Vol 1: Issue 3 January -December 2008

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Government, Housing and Rural. Development as remembered by Tsudisa. // Khamuseb as a former trained teacher at St. Joseph High School Döbra and a.
z x c v b t d f rt y x p m

TEACH

TEACH

The Official Newsletter Of The Namibia National Teachers’ Union (NANTU)

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Etsikilo Primary School in Omusati Region, one of the remote schools but strives for a very brighter future. This placard as displayed is in the principal’s office reminding the staff what obstacles hamper the progress in effective teaching and managing a school. Every school must have a vision and a mission, which gives a direction as to what the school is aiming at year after year to see if there is a progress or not.

Volume 1 - Issue 3 January - December 2008

From the Desk of the Editor

Patrick W. Kazimbu “Six Mabone” Editor

The year 2008 has drawn to its close and as a leap year, many believe surprises can happen. Oh, it seems to be true. We have lost prominent members in our society such as Minister, Hon. Pandeni, former Minister Hon. Bessinger, Parliamentarian Hon. Gertze and Hon. Minister Shihepo, which many people could not believe. Jesus says in John 14:6: “I am the Way, the Truth and the Life. No one comes to the Father except through me.”

The five percent (5%) increment was something good but not better. It still did not overshadow the inflation rate. Looking at the hiking of prices such as fuel, electricity and other commodities, the poor suffer the most. An improvement is what we want to see for the next three years. We must stand firm and united in order to gain. Fantastic to see how some regions have improved their Grade 10 results. Congratulations and keep it up. The others who could not make it, there is still a next time and it is this year, 2008 or next year 2009. All the regions can practically not be in the first position and should therefore strive for a pass rate 50% and more. Teachers must be commented for a good pass. It is observed in many occasions that learners get all the praises if the results are excellent and teachers are left out. Some regions have started to award teachers for their outstanding performances, keep it up. Members are encouraged to be very careful for dual membership. In the case of NANTU, a teacher with dual membership will face a problem. Well, according to the Namibian Constitution, everyone is free to join a union of his/her choice. Before signing for any union, make sure you get what you want. Original proof must be proved and beware of a sweet tongue. As the only and only recognized union, NANTU works for the benefit of all teachers in Namibia and the NANTU Constitution does not allow dual membership. It is very good to hear and realize that in some regions teacher-learner sexual relations are decreasing at an alarming rate. REFRAIN totally from such unprofessional and unacceptable behaviour, because it is the right thing to do. We as teachers cannot be politicians in our classrooms. Our objective in the classroom is to teach the prescribed curriculum. Political Science is a subject at University level. Why are we trying to involve learners at this stage in politics by providing them with all sort of negative influences? Such teachers should be brought to book. At a different note and once again, TEACH is for all the members. We need inspiring messages, jokes, aspects on and etc. Wishing you all the best. Have a merry Christmas and A Prosperous New Year. Till 2009. Editor.

To forget is a crime, To be lazy is a greater crime, To neglect work and offer excuses is the greatest crime, Action without delay is the secret of efficiency.

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

Whatp Does Tf he Bd iblea able Contents qTw eofrt yu io g Say? Editors’ Desk.

1

1 Corinthians 12: 12 – 17 and 21.

What Does The Bible Say?

2

12

Christ is like a single body, which has many parts; it is still one body, even though it is made up of different parts.

New Appointments and Benefits.

3 13

In the same way, all of us, whether Jews or Gentiles, whether slaves or free, have been baptized into the one body by the same Spirit, and we have all been given one Spirit to drink.

14

For the body itself is not made up of only one part, but of many parts.

15

If the foot were to say, “Because I am not a hand, I don’t belong to the body,” that would not keep it from being a part of the body.

16

And if the ear were to say, “Because I am not an eye, I don’t belong to the body, “that would not keep it from being a part of the body.

17

If the whole body if the whole body were just an eye, how could it hear? And if it were only an ear, how could it smell?

21.

So then, the eye cannot say to the hand, “I don’t need you!” Nor can the head say to the feet, “Well, I don’t need you!

Profit Sharing; Metropolitan Namibia.

4

AIDS The Silent Killer.

5-7

TABLE 8 OF CONTENTS

Kunene Regional News. Tribute To Late Hon. Pandeni.

8

A Consultation Visit To Botswana.

9-10

Let Them Know You Care.

10-11

What Is The School Temperature Today?

11

Membership Education.

12-16

Negotiation Training In Canada.

17

Karas Regional News.

18

National Standards and Performance Indicators For Schools In Namibia.

19

News Clippings.

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Let us see today how we can bring this message back to our own situation in education. It seems that in some regions, some educators such as teachers don’t want to welcome teachers from other ethnic groups.

20-21

Lecturers At Colleges Of Education.

22-23

World Teachers’ Day Celebrations, 2008.

24-28

NANTU/BCTF Leadership Training Workshop.

28-31

In the next edition; negotiation for 2009 - 2011, HIV and AIDS Workshop and etc.

For example a Nama speaking Namibian teacher is not very welcome in the area of the Ovahimba speaking Namibians. An Oshiwambo speaking Namibian teacher is not very welcome in the Afrikaans speaking area. Schools with excellent resources, do not share with those schools that have a few resources. Where do we want to take this attitude? Although we are from different cultures and backgrounds, we work for one Ministry and in the interest of the Namibian child. On the NANTU logo there four teachers holding hands over the four corners of Namibia. This stresses one of the objectives of NANTU which is: “To unite all teachers of



Namibia into a non-racial and national teachers’ union that will seek to channel all the democratic demands of teachers, their students and social development of the Namibian society”. NANTU members, school managers etc, should never intimidate teachers who belong to other unions or who are not members of any union. Let us integrate and learn to live together in peace and harmony.

Design and layout: Solitaire Press ( ) Ltd. Printed by: Solitaire Press

NANTU Head Office Mungunda Street, Erf 8506 Between Katutura Police Station and Katutura Magistrate Court P.O. Box 61009, Katutura, WINDHOEK Tel.: 061 - 262247 or 215435, Fax: 061- 261926

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

Benefits zN xewcAppointments v b t d f rt yx pm The following people were appointed to serve the union in different capacities

As a NANTU member you are entitled to:

Benefits: Ms. Erenstine Haragaes. Personal Assistant to the Secretary-General and Deputy Secretary-General.



Collective bargaining and negotiations on your behalf. Protection from unfair dismissals retrenchment and unfair labour practices. Representation at disciplinary hearings. Death benefit (N$ 5 000). Legal aid for labour related issues. Grievance Handling and Conflict Resolution. Free Leadership Training Courses. Representation at Educational and other Public Institutions. Conditions of service. Educational and Union news through TEACH. Financial Management Skills such as Money Sense Workshops and Financial Loans through NamMic Financial Holdings (pty) ltd. Health and Safety in the work place.

Discounts:

TrenTyre: For buying tyres and batteries, effective 1st March 2007. Pupkewitz Toyota: For buying cars and major parts. EDUMEDS: 5% for other educational materials and 7,5% on textbooks only. Waltons: 7,5% on all stationery from 1st May until 30th November each year. Novel Ford Motor Company: For buying cars, servicing and buying of parts. Tré Supermarket in Windhoek: A 5% discount for items bought beyond N$ 100.

If benefits exist in regions please forward it to Head Office to be published so that whenever members travel while on holiday, they can make use of the benefits all over Namibia.

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Ms. Michaela Mokhatu Regional Office Assistant for Khomas Region. • Based at the Head Office in Windhoek. • Members in Khomas Region can contact her at Tel - 262247 and fax 261926.

A membership card is required. Some membership cards are not having a passport photo which is a requirement. Take along your ID document. New membership cards are available on which your passport photo is needed.

Ms. Alina Shilongo Regional Office Assistant for Oshana. • Based at the Head Office in Oshakati. • She will also serve for Omusati, Ohangwena and Oshikoto. • Members in regions Oshana, Omusati, Ohangwena and Oshikoto can contact her at Tel/fax 065 – 220742.

NANTU leadership wishes them all the best in their different positions they will serve and hope their contributions and professionalism will push the Union to greater heights.

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

q w e rt yu io p g f d a Profit Sharing: NANTU Receives Lion Share

METROPOLITAN NAMIBIA PROFIT SHARING CEREMONY REMARKS BY RUDOLPH HIMARUA, NATIONAL SALES MANAGER OF METROPOLITAN NAMIBIA AT THE ANNUAL PROFIT SHARING CEREMONY ON 07 May 2008 at Thuringerhof Hotel.

Metropolitan Namibia is once again proud and privileged to be associated with its prime and valued corporate clients, the entire Trade Union family. Driven by a strategic and smart partnership approach, the year under review 2007, has been a significant year in many respects and in particular to reposition Metropolitan Namibia above its competitors. Our client centric approach has further kept us afloat and has enabled us to weather off economic challenges and to sustain our productivity and profitability margins. The application of our business acumen has further impacted positively on our. Investments to be able to return some, but not to all Trade Unions a percentage of their generated profits. This year a total of N$610 000 will be handed over to the four Unions present her today.

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Against the stated business scenario and Mr. Rudolph Himarua achievements in a volatile marketplace with Executive: Retail Metropolitan Namibia continuous economic and competition pressures, Metropolitan Namibia values its business, social and investment responsibilities and therefore would like to share with you the dividends from our collective investments. It is also on record that over and above the profit sharing, most, if not all, trade unions doing business with Metropolitan Namibia have been cashing in on what we call monthly commission and they are still enjoying this privilege. We, therefore, urge your visionary leadership to continue to conduct business with Metropolitan Namibia and increase your scheme membership for improved future benefits. At this juncture, we invite you all to share in the delight of announcing the profit sharing for 2007.

Cde. Basilius Haingura - NANTU Secretary - General, Mr. Rudolph Himarua and Cde. David Quito Mulunga - NANTU Deputy Secretary - General. The NANTU leaders receiving the cheque of N$ 500,000 from Mr. Himarua Photo: PW Kazimbu

Metropolitan Namibia will pay; TUN (N$ 10 000), PSUN (N$ 50 000), NAPWU (N$ 50 000) and NANTU (N$ 500 000) respectively. We trust that you would use and apply your money wisely and be assured of our usual commitment, support and co-operation to an improved service delivery at all times. Last but not the least I am suggesting that we must schedule appropriate time to discuss the future profit sharing status of each client separately.

I thank you.

Rudolph Himarua Executive: Retail METROPOLITAN NAMIBIA

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

Day y x p m z x c v bWorld t dAIDS f rt On December 1 Every Year At Your School, Talk About Hiv

Dealing with stigmatising and discriminatory statements

ONE HOUR ON AIDS: TIME TO TAKE THE LEAD Each year on December 1, millions of people throughout the world commemorate World AIDS Day. World AIDS Day raises awareness of HIV and AIDS and is an opportunity to take action on HIV prevention in schools. Teachers are crucial to this campaign: they have a key role to play in education for HIV prevention and advocacy for universal treatment, care and support. Building on the success of the World AIDS Day campaign in 2007, Education International (EI) in partnership with NANTU proposes teachers use this Activity Kit with their colleagues and students on Monday 1 December 2008 in schools, classrooms and union meetings. With ‘One Hour on AIDS’ as the guiding theme, teachers worldwide will lead their students and colleagues in a lesson on AIDS with the help of the simple Activity Kit developed by EI in collaboration with the Education Development Center. We hope this activity will be used as a starting point for other HIV and AIDS-focused activities throughout the year.

Cde. Michael Nasheya, NANTU HIV and AIDS Co-ordinator

The activity in this kit will help you explore what AIDS means to you, your colleagues, and your students and is designed to be tailored to the specific needs of the group you are teaching. The activity includes both small and large group work and is designed to encourage frank and open discussion about HIV and AIDS. The kit contains a poster reflecting the main themes of the activity that can be displayed in classrooms, staff rooms and union offices throughout the year. By participating in this activity with your students and colleagues, you show leadership and contribute to the success of World AIDS Day. One hour on AIDS today, leadership on AIDS throughout the year!

‘ONE HOUR ON AIDS’ ACTIVITY Leading the Activity Anyone can lead this one-hour World AIDS Day activity with students, teachers, and other school staff. You do not need to be an expert on HIV and AIDS. Your main role is to facilitate open discussion, which is a key step towards taking action to address HIV and AIDS.

To make clear that discrimination and stigmatisation are unacceptable, introduce the activity by discussing the following: • No one deserves to have HIV or AIDS. • Having HIV and AIDS is not anyone’s fault. • Everyone has an equal right to access to prevention, treatment, care, and support services regardless of his or her HIV status. • Everyone has an equal right to study and work, regardless of his or her HIV status. • Everyone has a role to play in the response to the HIV and AIDS.

