dedication is wrapped around the shaft beneath the brackets. The main shaft is in two sections, each with Latin inscriptions. The bulbous ornaments (knops) bear four silver devices, including the Royal Cyphers of Her Majesty and King Charles II, The Royal Hospital badge, acorns and cuirasses. The lower finial repeats the upper section of the Mace and its base is shaped like the cascabel end of a cannon. INSCRIPTIONS ON THE MACE DEDICATION - Spiral below Head, under Brackets: MILITIBUS FIDELIBUS GRATO ANIMO DEDIT REGINA ‘Presented to her faithful soldiers by their grateful Sovereign’

UPPER INSCRIPTION - between top and centre Knops: HANC VIRGAM REGIAM PROTESTATIS REGIAE INSIGNE DEDIT REGINA ELIZABETHA SECUNDA QUA CELEBRARETUR REGNI SUI LUSTRUM DECIMUM ET OFFICIUM MILITARE CORONAE PRAESTITUM AB EMERITIS QUI USQUE AB ANNO MDCXCII IN HOSPITIO REGALE CHELSEIENSI HABITAVERUNT ANNO DOMINI MMII ‘This Sovereign’s Mace, symbol of Royal authority, was presented by Queen Elizabeth the Second to commemorate her Golden Jubilee and in recognition of military service to the Crown by the In Pensioners who, since 1692, have resided at The Royal Hospital Chelsea. The year of our Lord 2002.’ LOWER INSCRIPTION - between centre and lower Knops: IN SUBSIDIUM ET LEVAMEN EMERITORUM SENIO BELLOQUE FRACTORUM CONDIDIT CAROLUS SECUNDUS AUXIT JACOBUS SECUNDUS PERFECERE GULIELMUS ET MARIA REX ET REGINA ANNO DOMINI MDCXCII For the succour and relief of veterans broken by age and war. Founded by Charles the Second, enlarged by James the Second Completed by William and Mary, King and Queen, in the year of our Lord 1692. (This was in effect the “Mission Statement and Royal Patronage” of the Royal Hospital on opening, and which remains to this day the core objective of its activities)

John Rochester, RQMS (C), Compliance Manager & Curator, Royal Hospital, Chelsea

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THE COMMONWEALTH MACE If you were watching the Queens’ Jubilee Boat Pageant, the eagle eyed Mace-Bearer would have seen a Mace on board the Royal Barge ‘Spirit of Chartwell’.

(Royal Collection trust / ©Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2012) The Commonwealth Mace was presented to Her Majesty The Queen in 1992 to commemorate the 40 th anniversary of her accession to the throne. The mace includes the Royal Coat of Arms, the symbol of the Commonwealth and the flags of each of the Commonwealth nations at the time. The Mace is used:    

in the presence of HM The Queen or an immediate member of the Royal Family representing the Head of the Commonwealth; at Commonwealth Heads of Government Meetings and on special Commonwealth occasions; at the annual multi-faith Observance on Commonwealth Day at Westminster Abbey; and, at the Commonwealth Day evening reception hosted by the Secretary-General.

There is also a matching set of 55 silver gilt toasting Goblets each engraved with the respective member government’s national armorial bearings. The Goblets are used at the banquet hosted by the Queen for Heads of Government at CHOGMs.

MISCELLANEOUS MACES Here we bring you a selection of other maces.

Reverse of £2 coin Glass Mace presented On retirement of Southampton Town Sergeant.

Christmas Decoration

Silver Charm

Novelty Sticker 21

MACE-BEARERS OF THE CITY AND THE WARD BEADLES – CONT. The Beadles are already acting at the earlier date along with the Ward Clerks, whom always seem to have been appointed. The Beadles were elected at the Folk-Moot (now the Ward Motes and Common Halls) but whether this was originally an open election by those present or only to choose from those nominated by the Alderman, as today, is difficult to say. Whatever, the Beadles duties were as follows: 1. 2. 3. 4.

To prepare the list of Freemen of the Ward for the Ward Mote and Folk-Moot and summon them to these; To conduct the details of any elections, in regard to the list, held at the Ward Mote with the Ward Clerk. To open/ close and keep order at the Ward Mote To ‘amerce’ non-attendees of the Ward Mote and Folk-Moot and ‘attach’ ie collect the fines for this; the Beadle’s word in regard to summons being delivered to a freeman and his non-compliance was the only evidence required. (see also Prof Wm Stubbs Select Charters ... to 1307; Customs of London in the Reign of John 1205-06 pp 312314)

As can be seen the original role of the Beadle was as an Electoral Officer, with the Ward Clerk as Recorder and the Alderman as Returning Officer. Duties 1) and 2) are now performed by the Electoral Services section of the Town Clerk’s Department. Duties 3) are largely ceremonial and are still the preserve of the Beadle. Duties 4) have long ago fallen into disuse. Apart from the ‘Ward Mote’ the Beadles attend on the Aldermen at the seven great ceremonial occasions of the Civic Calendar. The United Guilds Service at St Paul’s This is the most recent ceremony dating from the period of our nation’s greatest peril during the Second World War; all of the Livery Companies and their Livery men attend this in mid-March. The address is always given by a senior Bishop, recently the Cardinal of England. The Spital Sermon This is a short Service, held sometime between April and May, in the Guildhall Church of St Lawrence, Jewry for the Lord Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen only. It was instituted by the boy-king Edward VI in 1543 and marks the foundation of two ‘hospitals’:- Bridewell and Christ’s Hospital which are in fact schools. The Head Boy or Girl reads one of the Lessons. Midsummer ‘Common Hall’ at Guildhall This is for the Livery to Elect the two Sheriffs, on Mid Summer’s Day, effectively the Lord Mayor’s assistants. The Sheriffs live in the Old Bailey for their year of office with the senior judges and entertain them and deputise for the Mayor within the City at social functions. The Admission of the Sheriffs This is held in Guildhall on the day before the election of the new Lord Mayor; it is attended only by the Aldermen and Lord Mayor and current Sheriffs to watch the swearing-in of their replacements who had been elected some months before Michaelmas ‘Common Hall’ at Guildhall On the 29th September the Livery Elect two persons who have served as Sheriff and are Aldermen one of whom is then chosen by the Aldermen in private, to become Lord Mayor. He is then presented to the assembled Livery in Guildhall. The ‘Silent Ceremony’ Guildhall This is the ceremony of admission of the new Lord Mayor. The symbols of office are withdrawn from the previous incumbent and presented to the new one. The ceremony is very complicated and is done in complete silence, before the Aldermen and invited persons. It takes place the day before the Lord Mayor’s Show The Lord Mayor’s Show This is officially called the ‘Presentation of the Lord Mayor and Procession to the Royal Courts of Justice’. Although the general public think this is done for their entertainment, in fact what it is for, since the time of King John when 22

the citizens first chose their own Mayor, is to present him to the Queen’s representatives so that she can be told who he is. These are the Lord Chief Justice and the senior judge at the Royal Courts who is called the Queen’s Remembrancer. Originally, this was done in state barges on the river, they rowed to Westminster Hall, which was the original royal courts. When the present building opened at the end of The Strand in 1868 the procession moved to the street, but the celebratory groups and tableaux are still said to be carried on ‘floats’. At the great meetings held in the City Guildhall, the Ward Beadles process in with their Aldermen, the Sheriffs and the Lord Mayor who go to the dais. Then somewhat surprisingly the Ward Beadles turn their backs onto these senior persons and face the audience throughout proceedings. This is because as late as the Georgian period of the 1790s riotous behaviour by the Freemen might occur and the Ward Beadles had to protect the Aldermen and quell the troublemakers. THE OATH OF THE BEDELS From the Liber Albus, 1861 ed Riley pp 272-3 compiled by City Secretary John Carpenter at the request of Sir Richard Whittington in 1419 most of its procedures are still followed:“You shall swear, that well and honestly you shall keep the Ward of which you are Bedel; and shall suffer no one accused of robbery or of evil covin, or huckster of ale, or of those keeping a brothel, or others commonly reputed of bad and evil life, to dwell in the same Ward, but you shall forthwith shew the names of such unto the Alderman, to the end that the same may have them turned out within fifteen days. And if Alderman do it not, you shall at once, and after the fifteen days ended make known the same unto the Mayor. And if any one shall make affray or draw sword, or knife, or other weapon, you shall make known the same unto the Chamberlain of the City, or unto the Sheriffs, that so they may be able to make levy by their serjeants of such misdoers, in manner ordained for keeping the peace of our lord the King. And also, you shall return good and lawful men upon Inquests at the Hustings, and before the Sheriffs and Coroners, and not persons suspected of maintenance of parties [to the suit]. And the returns that you shall make, you shall shew unto your Alderman two or three days before the Hustings that he may see if your return is sufficient or no. And that you shall know no poultry or other small victual, or malt, or corn, to be received in any privy place, or to be sold in secret, or against the ordinance of the Mayor, but you shall warn the Mayor and the Sheriffs thereof; nor shall you be officer in any Court Christian during your office of Bedelship; nor shall you brew, by yourself or by any other, to sell; or keep an oven, or a cart for hire; nor shall you be a regrator of any victuals, or a huckster of ale, or a partner with such. And all other things which unto your office pertain to do, well and lawfully you shall do. So God you help, and the Saints.” The first two paragraphs outline the duties of Beadle as effectively a police officer for keeping the peace within his ward; he could be assisted by the Watch who looked after the City gates and walls. The third paragraph details how the Beadle was also an officer of the City Courts, summoning the freemen for jury or coroners inquest service, the latter duty was actually performed until the re-organisation and merger of the City and Westminster’s Coroner’s office in 1988. The reference to ‘maintenance’ was the disreputable practice of litigators paying henchmen to support them in their Court cases, usually over false claims to property rights. The Beadle also had to attend the Licensing of Pubs at the Magistrate’s court and verify that the Licensee was who he said he was. The fourth paragraph reminds us that only Liverymen could trade or manufacture within the City in public markets, hence the restriction of the non-qualified trading privately. The Ecclesiastic Courts were a competing jurisdiction within the City in the mediaeval and pre-Reformation period and there would be a clear conflict of interest if the Beadle was also a servant of the many monastries, bishops palaces and other church institutions. The final part recalls how the Beadle was effectively the consumer protection service and weights and measures inspector for the ward and so if he traded would have a conflict of interest. A lot of these duties ceased to be performed only in the last thirty years and one of our most recently retired Ward Beadles actually did undertake the calling of jurors to Coroner’s Court and accompanied Licencees for applications. Today the duties are exclusively ceremonial. Tony Sharp, President, The Ward Beadles of the City of London 23

A LITTLE RELIEF FROM THE TAX MAN Are you aware that if you have to wear a uniform at work and are responsible for the washing and repair of it then you could claim tax relief? Do you wear a recognisable uniform that shows you have got a certain job? Does your employer require you to wear it while you're working? Do you have to pay to clean, repair or replace it yourself? Have you paid income tax in the year you are claiming for? If you can answer yes to all these questions then you may be able to claim. You simply need to send a letter to your local tax office. For further details check out http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/reclaim/uniform -tax-rebate.

TAKING STOCK!

Peter Townsend demonstrates what becomes of outgoing Prime Wardens (we did let him out when he promised to continue as Guild Clerk!)

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THE ART OF THE CHAUFFEUR In the current difficult economic times it is hardly surprising that many civic offices are looking closely at their transport arrangements and the ongoing debate about in-house cars and chauffeurs verses external private hire cars or the civic driving themselves seems set to rage for years to come so let’s have a look at the issues. First, let me declare my interests. I was a private hire driver for a chauffeur car company before becoming a Mayoral Officer/ chauffeur for 12 years, and three years ago I left the authority to go freelance again. Now some of my biggest customers are civic offices where the civic heads are often expected to drive themselves but can hire a chauffeur driven car if required. In driving for a wide range of Mayors, Chairmen, Lord Mayors, High Sheriffs and Lord Lieutenants in both authority owned vehicles and my own limousine it becomes apparent that the requirement to use a chauffeur seems dependent on what the authority expect from their civic head. If the role is chiefly that of chairing the council meetings and an incidental side effect is that the chairman might occasionally be asked to attend a local function then it does not seem unreasonable for the civic to drive themselves to many events, however if the civic head is a high profile representative of the council and its people who has a prominent role attending hundreds of functions both in the area and on a wider platform then there are likely to be more occasions when the use of a chauffeur is a necessary requirement. Make no mistake, whatever the size of the authority the civic head when out in public is “playing a part” and whether it’s a one-man show at a small village school or as the starring role in a massive production in which there might be a part for a chauffeur, it is all about giving the public the performance they want and expect. Most event organisers will have invited their civic head with the thought that it will raise the profile of their event, and lend it some formality and prestige. Matching their expectations is vital and having a self-drive civic turn up late because they have struggled to park then seeing them root around in the boot of the car for their chain, sling it over their shoulders and enter the venue unannounced will do nothing to increase the public demand for the service and the number of invitations a year they receive.

The alternative, of having the civic driven up to the door on time, well briefed and introduced and accompanied by a well turned out chauffeur can have a dramatic effect on the dignity and gravitas of the whole event and the way the authority is viewed by the community. So if you are fortunate enough to work as civic chauffeur, whether employed by an authority or freelance, what can you do to ensure your civic doesn’t become a victim of the economic cuts and become self-driven? The answer is to make yourself as indispensable as possible!

1. Make sure you know exactly where you are going. Not just the address of the venue but which door do you need to arrive at? If you are not sure then go and find out in advance, and if the venue is too far away to justify a recce make use of the internet. Does the venue/organisation have a web-site? Can you see the venue on Google Earth/Maps/Streetview? 2. Remember that if you do nothing more than deliver the civic to the door then take them home again they might just as well drive themselves or book a taxi. 3. Make sure you know who is meeting the civic so you can introduce them on arrival. If you arrive at the venue and there is no-one waiting to meet your civic, leave them in the car while you go and locate the host, bring them out to the door and make your introductions there. 4. If you can’t remember the hosts name or you have to introduce the civic to someone you don’t know then just reverse the introduction. Instead of saying “Mr Mayor, may I introduce Mrs Xxxxx” try starting with “May I introduce the Worshipful the Mayor of Xxxxxx and wait for the host to (hopefully) to say “Hello Mr Mayor, I am Mrs Xxxxxx” 25

5. Once the civic is handed over park the car somewhere where you can quickly drive up to the door when they are ready to leave, or turn it round so you are ready to drive away the minute all the goodbyes have been said. The organisers want to wave the civic off not watch you reversing round the car park or attempting a three point turn. 6. Once the car is parked (have you removed the flag in case it gets nicked?) now is the moment to return to the room the civic is in and lurk! Just keep a watching brief in case you can assist with anything. They may be chatting and unable to get over to the drinks table, can you fetch them something? Or have they been handed some flowers or an information pack which is now making it difficult to shake hands with everyone? 7. If they are going to be going in to a formal dinner it’s always worth checking the seating plan and looking at the room layout. Is there time to change the place settings if they have not been allocated the correct position, or do you just need to be ready to show them where their seat is when they enter the dining room? 8. Do you have a camera (or your phone) handy to take a photo? If the civic is being left with little to do while others arrive can you organise a couple of pics, and most civics will be pleased you’ve “gone the extra mile” if you surprise them at a later date with a couple of discrete shots of the event in action that they weren’t aware you had taken. 9. If they are attending an outdoor event might they need to put their coat on (or take it off?) or need a rug to tuck round them if they are sitting in the cold? All these little tasks (and thousands more) can be invaluable to your civic head and just make the event flow that little bit smoother for the organisers, and anything that makes your civic look good will reflect on you - the officer supporting them. Whether you are employed by the authority and expected to do these kind of things as part of your job, or hired in for one night and might otherwise sit in the car and read the paper it is vital in this day and age to exceed the expectations. Making the extra effort to provide an exceptional service will not only make you (and your civic) feel good, but it might just tip the balance the next time someone suggests that “they don’t really need a chauffeur – they can drive themselves to that one!” Peter E. Legg, www.freelancechauffeur.co.uk

GLASS SWORD

In our first edition, you will recall there was a piece about creating a glass mace. Well, since then Jim Lang has perfected a glass presentation sword. If anyone is interested in having one made for as a suitable gift for a sword bearer (retirement, birthday etc.) then please contact Jim via e-mail on [email protected]