Guidelines for Conducting the Activity Purpose: • To engage participants in thinking about and discussing issues related to HIV and AIDS • To encourage participants to take action in response to the HIV and AIDS Target Group: Teachers and their students (ages 13 and above recommended) Time: One hour Materials: • Copies of the Take the Lead worksheet, with a statement for discussion written on each one • Paper and pens • ‘Take the Lead on AIDS’ poster Procedure: 1. Introduction (3 minutes) • Open the session by explaining to participants that December 1 is World AIDS Day. You could say, “This is a time when people throughout the world join together to raise awareness about HIV and AIDS and call for greater action to be taken to address HIV and AIDS. Today we are doing an activity in solidarity with other students, teachers, and staff in schools throughout the world.” • Divide participants into groups of 4–8 for the small-group discussion. • Distribute a ‘Take the Lead’ worksheet to each group. •

Choose several statements for discussion from the following list: - HIV and AIDS affect people in all countries around the world - HIV can be spread by shaking hands with someone who is HIV positive or by sharing the same toilets, cutlery, or chalk - If you have sex with people who look healthy, you will not get HIV - If you stay with one partner, you will not become infected with HIV - Women have a greater chance than men of getting HIV from unprotected sex - Young people who have sex with older partners increase their risk of getting HIV - People who are HIV positive are promiscuous - Students who are HIV positive should be allowed to go to school with other students - Teachers who are HIV positive should not be teaching - If you see someone insulting or bullying a person because of HIV, it is best not to interfere



Allocate a different statement for discussion to each group.

What is most important is that you create an environment in which colleagues and students feel free to express their ideas and engage in dialogue with others. HIV and AIDS are sensitive topics because there has been so much misinformation, stigma, and discrimination associated with them. To create an environment conducive to open debate, you need to know how to: • facilitate a discussion • handle questions to which you do not know the answer • deal constructively with stigmatising and discriminatory statements Facilitating a discussion Below are some tips for conducting effective discussions: • Establish rules and criteria for a frank but constructive discussion. • Encourage participants to speak, to consider multiple points of view, and to have debate based on mutual respect. Handling questions to which you do not know the answer. You may not know the answer to all questions. If this is the case, you could say, “I don’t know the answer, but I will find out for you”. Then you can ask a health educator, nurse or doctor in your school, local clinic or hospital and get back to the group with the answer. You can also encourage participants to do their own research on the topic and hold an additional session to ensure their research produced accurate answers. It is important not to provide inaccurate information.

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2. Small-Group Discussion (25 minutes) • Tell the groups that their first task is to choose a person who will take notes and report back to the large group about the small-group discussion. Ask each group to write their group statement on the blank line at the top of the worksheet. • Then ask each member of the group to take a minute to share with their group what the statement means to him or her. • The group should now discuss their responses to the three questions on the worksheet:

Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

q w e rt yu io p g f d a * * *



Which points does everyone agree with in relation to the statement? What, if anything, do group members disagree with in relation to the statement? What actions should you take to address the issues raised in your discussion?

The notetaker should briefly summarise the main points in readiness to report back on the group discussion.

3. Large-Group Work (20 minutes) • Reconvene the large group, and ask the participants who took notes to provide a brief summary of their group’s responses to the three questions. • If time permits, facilitate a brief discussion of the points made. If time is tight, summarise the key points yourself. • Provide a few summarising points about World AIDS Day: * HIV and AIDS are global issues. Millions of people around the world are infected with HIV. Plus, many more are affected by the disease because they have immediate family, friends, students, or co-workers living with it. So, we are all involved and affected. * Everybody has a right to an education, to the whole range of health and social services, and to live, study, and work to their fullest potential, whether or not they have HIV. We can all make sure these rights are respected by taking the lead and playing a part in the response to HIV and AIDS. * The theme for World AIDS Day in 2008 is ‘leadership’, and this applies to everyone, including governments, communities, schools, families, and individuals. In order to successfully respond to HIV and AIDS and to make sure that the required education and services are provided, people at all levels need to take action and assume responsibility. * Both young people and adults can take action.

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4. The ‘Take the Lead on AIDS’ Poster (15 minutes) • Explain that there are many ways that we can take action on HIV and AIDS at the individual, community, and global levels. The ‘Take the Lead on AIDS’ poster suggests forms of action. • Explain each form of action to the class: * Begin with the central box – ‘Protect Yourself’, which encourages individuals to take responsibility for their own health and their relationships with other people. The first step is to protect yourself from HIV, other STIs, and pregnancy by abstaining from sex or practising safe sex. Remember to use universal precautions (e.g. gloves) when coming into contact with bodily fluids, such as blood. * ‘Increase Awareness’ applies to many different settings, including your school and community. The goal is to help people learn more about HIV and AIDS, including prevention, treatment, care, and support, as well as stigma and discrimination. You could increase awareness by holding a forum to discuss issues and articles in the news, by inviting a guest speaker, by creating and performing a drama piece, by holding a poster competition, and by writing letters to the editors of newspapers. * ‘Change Your School or Workplace’ means getting your school or workplace to address HIV and AIDS and includes advocating for health services and comprehensive HIV and AIDS education. Encourage your school to address stigma and discrimination and to support the full inclusion of students and teachers who are living with or affected by HIV and AIDS. It is important to live in a positive way that is free of stigma and discrimination towards people affected by HIV and AIDS. * ‘Get Involved in Your Community’ includes a wide range of activities to help people living with or affected by HIV and AIDS, such as volunteering at a hospital, home-based care programme, or AIDS action group; providing support and helping with schoolwork for orphans or children affected by HIV and AIDS. * ‘Demand Global Action’ is about convincing politicians and national leaders to take action to provide HIV and AIDS prevention, treatment, care and support services, and to tackle stigma and discrimination. You can take action by organising a rally or writing to politicians.

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If time permits, encourage participants to pledge to undertake a specific action. Provide a sheet of paper for them to write their name and the action they plan to take. Say that you will ask them to report back to the class in the following months on their progress in taking action. You could also ask some students to write their pledge on the ‘Take the Lead’ poster before hanging it in the classroom. Post-Activity Follow-Up • In the months after World AIDS Day, ask those who signed the pledge sheet to report on their progress. • Refer to the poster at various times during the year to remind students of the importance of taking action and of becoming involved in HIV and AIDS prevention.

The entrance at Otjitoko Primary School in Kunene makes it very clear that we must ride safe, because Aids is real. Riding on a horse will not prevent you from contracting the disease. They want to tell people that where ever you go, whether on horse back, in a car, a bicycle or footing around, your condoms have to follow you. Abstain will just be the right thing to do. Photo: PW Kazimbu

TAKE THE LEAD WORKSHEET Statement for discussion: …………………………………………………………................................................... …………………………………………….…………...................................................... …………………………………………………………................................................... Instructions • • • •

Choose a person to take notes for the group and to report back to the large group about your discussion. Each person in your group should take a minute to say what the statement for discussion means to them. Everyone in the group should discuss their responses to the three questions on this worksheet. Try to summarise the key points so that the person taking notes can record them and share them with the large group.

Questions 1.

What points does everyone agree with in relation to the statement?

2.

What, if anything, do group members disagree with in relation to the statement?

3.

What actions should you take to address the issues raised in your discussion?

Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

z x c v b t d f rt y x p m STATEMENTS FOR DISCUSSION

Although promiscuity can increase one’s chances of contracting HIV, the virus can be contracted from having unprotected sex just once.

Note: The responses to the Statements below are provided as an example to give you an idea of the issues that should be discussed. You and the participants may add further information and examples according to the age, knowledge level, and interests of the group.

8.

1.

HIV and AIDS affect people in all countries around the world. Agree. Forty million people in countries around the world are HIV positive. In 2007, almost 2.1 million people died of AIDS, and 2.5 million new cases of HIV occurred. HIV and AIDS is being spread throughout all countries, although some countries have much higher rates than others.

2.

HIV can be spread by shaking hands with someone who is HIV positive or by sharing the same toilets, cutlery, or chalk. Disagree. HIV can only be transmitted through the exchange of the following four bodily fluids: blood, semen, vaginal fluid, or breast milk.



The four main ways the virus is spread are by: • having unprotected sexual contact • sharing contaminated needles when injecting drugs • transfusions of infected blood or use of unsterilised medical instruments • a mother passing the virus to her baby before or during birth or during breastfeeding





The ‘H’ in HIV stands for ‘human’, which means that the infection is only spread by human beings and not by animals or insects. 3.



If you have sex with people who look healthy, you will not get HIV. Disagree. Many people living with HIV look healthy. People who are infected with HIV may not show any visible symptoms for many years and may not know that they are HIV positive. Even if they have symptoms that could be caused by having HIV, those symptoms could also be caused by other health problems that are unrelated to HIV. Therefore, you cannot tell by looking at someone whether he or she has HIV.

Students who are HIV positive should be allowed to go to school with other students. Agree. All students have a right to an education. In addition, students who are HIV positive should not be excluded nor discriminated against, and HIV is not contagious through the everyday contact that students have in school.

9.

Teachers who are HIV positive should not be teaching. Disagree. Having HIV does not make a person ‘bad’ or a poor role model. As with many diseases, with the right treatment many teachers living with HIV can continue to carry out their work efficiently. Everyone has the right to work regardless of their HIV status.

10.

If you see someone insulting or bullying a person because of HIV, it is best not to interfere. Disagree. If you do not say or do something, your silence may be seen as complicit support for what the bully is doing. Tell the person to stop immediately and explain that it is unacceptable to discriminate against someone because of their HIV status. Your actions will help decrease stigma and discrimination.

Take A Break, Sit Back And Try Your Best. There are ten differences between the picture on the top and the one underneath it. Just draw a circle around each of the differences on the picture below

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http://data.unaids.org/pub/EPISlides/2007/2007_epiupdate_en.pdf 4.

If you stay with one partner, you will not become infected with HIV. Disagree. It depends on the partner, what they did before they met, and whether either one has unprotected sex outside the relationship, or is an injecting drug user. A stable relationship does not guarantee safety.

5.

Women have a greater chance than men of getting HIV from unprotected sex. Agree. There are several reasons for this: • Biological: Women have a larger area of exposed mucous membrane where the virus can enter, and there is more virus present in sperm than in vaginal fluid.





Social/Cultural: In many cultures women are not allowed to discuss or make decisions about sex, including asking their partner to use safe sex practices.

N.B When women are financially dependent on men, it may be harder for them to control when and with whom they have sex. They are therefore more susceptible to getting HIV. Both men and women should take equal responsibility in sexual decisionmaking to stay safe and avoid unwanted pregnancy. 6.

7.

Young people who have sex with older partners increase their risk of getting HIV. Agree. Older partners have often had numerous partners and frequently dominate the decision-making in relationships with younger partners. If younger partners become dependent on older partners for such things as money, cell phones, or car rides in exchange for sex, they give up their power to set limits and demand safe sex practises, such as condom usage, and thus expose themselves to risk. People who are HIV positive are promiscuous. Disagree. People who are HIV positive could have got the infection through non-sexual transmission (e.g., sharing contaminated needles). And even if they got the virus from unprotected sex, that does not mean they are promiscuous.

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

Kunene Rrt egion Fyu inally io A Tp ribute to John q w emade g f da it Alfons Pandeni By Cde. Julius KK Kaujova Regional Chairperson: Kunene Principal of Elias Amxab Combined School

By Cde. John Tsudisa //Khamuseb Organizing Secretary for Khomas REC HOD at Dordabis Primary School The late John Alfons Pandeni former Minister of Regional and Local Government, Housing and Rural Development as remembered by Tsudisa //Khamuseb as a former trained teacher at St. Joseph High School Döbra and a prominent Unionist.

On behalf of NANTU Regional Executive Committee in Kunene Region, I would like to air my gratitude and heart-felt appreciation to the teaching fraternity in the Kunene Region, as well as the Kunene Regional Office for the efforts they put in place in order to improve the grade 10 JSCExamination results for 2007. I must honestly state that the commitment and hard work our teachers do, to involve their learners in different educational programmes e.g. remedial classes, compensatory teaching, spring and holiday school paved a way up from position number 13 to position number 5 of the JSC-League table.

Cde. Julius KK Kaujova

This is what Cde. //Khamuseb is saying:

Cde. John Tsudisa //Khamuseb

The roar of a lion faded away in the early morning hours; The hope of a new dawn has perished; The dark cloud of the new generation echoed in the mountains; The warrior has fallen in pouring rain; A committed cadre of format; A military cadre who retaliated in ambush and crossfire; A carrier of Peshas and Bazooka on battlefield across roadblocks; A fearless sacrifizer for a noble goal; A skilful master of negotiations; A skillful master of resolution and conflict resolution; A skillful master of patience and tolerance; A skillful master and harmonizer of tribal differences; A skillful organizer of workers emancipation through workers union; Indeed a tested and seasoned party cadre; Indeed a legend in his own light; An elder brother to the beloved ones; An elder brother of the Namibian youth; An elder brother and advisor of the Namibian nation; Mwalimu in the footsteps of great Mwalimu Julius Nyerere; The hope of a new dawn has perished; Indapo nawa Camarada Pandeni; Khib !na sare Comrdae Pandeni; Go in peace Comrade Pandeni; Mushas grasias companjero

It is only through hard work and perseverance that we as teachers and stakeholders can bring a difference within our education circle. Although the results have improved drastically let me alert all teachers that “relaxation in classes is over in Kunene Region”. While congratulating all those schools that performed well, I want to urge them to maintain the status quo for this year. On the same note my appeal goes to those schools that under performed to map strategic plans to improve their results for this year.

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I want to emphasize the following; •

that teachers and school managers must behave professionally and responsibly.



that only hard work and determination brings success.



that discipline in schools and hostels determine academic results.



that parental involvement in the education of their children is of vital and parent-teachers to lead this example.