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A VISIT TO BUCKINGHAM PALACE Firstly after many trips taking the Mayoral party to the Palace, what a privilege to get our own invite. This being due entirely to being in the Guild of Macebearers and being honoured by taking the Prime Wardens position, maybe this might be sufficient inducement to join and actively participate in the Guild affairs. Needless to say Marcia was delighted, the opportunity to find a suitable outfit to wear, and to get me into a full morning dress, as advised by our wise old Guild Clerk. Marcia suitably attired for the journey in track suit and for me Jeans and a polo. We made our way to the Winning Post for lunch, a time honoured route and watering hole. We in our lowly Megane had been overtaken by APR 1 just after leaving Ferndown. At the Winning Post, a plethora of Mayoral transport, Poole, Bournemouth, East Dorset and Weymouth were there assembled. The company were surprised to find us on our way to their destination so casually dressed; however, by our departure the Cygnets had changed their plumage. We took our place in the convoy, made a small deviation from our time honoured track due to Beach Volleyball on Horse Guards Parade and ended parked herringbone in the Mall. Unfortunately as we left the car the rain started, at the head of the Mall, Marcia found that she had left the paperwork in the car so back I went leaving Marcia and the umbrella, it is a good job seafarers and water mix, fortunately the rain was not enough to spoil the anticipation but sufficient to drive the photographers away, so the professional photo call that would have been nice to post in The Macebearer was not available but an amateur version is available, subject to the Editor’s scrutiny. (Very smart they are too – Ed) Needless to say we had a wonderful time strolling around the gardens, Marcia especially as she is dedicated to gardening, unfortunately we had to leave the camera as photos are not permitted within the grounds, although there were a multitude of smart phones in action, however, we resisted the temptation. There were the little points of interest, to note in the event planning, such as the two bands playing from

bandstands at opposite corners of the lawn, with a pennant on each being raised and lowered to indicate when a changeovers were due. Whilst on our perambulation we were approached by a resplendent Gent and his Lady, who mistakenly recognised my Guild Prime Warden’s badge for the one he was wearing, and asked me which County I represented. He had mistaken the cross maces for the cross swords, and had assumed I was High Sherriff, as he was for Rutland; obviously I did a reasonable job of upholding the traditions of the Guild’s reputation. Marcia, a dedicated foody took great delight in the tea especially the gold crown insignia topped chocolate cake provided from the refreshment marquee, I had been pre warned from my past trips , not to expect a great deal from the catering, however, I have to say, other than not having hot coffee on tap, brilliant. We took our place close to the designated path, for the Royal perambulation, the line of which was held and continually expanded by the Gentlemen Ushers. During the afternoon the rain came in showers even until the time for the Royal family and their entourage to come onto the lawn, and then the showers stayed away. The sun shines on the righteous. However finally the showers turned to more persistent rain and we having met up and spent time with the Bournemouth Mayor and Mayoress, with whom we had spent a previous evening at a Dorset Magistrates reception at the Lord Lieutenant’s home. Although the Queen had not taken her leave, we decided to do so. A marvellous day which we found most enjoyable. As part of the job the Macebearers perform, the Mayoral visit to the Palace is one of the regular ports of call, surely this must be a fitting reward. As I have said previously, this reward must be an incentive to join the Guild, attend the Conference and show your commitment to the Guild and assist in its governance.

David Knight, Poole

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CIVIC INSIGNIA In this section we continue our look at Civic Insignia. The observant amongst you will have noticed that the header of this section has changed. After publication of the last edition of the magazine the editor was taken to task and informed that it should be ‘Insignia’ rather than ‘Regalia’. The dictionary definitions of both are. Regalia The emblems or insignia of royalty, especially the crown, sceptre, and other ornaments used at a coronation. Insignia A distinguishing badge or emblem of military rank, office, or membership of an organization As a result, your editor considers himself corrected.

LONDON BOROUGH OF HAMMERSMITH & FULHAM The Hammersmith Mayoral chain and badge were provided by public subscription and presented to Hammersmith Metropolitan Borough Council on the subscribers’ behalf by W J Bull, MP (later Sir William Bull). It was made by the Goldsmith’s and Silversmith’s Company and the artist and borough councillor, Sir William Blake Richmond, was consulted over the design. The chain, which is made of eighteen carat gold, consists of alternate linking letter H’s, with crossed hammers, and ornamental shields for engraving the names of successive Mayors. The badge, consisting of a gold and enamelled replica of the coat of arms of Hammersmith Metropolitan Borough, is suspended from a centre link bearing the initials of the first Mayor, Thomas Chamberlen, and the date 1900.

The second Mayoral badge of the Metropolitan Borough of Fulham was the gift of the sixteenth Mayor of Fulham, Fred Holgate Barber, in 1928. Made of 18 carat gold it shows the new coat of arms, granted to Fulham on 12 October 1927. This includes the crossed swords and golden mitre of the Bishops of London, the wavy bars of the river and the sailing ship of the Danes. The motto is 'Pro civibus et civitate' meaning 'For citizens and state'. The chain is composed of alternate shields and the letter F connected by a wave link pattern chain. The shields have a crane on either side, and are surmounted by a crown. The centre link is surmounted by an imperial crown.

Keith Simpson, Hammersmith & Fulham

THE INVISIBLE MEN (AND WOMEN) At every Civic Procession with the Mayor in attendance the Mace can be seen and whenever the Mayor attends an event the Mayoral Chauffeur /Attendant is not far away. How many times have you looked at the pictures later reported in the press and said ‘That is my elbow’ or ‘I was stood just to the left of that person there’? Tim Alban of Huntingdon sent us this unusual photograph.

To redress the balance, here is a picture of Tim how he normally looks.

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THE CITY OF RIPON BELLMAN To those who frequent Ripon market in North Yorkshire on Thursdays, the Bellman is a very familiar figure as dressed in his formal uniform he proclaims the market 'open' at 11.00am with eleven 'dongs' of his handbell. The Bellman's office is an ancient one - there was certainly a Bellman by 1668 when the Corporation had to pay for a new and expensive cloth coat. Other recurrent cost over the years included his large silver badge of office, his tricorn hat and of course his bell (nine shillings in 1668). In past centuries the Mayor was entitled to a toll, the 'Market Sweepings', levied on the corn set out for sale and trading could only begin when this tax had been collected - the go-ahead being given by the ringing of the 'Corn' handbell. It is rumoured the one of the criteria for the position of Bellman was to have the largest hands in the locality! The toll was discontinued in 1849. The Bellman's other duties were as Town Crier, an office which has unfortunately died out. In 1673 when there was an important announcement to be made, the Corporation had the news proclaimed at the Cross in the Market Place and also "did order the Bellman to ' tincle' (sic) the bell throughout the towne".

In 1800 George Wills, Bellman, was "paid 5 shillings for each whipping".

As is the case today, the Bellman would walk in civic processions, but in Georgian times he also appears to have been responsible (and could claim expenses) for cleaning the Market Place, posting up notices, lighting fires for Corporation meetings, and acting as their courier (1802: "ordered that the Bellman's fees for making calls in the town in future be threepence each and fourpence for the country"). One of the duties which a vindictive Bellman would have enjoyed was chastising malefactors in the Square on market day using a cat o' nine tails - an event which would certainly have contributed to town centre entertainment. In 1800 George Wills, Bellman, was "paid 5 shillings for each whipping". The identity of several Bellmen is known, one of the earliest (1749) being William Bell who presumably got the job on the strength of his name alone. John Gregg, Bellman for nearly 30 years (1853-82), had a powerful and well modulated voice, his fame soon spread abroad and many matches were made as to which town had the best Bellman. Apparently he was also very athletic and backed himself to leap any tollgate in the neighbourhood, a feat which he accomplished on many occasions. Even this man's health eventually gave out and in 1882 he was succeeded firstly by his son-in-law James Flinn and then in 1886 by his grandson Anthony Flinn. The Bellman's role in Ripon as Town Crier appears to have lapsed in Edwardian times which is regrettable for Town Criers are essentially part of our heritage much appreciated by townsfolk and visitors alike. Each July at the beautiful Ripon racecourse the Bellringer Stakes is run (this year on the21st July) which requires the Bellman in full civic uniform to walk out onto the course and sound his bell in front of the main Grandstand at the start of the race. Conveniently and presumably for the safety of the Bellman the race is over one and a quarter miles which allows ample time for him to vacate the racetrack in a sedate and dignified manner! Brian Rushworth, City of Ripon Bellman

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THE EXETER EXPERIENCE

2012 On a bright November day Exeter welcomed a number of mace-bearers from the South West region to a meeting at the historic Guildhall. Ernie Davies, the South West Region Representative at the time had organised the day following requests from members who were unable to travel to the annual Guild of Mace-Bearers AGM but still wished to get together with like-minded people.

A full program had been organised covering various aspects of macebearing. Members were given plenty of opportunities to ask questions and join in discussions. After a buffet lunch, Ernie had arranged for one of the City Red Coat Guides to give a tour of Exeter including an illuminating tour of the Cathedral. A big thank you to Ernie for organising the event and may I take this opportunity to wish him well now he has moved from Exeter back to his Yorkshire roots. Perhaps some of the other regions could hold similar events for their members. Alan Spencer, Editor

ROYAL WOOTTON BASSETT In the previous magazine we included the article ‘The Office of Town Crier – Royal Wootton Bassett’ written by the guild of Mace-Bearers bursar Owen Collier. Since that article was submitted, Her Majesty the Queen conferred the title ‘Royal’ on the town as ‘an enduring symbol of the nations’ admiration and gratitude following Wootton Bassett’s part in the repatriation of service personnel.

On Sunday 16 October 2011, Her Royal Highness, The Princess Royal presented the Letters Patent on behalf of Her Majesty The Queen, the first time a town had been granted the ‘Royal’ title since 1909. Alan Spencer, Editor Picture Supplied by Owen Collier, Bursar 30

THE CEREMONY OF THE WHITE GLOVES On the last day of term before Christmas the Mayor of Hertford and Town Councillors attend Richard Hale School’s prize-giving, for a ceremony that has been enacted annually for more than 350 years. This unique ceremony began in 1657, initiated by the will of Ralph Minors (c1600-57), one of many Headteachers to have guided the fortunes of Richard Hale’s School in Hertford. In his will, Ralph Minors left to “the parish of All Saints Hertford ten pounds.to the Mayor, Justice and Minister…they to secure the stock and disperse the income in White Gloves for themselves if they three trustees be present at the scholars’ breaking-up in December.” In his 30 years as Master, Minors had made Richard Hale’s one of the foremost Grammar Schools in the country. He held it together during the Civil War, educating the sons of eminent Royalists and Parliamentarians alike, but he feared for the School’s future and determined to secure that future as best he could. Minors foresaw that the interest in the welfare of the School by members of the Hale family who, by foundation deed and governance were its hereditary patrons, must inevitably decline. He reasoned that the hitherto passive interest taken in the School by its ten Patron-appointed Governors, most if not all of whom were eminent Hertford townsmen, must be activated. What better way than by inviting their two senior members and the Vicar of the School’s Church to formally visit and join the School’s celebrations at the end of Christmas term, the scholars’ feast, speeches, songs, orations and, “if they be present”, give them each a pair of White Gloves?

An excellent public relations exercise, the tactic went a long way to ensure the Borough’s involvement in the school. Today things are a little different; it is only the Mayor who receives a pair of White Gloves and the Senior Scholar’s Latin oration recounts murky doings in the years between. (Put succinctly, the original, sizeable capital investment of £10, from the interest on which the White Gloves ought to be purchased, went missing from - or into - the Borough accounts and has not been seen since!) Thus it is that nowadays, whilst the Justice and the Minister no longer attend, when the Mayor of Hertford visits at the end of Christmas term, he or she is reminded by the senior scholar that: “in his Will proved in 1657 Ralph Minors, the third Headmaster of this School, left the Chief Burgesses of the town of Hertford a sum of money, out of the interest of which they were to buy a pair of White Gloves for the Mayor whenever he visited us before the Christmas holidays, and he further directed that if any interest was left over, it was to be given to the well-deserving scholars. However, in the reign of George 11 the money disappeared. Nevertheless, we offer you, most worthy Mayor (dignissime Maior), this sign of our goodwill and good behaviour, and we have no doubt that you will see to it that the money is found and the interest paid to us”. To which matter the Mayor annually promises, in Latin and later in English, to give full attention. In the meantime the School pays for the new White Gloves!

Frank Ferguson, Hertford (With acknowledged thanks to the staff of Richard Hale School, Hertford.)

A MAYOR’S BEST FRIEND A mayor struck by lightning while on his way to feed his animals has hailed his pet dog after it led him back to his house to raise the alarm and get medical treatment. Ian Thomas, Mayor of Redruth in Cornwall, was struck by lightning while holding a metal bowl, throwing him into the air and leaving him stunned and dazed on the floor. He grabbed hold of his eight-stone black schnauzer, Monty, who led him back to his house where Mr Thomas alerted his wife, Sharen. Southern Daily Echo, October 2011

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COAT OF ARMS EAST DUNBARTONSHIRE

East Dunbartonshire Council came into being with the reorganisation of Scottish Local Government in 1996. East Dunbartonshire Council is really something of a hotchpotch, taking in parts of the former Srathkelvin area and all of the Bearsden and Milngavie area. In addition, regional services, previously supplied by Strathclyde Regional Council were also incorporated into the remit of the new authority. The coat of arms reflects the diversity of East Dunbartonshire and is one of the most elaborate in the country. Starting at the top the bear, which has been taken directly from the coat of arms of the former Bearsden Borough Council can be clearly seen and this is representative, obviously, of the Bearsden area. The Bear is muzzled whi ch is always the way a bear is shown in heraldry. Underneath the bear comes the coronet which is common to the coats of arms of all Scottish local authorities and represents the rural and urban nature of the country. Going into the shield at the top there is a red rose. This is traditionally the symbol of the House of Lennox which owned extensive lands in the Milngavie area. The red rose is particularly associated with Milngavie and feature prominently on the coat of arms of the former Burgh of Milngavie. Indeed the chain of office worn by the Provosts of Milngavie was made up of a collection of gold roses. Beneath the red rose of Lenox is a stylised version of the Campsie Fells. Within the Fells in gold and green are riggs’ representing the riggs of Bishopsbriggs. Bishopbriggs is in fact two words which can be translated in to “the Bishop’s riggs” or, in modern English, “the Bishop’s fields” which is a reference to the fact that, in medieval times the fields in what is now Bishopbriggs belonged to the Lord Archbishop of Glasgow. Beneath the campsite Fells and riggs is a mill which can either represent Milngavie or Milton of Campsie. The actual mill itself is a direct copy of that shown on the badge of Milton of Campsie Bowling Club. In addition to the shield and coronet, and fairly unusual for a Scottish local authority, the coat of arms also has two ‘supporters’. On one side we see a Roman soldier who represents the fact that East Dunbartonshire has a rich history dating from the Roman period and has many valuable and worth seeing Roman remains. The keen eye will detect within the Roman soldier’s shield three stars. These three stars have been taken directly from the coat of arms of the former Burgh of Kirkintilloch and represent the Holy Trinity.

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There was some reluctance on the part of Lord Lyon to agree to the incorporation of the three stars since these are, clearly, a Christian symbol when the Roman occupation of this part of Britain, clearly predated the Christian era. However, to allow the incorporation of a symbol symbolic of Kirkintilloch, he eventually agreed. On the other side, the miner is a reminder of the proud heavy industrial traditions of part of East Dunbartonshire and particularly the coal mines which were a staple supplier of employment for almost two centuries. The motto is “AIR ADHART COMHLA” and this language was deliberately chosen because East Dunbartonshire is the only authority in Central Scotland that has a Gaelic speaking school – Meadowburn Primary School in Bishopbriggs. In English the phrase means “Going Forward Together”. The Coat of Arms was approved after lengthy discussions in 1996 and quickly became a very popular symbol of the new authority. In Scot’s law, although the arms are unique to East Dunbartonshire, the ownership remains with her Majesty the Queen. The grant of arms having been made by her Lord Lyon, King of Arms, who is head of the Scottish Heraldic Genealogical Executive. The Lord Lyon, King of Arms is appointed by the Sovereign and receives a commission issued under the Great Seal of Scotland. Jurisdiction of the lord Lyon is both ministerial and judicial. The principal administrative function of the Lord Lyon is in relation to the granting of armorial bearings by letters patent. The style th “Lord Lyon” goes back to the early 16 Century although his prefix “Lord” can be found as late as the Debtors (Scotland) Act of 1987! Willy Paterson, East Dunbartonshire

LONDON BOROUGH OF HAMMERSMITH & FULHAM

The coat of arms was granted on 1 March 1965, incorporating devices from the coats of arms of the former Metropolitan Boroughs of Fulham and Hammersmith. The main motif of two gold hammers inter-laced with a gold horseshoe is an indication of the borough’s name. The blue and white wavy bars on the shield represent the River Thames. Above are the crossed swords and gold mitre of the Bishops of London, lords of the manor of Fulham for almost eleven centuries. The turreted crest on the helmet represents civic authority. Above this is a black ship denoting the presence of the Danes in Fulham in 879AD. Two griffins, mythical creatures of strength and vigilance, symbolise the merging of the boroughs. They sprout rays of progress and enlightenment. Round their necks hang the symbols of two men important to the development of Hammersmith; the scallop shell of George Pring, a supporter of the first Hammersmith Bridge, and the crosslet of Edward Latymer, who left property for the welfare and education of the poor. The motto Spectemur Agendo was adopted in 1969 from the original motto of the Metropolitan Borough of Hammersmith. It can be translated as 'Let us be judged by our actions'.