In conclusion, let me challenge all teachers, NANTU School Committees, Branch Executive Committees and Regional Executive Committees to commit themselves towards improving the results in their respective schools while at the same time addressing the factors that are affecting the condition of services of our teachers. Wishing you all the best in your educational endeavour.

Que su alma descance en paz companjero Pandeni; May your soul rest in peace. Cde. John Tsudisa //Khamuseb started his teaching career in Kunene Region. He is now promoted to Head of Department (HOD) at Dordabis Primary School in Khomas Education Region.

Get Together: See if you can match these faces correctly

TEACH

Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

Consultation to Botswana z x cAv b t dvisit f rt yx pm N

ANTU found it important to have a visit to Gaborone, Botswana for consultations and information sharing. This happened from March 25th to March 28th, 2008. The delegation from NANTU included the President Cde. Kavila, Secretary-General, Cde. Haingura and Director for Research, Information and Publicity, Cde. Kazimbu. Wednesday March 26th, 2008, Cde. German Motswaledi, Administrative Secretary of Botswana Teacher’s Union (BTU) accompanied us to BTU offices.

BTU Vice President Cde. Ramaabya

The Vice President of BTU Cde. Ramaabya welcomed and shared some issues planned for the three day visit. He was happy to hear that NANTU is visiting BTU just at the time their recognition by the Government of Botswana

has reached the final stages.

Photo: PW Kazimbu

At the office of the Ministry of Education, we were welcomed by the Director of the Teaching Service Management (TSM), Mr. Makhandela and a Deputy Director Mr., Mulemoegi.

The following information was shared by the Director of the TSM, Mr. Makhandela:

1. T e a c h e r Licensing:

Mr. Makhandela

3. Staffing Norms and learner discipline:

This an issue they are still considering because they still don’t license teachers and mentioned the following: * That the recognized union will be involved right from the beginning. *That a Teachers’ Council will be established. * That the body who will be dealing with licensing to be autonomous.

Cde. Kavila busy explaining the mission of the NANTU delegation.

School managers (principals) Photo: PW Kazimbu do not teach at all, because they should manage the school properly. Primary schools have a learner – teacher ratio of 40:1. As soon as a class has more than 40 learners, the class is split into two. The MoE accepts it because they also do not want to worn out they teachers. Both teachers and learners should have a conducive environment for teaching and learning. To discipline learners, they use a regulated corporal punishment.

4. Short discussions were held and the panel proceeded to the Ministry of Education were they had an appointment at 10:00 a.m. BTU Secretary-General Cde. Kgasa and Administrative Secretary Cde. Motswaledi led the delegation to the Ministry of Education.

From left to right: Cde. Kgasa, Secretary-General of BTU; Cde. Ramaabya, Vice-President of BTU, Cde. Haingura, Cde. Kavila and Cde. German Motswaledi, Administrative Secretary of BTU.

up to PhD level and the total cost of the studies amounted for example P 12,000-00, that particular teacher will be rewarded with P 12,000-00. Students studying in the field of Science (health) receive a 100% study grant because health is a priority.

Maternity Leave:

Maternity leave is fully payable for the 1st three children. Teachers get unpaid leave as from the fourth child and onwards. The following institutions were also visited Tlokweng College of Education, Mophane Primary School and Naledi Secondary School. At Tlokweng College of Education were realized that all the four Colleges of Education remains under the pay structure of the government and lecturers should hold a Masters’ degree. Mophane Primary School, one of the best performing schools in the country under the ranking of the Top 5, welcomed us wholeheartedly.

 H

The Entrance to Mophane Primary School. Photo: PW Kazimbu

What we have learnt from Mophane Primary School were the following: *

The school opened its doors in 2001, has an enrollment of 1 052 learners from Standards 1 to 7 with a staff of 30 members.

*

The principal and Deputy Principal are not teaching because they have to make sure that the school is managed properly.

To kick off this process, the TSM will take a committee to Glasgow, Scotland to monitor what they have done and the recognized union will form part of it.

2.

Qualifications:

The minimum qualification a Primary School teachers must be is a teaching diploma, while a Secondary School teacher must have a degree. They can both study up to PhD level. Any teacher qualification obtained will be recognised what they have studied for, because the Ministry recognizes the skill and knowledge obtained during further studies as it will bring positive results in all aspects. If a teacher at Primary School studied

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

q w e rt yu io p g f d a They shared the following with the Namibian delegation: * The school has an enrollment of 1 680 learners. * They have a principal, a deputy and five HODs, all seven management members are not teaching but to see that the performance of teachers and learners which include student support, teaching and preparation is well up to the needed standard. * Parent teacher Associations are well established and deals mostly with discipline, problems and successes.

Naledi Secondary School which is being headed by the School Head Mr. Coles and his Deputy Mrs. Obusituwe, were waiting for the Namibian delegation despite having a lot of work.

Mr. Coles and Mrs. Obusituw Photo: PW Kazimbu

Let them Know you Care By Silba Inaani Karuuombe Teacher at Pionierspark Primary School

10 H

We tend to ignore little good things learners are doing. We must respect the dignity of Junior Primary learners. When working with these small ones one should be able to understand them first before they understand you. In fact this is were the behaviour of these learners needs to be given a proper direction. Just try and remember how hurt and upset you felt when a friend, perhaps without having meaning to made fun of you or said something insulting to you.

Silba Inaani Karuuombe

Our learners are even more hurt when we laugh at them or make fun of them. They cannot understand it or shrug it off or explain it to themselves. They feel hurt when you point out how badly they have done something, because they did the best they could. If they could have done better, they would have. They are still learning. We are very proud of infants as they learn to walk. Older children also need us to be proud and happy when they build or paint or draw or write or throw or catch a ball, even if to us it looks badly done.

Factors to be seriously considered are: 1. Bad Talk. Never talk badly about your learners when they can hear you. Every negative word they hear, they remember. If you always talk about ‘you naughty learners’, they will become more and more naughty, not less and less. After all, it is only their bad behaviour which constitutes a problem. When you do talk about your pupils, speak about good things they have done. Use a general platform to point out that if they are negative, things will look very bad and they can easily adopt to bad things. Tell other teachers about the new skills they are learning, not about their failures. Let your learners know you can see how hard they are trying. Learners grow more confident when they know they are loved and approved of just the way they are. 2. Show Them Love: Do not be afraid to pat your learners on the back or to affirm them in whatever way seems appropriate. Tell them how much you love them, and how glad you are that they are in your class. 3. Listen: If you listen carefully, your learners may tell you why they do things that seem naughty to you. 4. Rules and Discipline: Look for new ways to teach without smacking and shouting. We can teach children rules of behaviour by playing games and explaining in a fun way. When learners are out of control, maybe all they need to learn is the right way to behave. Teach them this, in a kind way, before you think of smacking.

Mrs. Isabella Gawises with her Grade 4 class doing Mathematics at W. Borchard Primary School in Erongo Region. Photo: PW Kazimbu

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

z x c v b t d f rt y x p m

After proper rules has been given, there was good discipline in the class and everyone was busy doing the task given to them Mophane PS, Gaborone, Botswana. Photo: PW Kazimbu

Have you worked out the rules in your classroom yet? If you spend a lot of time saying ‘No’, maybe there are too many rules. Some simple rules that most learners find easy to follow are: Don’t hurt anyone else. • Don’t break things. • Put things back were you found them. • Don’t take other learners’ things. • Leave other learners in peace when they are busy.

WHAT IS THE SCHOOL TEMPERATURE TODAY? The performance of a school is directly linked to relationship atmosphere that prevails in the school. If the personnel in a school is happy the performance of the school will tend to be “happy” or on the positive side. Schools that have motivated

Cde. Steven Siseho Regional Chairperson Caprivi

Everyone in the classroom should know the rules and follow them. This means that

teachers are most likely to perform better than schools that

you need to respect your own rules too.

are frustrated.

5. Explain Things: When learners ask questions, they really need an answer. If you say to them, “Don’t worry me now” or “Keep quiet!” or “It is none of your business”, you are really telling them that their needs are not important. If you don’t know the answer (and that happens often to all of us), try to find the answers somewhere. For example, go to the library, ask people, or write to a newspaper. If you still can’t find an answer, your learners won’t mind. They will still respect and revere you as their teacher. But they will see that there is a lot to learn and that we keep learning all our lives. They will also see that you are being honest and helpful and will try to copy you. 6. Learners Respect:

Deserve

Photo: PW Kazimbu

importance of motivating their personnel. Resource materials for school heads (1993:17), states that motivation is concerned with the cause of behaviour: why people act, speak or think in a particular way”. It is important that managers know how to motivate, that is, getting the best out of people. Getting results through people or getting the best out of people is most likely to be achieved if the mangers help the teachers (foot soldiers) experience job satisfaction. Job satisfaction stirs what is known as intrinsic motivation whereby an individual is self compelled to strive for a particular goal. Unlike

Talk to your learners as if they are proper people. Some and or many of the teachers talk to learners as if they were animals or objects or simple-minded.

Learners at Ndama Primary School in Kavango Region

Most managers in our schools, circuits or regions tend to overlook the

Young children are cleverer than many people realize. They learn more in their first seven years of life than in the rest of their lives put together. So respect their intelligence.

extrinsic motivation which is too often based on fear, threats, harassment, unfairness and outright corruption by managers. Results will then be the best that the teacher can produce and be more likely to be in line with the overall goals and ethos of the school/Ministry of education and of course NANTU. It is imperative that our managers realize that the key to effective management or leadership is the ability to get results from other people, through other people and in co-operation with other people. If this formula is wrong, all the kings horses and all the kings men will fall down, in other words ETSIP

You may have noticed that children really like adults who talk to them like real people. They also behave better, act more responsibly and are kinder to others when they are treated kindly and with respect.

or any other carefully constructed system and plans will fail.

7.

of ensuring success. Our managers should ensure that teachers are involved

Try It Out:

This week. Try treating your learners with respect. Be polite, listen carefully, and speak honestly. NOTICE what happens.

11 H

Participation and consultation are some of the most important ingredients in decision making [through structures like NANTU School Committee, Branch Executive Committee (circuit)] and in matters which affect them. The more the teachers are involved, the more they adopt the vision of the school/circuit/region or ministry, and they will have a sense of ownership in decisions and be self geared towards achieving the set targets or goals. NANTU is an important stakeholder and partner of the Ministry of Education, hence I urge the usage of NANTU structures in the Ministry. To my comrades in NANTU, if awarded the opportunity to serve in any one of the NANTU structures, do so with excellencies and pride. Represent us progressively at all these levels: School – NSC, Circuit – BEC, Region – REC and Head Office – NEC. I pen off

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

Membership Education q w e rt yu io pg f d a When Regional Workshops were conducted, the Code of Conduct was a burning issue. The decision was taken that members need to be aware of their behavior in the teaching profession. The next pages, provide statistics and information on this issue. The Code of Conduct is in the last section because this information was not known to many teachers and they were requesting for it. The first part of the Code of Conduct which is also very important will appear in the next edition.

Misconduct Cases for 2006

Misconduct Cases for 2007

Cases

TOTAL

Cases

TOTAL

Corporal punishment

14

Corporal punishment

16

Absenteeism

26

Absenteeism

13

Forgery/Falsification

7

Forgery/Falsification

2

Fraud/Theft

13

Fraud/Theft

19

Impregnation/sexual relations with learners /sexual harassment

34

Impregnation/sexual relations with learners /sexual harassment

24

Misappropriation of state funds

6

Misappropriation of state funds

5

Misuse of government vehicle

3

Misuse of government vehicle

1

Unauthorized possession of state vehicle

0

Unauthorized possession of state vehicle

0

Under the influence of alcohol or intoxicating liquor/drug abuse

10

Under the influence of alcohol or intoxicating liquor/drug abuse

6

Other

39

Other

19

TOTAL

152

12 H

TOTAL

105

Finalised

75

Finalised

80

Pending

77

Pending

25

Final Warning

43

Final Warning

29

Demotions

5

Demotions

4

Suspensions

7

Suspensions

2

Dismissals

20

Dismissals

17

Acquittals

4

Acquittals

6

TOTAL

152

TOTAL

105

Dismissals

Dismissals

9

Impregnation/sexual relations with learners /sexual harassment

11

Impregnation/sexual relations with learners /sexual harassment

3

Forgery/Falsification

4

Absenteeism

2

Absenteeism

1

Fraud

2

Insubordination

1

Insubordination

2

Abscondment

2

Theft

20

20

It was noticed that the Code of Conduct seems to be an unknown document to teachers and especially new appointees. We are urging teachers to get hold of this very important document and to share it with others. NANTU leaders, such as NANTU School Committees (NSC), Branch Executive Committees (BEC), Regional Executive Committees (REC) and/or any other member who is in a leadership position to make sure that every teacher is aware of the Code of Conduct.

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

z x c v b t d f rt y x p m Code of Conduct

1.

PURPOSE

The purpose of applying disciplinary action against a teacher is to:

NOTE: * A workplace representative must be present when verbal or written warnings are given to teachers.

1.1

maintain good standard of work and professional behaviour by the teacher,

*

1.2

ensure that the teacher who has violated or failed to comply with any provision of the Code of Conduct is given the necessary counseling, advice and opportunity to correct future behaviour,

1.3

comply fully with Labour Act, 1992, (Act 6 of 1992), the Education Act, 1998, (Act … of 1998) and the Public Service Act 1995 (Act 13 of 1995).