Keith Simpson, Hammersmith & Fulham 33

BREAKING THE CEREMONIAL MOULD In 2002 the University of Southampton celebrated its Golden Jubilee and I decided to undertake some research on the history of the signing of the Royal Charter in 1952, the year the new Queen was crowned. I discovered many interesting facts but I also came across some old regulations regarding the role of the Esquire Bedell who carries the Foundation Mace during the graduation ceremonies at the University. The magazine I found stated that “The Esquire Bedell should be a man with a great love of ceremonial born in him and young enough to be able to hold office for 25 years. It is a graduate’s post, as he is not a menial but an important ceremonial and honorary officer attached to the Chancellor”. Additionally the Esquire Bedell should “….be about 6ft”. For several years I undertook the role of the Academic Marshall at graduation, whose role it was to organise academic colleagues into the graduation procession. Carrying the Jubilee Mace, the Academic Marshall leads the procession into the hall and ensures the academics are seated correctly. Next in the

procession comes the University Marshall who in turn organises the Senior Officers of the University, the Deans and Pro Vice-Chancellors and any dignitaries such as the Mayor or Mayoress. Finally the Esquire Bedell leads the Presiding Officer, either the ViceChancellor or the Chancellor, into the hall. I had not thought it possible to even consider myself for the role of Esquire Bedell but on showing a colleague the magazine article we began to speculate about a woman holding the position. Of course I wasn’t 6ft, nor had I completed my Master’s degree at the time but I did have a great love of ceremony and understood that graduation was both a joyful occasion and also one full of history and tradition. My nomination was approved by Senate in 2004 and I had the honour of becoming the University’s first woman Esquire Bedell. We spent some time researching what the feminine of “Esquire Bedell” might be – but no-one has been able to suggest an appropriate equivalent. I dismissed “Spinster Bedell” quite quickly.

Installation of the first female Chancellor of Southampton University. From left to right: Town Sergeant/Mace-bearer Paul Potterton, Mayor of Southampton Cllr. Terry Matthews, Dame Helen Alexander DBE, Professor Don Nutbeam and Jo Nesbitt. Picture courtesy of Tempest Photography

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The appointment received a small amount of press coverage; the Hampshire Chronicle was particularly interested in the official robes and hat, detailing how they were made and of what materials. The story reached the ears of Dr D B McNeill, the very first Esquire Bedell of the University of Southampton appointed in 1952 who had retired to Ireland. Dr McNeill and I exchanged several letters, his gave wonderful details of the original graduation ceremonies held in Southampton’s Civic Centre, including Mayors quibbling over who took precedence in the procession, maces falling off stands and rolling across the platform and much quaffing of sherry in the Mayor’s parlour prior to ceremonies. Dr McNeill was the Esquire Bedell present at the Installation of the first Chancellor of the University, the Duke of Wellington. I was privileged to be the first female Esquire Bedell to attend an Installation of a

Chancellor, Sir John Parker. Recently there was another first for the University, the Installation of the first female Chancellor, Dame Helen Alexander DBE and I was honoured to be the Esquire Bedell attending her at the ceremony. Besides sharing in the delight of all the families at graduation, my favourite part of the ceremony is the hooding of the PhD graduates, as Esquire Bedell I prepare the hood for the Presiding Officer to place it on the graduate. I now have it down to a fine art and take great pride in ensuring the hood is ready and sits well. The number of students graduating at Southampton has grown, so that our graduation ceremonies now take place over 6 days – too much for one officer, so we are now 3 Esquire Bedells – all dedicated to ensuring the ceremonies run well and that our graduates know that their achievement is celebrated but also given the gravitas it deserves. Jo Nesbitt – Esquire Bedell University of Southampton

THE GUILD ON-LINE The Guild website www.macebearer.com continues to be the place to keep in touch with what the Guild is up to and to get advice and information about all civic protocol matters. Non members can access information about the Guild, why membership is useful and how to join, along with a gallery of uniforms from across the country and have a go at our two quizzes. Members can also register for access to the pages containing contact details for other mace bearers, the on-line Manual of the Mace – the how-to guide to civic work, details of training and other Guild events, our on-line shop, minutes of Guild meetings, back issues of the Guild magazine and much more. Whether it’s the correct line up for a procession, or how to organise a completely new event for your Mayor the members’ message-board is the place to get a quick answer to that problem you are struggling with! Don’t forget that registered members can now sign up for email notifications of new messages by emailing [email protected] and if you have an interesting photo or story about your job why not share it with us on the message board or by sending it to the webmaster. Peter Legg, Webmaster

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THE ROYAL HOSPITAL CHELSEA Unlike Regiments in the British Army, The Royal Hospital has no Colour, Standard or Guidon to parade on formal occasions. For that reason, and also to honour Her Majesty’s upcoming Golden Jubilee in 2002, the then Governor General Sir Jeremy Mackenzie GCB, OBE, DL, decided that clearly some kind of ceremonial device was needed for the Royal Hospital and it was at this moment that he considered that a ceremonial Mace, similar to those carried by Sergeants at Arms in The House of Commons and for Lord Mayors around the country, would be eminently suitable. Such a ceremonial device should also be gilded and in keeping with long established military tradition in Britain, as with Regimental Colours should ideally be presented to the Hospital by the Sovereign herself. Later in the year we were delighted to learn that Her Majesty had graciously agreed to present the Mace to The Royal Hospital and also that Mr Ronald Gerard OBE kindly wished to fund the construction of the Mace.

HISTORY The actual ceremony for the handover was choreographed by the indomitable Garrison Sergeant Major for London District, WO1 (GSM) Alan G 'Perry' Mason MVO MBE, Coldstream Guards, (coincidentally this was also to be his final parade in that post) to take place during the Golden Jubilee review of the Royal Companies of Bodyguards that was held in the grounds of Buckingham Palace on 5th July 2002. On that day drawn up on the lawn from right to left in order to be reviewed by Her Majesty were      

Her Majesty’s Body Guard of The Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms The Military Knights of Windsor The Body of Yeomen Warders of Her Majesty’s Tower of London The In Pensioners of the Royal Hospital Chelsea The Queens Body Guard for Scotland, the Royal Company of Archers The Queen’s Body Guard of the Yeomen of the Guard

An august gathering of living military history if ever there was one! At the completion of the review, Her Majesty then presented the Sovereigns Mace to its first bearer, In Pensioner Des Loat (Late Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers).