1.4

Ensure that when disciplinary measures are exhausted, the dismissal of a teacher is both procedurally and substantively fair.

2.

POLICIES APPLICABLE

2.1 RESPONSIBILITY Responsibility for disciplinary action against a teacher is vested in the immediate supervisor of the teacher. This is to ensure that disciplinary action is immediate and in response to known violations of performance and conduct. (Teacher – Head of Department – Principal – School Inspector). 2.2 CORRECTIVE DISCIPLINE Disciplinary action against a teacher shall be corrective and not punitive. It shall encourage and enable the teacher to meet the required performance standards. 2.3 REPRESENTATION A teacher shall have the right to be assisted or represented by a colleague from within the school or from a recognized Trade Union at a disciplinary hearing should he/she so prefer. 2.4 APPEAL A teacher shall have the right of appeal against disciplinary action. 2.5 DISCIPLINARY REGISTER The supervisor shall record the date, nature of violation, and disciplinary action taken in a disciplinary register in order to monitor the frequency and nature of violations by a teacher and disciplinary action taken the teacher.

3.

DISCPLINARY ACTION

3.1 COUNSELLING A teacher shall be counseled when a minor violation of standards has occurred. During the counseling session the supervisor shall discuss the standard that has been violated to ensure that the teacher knows and understands it. Although counseling sessions for first-time violations need not be recorded, subsequent sessions for the same violation shall be recorded. 3.2 VERBAL WARNING A verbal warning may be initiated by a supervisor if he/she is of the opinion that the teacher’s behaviour is unsatisfactory, but does not warrant a written warning or more stringent disciplinary action. A verbal warning is normally valid for a period of three months. 3.3 WRITTEN WARNING Written warnings may be given by the supervisor to the teacher when counselling or verbal warnings for minor violations were unsuccessful or for a first serious offence. An ordinary written warning is normally valid for six to nine months. 3.4 FINAL WRITTEN WARNING A final written warning can be requested by the supervisor and is issued by the personnel officer under the signature of the Permanent Secretary (PS). This request must be based on a thorough investigation into the violation by the supervisor. Final written warnings can be given for major violations or for repeated violations by the teacher to whom previous written warnings were issued.

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The possible disciplinary action to be considered and given under paragraphs 3.1 to 3.4 merely serve as guidelines and depending on the seriousness of the violation and the circumstances under which it occurs, different disciplinary action can be taken e.g. immediately charging a teacher with misconduct without a final written warning.

3.5 CHARGE WITH MISCONDUCT If the Permanent secretary has reason to believe that any teacher is guilty of misconduct, he or she may charge the teacher in writing under his or her hand with misconduct. Such charge shall be made in terms of sections 25 to 29 of the Public Service Act, 1995 (Act 13 of 1995) and the Public Service Staff Rules on misconduct and disciplinary action.

Definition (Public Service Act, 1995, Reg. 25) Paragraph 1: Any staff member shall be guilty of misconduct if he/she – (a) contravenes or fails to comply with any provision of this Act; (b) performs or causes or permits to be performed, or connives at, any act prejudicial to the administration, discipline or efficiency of any office, ministry or agency or any organizational component thereof; (c) disobeys, disregards or makes willful default in carrying out any lawful order given to him/her by any person authorized to do so, or by word or conduct shows insubordination; (d) is negligent or indolent in the performance of his/her duties; (e) operates or undertakes, without the approval of the Prime Minister, any private agency or private work in regard to any matter directly or indirectly related to the field of operations of the office, ministry or agency in which he/her household operates or undertakes any such private agency or private work; (f ) uses his/her position in the Public Service or utilizes any property of the State to promote or prejudice the interests of any political party; (g) uses his/her position in the Public Service or utilizes any property of the State to promote or prejudice the interests of any private business or agency, except in the performance of his/her official duties; (h) conducts himself /herself in a disgraceful, improper or unbecoming manner causing embarrassment to the Government or to the Public Service or, while on duty, is grossly discourteous to any person. (i) uses intoxicating liquor extensively or uses stupefying drugs without a prescription of a medical practitioner resulting in his/her incapacity to perform his/her duties efficiently; (j) uses or is under the influence of intoxicating liquor or stupefying drugs during prescribed official hours of attendance without the prescription of a medical practitioner; (k) without having first obtained the permission of the Permanent Secretary concerned, discloses otherwise than in the performance of his/her official duties any information gained by or conveyed to him/her by virtue of his/her employment in the Public Service, or uses such information for any purpose other than the performance of his/her official duties, whether or not he/she discloses such information; (l) accepts or demands in respect of the performance of or the failure to perform his/her duties any commission, fee or rewards, pecuniary or otherwise, to which he/she is not entitled (m) by virtue of his/her office, or fails to report forthwith to the Permanent Secretary concerned the offer of any such commission, fee or reward; (n) misappropriates or improperly uses any property of the State without committing a criminal offence; (o) commits a criminal offence relating to the performance of his/her official duties or to the administration of any office, ministry or agency; (p) absents himself/herself from office duties without leave or valid cause; (q) with a view to obtain privilege or advantage in relation to his/her official position or his/her duties, or to cause prejudice or injury to the Government or any office, ministry or agency or any member of the Public service, make a false or incorrect statement, knowing it to be false or incorrect; (r) contravenes or fails to comply with any provision relating to his/her employment or conditions of service, or contravenes or fails to comply with any provision of a prescribed code of conduct.

Volume 1 • Issue 3

13 H

January - December 2008

q w e rt yu io p g f d a 4

MISCONDUCT AND DISCIPLINARY ACTION

criminal offence, the offence must be reported to the Namibian Police, as well as the Auditor-General.

MISCONDUCT: Sections 25 to 29 of the Public service Act, 1995 (Act 13 of 1995) defines misconduct and the procedure to follow when a staff member makes him-/herself guilty of misconduct. The following offences can be used as guidelines when dealing with actions that constitute misconduct: 4.1 Major Offences: Examples of Major Offences: • Theft • Fraud • Bribery • Malicious damage to State property • In unauthorized possession of State property • Driving an official vehicle under the influence of stupefying drugs/liquor • Intimidation • Incitement • Perjury • Falsification of records, documents (This includes medical certificates and educational qualifications) • Assault • Making false statements when applying for employment or undergoing a medical examination • Disobey or disregards work-related orders • Inebriety or drug abuse where the lives or property of others are endangered • Sexual harassment • Revealing confidential information to unauthorized persons • Gross discourteousness • Racism • Tribalism • Nepotism

H 14

Note:

If a staff member is caught red-handed with stolen good or is suspected of a

Terminology (A Thesaurus) Conduct - behaviour; action; performance Contravene - be in conflict with; violate Comply - agree to; submit; adhere to Connive - conspire; disregard; turn a blind eye Prejudicial - damaging; hurtful Disobey - resist; ignore Disregard - neglect; disobey Willful - intentional; deliberate Default - wrongdoing; error; failure Lawful - legal; valid Insubordination - disobedience; defiance; disturbance Negligent - lax; sloppy; careless Indolent - lazy; idle; inactive; listless Performance - achievement; completion Disgraceful - dishonorable; shocking; shameful; offensive Improper - unsuited; unfit; incorrect Unbecoming - improper; indecent; rough Embarrassment - annoyance; trouble Grossly - totally; wholly; outrageously Discourteous - brief; impatient; abrupt; boorish Excessively - overmuch; extremely Convey - reveal; disclose Virtue - morality; integrity; quality; merit Pecuniary - monetary; financial Misappropriate - misuse; abuse; steal; rob Valid - well-founded; true; real Privilege - right; advantage; benefit Misconduct - misbehaviour; wrongdoing Procedural - by transaction Substantive - based on facts Fairness - right; justice

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Possible Action to be Considered: Charge with misconduct. 4.2 Serious Offences: Examples of Serious Offences: • Illegal striking in terms of the Labour Act • Flagrant disregard of safety • Misuse of State property for private purposes • Under the influence of intoxicating liquor or stupefying drugs during official hours of duty • Abusing of sick leave • Sleeping on duty • Repeated absence from the workplace while on duty • Repeated unauthorized and/or uncommunicated absenteeism • Physical fighting • Using abusive language • Failure to report an accident or damage • Driving State vehicles without authority • Reckless driving of State vehicles • Gross negligence or indolence Possible Action to be considered: First Offence: First Written Warning Second Offence: Final Written Warning Third Offence: Charge with misconduct 4.3 Minor Offences: Examples of Minor Offences: • • • • • •

Poor time control Horseplay Improper conduct Carelessness Not reporting for overtime without a reasonable excuse Not dressed in a clean, decent and tidy manner

Possible Action to be considered: First Offence: Verbal Warning Second Offence: First Written Warning Third Offence: Final Written Warning Fourth Offence: Charge with misconduct 4.4

WARNINGS WITH REGARD TO MISCONDUCT:

4.4.1 Verbal Warning: Verbal warning may be initiated by a supervisor if he/she is of the opinion that staff member’s is unsatisfactory, but does not warrant a written or more stringent disciplinary action. A verbal warning is normally valid for a period of three months. 4.4.2 Written Warning: Written warning can be given by the supervisor to the staff member when verbal warnings for minor offences were unsuccessful or for a serious offence. A written warning is normally valid for a period of six months. 4.4.3 Severe written warning: A severe written warning can be issued by the supervisor to the staff member if the first written warnings were unsuccessful. A severe written warning is normally valid for a period of nine months. 4.4.4 Final Written Warning: A final written warning can be requested by the supervisor and will be issued by the personnel officer under the signature of the Permanent Secretary concerned. This must be done after an investigation by the supervisor. Final written warnings can be given for major offences or for additional offences by staff members to whom previous written warnings were issued. A final written warning is normally valid for a period of twelve months.

Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

z x c v b t d f rt y x p m 5

PROCEDURE:

(g)

Appeals:

The Labour Act, 1992 (Act 6 of 1992) stipulates that reasons for and procedures relating to disciplinary measures should be fair and valid. No staff member can be summarily dismissed.

Sections 26 (14) to (16) of the Act fully describes the procedure to follow for appeal

Suspension:

Formulating a charge of misconduct:

The Public Service Commission is a statutory body which is empowered with the necessary authority and powers to enquire into grievances of staff members. Cases occur where staff members harbour grievances and that they sometimes seek assistance outside the Public Service – either because of ignorance in regard to existing machinery or for other reasons. A disturbing percentage of staff members feel aggrieved over matters concerning their positions or circumstances in the Public Service. The grievance is frequently based on ignorance and in many cases does not concern salaries or other conditions of service, but points to other factors in the work situation. This does not mean that cases of serious grievances which may occur in Offices/Ministries should not be brought to the personnel attention of the Chief Executive Officer and the Under Secretary: Public Service Management.

(a)

There are two ways to handle grievances:

Section 26 (2) (a) to (d) of the Act fully describes the procedures to follow for the suspension of staff members. Suspension can often be avoided by temporarily transferring a staff member elsewhere in the Office / Ministry / Agency in terms of section 21 (1) of the Act. Suspension should under no circumstances be utilized as a punitive measure in itself as this will constitute punishment before the case has been investigated and the person heard.

Preliminary investigation by the supervisor:

6.

HOW TO HANDLE GRIEVANCES:

An investigation by the supervisor is normally initiated after a major or serious offence has been committed by a staff member or an accumulation of minor offences by a staff member.

Firstly, an informal discussion is conducted between the supervisor and his/her subordinate. Most of the time grievances can be solved through an open-hearted talk.

When an investigation into an alleged misconduct is conducted, the staff member concerned as well as witnesses should interviewed to inter alia obtain answers to questions like: • How did it happen? • When did it happen etc?

There will, however, be times when informal discussions between employees and even the best of supervisors will fail to resolve a problem to the satisfaction of all concerned. There will also be times when circumstances require that disciplinary action be taken against a staff member. He/she may, however, wish to appeal or seek some form of redress. In such cases, further discussion on an informal basis will be of no avail. The Public service has created specific channels through which an aggrieved staff member can seek reversal of an adverse decision or redress for some alleged wrong.

(b)

Formulating an Actual Charge:

A staff member may only be charged with misconduct in terms of the provisions of section 26 (1) read in conjunction with section 25 of the Act. (c)

Admission of guilt by staff member or failure to comply with directions:

In terms of section 26 (4) of the Act, in the case where a staff member charged admits the charge or fails to comply with the direction in the charge, he/she is deemed to have been found guilty of misconduct as charged. If the staff member is deemed to have been found guilty, the Permanent Secretary concerned may refer the case to a disciplinary committee for a recommendation of punitive measures to be taken or he/ she may take action in terms of the Act or propose more stringent disciplinary action of the Commission, take action of the Act. (d)

If a staff member is dissatisfied or discontented with an official action or mission, he/she may raise the matter with his/her supervisor. It is the responsibility of the supervisor to determine the cause of the dissatisfaction or discontent. If the supervisor finds that the dissatisfaction or discontent has arisen from a matter which is not within his/her power or competence to deal with, he/she shall within five working days of the interview referred to, inform the staff member concerned of his/her right to make representations about the matter to a higher authority.

Appointment of the Disciplinary Committee: •

6.2

The designated officer shall act without delay; or within ten working days of receipt of such representations, refers the matter to an officer who is employed to act; and satisfy him-/herself that the prescribed provisions have been complied with and that the aggrieved staff member has been fully acquainted with his/her rights.

6.3

If the staff member’s complaint cannot be disposed of to his/her satisfaction in accordance with the procedure laid down or within the periods specified there in, he/she may make written representations about the matter to the designated officer. Written representations shall contain the following information:

• • • • • • • • (f )

6.1

If a staff member’s complaint concerns a matter which cannot be dealt with by his/her supervisor, or if he/she has a complaint about the supervisor him-/herself, or if the situation remains the same, the staff member may make representations about the matter to the personnel officer in charge of personnel services in the Office/Ministry.

The Chairperson must be member of the of the management cadre of the Office/Ministry/Agency in which the staff member is employed, not have been involved in the offence which led to the charge of misconduct and not have family ties with the staff member charged. Head of organization Component Responsible for Personnel Administration. Personnel Officer. Expert of the Subject on which the charge is based. Representative of a recognized Trade Union. Witness (including Supervisor) Investigating Officer. Staff Member charged or his/her representative Interpreter.

6.3.1 6.3.2 6.3.3

Finding of the disciplinary Committee:

6.3.4

The Staff member’s guilt should be proven on the balance of probabilities. If the staff member is found not guilty, he/she as well as the Permanent Secretary concerned shall be informed. If he/she is found guilty, appropriate disciplinary action must be decided upon.

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15 H

The process in detail looks like this:

Denial of guilt by a staff member:

If a staff member denies the charge, the Permanent Secretary concerned must establish a disciplinary committee. In order for a staff member to prepare for the inquiry he/she must be given reasonable notice in writing. (e)

The grievance path starts with a submission of the aggrieved person to his/her supervisor, and in case his/her supervisor is the cause of the grievance, the submission will be addressed to the next higher rank, i.e. the supervisor’s supervisor.

Volume 1 • Issue 3



Name and rank of the staff member; Full details of reasons for his/her dissatisfaction/discontent; Steps already taken to dispose of the complaint and the outcome; Statements by other persons or other evidence, if any, in support of the contention of the staff member concerned.

January - December 2008

q w e rt yu io p g f d a 6.4

6.5

Within ten working days of receiving the written representations, the designated officer shall submit such representations together with any comments, explanations, statements or evidence that may be required, via the aggrieved staff member’s head of office or division and chief executive officer of the relevant Office/Ministry to the Under Secretary: Public Service Management. Within ten working days the Under Secretary: Public Service Management will notify in writing that an investigation is being conducted regarding his/her complaint as well as giving the names of three staff members not involved in the matter to conduct the investigation.

8.

CONCLUSION:

There are numerous ways to trespass or be aggrieved in the Public Service, as there are elsewhere. This procedure must not be taken lightly and a staff member must make sure of the ground of complaint. He/she can, however, be assured that his/ her grievances will get an objective investigation, and that he/she can turn to the Ombudsman as a last resort.

Time to Relax

The investigating officer then shall begin or continue the investigation of the complaint within five working days. During the investigation, the aggrieved staff member may, if he/she desires, be assisted by a staff member of a staff association/union which is recognized by the Commission and of which the staff member is a member. After the investigating officer has thoroughly investigated the complaint, he/she shall record his/ her findings and submit it together with the minutes of the investigation, evidence if any and his/her recommendations in the matter to the Under Secretary: Public Service Management. If the Under Secretary: Public Service Management decides that the complaint is without foundation or that for some reason the representations have to be rejected, the reasons for the decision shall be given to the staff member concerned and he/she shall be informed of his/her right to demand that his/her representations be submitted to the Commission. 6.6

6.7

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2 3 4

If a staff member’s complaint cannot be disposed of to his/her satisfaction by following the procedures laid down, he/she may within ten working days of receipt of the notification require in writing that all the documents relating to the complaint be submitted to the Commission. Within ten working days of receiving the request, the Under Secretary: Public Service Management shall forward all the files and documents to the Commission and advise the staff member in writing that this has been done. The Commission shall consider the files and documents and if it is deemed expedient, designates one of its members or an officer to investigate the matter. The investigating officer shall commence his/her investigation within five working days of his/her being informed of his/her designation. After the investigating officer has thoroughly investigated the complaint, he/she shall record his/her findings and submit those, together with the minutes of the

6.8

Investigation, evidence if nay and his/her recommendations on the matter to the Commission.

6.9

After the Cabinet has taken a decision on the recommendation made by the Commission, the Under Secretary: Public Service Management shall advise the aggrieved staff member accordingly through official channels.

7.

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5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

THE OMBUDSMAN:

If, after having followed the grievance procedure, a staff member still is not satisfied, the last resort is to approach the office of the Ombudsman. Ever since the year 1800, citizens in France have had the right to appeal to the state council against any decision of an executive institution or office-bearer (including ministers). France is known as a country where the rights of the individual are well protected and where public accountability is always enforced. In Sweden, provision was made for the appointment of an “Ombudsman” in the year 1809. he had to investigate complaints of members of the public against decisions of executive functionaries. The Ombudsman system has also been in operation in Finland and Denmark. An Ombudsman receives complaints from the citizens about supposedly prejudicial actions or decisions taken by Government officials. The Constitution of the Republic of Namibia also makes provision for an Ombudsman. The basic functions of the Ombudsman as described in the Constitution are as follows: •



He/she must investigate complaints concerning alleged or apparent instances of violation of fundamental rights and freedoms and any other irregularities by the Government (whether central or local) and its staff members; and He/she must try to solve problems through negotiation and compromise between the parties concerned. He/she also needs to report annually to the National Assembly on the exercise of his/her powers and functions.

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Read the questions below and complete the quiz. 1. Breaking into pieces with noise and violence. 2. Newsletter for the Namibia National Teachers’ Union. 3. To understand something written. 4. Complete: Educate to ……….. 5. Colour associated with jealousy. 6. International who is still funding the Leadership training Programme. 7. Fill in: In 2009, NANTU will hold its …….. Congress. 8. The month in which NANTU was established. 9. First book in the Holy Bible. 10. Who was the first President of NANTU? 11. World Teachers’ Day celebrations. 12. Surname of the NANTU’s longest served Secretary-General. 13. What is the back of a human neck called? 14. Who was NANTU’s first female Secretary-General? My Answer Is: _____________________________

Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

egotiation raining in Canada z x cNv b t Td f rt yx pm The Secretary-General, Cde. Basilius Haingura and the National Organizer, Cde. Bendos //Garoëb were invited to Vancouver, Canada by the British Columbia Teacher’s Federation (BCTF) to attend some training in Winter Labour School. The aim of the training was Collective Bargaining and Phasing Management which comprised of many other components. They left Namibia on 23rd January 2008. Summer in the Southern Hemisphere means winter for the Northern Hemisphere.

The weather was snowy in Vancouver and the Namibian delegation had to make sure they are well protected against the chilly weather.

Here they are posing in front of Uncle Don’s house in Vancouver.

Uncle Don Reader met them at Vancouver Airport and accompanied them to his house. On February 2nd, the delegation attended the Assembly of the British Columbia Representatives and the Secretary-General made a comment on behalf of the NANTU membership. “On behalf of the National Leadership and entire members of NANTU and indeed on my own, we in NANTU are very much grateful and appreciate to be associated with you as a strong union in your country. I believe the visions and objectives of the two unions do not differ, as such. We are there to address issues affecting our members and educate them to execute their duties efficiently and effectively. Although we are trying our level best to address issues affecting members, there are some lessons that we as leaders need to get learn a union like yours.

We operate within the ambit of our Collective Agreement and the recognition Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Namibia as well as the mandate of the members. NANTU is the sole bargaining agency for the teaching fraternity in Namibia including our rival union members. Currently the Government is busy reforming our education system. This has raised many issues facing teachers that need our intervention to curb the negative impact on our members, such as class size, contract appointment of School Managers, licensing for teachers, etc. just to mention a few. To tackle these issues NANTU needs support in terms of advice from other unions outside the country such as yours. To be able to conduct adequate research on educational issues the Union should always get in touch or connect with others to get relevant information regarding the specific issue under discussion. Of interest allow me to sketch the structures of NANTU. NANTU is still a young union, which needs support of any kind, like the BCTF supported workshops cited earlier on to you. It has 13 full time staff members who run the daily activities of the union. Out of the 13, two staff members are based in the regions. The structures are as follows: * * * * *

NANTU School Committee. Branch Executive Committee. Regional Executive Committee. National Executive Committee. National Teachers Council (NTC) the highest decision making body between the National Congress.

The National Congress is being held every three years. Our next congress will be in 2009.

As some of you might be aware, the operations of NANTU are still in the same fashion since formation. There are two teacher unions in Namibia, which are competing, with each other for membership in order to get recognition with the government. Out of twenty thousand teachers within the country, twelve thousand and more signed up with NANTU, the remaining number of teachers comprise of free riders and some to our rival union. Based on this NANTU is accorded the recognition with the government. This is a very challenging task facing the leadership of NANTU. Due to a lack of full time staff at the Regional level, it is expected from Head Office especially the National Organizer to travel throughout the regions for recruitment.

Let me briefly give you the history of NANTU’s relationship with the BCTF. It began in the early 1990’s when Marius Kudumo visited the BCTF and observed your training programs and liked what he saw and requested assistance. Oxfam Canada in Namibia also offered assistance and thus the three year project was After the training, the Namibian delegation were initiated. In 1994, Susan certified by the course presenters. Lambert and Don Reader went in July to Namibia to offer training to NANTU School Committee Chairs (who are our school union reps). The project has been so successful that it still continues after 14 years. Oxfam Canada continued financial support till 2000 and now NANTU also budgets for the project. However the overwhelming financial support has come from the BCTF International Solidarity Committee whom we thank and especially Larry Kuehn, its BCTF support person. Over the years there has been other training as well, such as Negotiation Training by Sheila Pither and Don Reader and English Second Language Training supported by the Canadian Teachers Federation.

This requires lots of planning and resources. For NANTU to grow, we are motivating and encouraging the NANTU/BCTF facilitators to conduct as many workshops as possible to enable teachers who are not yet NANTU members to understand and know why a teacher should belong to a union such as NANTU. Our membership is inclusive, it simply means that it coves teachers from Pre-primary to Lecturers at Tertiary Educational Institutions.

Several NANTU Leaders have also came to Vancouver for training; in fact the number would be close to 20. Some have studied at the Justice Institute and now Bendos and I have been at the CLC Winter Labour School. All of this training has enriched both our professional and personal lives and it would have been very difficult if not impossible to find this type of training anywhere in Southern Africa. We have not only become colleagues over the years but we have also become personal friends.

Cde.Haingura,Secretary-General busy addressing the Assembly of the British Columbia Representatives.

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

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January - December 2008

Karas Region qw e rt yu io p g f d a Concerned about Grade 10 results which are Deteriorating By Cde. Richard Alex Christiaan Regional Chairperson: Karas It is a well known, fact that the Karas Education Region previously known as Keetmanshoop Education Region was a top performer. The former Regional Director of Education received awards as the best Education Director.

Cde. Richard A. Christiaan

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International Solidarity

Don Reader a true friend of Namibia and in specific NANTU, approached a couple of schools in Canada, Vancouver and collected some money in order to provide to needy schools in Namibia. The first school to receive a donation was Oshitama Primary School in Omusati Region. They received N$ 5,000-00 to erect toilet facilities and again N$ 2,000-00 for the completion thereof. The school in Canada, Vancouver who thought it very wise was Queen Alexandra Primary School.

It is surprising to learn that our region dropped so drastically last year. We were rated the 11th from the 13 Educational Regions. Being acknowledged as the best region in terms of infrastructure and qualified teachers, one wonders what went wrong.

The Regional Education Office Management Team, advisory teachers, teaching staff are still the same people who were in charge of the region a few years ago when it was the top performer. We need to take a critical look and make analysis of the situation. I don’t want to blame anybody. We as teachers, learners, parents, inspectors and advisory teachers need to do some self-introspection and not point fingers. As stakeholders in the education sector, we should work together to remedy the situation for the better. I acknowledge and thank the Regional Education Office with the Û-Oa Programme and encourage all stakeholders to be part and parcel of the brilliant idea. Otherwise the well drafted document will only be a pipe-dream and not reality.

The principal of the school Cde. Katrina Eilo(right) holding the cheque of N$ 2,000. Photo: PW Kazimbu

The second school to receive a donation was Onashikuvu Primary School in Oshikoto Region who received about N$ 17,000-00 from Henderson School in Vancouver, Canada. Part of the money was used to buy sports equipment and the others to purchase a photo-copier.

As Regional Chairperson, I want to advise the teachers to be committed, dedicated and enthusiastic towards the profession no matter what happened. We must not disadvantage the learners because of differences amongst ourselves at school level. We must have passion for the profession, because I know the hardship the teachers experience from the side of the learners, parents, management and entire community. As stakeholders in the region, we should pull hands together and put our difference aside because our potential doctors, engineers, future leaders are suffering innocently.