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Since 2002 there have only been 3 holders of the appointment “Sovereign’s Mace Bearer”, following Des Loat in 2003 was George Kelsall (Late Blues and Royals (Royal Horse Guards)) and since 2008 Cas Butler, Late Welsh Guards (Pictured). All selected for their bearing, enthusiasm and in no short measure, their physical ability (at no tender age) to carry the 24 pound mace during often protracted parades such as on Founders Day, the annual parade, to commemorate the Hospital’s Founder King Charles II. The Mace bearer is however but one element of the Mace Party which also comprises 4 In Pensioners escorts armed with halbards and a Hospital Warrant Officer as the commander. The halberds represent the half-pike/spontoon issued to 17th&18th century serjeants for maintaining the straight lines that the British infantry were famous for fighting in and who traditionally provide the escort to the Regimental colours. The Warrant Officer rather than an Officer in command is due to the nature of the Royal Hospital establishment which is somewhat lean in staff and so the officers carry out the parade duties of company commanders with their In Pensioners, leaving the Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant (RQMS) to look after the Mace which is the role of an RQMS in Cavalry Regiments anyway. The Mace is paraded at various times throughout the year as required but notably for Founders and Remembrance Day, Friends and Corporate events in the Royal Hospital and more recently during the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Armed Forces Muster at Windsor Castle and when exercising its rights under the Freedom of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea conferred on the Hospital in 2006 by parading through the streets of the Borough. When not on parade the Mace normally resides in the Royal Hospital museum where it can be viewed, resting upon the woolsack, itself on a purpose built table as described below and alongside the Freedom Scroll from the Royal Borough. John Rochester, RQMS (C), Compliance Manager & Curator, Royal Hospital, Chelsea

T-SHIRTS

Black T-Shirts with Gold Lettering. Available in sizes Small to XXL. £15.00 each. Please contact the editor ([email protected]) if you would like one of these.

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THERE SHALL BE A SCOTTISH PARLIAMENT “THERE SHALL BE A SCOTTISH PARLIAMENT”. Those are the words engraved into the head of the Scottish Parliament’s mace, quoted from the Scotland Act of 1998, an Act of the UK Parliament which led to the creation of a Scottish Parliament. The values of 'Wisdom, Justice, Compassion and Integrity' are engraved on the inlaid gold banding at the head of the mace - these are a reference to the ideals that the people of Scotland aspire to for their Members of Parliament; and the mace was designed to symbolise the relationship between Parliament, its people and the land. The mace and the values of the Scottish Parliament are intrinsically linked together. The mace was gifted to the Scottish Parliament by Her Majesty The Queen at the Royal opening of the new Scottish Parliament on 1 July 1999. Addressing the 129 newly elected Members of the Scottish Parliament, of which I was one, The Queen described the mace as “a modern embodiment of an ancient symbol of power, legitimacy and the relationship between Parliament and Crown”. That ceremony took place in the Parliament’s interim accommodation in the home of the Assembly Hall on the Mound, the annual meeting place for the Church of Scotland’s General Assembly. Since the completion of the Scottish Parliament building at Holyrood, the mace has taken its place in our Debating Chamber, in front of the Presiding Officer’s dais; an appropriate place given it’s designer’s remit that the mace would represent the authority of the Presiding Officer. The mace was designed and crafted by renowned Silversmith, Michael Lloyd, from Galloway in the south-west of Scotland. The gold and silver from which it was crafted was donated by the gold panners of Scottish rivers. The mace is always present when Parliament is in session. At other times, it remains in the Debating Chamber, in a secure glass cabinet on view for the passing tour groups. The mace takes on a ceremonial role during Royal occasions at the Parliament. Following the opening ceremonies of 1999, The Queen has returned to the Scottish Parliament a number of times and the mace always plays an important role in these proceedings. The Parliament’s own mace bearer, Phil Horwood, also a Security Operations Manager, carries the mace at the head of a procession into the Debating Chamber, which includes The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh, the Crown of Scotland and the Presiding Officers. Thirteen years have now passed since the Scottish Parliament came into being. One thing is for sure: we politicians will come and go, but the mace will continue to be a constant presence, representing the authority vested in the Parliament for many years to come. Tricia Marwick MSP, Presiding Officer, The Scottish Parliament

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AN OLYMPIC YEAR 2012, as well as being the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, is also a year for a small sporting event taking place in London! Prior to the main event, the Olympic Torch made its way round the country visiting many of the areas covered by Guild Mace-Bearers.

As this magazine goes to press Team GB have already gained 16 Gold, 10 Silver and 10 Bronze medals. We wish the team the best of luck with the remainder of the Games and hope they add more medals to their tally. Go Team GB!! 39

PRESTON GUILD Preston Guild is unique in the U.K. It is celebrated only once every 20 years and has a history stretching back 800 years. Originally it was held to keep the Guild roll (the list of people allowed to trade in the town) up to date but by the 18th Century it had become a huge celebration of civic pride.

History of the Guild – Key Dates 1179 Henry II granted a charter which empowered the Burgesses of Preston to hold a Guild Merchant. Burgesses had exclusive rights of trading in the town, together with the responsibility of town administration 1328 First Guild of which there is any reliable record but likely to have been some before Guilds were held on an irregular basis until 1542 when the 20 years interval was agreed. Why – Once in a generation and expensive if more held more frequently 1562 Rule established that the Guild Merchant should start on the Monday following the Feast of the Decollation of St. John the Baptist (29th August) 1942 Sequence broken by the Second World War and postponed until 1952 2012

30th of the known Guilds to be held.

What is a Burgess? There are 2 categories of Guild Burgess:

Rights and Privileges of Burgesses:





The ‘in-burgesses’, technically known as the ‘inhabitants’ were originally at the very beginning of the Guild’s life those who lived within Preston. The ‘out-burgesses’ or ‘foreigners’ were those who lived beyond the borough boundaries, as far away as Ashton, Fishwick and Ribbleton?

Burgess status is hereditary, formerly only from father to son:  

Daughters of living burgesses were admitted in 1992 2012 all offspring of burgesses on the 92 roll will be eligible

Prominent Guild Burgesses such as Lord Derby and Lord Clitheroe play particular roles at the Guild court. The Guild Mayor of the previous Guild or his closest relative is a Prominent Guild Burgess.

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None today but most Burgess families want to renew and add names to the Guild Roll from attachment to the custom and to renew a traditional connection with the City

Honorary Burgesses – the custom for Guild Mayor to exercise his privilege of office in admitting new inburgesses. Traditionally these have been people who have been of service to the Guild and the City Council such as the Guild Stewards, former Mayors, Honorary Recorder, Alderman, Freemen, Town Clerk/Chief Executive, prominent people (Tom Finney and Florence Cook in 1992). Up to 3 nominations can be made by the Guild Mayor. Also the Guild Clerk admits the Guild Mayor.

Further Information about Key Events

Mayoral Reception for Overseas Visitors

On each of the three Saturdays before the celebrations of Guild week and in accordance with the ancient custom, a proclamation will be made announcing that a Guild is to be held and summoning those people who wish to attend. The regalia party will lead the Guild Mayor and the civic party onto the steps of the Harris Museum and gallery. After a fanfare of trumpets there will be a call for silence with ‘Oyez, Oyez, Oyez’ so that the Clerk of the Guild can read the proclamation. The Guild Mayor then addresses the crowd bringing the focus back to the Guild of 2012.

Many ex-Prestonians and people whose ancestors called Preston home return to Preston during the Guild week. A large number of visitors are from overseas and since the 1952 Guild the Mayor has held a reception to welcome them and their hosts. In 1992 around 1,700 people enjoyed refreshments, entertainment, speeches and nostalgia at this event in the Guild Hall. A similar event is planned for 2012.

The Guild Mayors’ Civic Procession and Divine Service at the Minster The Guild Mayor, his regalia party, guild officials, councillors will lead representatives of all groups of the City from the Guild Hall to the Minster. Following the service the procession will return to the Guild Hall for a Mayoral reception, another tradition of all recorded Guilds.

The Guild Court This traditional ceremony is at the heart of the Preston Guild. The order of proceedings is carefully followed Guild after Guild forming an unbroken link with medieval Preston. The day will start when the Guild Mayor is welcomed to the Town Hall by distinguished guests. At 10am a civic procession will walk from the Town Hall to the Guild Hall, taking the long way round so that the assembled crowds can line the route and witness the start of this historic event. Meanwhile the burgesses and their guests will be taking their seats in the Guild Hall awaiting the arrival of the civic party. During the ceremony, amid much pomp and ceremony, the Clerk of the Guild will recite the charters associated with the ancient Guild and the names of the Guild role will be called out so that the Burgesses can renew their franchise and new hereditary burgesses can be admitted. Two students will deliver Latin orations and the Guild Recorder will reply in Latin. The Guild Mayor will then deliver a short speech. After a short break for refreshments a religious service will be held.