The SG, Cde. Haingura (left ) and NO, Garoëb (right) handing over a cheque of N$ 15,000 to the School Principal, Ndapewa Nghipandulwa, middle in Oshikoto Region at Onashikuvu Primary School. Photo: PW Kazimbu

NANTU really values these contributions very much because it serves for the Namibian children and therefore wishes Uncle Don Reader and the two schools all the best.

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

Standards And Performance zxN cational v b t d f rt y x p m Indicators For Schools In Namibia Compiled by Mr. M. Gqwede Inspector of Education, Directorate: Programmes and Quality Assurance (PQA) Division: Audit Standard & Quality Assurance Ministry of Education, Head Office

This print seeks to enlighten teachers and public at large about National Standards and Performance Indicators (NSPI) for Schools in Namibia and also to appeal to schools to re-visit Circular: FORM. ED 3/2006 on implementation of NSPI. The history of education in Namibia informs us about the following:

Mr. M. Gawede

• • •

Before Independence • We inherited 11 disparate education systems from previous dispensation. There was unequal provision of resources along racial lines. The different curricula that were content-based were designed to cater for very few who would proceed to university There were no clearly defined standards for the majority.

After Independence • One Ministry of Education was created with Regional Offices • They had to address the backlogs inherited from the previous dispensation • Although we had one Ministry of Education, regional differences and approaches existed. • There was no uniform approach hence the need for establishment of National Standards.

- - 2. 3. 4.



• •

The aim is to provide uniform approach in teaching, learning, assessment, evaluation, and to improve service delivery to ensure improved end-year examination results and quality in education across the country Since the work of all schools in the country is standardized through National Standards, ideally all schools should perform more or less the same. Ninety (90)% or more pass rate should be easily attainable by all schools. The National Standards were officially launched by Hon. Nangolo Mbumba, Minister of Education, on 16 March 2006. National Standards are now official policy for quality assurance in schools in Namibia • National Standards booklets were issued to each and every teacher in Namibia.

Structure Standards

Rural school to be provided with the latest technology and resources will be of much help. This old, old type writer at Aasvoëlnes Primary School close to Tsumkwe in Otjozondjupa Region was donated by Cde. Norman Titus during the so-called “donkie jare”. Cde, Titus was a long serving member in the NTC. Photo: PW Kazimbu

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of

If used, standards will guide the school on the following: - What it is aiming to do - How well it is achieving its aims - What aspects of the school needs sustenance - What aspects of the school needs improvement - What action is planned - What can be done to improve things with existing resources - Whether action currently undertaken is succeeding

School Self Evaluation Sharing information with the Regional Office or Head Office with regard to: - - - - -

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What is actually happening in the school How what is happening measures against a National Standard Strengths of the school (preserve) Where effort is needed to keep things at good standard Weaknesses that need to be remedied

How to use Performance Indicators •

Have a broad look at the school. The management and the whole staff discuss strengths and weaknesses of the school currently. School Self-Evaluation results will guide discussions.



Decide which aspects should be looked at in detail (usually where weakness is seen) If, for example, teaching and learning are identified as problem, then Key Area 2, 3 and 5 is where the school could focus its attention on. If, for example, School as a social unit would be an identified problem, then aspects of Key Area 4 and part of Key Area 5 would be studied.



Actions taken in addressing weaknesses identified above would normally form part of the School Development Plan (SDP).

National

1. Seven Key Areas of the work of schools have been identified: - Provision of Resources for schools and hostels - Curriculum and attainment - The Teaching and Learning process - The School as a Social Unit - Management and Leadership of school and hostel

For each of these Key Areas, a number of Performance Indicators (PI) have been written—30 PIs. Each PI deals with a group of themes/aspects- 111 themes. PIs are designed to enable grading to be given to the aspect of school work on a four-point scale: Level 4: Excellent (strong in almost all themes) Level 3: Good (more strengths than weaknesses) Level 2: Fair (more weaknesses than strengths) Level 1: Weak (extensive weaknesses)

Use of standards by the schools

Why National Standards? •

Links with Parents and the Community Links with other Schools and the Region

To be continued in Part 2 of the series...

Comments, questions, or request for information about the activities of the Directorate should be directed to: The Director Programmes and Quality Assurance (PQA) Ministry of Education Government office Park (Luther Street) Private Bag 13186 WINDHOEK Tel: +264-61-293 3205 Fax: +264-61-293 3922

Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

q w e rtNEWS yuCLIPPINGS io p g f d a Retired Don Reader also known as” Mr. NANTU” receives his Life Membership Award from the President of the beautiful

As NANTU is trying to get its members updated and educated about structures of the Union and issues that will affect their profession, Metropolitan Namibia as usual made another amount of N$ 15,000 available to get the workshop being a success. From left to right; Mr. Himarua-National Sales Manager of Metropolitan

British Columbia Teachers’ Federation (BCTF), Ms. Irene Lanzinger. While still a teacher, Uncle Don was a very active member of his federation in organizing and conducting workshops. Uncle Don’s contributions to NANTU through BCTF will for long remain in the hearts of the leaders of NANTU.

Namibia; Ms. Elsabé-Public Relations Practitioner at Metropolitan Namibia, Cde. Kazimbu-Director for Research, Information and Publicity of NANTU, Cde. Garoëb-National Organizer of NANTU and Mr. Hangula-Sales Manager for Central Region of Metropolitan Namibia. The contribution was used to carry out workshops in Outjo, Khorixas and Opuwo, Kunene Region. Photo: PW Kazimbu

Parental involvement is a matter of concern for many schools. This Omuhimba mother was very much interested to see whether her child on this Friday reached the school. Mr. Gqwede (left) Inspector of Education (PQA) in the Head Office of

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the MoE and Mr. Matamu (right) Senior Human Resource Practitioner in the Head Office of the MoE were indeed happy to witness the presence of the parent at school. Photo: PW Kazimbu

NANTU some years ago had a very sound relationship with the Norwegian Teachers Federation, Norsk Laererlag (NL)Vest Agder. NANTU , however, want to revive the relationship at its best for more projects. Here from left to

right; Mr. Harry from Norway, Cde. Kleinert – NTC member and Cde. Haingura – NANTU Secretary General after having fruitful discussions. Mr. Harry is a board member of NAMAS. Photo: PW Kazimbu

As NANTU is trying to get its members updated and educated about structures of the Union and issues that will affect their profession, NamMic as usual made another amount of N$ 7,000

NANTU signed an agreement with Metropolitan Namibia on the death benefit for members which remains at N$ 5,0000. From left to right: NANTU

Secretary-General, Cde. Basilius Haingura, Metropolitan National Sales Manager, Mr. Rudolph Himarua and NANTU Financial Administrator, Cde. Isabella Nguaiko. Photo: PW Kazimbu

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available to get the workshop being a success. From left to right; Mr. Sylvester Gawaseb of NamMic Financial Services Holdings and NANTU SecretaryGeneral, Cde. Basilius Haingura The contribution was used to carry out workshops and meetings in Uis, Omaruru Okombahe and Karibib, Erongo Region.

Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

z x c v b t d f rt y x p m

Dibasen JJS in Okombahe, Erongo Region. These members were left in the dark for many years as explained by the principal. They were indeed very happy to have a chat again and being recognized as die-heart NANTU members.

Members of the Branch Executive Committee after a Mass meeting in Khorixas, Kunene Region. Photo: PW Kazimbu

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Members in Oshana Region attending a Mass meeting.

In Walvisbay, Erongo region, the early birds threw a light discussion as a starter.

Photo: PW Kazimbu

Photo: PW Kazimbu

In Khomas Region, members were also given a chance to air their views during a Mass meeting. New branches were established as mandated by the NTC and members started to involve themselves in activities. Some prominent members also attended like Cde. Mahalie (far left), a former National Organizer with Cde. Matsuib member of the NTC. Photo: PW Kazimbu

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

At Colleges Education q wLeecturers rt yu ioOfp gfda According to NANTU records, it is now for approximately 5 years since 2003 when the issue conditions of service of the lecturers of Colleges was first raised. It started during the time of the Ministry of Higher Education, Science and Technology under which the Colleges resorted. In February 2007, NANTU engaged the Ministry of Education on the issue. What was observed was that the submission that was Photo: PW Kazimbu made previously was outdated and a mandate was given to submit a new proposal. A new proposal with the Colleges was set up and submitted to the Ministry of Education and then transferred to the Office of the Prime Minister (OPM). OPM and NANTU had several negotiation meetings in order to reach a consensus. It took the government longer to express themselves on the issue because the lecturers of colleges wanted to be treated equally as the lecturers at the University of Namibia (UNAM) and Polytechnic of Namibia (PoN). What should be understood is that the Colleges of education fall under the Teaching Pay Structure while At Rundu College of Education, the lecturers were UNAM and PoN are indeed happy to have the Secretary-General semi-autonomous. physically there. For them it was too much looking at where 2003 is. They in fact contributed well and During the visit of the were eager to see the issue being solved at a faster Secretary- General to the Colleges of Education, it pace. was explained to them Photo: PW Kazimbu how it all started and how the process is being handled. The Lecturers at Colleges of Education regarded some aspects as delaying tactics by government and NANTU who is not taking their concerns seriously.

At Ongwediva College of Education, Cde. Mbangura made it clear when he said ” Let an electrician fix the bulb”. Although he was also very much concerned and eager to hear about the next step, he made it clear that proper procedures which need to be followed.

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NANTU Secretary-General Cde. Basilius Haingura is trying to explain to three of the members who are serving on the Steering Committee what should be done and how procedures should be followed. Every route taken must be procedural.

Wherever finances are involved, costing should be considered. It must be ensured whether it can be maintained for a longer period and or forever. The Lecturers at Colleges of Education fall under the Teaching Salary Structure (TSS) and starts at T4A for an ordinary lecturer, which is a management position at school level e.i. a Head of Department (HOD).

The argument now is, if the salary structure of the lecturers which falls under the TSS should be changed then all servants who falls under those grades/scales should be accorded with the same treatment. The lecturers demanded for an immediate implementation backdated to 2003. No agreement was signed It was also a big concern for Caprivi College of Education. These lecturers were also eager to see that lecturers will be their new salary scales being implemented. Here given an increment or Cde. Chata (left) makes his voice heard using good grades higher. This was formulated ideas. Seated on the right is the Viceexplained clearly to the Rector of the College. Steering Committee and they found it difficult Photo: PW Kazimbu to understand. Several meetings were held and no solutions could be achieved. The lecturers than threatened with a strike which NANTU did not support because correct procedures need to be followed whenever any industrial action needs to be taken. As from June 9th till June 12th, 2008, the lecturers started with a peaceful demonstration outside their premises demonstration and a strike followed a week thereafter. This strike was illegal because no proper procedures were followed. The Union, however, did not comment on it. The lecturers at the Windhoek College of Education asked for the Federation to intervene and officials in the federation threatened with a national strike which the union did not support because the negotiations were not exhausted and talks were ongoing. They wanted the Federation to intervene because they mentioned that the strike at the national carrier, TransNamib was successful due to the intervention of the Federation. This strike was illegal and government lost a lot of money unnecessarily. NANTU and government jointly looked at what solution an interim agreement could bring while other job related categories are also waiting for their issues to be looked at. The two teams thought of giving the lecturers a grade higher. The lecturers (Steering Committee) claimed for a grade higher and two notches. The two notches caused a big problem As the lecturers were in dire need to see their because some could salary scales be changed to higher grades and move to the next grade notches, the sign-post that gives direction towards and with the two notches Ongwediva College of Education decided to play along and instead of being in a horizontal position jumped into another the arrow stood in an upwards position meaning grade for example: from salaries should go up. Grade T4A to Grade T4B with two notches directly Photo: PW Kazimbu into T4C at the beginning notch. This was practically impossible to too costly. The two teams even looked at the regrading process which has started and whereby the lecturers will also benefit. The system might regrade the scales of some people if they are overpaid and the want to avoid it. The proposed interim solution of moving the lecturers’ one grade higher and regrading was discussed with the lecturers of all four Colleges of Education. Three of the Colleges, Ongwediva, Caprivi and Rundu agreed with the interim solutions. The remaining college still did not see any need of getting one grade higher. We must know that there are limits in what ever we do. To get something is better than receiving nothing.

Photo: PW Kazimbu

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

z x c v b t d f rt y x p m The Signing Ceremony: After a mandate was given by three of the four Colleges of Education; Caprivi College, Rundu College and Ongwediva College, on October 29th, 2008 the agreement was signed between the Government of the Republic of Namibia and NANTU.

The Secretary to Cabinet, Mr. Frans Kapofi on the right and Secretary-General of NANTU Cde. Basilius Haingura on the left busy to initial and sign the agreement.

The Secretary to Cabinet, Mr. Frans Kapofi on the right and Secretary-General of NANTU Cde. Basilius Haingura on the left busy exchanging the signed agreement.

Photo: PW Kazimbu

Photo: PW Kazimbu

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The regrading is effective from 01 October 2008 and translate into the following: # # # #

Lecturer - Ordinary Lecturer - HOD Vice Rector Rector

AB

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ird i n

-

Current Grade T4A Current Grade T4B Current Grade T4C Current Grade T4D

New Grade T4B. New Grade T4C. New Grade T4D. New Grade Unified 4A (M).

h s u b e h t the han d is worth two in

Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

Day Celebrations qwW e orld rtTeachers yu ’io pg f d a Caprivi Region Ngweze community hall, katima mulilo Friday, october 3rd, 2008

The Teachers marching to the Community Hall.

Being a teacher is a task that many people in some communities still do not have a right concept of. People regard teachers as educators of only children. A teacher is an educator of the whole nation, a doctor, an engineer, a nurse, a pilot, you name it. Yet teachers are not given what they deserve.

Photo: PW Kazimbu

An early World Teachers’ Day was celebrated on Friday October 3rd, in a different style in Katima Mulilo, the only town in Caprivi Region. All the teachers marched from the NBC Quarters through the main street to Ngweze Community Hall.

The Religious Opening:

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Before the event started, some teachers could not wait and were up to show their happiness and flexibility of their bodies by dance to the beat of Stanley. They were all dressed in T-shirts which were partly sponsored by EI (Education International to make teachers more aware of the pandemic HIV/Aids. Photo: PW Kazimbu

The day was opened with a word from the Holy Bible by Father John. He read from Proverbs 9:7-12. In his short preaching, he encouraged the teachers to take the role Jesus played because Jesus is the Great Teacher and therefore the patron of teaching. Jesus brought the message from God to us, so the teacher should do the same by teaching the learners.

Father John also emphasized on three important words in life which are information, knowledge and wisdom. Teachers must give information to the learners so that they can have knowledge about the information and inherit wisdom. Teaching through visible signs was the technique of Jesus through healing and changing the minds of people positively. This is what teachers should do also in order to produce better quality learners through obtaining higher grades and marks.

Father John reading a scripture and giving a short preaching.

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The Welcoming Remarks: The Deputy Major of Katima Mulilo town, Her Worship Hon. Mapenzi welcomed all visitors and teachers to her town. She said that teachers are the torch bearers of any developing country and therefore in recognition of the contributions made Teachers in their World Teachers’Day attire a sponsorship by teachers, this from Education International singing the National day is celebrated as Anthem. technologies and all Photo: PW Kazimbu fundamentals are coming from the elementary classrooms. She further mentioned that teachers are a source of knowledge and wisdom that without teachers professions such as doctors, nurses lawyers, directors could not have existed.

The Opening:

Official

The Hon. Governor of Caprivi Region officiated the day on behalf of the Deputy Minister Hon NdjozeOjo by conveying the message of the Deputy Minister. “World Teachers’ Day is proclaimed by the United Nations to Deputy Major Hon. Mapenzi recognize the teaching profession and to raise public awareness of the vital contribution teachers make to society, present and future.” “So today we are here to celebrate the thousands of teachers in Namibia, and our millions of colleagues around the globe, who every day gives their energy, creativity and knowledge to nurture the emerging intellect of the next generation.” He further said that education is one of our top national priorities for the next phase as we develop and gave the following two reasons: Firstly, that education is the most precious gift we can give our children. Secondly, that education is the most critical investment in our future.

Hon. Mwalima, Governor of Caprivi Region.

“When we talk of quality education it is not just a matter of putting in the resources and the people or

Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008

z x c v b t d f rt y x p m the money but finding the dedication, the commitment, the team, setting the goals for our education system and motivating and inspiring our teachers, our principals, our staff, to go ahead, give their best and make it happen and change the lives of the students therefore Namibia needs to add quality to quantity.”

Cde. Joseph Dinyando, Deputy President of NANTU giving the background of World Teachers’ Day and very specific in Namibia as a school holiday whenever October 5th falls during the week. In the background from left to right; Cde. Shaanika NTC member and Cde. Williams the National Treasurer.

“Professionally trained teachers ensure allrounded development of the human personality that takes into account the spiritual, moral and social aspects. Awareness of values relating to tolerance of diversity, environment, peace, health, love for learning, respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms are indispensable to individual development and progress of societies. Teachers play a pivotal role to inculcate such values in their pupils and therefore dialogue is the main tool of education.”

A poster the teachers made to make everyone aware, gives a clear message on the importance of a teacher. ETSIP is also having a vision till 2015 and teachers’ views must be recognized through their representatives. This is how one of the teachers’ set the acronym ETSIP in our context: ETSIP (Every Teacher Student Inspector Parent). We all should be involved in a dialogue.

On ETSIP, it came clearly out that this ambitious teaching and educational plan which have been set up by the Ministry of Education can not be implemented or activated unless being accompanied by an anticipated highstandard preparation of teachers who would be entrusted with applying those plans and studies.

At a very important note it was said: “Based on this concept of appreciation to your role and responsibilities within the educational process, we reiterate the importance of upgrading –first and above all- the level of teachers and those who would be entrusted with accomplishing it, starting from kindergartens until universities or their equivalents.” “Teachers need to work closely with the parents as many parents are now very much interested in the performance and progress of their children. This should be a two-way relationship where parents should support the teachers, helping teachers to achieve the learning objectives and teachers giving parents the feedback so that they can know how their children are doing.” “On this specific day, we remember our teachers, we remember our children’s teachers. We recognize these very dedicated people. People who give of themselves and take a personal interest in their students. Teachers, who have touched our lives, moulded us into what we are today. WE should therefore feel honoured and privileged to be entrusted in helping to shape today and tomorrow’s students who are citizens and leaders.”

According to UNESCO, many countries encounter a shortage of teachers and if we want to achieve the Universal Primary Education by 2015, then 18 million additional teachers will be needed. Even if all teachers are fully and appropriately qualified for the levels and subjects they teach as well the overall supply of teachers, remote and disadvantage areas across Ms. Aimtonga Amani Makawia, EDUCAIDS Cluster the globe may suffer Coordinator UNESCO giving the message on behalf of UNESCO. persistent problems in recruitment and retention. To achieve the Education For All (EFA) goals the shortage of qualified teachers is one of the biggest challenges. The teaching profession is also facing the challenges of providing quality education to meet the new demands of the 21st century and there is a number of factors which have an impact on the profession which are; economic, social, scientific and technological needs, the issues of sustainable development, poverty reduction and related questions of decent work for all, the AIDS epidemic and school violence. Faced with such high expectations, teachers often feel undervalued, insufficiently supported and ill equipped professionally to cope with the realities of the environment in which they work. To overcome the new challenges, the following factors should be seriously considered: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f )

More recruitment, full and appropriate teacher training. Better targeted deployment and management. Salaries and incentives which compare favourably with those in other occupations requiring similar qualifications. Better working and living conditions. Ongoing professional support and Opportunities for career development.

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Throughout the process of policy development, it is crucial to ensure that social dialogue takes place between stakeholders, including policy makers, teachers, and their organizations. Social dialogue will help build national consensus and ownership towards a more efficient implementation of teacher policies, which is a

Message form IOL – Caprivi: “On behalf of the Institute of Open Learning (IOL), we would like to thank all teachers of Caprivi and the whole of Namibia for the selfless effort they put in for the youth of our country , was the opening remark from the Regional Manager. Ms. Vernooy made it very clear that, this career called “teaching” is the most underrated and least appreciated occupation today because many people do not realize the importance of their teachers in their communities. She regarded teachers as specific individuals who can mould and shape youngsters in order to become productive citizens and at the same telling teachers that they can make or break a student. Ms. Vernooy was also concerned about the economy, education and government of our country which could not materialize without having these important members in the communities called “teachers”. She encouraged the teachers and said the following: “It is the responsibility of each and every teacher to do their teaching to the best of their abilities and most important of all to set the right example. Setting the right example is so much more valuable than words. One must lead by example for all students watch each and every movement of teachers, the clothes they wear and their actions after official hours”. According to Ms. Vernooy, teaching is not an easy job. Teachers on the other side do it for their love of children and therefore, every parents and citizen of Namibia must applaud teachers and for their hard work.

Message form UNESCO: “World Teachers’ Day is a day when we acknowledge the essential role teachers play in providing children, young people and adults with s relevant and appropriate education” as introductory by UNESCO.

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January - December 2008

q w e rt yu io p g f d a In conclusion she said that IOL really admires teachers who work so hard at school and at the same time they study because they are motivated to make a success of their career and want to acquire more knowledge in order to produce useful Namibian citizens.

Ms. Koeks Vernooy IOL, Regional Manager Caprivi

Message USAID/AED:

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“I am humbled to present this speech on behalf of mu Chief of party, Mr. Muhammed Liman, who unfortunately cannot be here today. Please accept his sincere regrets for his inability to join us.” This message was presented by Mr. Vincent Matakala. “World Teachers’ day was Inaugurated in 1993 On October 5th by UNESCO. This day is being celebrated because it represents the appreciation displayed for the vital and substantial contributions that teachers make to education and, as a natural consequence, development and prosperity.

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On HIV and AIDS he said that it has a devastating effect across the globe, primarily in Africa, and visibly clear in Namibia, which threatens to reverse back the gains made in the education sector. “Education is the key to EVERYTHING, to peace, democracy and stability, to job security and economic growth, to good This local band , kept the teachers during each health, to tolerance and break on their feed. respect for diversity, to EVERYTHING. Education plays such a prominent role and permeates every aspect of live only because the drivers are so professional, the teachers. We can have a school without the minimum inputs such as desks and chairs, a chalk board and a chalk but you cannot have a school without a teacher”. “There is a lot of demand of teacher supply globally and as a result many children are NOT in school. About quality in education, the current supply of teachers does not solely consist of an adequately trained group of professionals. There are fundamental gaps. There are gaps in levels of training, minimum training requirements; fluctuating attrition with concomitant adverse effect on education delivery and outcomes, etc. this contributes to the children we are seeing on the streets, the pre-mature dropouts”. “The Academy for Educational Development (AED), with USAID funding, has now partnered with NANTU to help mitigate the impact of the HIV and AIDS pandemic on education sector. This years’ collaboration with NANTU is characterized by funding from the Presidents Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), funding from the American tax Mr. Vincent Matakala, Project Manager payers. The funds are aimed USAID/AED at supporting NANTU to implement activities that will help teachers take care of themselves and their families, and by extension, the learners they teach.

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From left to right: Hon. Mwalima - Governor of Caprivi, Father John, Mr. Lupalezi Caprivi- Education Director, Cde. Kavila-NANTU President, Cde. DinyandoNANTU Deputy President and Cde. Haingura-NANTU Secretary General. Photo: PW Kazimbu

USAID is providing over half a million Namibian dollars to fund NANTU and its regional structures in setting up and capacitating a network for HIV positive teachers. This network, which is one of many activities that the sub agreement with NANTU will support, will enable the HIV positive teachers from support groups to help one another, as well as advocate for their right to work and diminish stigma, while at the same time equipping them with skills to live healthy and positive lives”. Currently there is another sub-agreement which is the Teacher Health Days that AED is supporting the MoE to launch. To date AED, HAMU and NANTU have held six health days whereby about 8,000 education sector employees, mainly teachers accessing medical aid for free. According to the records about 1,000 teachers now know their status. Mr. Matakala further said that, as much as our teachers teach, and teach well, they do much more than that which is that they coach and mentor, lead and illuminate, enable and encourage, and include and inspire. To sum up he said: “Teachers are purveyors of hope: hope for a brighter future, hope for an HIV free society. A cynic can never be a great teacher, because cynicism is corrosive; and great teachers are creative. A pessimist cannot be a great teacher, because pessimism sees only limits, while great teachers see potential. A defeatist cannot be a great teacher, because defeatism knows only how to give up the fight; great teachers never give up on a child”. In conclusion, he said that our country is a great country with skilled, competent and committed teachers. Teachers are the building blocks of our society and we should take special care of them.

Keynote Address By NANTU: I am extremely honored today to be standing in front of you to address you on this momentous occasion of World Teachers Day 2008 under the theme “teachers’ matters”. This is exactly the eighth year into the new millennium and we as NANTU President, Cde. Kavila teachers have not yet move closer to millennium targets set out by Education International (EI) and various stakeholders like the United Nations through its affiliate body, UNESCO, fifteen years ago.

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January - December 2008

z x c v b t d f rt y x p m Some of these targets were that all countries in the world should have an adequate supply of properly trained teachers, teachers’ conditions of employment should be improved and a teachers’ charter should be introduced. However many teachers in some impoverished countries still has a raw deal as far as these targets are concerned. Teachers today are facing more pressing challenges than 15 years ago. We are faced with: * The rising cost of living, * Very low income levels, * Limited accommodation and teaching facilities and * The scourge of HIV and Aids, to name but a few.

A house that belongs to a teacher at Otjetjekua PS in Kunene Region. No toilet and bathroom available. We expect this type of teachers to perform to the best of their abilities. Teachers working under such conditions should be looked well after by providing them with any good reward in order to retain them and doing a good job under such hash conditions in rural areas. This type of conditions are noticeable in many of the regions.

In my career as a teacher and a unionist I have long realized that these realities have a strong and adverse impact on the performance of teachers in the classroom and the social mobility of teachers. The impact of these things has to a greater extent lowered the morale of teacher productivity and the subsequent development of our nations.

As a unionist and a leader of teachers I am dealing with a multitude of problems experienced by teachers on a daily basis and I know the “heart and the soul of a teacher”. Photo: PW Kazimbu

Teachers in Namibia are confronted with a host of problems like the unappreciative communities whom they serve, an administration that do not appreciate his or her efforts and lack of professional support in regions. Ladies and gentlemen, allow me to say that in my experience as a teacher, I have never observed a learner, community or an administration that comes back to a school or a teacher and says: “Under the least that you have, you have done the best you could. Thank you very much!”