Formal Adjournment of the Guild Court In comparison with the Guild Court, this is a shorter, but no less magnificent civic ceremony with no procession before it. It is at this court that new burgesses are admitted at the gift of the Guild Mayor. These are traditionally people who have been of service to the Guild and to Preston. In 2012 this tradition will be widened to allow more people, nominated by the community, to become Burgesses. After the new Burgesses are admitted the court is adjourned for another 20 years.

Guild Mayors’ Civic Procession to Service of Thanksgiving at the Minster Following a similar pattern as on the first Sunday of Guild week, Preston will witness a last procession of the Guild as the civic party make their way once more from the Guild Hall to the Minster. The service this time is one of thanksgiving for the week past and looking ahead to the continuing prosperity of the City in the next 20 years.

Farwell Ceremony Since the Guild of 1922 it has been traditional for the Guild Mayor to address the crowds. As this event joins with the Firework display, spirits are high as the crowd reflects on an amazing week of magnificent ceremony and exciting celebrations.

Processions – A Traditional Part of the Guild    

Trades Procession – will reach the city as the 3rd Proclamation comes to a close Churches procession Community procession Torchlight Procession

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Scrolls of Friendship – Key Facts 

 



In 1952 it was decided to establish a link with exPrestonians overseas by sending scrolls of friendship around the world for signature Scrolls contained 2 emblems made in the form of the Old Town Hall Clock Tower Circulated throughout Australia, New Zealand, United States of America, Canada, South Africa and Preston’s’ Twin Towns In 2012 there will be 3 scrolls doing physical journeys to key cities in the traditional countries and in addition they will go to India, Pakistan and China.



A ‘virtual scroll’ will bring the tradition up to date. People will be able to send messages of goodwill through text, pictures, audio and video. Both physical and virtual scrolls will set off in September

The Guild Wheel – a physical legacy from Guild 2012-07-04   

A 21 mile route around Preston for cycling, running and walking Aim is to encourage activity and access to the countryside Fully accessible with ‘spokes’ going out from the City centre Craig Banner, Mayoral Attendant, Preston

A ROYAL VISIT As part of her Jubilee Year, Her Majesty the Queen undertook a tour of Great Britain. The last day of this tour ended in the South at the New Forest and Hampshire County Show. However, the Queen started the day with a visit to the Isle of Wight Guild Member Steve Hammond sent us this picture of him on the day. Note the size of the crowd waiting to cheer the Queen. By the look of it, the weather was certainly a lot better than that experienced during the Jubilee Pageant on the Thames.

A LITTLE LIGHT READING

Browsing on-line, the editor came across this book – ‘The Diary of John Jackson. Sometime Macebearer in Seventeenth Century Beverley’ I have not had the chance to read this yet but plan to do so soon. Maybe a book review could be a new section in the magazine for 2013?

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CONFERENCE

2013 For members who are attending the conference in Royal Wootton Bassett in 2013 (or those of you undecided) here is an idea of what will be happening. Royal Wootton Bassett 6th – 8th February 2013 Wednesday 06-February Arrival followed by an evening get together at the Memorial Hall. A buffet will be supplied and members will get a chance to see the museum at the old Town Hall. Thursday 07 February Installation ceremony of the new Prime Warden at the Memorial hall. Followed by training throughout the day Ian Denyer, The Work of the Crown Office Gregory Furr, Constable of the Town and Manor of Hungerford, accompanied by Mr Julian Tubb, Bellman. Godfrey Room, “To write and speak with Power’ Guild Dinner at the Wiltshire Hotel Golf Country Club Cream of Vegetable Soup Roast Beef & Trimmings Vanilla Cheesecake with Fruits of the Forest (Vegetarian option will be available) Friday 08 February AGM in the morning at the Wiltshire Hotel Golf Country Club Depart early afternoon

More details to follow from the Guild Clerk.

We look forward to meeting members old and new

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GUILD AREAS Those of you new to the Guild (or even some of our ‘older’ members) may wonder which representative covers which areas. Our Guild Clerk kindly put together a map which is reproduced here.

SCOTLAND

NORTH & NORTH WALES

SOUTH EAST

SOUTH & SOUTH WALES

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RECIPE CORNER As well as the ceremonial mace that you are all familiar with (certainly if you have read this entire magazine) there is also a spice called mace. This is the outer shell of the nutmeg which is dried and then either sold in whole pieces, called blades, or ground. If you have never used mace in cooking here is a recipe for you to try just in time for Christmas!

MINCE PIES INGREDIENTS 100g/3½oz raisins

2 tsp ground cinnamon

100g/3½oz sultanas

50g/2oz vegetable suet (optional)

100g/3½oz currants 50g/2oz cherries

½ Bramley cooking apple (unpeeled, cored and chopped)

1 tsp ground ginger

1 lemon (unpeeled, cut into small pieces)

1 tsp ground nutmeg

1 orange unpeeled, cut into small pieces)

½ tsp ground mace

120ml/4fl oz brandy or whisky

FOR THE PASTRY 375g/13oz gluten-free and wheat-free flour with xanthan gum 150g/5oz butter 1 egg (optional) PREPARATION  Mix all the dried fruits with the spices (and suet)  Puree the apple, orange and lemon pieces and add to the dried fruit.  Add the brandy (or whisky)  Mix well, cover and set aside for anywhere between two hours and 24 hours. MAKE THE PASTRY  Sieve four into a bowl  Cut in the butter and blend until it forms crumbs  Add 8 tablespoons of cold water  Mix to a dough and blend until it forms a ball (you can add more water if necessary)  Chill for 30 minutes.  Pre-heat the oven to 180C/350F/Gas 4.  Grease and flour some mince pie tins. ASSEMBLE THE PIES  Remove the pastry from the fridge, and roll out to a thickness of about 5mm.  Cut the pastry in circles slightly larger than the size of each pie, and line the tins with it, pushing the pastry up the edges.  Spoon some of the fruit mixture into each pie.  Roll out remaining pastry and cut out lids for each pie.  Wet the top of the pies and press on the lids  If required brush the lid of each pie with a little beaten egg. BAKE   

Bake for around 20 minutes until the pies are lightly browned and the pastry cooked. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with sugar (optional). Cool before lifting each pie out of the tins. Cool on a rack.

ENJOY  Serve warm or cold.

The Editor is more than willing to act as a taster!

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PUZZLE PAGE 1 Many Mace-Bearers also carry out Mayoral Chauffeuring duties. To help you pass the time whilst waiting for your respective Mayors, we have supplied a few puzzles for you. Prize Crossword Send your completed crossword to the editor for the chance to win a £10 gift voucher. At the Guild Meeting in Royal Wootton Basset in 2013, one entry will be selected at random from all correct entries received before 31-Dec-2012. 1

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Across 1 Slang for Medal (4) 6 Semper Fidelis (4-8) 8 Someone in high position (9) 11 Official Vestments (5) 14 Association (5-2-11) 17 Lock-up (4) 18 Combines (6) 19 First Citizen (5) 22 The Bursar (4) 24 Connected in series (5) 25 An urban community (4) 26 First in order (5) 27 Queen (5) 28 Someone who guards (6)

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Down 1 Precious metal (4) 2 Loose flowing over garment (4) 3 What a town crier should be (5) 4 Ornamental war club (4) 5 Pieces of bunting (5) 7 Botch or bungle (4) 9 Badge of Office (8) 10 Chest Armour (5) 12 Veneration (6) 13 N.C.O. (8) 15 Formal ritual (10) 16 Shire Reeve (7) 19 Bishop’s hat (5) 20 One serving the Royal household (6) 21 Frill of Lace (5) 23 Long Blade (5)

Strud-oko Puzzle You may be familiar with Sudoko puzzles. Well Hon. Freeman Richard Strudwick has provided us with his unique version.