Former Mayor of Katima Mulilo town Hon. Mabedi also attended the event to give his loyal and moral support as a former teacher.

All that I regularly hear is: “The teachers do not teach properly; they are a Photo: PW Kazimbu lazy bunch that is why the children fail. They must be fired.” These statements are very common especially after the release of Grade 10 results and they do not help at all. Officials in the very same system that we serve also make the same remarks. Ladies and gentlemen, allow me to state that teachers are the agents of the system. Teachers do not devise the curriculum, nor do they plan the syllabus or provide textbooks to learners. That is the responsibility of the “system administrators”. The problems of the teacher, therefore, are systemic. If there is any defect in this chain, than the client (learner) will eventually suffer. A successful education system is the one where a teacher matters. It is a system that takes good care of its educators. The core of teaching is the teacher. Without a teacher, you won’t have a school, a classroom or a learner.

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You might have observed all over the world that most of the public education systems collapsed. The United States of America (USA), which is one of the richest countries in the world currently experiences problems with its public education system and parents and community groups are forming private schools to send their learners there. The same trend can be observed in the UK, but for a different reason, which is that teachers are underpaid. They leave the sector and UK recruits foreign teachers all over the world.

This Traditional cultural group from Caprivi, gave the audience a good taste in their beautiful and bright attire. Photo: PW Kazimbu

This clearly implies that there is no education system that is perfect in the world if the core person is ignored, and that is: The Teacher. We should not loose focus of the immense contributions teachers make. Planning in the education sector should evolve around the teacher firstly and the learner secondly, and not their ego. Planners should think of what will be the ideal working environment for a teacher and a learner to prosper. What would probably be the best thing to do for teaching and learning to be optimized? NANTU is open to suggestions, but we have or own also. They are: The government should speed up processes of at least providing a textbook to every two learners. Resources must be invested in making the learning and teaching environment conducive, for example, building and equipping school science laboratories, stocking the school libraries with teaching and learning resources, providing in-service training and upgrading courses to teachers either through distance or workshops.

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Do regular advisory visits to schools in order to provide guidance and support to school managers and teachers and Lastly, do the right thing, by providing inflation related salary packages to the teaching fraternity for being the only evident and direct contributors to the national human resource development. We should also not loose focus of the teachers that are currently infected and or affected by HIV and Aids. All necessary policy frameworks should be instituted to assist these comrades in managing this state of affairs. Good planners will always provide good plans. We should not stagnate in the past or ridicule ourselves with “there is no money syndrome.” “Teachers matters” and it is high time that we start showing foresight as to why we are the custodians of the nations. We should be mindful of our actions as teachers and give a great thought to how we want the communities to see our profession. We should refrain from indulging into actions that will put the name of the profession, which was even followed by Jesus Christ, into disrepute. A teacher is impeccable although it is human to err. Making mistakes should not be part of our daily routine. You mean a great deal to this nation! Let us stand up and be counted, after all, we taught the president; the minister, the doctors, the engineers, the education planners, the directors and every Tom, Dick and Harry. In conclusion, I would like to request everybody in this venue today to stand up and do something nobody ever did to a teacher. Look at the person next to you; appreciate him or her by giving him or her a hand and say “Thank you for being a teacher, you make a difference in the lives of many people.” Aluta Continua. Solidarity Forever, Long live NANTU. I thank you. Simeon Kavila (NANTU President)

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January - December 2008

q w e rt yu io p g f d a The Vote of Thanks:

Mr. Lupalezi, Regional Education Director for Caprivi.

The Director of Education, Mr. Lupalezi was tasked to conclude the event for the day. He appreciated the decision that NANTU had taken to celebrate World Teachers’ Day in his region. He thanked the teachers for coming up in big numbers and encouraged them to work hard in the interest of the poor children.

NANTU would like to thank the following companies and institutions for their valuable contributions that helped to make World Teachers’ Day in Katima Mulilo a huge success. They appear in no particular order. NamMic IOL - Katima Mulilo Branch. Old Mutual Group Scheme. Bonus Finance – Katima Mulilo Branch.

NANTU/BCTF Leadership Training Workshops NANTU’s establishment as a Union was not just to have a union and thereafter did not know what to do with its aims and objectives. Still through leadership training it is educating its members.

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It all started in 1991 when the First National Project Co-ordinator, Cde. Marius Kudumo traveled to Canada, Vancouver to have discussions with the Canadian Teachers’ Federation (CTF), Oxfam Canada and British Columbia Cde. Marius Kudumo Teachers’ Federation (BCTF) as well as to see and learn how they go through training their members. Cde. Kudumo got very much interested and immediately saw it as a need for NANTU. He further had several meetings and upon his arrival back in NANTU Head Office, he brought along the good news that CTF, Oxfam Canada and BCTF are willing to provide funds. Cde. Kudumo is now a CoOrdinator for UNESCO in the Ministry of Education. The two Canadian friends better called comrades who made the whole funding and arrangements for a similar project possible in Namibia are; the Director: Research and Technology Larry Kuehn for BCTF and retired teacher Uncle Don Reader. Other teachers who came as facilitators to train NANTU members were Susan Lambert, Sheila Pither. Susan Lambert stands now for presidency at the BCTF. Mr. Larry Kuehn was never in Namibia and looking at his support and heart for NANTU, one might say he knows our country from north to south and from east to west. His generosity is very much appreciated as s true friend of the NANTU fraternity. Uncle Don is still coming to Namibia after every two to three years. Whenever he is here, it is Director for Research and Technology not for a holiday, it is for training Dr. Larry Kuehn new facilitators together with project leaders and conducting workshops in the regions. He is in fact observing how effective the project is and how it is being ran to report back in Canada, Vancouver especially to the BCTF. The BCTF is currently also assisting countries such as Mozambique and Columbia.

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Cde. David Hamutenya walked a long way with Uncle Don, Susan and Sheila. He continued with workshops and was used as Resource Person. Cde. Hamutenya is now a Regional Councilor for Mpungu Constituency in Kavango Region. The project was supposed to be ended in 2000 and due to the relationship between the two unions, the BCTF still continues with its solidarity by providing funds and human resources therefore NANTU Uncle Don Reader still continues to make the funds and human resources worth a diamond. With the appointment of the National Organizer Cde. Bendos //Garoëb the project is going on a track which still benefits the members. Cde. //Garoëb is being assisted by Cde. Patrick Kazimbu who is a National Facilitator for the past ten years. Because of the funding and support from BCTF, the project is and will always be known as NANTU/BCTF Leadership Training Workshops. The objectives of the training workshop are: (a) (b)

To provide NANTU Leaders with skills and knowledge to fulfill their roles as communicators, advocates, educators and organizers at all structures. To ensure that NANTU leaders have current knowledge and awareness of the legal documents and those processes, which requires leadership advocacy.

Cde. Bendos //Garoëb National Organizer

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Cde. Patrick Kazimbu National Facilitator

January - December 2008

z x c v b t d f rt y x p m An overview of the Leadership Training Workshops: 1. Role and Functions: Help new and beginning NANTU Leaders understand the scope of their job as the legal representative of NANTU members in the school.

Workshop for Kunene and Otjozondjupa regions which took place in Otjiwarongo, Otjozondjupa region.

2. Empowerment: NANTU Leaders are empowered with different skills that will help them to fulfill their roles in school as well as to provide them knowledge to be good communicators, advocates.

3. Code of Conduct: This course educates NANTU Leaders about the professional ethics as well as the law that governs the Ministry of Education and NANTU. NANTU Leaders are learning about their rights and obligations as teachers and Union leaders as well as disciplinary measures and misconduct as stated in various legal documents. Photo: PW Kazimbu

4. Staffing Interests: NANTU Leaders familiarizes themselves with services and benefits offered by the Union as well as the recognition agreements with its subjects of negotiations. NANTU leaders will be able to have a broad understanding on transfers, appointments, probation, leave, dismissals and etc

Workshop for Kavango and Caprivi regions which took place in Divundu, Kavango region. Photo: PW Kazimbu

5. Effective Meetings: NANTU Leaders are provided with basic knowledge and skills on conducting an effective meeting. It also teaches basic principles of preceding a meeting, rules, procedures and being a good democratic leader. Fruitful discussions can be exchanged.

6. Advocacy: NANTU Leaders are acquainted with advocacy skills needed for representing members in meetings with administration, parents and in working through conflict between members by realistic and logical presentations. 7. Assertiveness Skills: This helps NANTU Leaders to enhance the assertion skills needed for standing up for your rights not denying the rights of others and be able to speak up when representing members. It also learns the leaders to speak and act assertively as professional union leaders. There are other topics which will be published in the next edition.

Workshop for Omusati, Oshana, Ohangwena and Oshikoto took place in Oshakati at NANTU Regional Office. Photo: PW Kazimbu

President Kavila addressing NANTU Leaders at the workshop in Oshakati for the leadership of Omusati, Oshikoto, Oshana and Ohangwena. He is flanked the Secretary-General on his left and the National Organizer on his right. Photo: PW Kazimbu

-----------------------------------------------------------He was very delighted to realize that all invited members in the leadership were present because he regarded it as an eye-opener to enrich leaders with the necessary skills, knowledge and information. President Kavila at a very serious note warned leaders who just came to the workshop for peanuts to come forth, because money to conduct this workshop came from donations in specific from the generous British Columbia Teachers’ Federation (BCTF) very far from Namibia. School Committees and Branch Executive Committees must be trained. Cde. Kavila urge the leaders not to be divided by the political situation in the country. NANTU was established for all teachers and not along tribal lines. He emphasized that NANTU is non-political, non-racial but works in the interest of all the teachers in Namibia.

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Concerning information, Cde. Kavila wanted who NANTU is.Why do members not give information to their own newsletter, TEACH. NANTU in fact is not only the Head Office. The Constitution is clear on the issue of information sharing. President Kavila warned members especially leaders not to make un-audited statements which contradicts to the Union regulations. He asked leaders to do away with it and follow proper procedures. He further urged leaders to have vision and to act professionally. Corrupt leaders in NANTU are not welcome.

Did You Know ? The world’s largest meteorite was discovered in 1920 on a farm in north-central Namibia. The site, now a national monument, is open to visitors for a nominal fee. It’s on Hoba Farm, 15 mi/25 km northeast of Otavi. Namibia has the world’s largest known underground lake. Called Dragon’s Breath Cave, the large subterranean reservoir, 30 mi/46 km from the town of Grootfontein, is only for the extremely adventurous—it involves descending by ropes and ladders, sliding down tunnels and clambering down narrow ledges. Namibia’s dunes are famous for their dramatic shapes and colors. The dune fields of the Namib Desert, composed of quartz sand, range in hue from light cream to violet and brick red. The dunes near Luderitz are known as the roaring dunes for the rumbling sound they make as the sand grains shift over the slipface, or top, of the dunes. The Brandberg, a mountain in northwest Namibia, has some interesting rock paintings. The most famous of these is the so-called White Lady, a tall human figure that was once cited as evidence of ancient European settlement but is now recognized to be a stylized representation of a male bushman in hunting regalia. Tribal groups include the Bushmen (San), Nama (Hottentots), Wambo (Ovambo), Himba, Herero, Damara, Kavango (Okavango) and Caprivians. The Singing Rocks, south of the town of Goageb, are made of resonant black limestone.

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January - December 2008

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Cde. Ngavetene, Outjo Branch Vice-Chairperson was tasked to do the welcoming remarks.

Discussion during group work. Photo: PW Kazimbu

Photo: PW Kazimbu

In his welcoming remarks he expressed his gratitude to also be in contact with national leaders. It was that the minds of the branch leaders. It was that the minds of the branch leaders will be opened and regarded NANTU as a brave soldier. At a very serious note he sent a clear message that those who want to tarnish the Union must know that NANTU has come to stay and that NANTU deals with issues affecting teachers and not politics.

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Participants sharing views in a workshop in Khorixas, Kunene region. Photo: PW Kazimbu

The Secretary-General in Outjo officially opened the workshop

Cde. Haingura encouraged the leaders to make use of the skills which they will enquire in order to empower themselves and the others. He also asked the participants not to be selfish by keeping the information for themselves but to convey it so that we cannot destroy and ignore the complains from our members but to make issues professionally clear.

Sharing of ideas in a workshop let everyone participate. Participants in and around Opuwo, Kunene Region. Photo: PW Kazimbu

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A very strong regional delegation from Oshikoto and Ohangwena brainstorms serious issues affecting teachers during a leadership training workshop.

Cde. Sabatta from Otjimbingwe, Erongo region explains how he manage to get to wrong teachers being transferred. Photo: PW Kazimbu

Photo: PW Kazimbu

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The regional leadership of Kavango and Caprivi making sure their group to deliver the best during a Leadership Training Workshop at Divundu, Kavango Region.

In Karibib, Erongo Region, Cde. Emil was tasked to give feedback on behalf of their group. Photo: PW Kazimbu

Photo: PW Kazimbu

Participants during the workshop in Okahandja, Otjozondjupa region paying full attention.

The river attracted everybody after the workshop In Okahandja.

Photo: PW Kazimbu

Photo: PW Kazimbu

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Volume 1 • Issue 3

January - December 2008