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ADMINISTRATION ALDERMAN AUTHORITY BEADLE BICORN BOROUGH CHAIN CHAIRMAN CHARTER CHAUFFEUR CITY CIVIC COCKEDHAT CORPORATION

COUNCIL COUNCILLOR COUNTY DIGNITARY ELECTION GOWN GUILD INSIGNIA JABOT LIMOUSINE LORDLEIUTENANT MACE MACEBEARER MAYORALTY

MAYORESS MUNICIPAL PRIMEWARDEN PROTOCOL PROVOST ROBES SERGEANTATARMS SHERIFF SHIRE TOWN TOWNCRIER TRICORN UNIFORM

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MERCHANDISE The following items are available to purchase. Leather Organiser for The Manual of the Mace

Lapel Badge – Enamel or Gold Finish (Size approx. 20mm)

Guild Badge with Collarette (Badge size approx. 65mm)

Guild Greetings Card Various types Mace Brooch – Silver or Gold Colour Finish (Size approx. 50mm)

(See order form for details)

Guild Plaque

Blazer Badge

See Order form for prices and postage costs

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Guild Tie with crossed maces and 'GM' Blue, Black or Maroon

The Guild of Mace-Bearers Member’s Merchandise Order Form

Description Plaque Mace Brooch

Blazer Badge Lapel Badge Tie Guild Card Leather Organiser Badge with collaret

Price Shield with emblem & scroll Gold finish (brooch fastening) Silver finish (brooch fastening) Gold finish (butterfly fastening) Silver finish (butterfly fastening) Guild emblem to be sewn on to blazer Emblem with gold finish (brooch fastening) Enamel emblem (butterfly fastening) Blue with crossed maces and “GM” Black with crossed maces and “GM” Maroon with crossed maces and “GM” Guild emblem 5.75 x 4 inches Guild emblem 5.75 x 4 inches bearing message ‘Seasons Greetings’ Designed to hold “The Manual of the Mace” Emblem 63mm x 45mm gold plated white and blue enamel with upper loop and jump ring and blue collerette

£20.00 £8.50 £8.50 £8.50 £8.50 £7.00 £4.50 £5.00 £9.50 £9.50 £9.50 .50 .50

Postage & Packing £3.00 £1.50 £1.50 £1.50 £1.50 £1.50 £1.50 £1.50 £2.00 £2.00 £2.00 60p 60p

£14.00

£2.50

£30.00

£2.50

Number required

Total

Cheques should be made payable to “Guild of Mace-Bearers” Total Amount Due

£

All orders & enquiries to Owen Collier, Guild Bursar, 54 Briars Close, Green Park, Royal Wootton Basset, Wiltshire, SN4 7HX Tel. 01793 855737 Email: [email protected]

Postage & packing rates are quoted for individual items. For multiple orders please contact the Guild Bursar for further information.

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ANSWERS Strud-oko Puzzle K

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B E A D L E G D W U D Y O R V O G R E D K U L O I

B H A B A E L T Q T T R R X E M N C A S W O B H E

F D A K Y O Q E U L A C P C Y R I M I W R K B P K

S E R G E A N T A T A R M S H V A F A D E C S A R

Wordsearch C P S Q C O U N T Y A S M I E N W O G R F Z C D L

W N M K Q E B I X B J R T S P J C T R Z N J Z F V

J K N P L R O B E S R U S Z N O P R E T R A H C H

M A Y O R E S S L Z X S O B R E H A I N G I S N I

P E Q J W F S R Y R E K V P S K D F E W U T H O N

Q N J J M W W R I E U A L A I A F E L C H M L Q B

R Q P J U L O O C L U U X C V I I I B J E D I T K

Z A C D D Y N P H Q M A O C R K E R Z E E G O R E

Z U H T A F G J A I Z U B E X U I V M R C W J V P

L T A M P F U M I Q N E H M T U T B M A N A J D D

I H U K W E N G N C D S V E N C O A P S N K M A L

C O F M U N I C I P A L N A J R N C H Z T Z K O I

N R F P R I B L I P P A C Y O T M B W D X B D A U

U I E S X Q L E O K N O Q U M Z U N I S E U A I G

O T U H L O R S O T Z J G E D I X S G C W K T L W

C Y R I R S C I T Y D H C I P R O T O C O L C N S

B B R R V R J A D M I N I S T R A T I O N R R O T

T C K E L R M V V R F E L E C T I O N U J L N Q C

F X O Z A Q N R O C I R T I Q I L I M O U S I N E

M R O F I N U F F A S Q T E N Q X S K J A B O T H

G C O F Q R E I R C N W O T N F D I G N I T A R Y

A PLEA FROM THE EDITOR I hope you have enjoyed this edition of the magazine. I would like to thank all the contributors for taking the time to send me pictures and articles. By the time you read this I will have started to compile the magazine for 2013. Please send me in your pictures, articles, observations etc. If you make the mince pies, how about sending us a picture? If you come across something interesting then it is likely that Guild Members will also find it interesting. Send details to [email protected] or to your Guild Rep. Remember, you do not have to be a Guild Member to submit articles. There must be lots happening out there – let us know about it. Ed.

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PATRONS AND PAST PRIME WARDENS JOINT PATRONS The Right Honourable The Lord Mayor of London The Speaker of the House of Commons The Presiding Officer of the Scottish Parliament The Presiding Officer of the National Assembly of Wales PAST PRIME WARDENS 1947-1952

Cmdr John Poland RN (Rtd.)

City of London

1983 - 1984

R. Scott

Hamilton

1953 - 1954

Cpt. W.F. Floyd

Northampton

1984 - 1985

D. Trafford

Banbury

1954 - 1955

H. Gregory

City of Chester

1985 - 1986

R.T. Strudwick

City of Leeds

1955 - 1956

R.H. Strong

Middlesbrough

1986 - 1987

J. Malone

Falkirk

1956 - 1957

A. Johnson

Paisley

1987 - 1988

G.D. White

Barnstaple

1957 - 1958

R.C.F. Leppard

Dover

1988 - 1989

A. Milner

Pendle

1958 - 1959

A. Broadhurst

Nuneaton

1989 - 1990

D. Megany

City of Belfast

1959 - 1960

W.R.H. Thompson

City of Edinburgh

1990 - 1991

T.T.F. Harding

Peterborough

1960 - 1961

J.W. Foreman

Norwich

1991 - 1992

G. Robbins

Burnley

1961 - 1962

W. Wood

Goole

1992 - 1993

G. Milligan

Roxburgh

1962 - 1963

J. Currie

Ayr

1993 - 1994

I.E. Warner

Stevenage

1963 - 1964

W.G. Webber

Gravesend

1994 - 1995

K.M. Carson

Charnwood

1964 - 1965

H. Giliver

Bolton

1995 - 1996

D. Morrison

Western Isles

1965 - 1966

J.P. Slater

Dumfries

1996 - 1997

A.M. Hughes

Northampton

1966 - 1967

R. Pote

Bedford

1997 - 1998

P. Nendick

City of Kingston

1967 - 1968

T. Lewis

Bury

1998 - 1999

T. Cobban

City of Aberdeen

1968 - 1969

J.R. Moffat

Falkirk

1999 - 2000

G. Weatherhead

City of Wells

1969 - 1970

G.T. Eadie

City of Bath

2000 - 2001

L. Love

South Ayrshire

1970 - 1971

C.F. Clifton

Barnsley

2001 - 2002

D. Jardine

Blandford Forum

1971 - 1972

C. Macrae

Inverness

2002 - 2003

G. Adams MBE

Caledonian University

1972 - 1973

G. Busby

Sandwich

2003 - 2004

P. Hyde

City of Manchester

1973 - 1974

W. Lambert

Harrogate

2004 - 2005

R. Buckle

Colchester

1974 - 1975

W. Allen

Hawick

2005 - 2006

W. Paterson

East Dunbartonshire

1975 - 1976

J. Eaton

Taunton

2006 - 2007

D. Knight J.P.

Poole

1976 - 1977

J.W. McKiernan

Tyne & Wear

2007 - 2008

P. E. Legg

Charnwood

1977 - 1978

D. Aitkin

Kirkaldy

2008 - 2009

A. Jenkins

St. Helens

1978 - 1979

C. Watts

Southampton

2009 - 2010

S. Dennis

City & County of Swansea

1979 - 1980

J.C. Robinson

City of York

2010 -2011

J. Smoothy

St. Ives, Cambs.

1980 - 1981

G. Paul

Renfrew

2011 -2012

P. Townsend

London Borough of Croydon

1981 - 1982

V.A. West

Woodspring

2012 -

J Caruana

Hertford

1982 - 1983

F. Purcell

City of Kingston

With special recognition of J.B. Redcliffe (Bootle) and J.Parkinson (Gravesend) for their unstinting efforts from 15 th June 1933 until the outbreak of hostilities in 1939.

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mace-bearer Noun: an official, as of a city or legislative body, who carries a ceremonial mace before dignitaries.

Origin: 1545-55, mace + bearer

SEMPER FIDELIS

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